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1

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal x The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2,...

2

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Identification of nuclear weapons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

1987-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Virtual nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

Pilat, J.F.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Chapter 27 - Nuclear weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter faces the realization that the same atoms that can produce life-saving electricity can also be used to construct weapons of mass destruction. Some facilities, such as enrichment and reprocessing, in the nuclear fuel cycle can also serve dual uses when considering proliferation. The original atomic bombs were constructed of highly enriched uranium and high-grade plutonium, but their development led to thermonuclear devices with much larger yields. Thus far, nuclear war has been avoided by policies such as mutual assured destruction and international agreements such as the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is charged with performing worldwide nuclear material safeguards inspections. The legacy of the nuclear weapons arms race has left considerable weapons-grade materials that must be dealt with.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

US nuclear weapons policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

May, M.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Will our nuclear weapons work?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Will our nuclear weapons work? Will our nuclear weapons work? National Security Science magazine Latest Issue:April 2013 All Issues » submit Supercomputers are essential for assessing the health of the U.S. nuclear stockpile Supercomputers provide assurance by simulating nuclear weapons performance March 25, 2013 Graphic of a missile being tested through computer simulation Los Alamos uses supercomputers to make high-resolution 3D simulations that help to assess the health of nuclear weapons like this B-61 bomb. Contact Managing Editor Clay Dillingham Email The nuclear weapons in the U.S. stockpile were designed and built to be replaced with new designs and builds every 10 to 15 years. These weapons have lived beyond their expected lifespans. Supercomputers provide the high-resolution 3D simulations needed for

9

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Weapons Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Weapons Weapons The New START Treaty, which was signed in 2010, between the United States and Russian Federation will cap the strategic deployed nuclear arsenals of each country at 1,550 warheads, a nearly 75% reduction compared with the

10

Nuclear weapon system risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is a process for evaluating hazardous operations by considering what can go wrong, the likelihood of these undesired events, and the resultant consequences. Techniques used in PRA originated in the 1960s. Although there were early exploratory applications to nuclear weapons and other technologies, the first major application of these techniques was in the Reactor Safety Study, WASH-1400, {sup 1} in which the risks of nuclear power accidents were thoroughly investigated for the first time. Recently, these techniques have begun to be adapted to nuclear weapon system applications. This report discusses this application to nuclear weapon systems.

Carlson, D.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons National Security Science Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons Is it true...

12

Nuclear weapon reliability evaluation methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of those activities that are normally performed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide nuclear weapon reliability evaluations for the Department of Energy. These reliability evaluations are first provided as a prediction of the attainable stockpile reliability of a proposed weapon design. Stockpile reliability assessments are provided for each weapon type as the weapon is fielded and are continuously updated throughout the weapon stockpile life. The reliability predictions and assessments depend heavily on data from both laboratory simulation and actual flight tests. An important part of the methodology are the opportunities for review that occur throughout the entire process that assure a consistent approach and appropriate use of the data for reliability evaluation purposes.

Wright, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The gas centrifuge and nuclear weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment by centrifugation is the basis for the quick and efficient production of nuclear fuel-or nuclear weapons.

Wood, Houston G. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Glaser, Alexander [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Program on Science, Technology and Environmental Policy, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Kemp, R. Scott [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

Tang, Alfred

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex Request...

16

Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Cancels DOE O 5610.2.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

18

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nuclear weapons testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author examines the history of efforts to ban, or at least constrain, nuclear tests. The issue has been marked by shifts in attitude by the superpowers in recent times. The Reagan Administration sees a comprehensive test ban only as a very long-term goal for the U.S. The Soviets, on the other hand, have been pushing extremely hard lately for a ban on all testing. The author discusses the pros and cons of such a ban by examining the arguments of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nobel Laureate Glenn T. Seaborg, and Associate Director for Defense Systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory George H. Miller. Other issues that are discussed include verification, joint testing, and reliability. He concludes with a discussion of the future of the ban.

Heylin, M.

1988-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fixed denial system for access control of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fixed Denial System (FDS) is a simple, low cost, vertical, underground silo used to store individual nuclear weapons within secured areas of present storage sites. The normal storage position of each weapon is at or near the top of the shaft, allowing rapid operational weapon access and removal. In response to a threat, the weapon within a storage canister can be dropped to the bottom of the shaft where it is automatically locked in place. Once the alert condition is resolved and control of the site reestablished, the weapon canister is unlocked with a coded signal and retrieved. This system offers a high degree of hardening and access denial that is characteristic of Vertical Underground Storage (VUGS) systems. An aboveground test apparatus was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using a pneumatic air cushion, which is generated by the free-fall of the weapon container, to control impact velocity and descent time. Stockpile weapons that might be stored in the FDS include the W33, W48, W79, and the W54 ADM.

Willan, V.O.; Gustafson, E.C.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition Program OAS-L-13-06 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 29, 2013...

23

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing August 22, 1958 Washington, DC Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing

24

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

25

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by cdornburg Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons Programs,...

26

The politics of verification: Limiting the testing of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1982 to 1990, the United States and the Soviet Union renegotiated verification arrangements for two unratified arms control agreements that had nevertheless been observed since 1977: the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty. The negotiations yielded new verification procedures, changed attitudes regarding Soviet compliance, and established useful precedents for further restrictions on nuclear testing. The negotiations also demonstrated how technical arguments can be misused to promote a particular political agenda-in this case, the continued testing of nuclear weapons. By misrepresenting the uncertainties in US monitoring procedures, and then falsely characterizing these uncertainties as a fatal flaw of seismic verification techniques, opponents of a nuclear test ban clouded the sensitive issue of verification enough to delay progress towards a complete ban on nuclear weapons testing. The primary obstacle to further restrictions on nuclear testing was not the feasibility of adequate verification, but rather the unwillingness of several US administrations to address the real question of whether the United States and other nuclear weapon states should, in the interest of global nuclear nonproliferation, end the development of new nuclear weapons designs that require confirmation by underground nuclear tests. 51 refs., 6 figs.

Vink, G.E. van der (IRIS Consortion on Seismology, Arlington, VA (United States)); Paine, C.E. (Natural Reources Defense Council, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Toward a nuclear weapons free world?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

US?Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Washington. Ukraine's opposition to the complete relinquishment of strategic nuclear weapons located on its soil is ... for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), focused on the disposal of nuclear weapons in Ukraine itself, while a United Nations symposium addressed the wider question of disarmament across the ...

Colin Macilwain

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Iraq's secret nuclear weapons program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UN inspectors discovered an electromagnetic isotope separation factory that put Iraq just 18-30 months away from having enough material for a bomb. They also found European centrifuge technology and plans for an implosion device. The inspections of Iraq mandated by the United Nations as a cease-fire condition at the end of the Gulf War in February 1991 have revealed a clandestine nuclear materials production and weapons design program of unexpected size and sophistication. The total value of that program, in terms of equipment and personnel deployed between 1981 and 1991, may be on the order of $5-10 billion. The program employed an estimated 7000 scientist and 20,000 workers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Davis, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Kay, D.A. (Uranium Institute, London (United Kingdom))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

What do we do with Nuclear Weapons Now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Do We Do with Nuclear Weapons Now? by Michael M. Maythe Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy MICHAEL M. MAY wasmajority in nuclear weapons states. Unlike chemical and

May, Michael M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

32

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons...

33

Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 All Issues submit Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience The nuclear weapons designers who developed their skills during...

34

Reducing the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

35

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Computational Challenges in Nuclear Weapons Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a decade of experience, the Stockpile Stewardship Program continues to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) program was established to provide leading edge, high-end simulation capabilities needed to meet the program's assessment and certification requirements. The great challenge of this program lies in developing the tools and resources necessary for the complex, highly coupled, multi-physics calculations required to simulate nuclear weapons. This paper describes the hardware and software environment we have applied to fulfill our nuclear weapons responsibilities. It also presents the characteristics of our algorithms and codes, especially as they relate to supercomputing resource capabilities and requirements. It then addresses impediments to the development and application of nuclear weapon simulation software and hardware and concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations on an approach for working with industry and government agencies to address these impediments.

McMillain, C F; Adams, T F; McCoy, M G; Christensen, R B; Pudliner, B S; Zika, M R; Brantley, P S; Vetter, J S; May, J M

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

The history of nuclear weapon safety devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Find and neutralize clandestine nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of finding nuclear material at entry portals is to provide a secure perimeter as large as a weapon damage radius so that operations could be conducted within it relatively unencumbered. The objective of wide area search for nuclear material to provide a safe zone of similar dimensions in an area in which it is not possible to maintain a secure perimeter, to provide assurance for civilians living at an area at risk, or to provide rapid, wide area search of regions that could conceal nuclear threats to forces in the field. This rapid, wide-area, and confident detection of nuclear materials is the essential first step in developing the ability to negate terrorist nuclear assemblies or weapons. The ability to detect and negate nuclear materials are necessary to prevent the forced, massive evacuation of urban populations or the disruption of military operations in response to terrorist threats. This paper describes the limitations to current sensors used for nuclear weapon detection and discusses a novel approach to nuclear weapon detection using a combination of directional information (imaging) and gamma ray energy (color) to produce a gamma ray color camera.

Canavan, G.H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing July 03, 1993 Washington, DC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

42

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nuclear weapon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weapon Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric nuclear weapon...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nuclear weapons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weapons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric nuclear weapons...

45

Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are… (more)

Raas, Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

Garwin, Richard L., E-mail: RLG2@us.ibm.com [IBM Fellow Emeritus, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nuclear Explosive and Weapons Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been linked to this document. Show All Cancels: DOE O 5610.10, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program on Apr 29, 1996 Canceled by: DOE O 452.1A, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon...

49

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States

50

Nuclear proliferation: The diplomatic role of non-weaponized programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has not seen the end of reliance on nuclear weapons for deterrence or diplomacy purposes. The use of nuclear weapons for such purposes is as evident in the threshold states as in the nuclear powers. The nuclear weapon states used their nuclear weapons for deterrence, bargaining, and blackmail, even during the early years of the Cold War when the US was essentially non-Weaponized. In the nuclear non-Weaponized states in Asia a non-Weaponized deterrent relationship is developing between India and Pakistan and North Korea has used its nuclear program to restore diplomatic relations with the international community. The role of nuclear weapons in the post Cold War world is determined by the role of non-Weaponized programs in proliferating states. This paper describes examples in South Asia and the Korean peninsula and show that while an increased reliance on nuclear weapons programs may be a threat to the current non-proliferation regime, the focus on non-Weaponized programs rather than on weapons themselves actually improves international security by reducing the threat of nuclear war.

Reynolds, R.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority,...

52

Sandia completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

53

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

54

The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

Zifferero, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons scientists are taking issue with a proposal to use weapons-grade uranium and plutonium at the US National Ignition Facility.The facility is supposed to help scientists assess the nation's ageing nuclear stockpile without testing the weapons

56

American Economic Association How (Not) to Sell Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Economic Association How (Not) to Sell Nuclear Weapons Author(s): Philippe Jehiel, Benny://www.jstor.org #12;How (Not)to Sell NuclearWeapons By PHILIPPEJEHIEL,BENNY MOLDOVANU, AND ENNio STACCHETTI) areinterestedto acquirefis- sionable material, or even complete weapon systems from Ukraine. Russia and the United

Franz, Sven Oliver

57

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

58

The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the way other major powers view their nuclear capability. Finally, and though of less cosmic importance, it will save money in the long run.

Immele, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

History of US nuclear weapon safety assessment: The early years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the beginnings of the U.S. nuclear weapons program, military and civilian dual- agency judgment has been fundamental to achieving nuclear weapon and weapon system safety. This interaction was initiated by the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, which created the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The principle of using dual-agency judgment has been perpetuated in the design and assessment of the weapon and weapon system acceptance process since that time. This fundamental approach is still used today in all phases of the weapon life. In this paper, an overview of the history and philosophy of the approach is described.

Spray, S.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

What to do with 50,000 nuclear weapons?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the world celebrates the peaceful disposal of nuclear weapons, energies now focus on their careful disassembly. Recently, the United States` main focus for dismantling has been the safe dispersal and storage of the various nuclear components and their uses for peaceful purposes rather than weapons of destruction. It should be noted that the treaties currently in effect do not require weapons to be dismantled, only that each country withdraw the weapons from the deployed status and remove the means of delivery. The US current program dismantles weapons into their various components. The disassembly of a nuclear weapon involves numerous components. Many of these components can be disposed of or recycled after changing their shape. The nuclear components create the most safety and proliferation concerns. These nuclear components typically consist of three materials: tritium, highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Some of these nuclear components will be placed in a strategic reserve, while other nuclear components will be declared surplus. Both tritium and uranium can be re-used. The tritium is repurified and used for the active weapons stockpile. The uranium can be blended down and used in commercial nuclear power plants. At this time, plutonium disposal is the most vexing challenge. This paper will briefly describe how a nuclear weapons works, the mission of the Pantex Plant which dismantles the weapons, and the research opportunities for use of dismantled nuclear weapon components.

Klein, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities.This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

65

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

66

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

67

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs 7 September 2011 Denouncement weaponization of its nuclear program. The United States, Germany, France and Britain joined forces in exposing of its nuclear activities.' Rice said the installation of a uranium enrichment facility and heavy

68

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS)...

69

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01:...

70

States That End Nuclear Weapons Programs: Implications For Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis seeks to identify factors that cause countries to discontinue their nuclear weapons program using the qualitative case study method. Regime change, regional threats… (more)

Freeman, Shauna Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for...

72

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01, Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for...

73

Status of nuclear weapons material disposition in Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The security of nuclear weapons and fissile material in Russia, the disposition of weapons-usable fissile material in Russia, the Clinton administration`s policies and programs for assisting Russia in improving its security over nuclear weapons and fissile material, and the disposal of Russian weapons-usable fissile materials are discussed in this paper. There are {approximately}30,000 nuclear warheads in the former Soviet Union, {approximately}1000 t of weapon-usable high-enriched uranium (HEU), {approximately} 160 t of separated plutonium in weapons or available for weapons, and {approximately}30 t of separated civil plutonium stored in Russia. Most, if not all, of these inventories are stored under inadequate conditions of physical security and of material control and accounting.

Cochran, T.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

Pilat, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy 18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel. The analysis demonstrates that the impacts on the environmental, workers and the general public of implementing any of the alternative management approaches would be small and within applicable Federal and state regulator limits. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

76

Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort.

Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Y-12, the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement ? Or:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a huge mission for Y-12 bringing about substantial growth and continued to do so until nuclear testing ended in 1992. The United States tested nuclear weapons from July 16, 1945...

78

Plutonium Pits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To ensure the reliability, safety, and security of nuclear weapons without underground nuclear testing; weapons go through a surveillance process, where they are regularly taken...

79

Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Posted By Office of Public Affairs Participants in Sandia's Weapon Intern Program recently visited and

80

Nuclear-weapon-free zones: Coming of age  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear-weapon-free-zone agreements present a potentially effective option to supplement international efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and roll back proliferation where it has already occurred. NWFZs can also be used to create mutually binding obligations that go beyond the current obligations under the NPT, without risking the potentially disastrous consequences of an amendment debate at the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference. The negotiations leading toward regional agreements could also contribute significantly toward reducing tensions and building confidence. In pursuing its national goal of preventing nuclear proliferation, the US should give greater priority and support to nuclear-weapon-free-zones.

Wolfsthal, J.B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The future of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and U.S. nuclear weapons policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the viability of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons – NPT for short – in light of U.S. nuclear weapons… (more)

Claussen, Bjørn Ragnar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stability of nuclear forces versus weapons of mass destruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The model derived for nuclear missile exchanges is used to describe the interaction between two forces, of which one has nuclear weapons and the other has weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The model equations are solved analytically for exchanges, costs, and stability indices by analytically minimizing the cost of first strikes. The analysis is restricted to theater operations, as WMD are inferior to nuclear weapons in strategic counter force operations, but quite adequate for theater operations against exposed forces. The analysis treats only in-theater forces as companion papers show that ex-theater forces, which enter as survivable forces, cancel out of the theater balances treated here. Optimal nuclear weapon and WMD allocations are proportional to the opponent`s carriers and inversely proportional to one`s own weapons. Thus, as WMD increase, WMD allocations to nuclear forces fall, reflecting a shift from damage limiting to inflicting damage with surviving forces. Nuclear weapon kill probabilities degrade rapidly against dispersed forces. As they fall, their allocation to WMD falls sharply as they become ineffective and are reallocated to value. Thus, damage limiting is primarily effective for undispersed forces, which produces an incentive for the nuclear side to use his weapons while they are still effective.

Canavan, G.H.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Transparency in nuclear arms: Toward a nuclear weapons register  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his press conference to present a {open_quotes}10-point non-proliferation initiative{close_quotes} last December, German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel included a proposal calling for an international register for nuclear weapons, analogous to the UN Conventional Arms Register. When German diplomats explained the initiative to their allies in London, Paris and Washington, they were sharply rebuffed. Apparently the three nuclear-weapon states were strongly opposed to the idea and therefore discouraged Germany from pursuing it further in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva, where the ad hoc group on transparency in armaments would be an appropriate forum for further discussion. Faced with these cold responses, German diplomats shelved the idea for the time being and concentrated on initiatives that promised better chances for agreement, such as the comprehensive test ban (CTB) treaty currently under discussion, a fissile material cutoff agreement and an international plutonium management regime.

Mueller, H. [Peace Research Institute, Frankfurt (Germany)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A nuclear-weapon-free world: Desirable? Feasible?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors seeks answers to two key questions: Is an nuclear-weapons-free-world (NWFW) desirable, and is it feasible? Organized into six parts, the book begins with a historical review of attempts to abolish nuclear weapons. Five subsequent parts address the desirability of an NWFW, its feasibility, alternative routes to this goal, and intermediate steps to this end. The authors deals with many obstacles and difficulties facing those who wish to progress from today`s world of 50,000 or more nuclear weapons to one where none exist and strong international verification assures that no rogue state will resurrect these dread devices.

Rotblat, J.; Steinberger, J.; Udgaonkar, B. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tiny Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials This tiny wafer can detect hidden nuclear weapons and materials NUCLEAR DETECTOR -- This small wafer could become the key component in

87

Briefing, Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information- June 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This brief will familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing Nuclear Weapons-Related Information.

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - amchitka underground nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underground nuclear Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amchitka underground nuclear Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Underground Nuclear...

89

The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

How to optimally interdict a belligerent project to develop a nuclear weapon .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite decades of energetic international control efforts, nuclear weapons technology continues to spread worldwide. To understand how these complex weapons programs can be developed, we… (more)

Skroch, Eric M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solid Phase Microextraction for the Analysis of Nuclear Weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of answers to commonly asked questions about solid phase microextraction as it relates to the analysis of nuclear weapons. We have also included a glossary of terms associated with this analytical method as well as pertinent weapons engineering terminology. Microextraction is a new collection technique being developed to nonintrusively sample chemicals from weapon headspace gases for subsequent analysis. The chemicals that are being targeted outgas from the high explosives and other organic materials used in the weapon assembly. This technique is therefore a valuable tool to: (1) remotely detect and assess the aging of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and, in some cases, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) organic materials; and (2) identify potential compatibility issues (i.e., materials interactions) that should be more carefully monitored during surveillance tear-downs. Microextraction is particularly attractive because of the practical constraints inherent to the weapon surveillance procedure. To remain transparent to other core surveillance activities and fall within nuclear safety guidelines, headspace analysis of the weapons requires a procedure that: (1) maintains ambient temperature conditions; (2) allows practical collection times of less than 20 min; (3) maintains the integrity of the weapon gas volume; (4) provides reproducible and quantitative results; and (5) can identify all possible targets.

Chambers, D M

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY "To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and safety by providing dual-agency judgment and responsibility for the safety, security, and use control (surety) of nuclear weapons. To establish nuclear explosive surety standards and nuclear weapon design surety requirements. To address surety vulnerabilities during all phases of the nuclear weapon life cycle and to upgrade surety during weapon stockpile refurbishments and/or new weapon

93

The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty in December 1987, followed by the dramatic changes in East-West relations since 1989 and the more recent Soviet-American strategic arms limitation agreement, have greatly eased public concerns about the danger of nuclear war. The context has also changed for the Nonaligned Movement, which had made nuclear disarmament and condemnation of the concept of nuclear deterrence the primary themes of its multilateral disarmament diplomacy. More important would be the interrelationship among the states possessing nuclear weapons (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan). In any case, there is little risk of a revival of nuclear competition. Both France and China have decided to sign the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); they are the only two nuclear-weapon states that have stayed outside the regime. Meanwhile, Brazil and Argentina have moved further down the nonproliferation road by engaging in confidence-building measures and moving closer to joining the Latin American nuclear-weapons-free zone established under the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1967. South Africa has also agreed to embrace the NPT as well as a nuclear-weapons-free zone regime for the entire African continent, while North Korea has agreed to sign a safeguard agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), thereby allowing in principle international inspection of its nuclear facilities. In the third world regions, the dangers of nuclear proliferation and competitive nuclear buildup are most pronounced in South Asia, a region where a variety of complicating problems exist: acute threat perceptions, historical emity, religious and sectarian animosity, ethnic antagonism, territorial disputes, ambitions for regional dominance, and domestic political instability. This chapter will focus primarily on South Asia, although references will also be made to other regions, where relevant. 17 refs.

Kamal, N. [Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabada (Pakistan)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

The unique signal concept for detonation safety in nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a unique signal (UQS) in a nuclear weapon system is to provide an unambiguous communication of intent to detonate from the UQS information input source device to a stronglink safety device in the weapon in a manner that is highly unlikely to be duplicated or simulated in normal environments and in a broad range of ill-defined abnormal environments. This report presents safety considerations for the design and implementation of UQSs in the context of the overall safety system.

Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons May 10, 1992 Washington, DC U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons

96

Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers October 28, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health Safety and Security Officer | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013

98

Nuclear dependence| The Russian Federation's future reliance on nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The Russian Federation's reliance on nuclear weapons for national security will steadily increase over time. Based on current evidence and historical data, the Russian… (more)

Lukszo, Adam J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

100

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant. Rad Res 1989;120:19-at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility MASTER DISTRIBUTIONAT T H E HANFORD NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITY JULIE BRITTON

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - america nuclear weapons Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear weapons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: america nuclear weapons Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 First strike Sixty years ago,...

102

Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Operation TEAPOT, 1955 continental nuclear weapons test series. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of an estimated 11,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation TEAPOT, the fifth atmospheric nuclear weapons testing series conducted in Nevada from 18 February to 15 May 1955. Activities engaging DOD personnel included Exercise Desert Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear device; DOD operational programs; and air support.

Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Shepanek, R.F.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Obama Calls for an End to ... President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons April 05, 2009 Prague, Czech Republic President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons

105

Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2] The end of the Cold policy objectives and risks compromising the value that nuclear weapons continue to make through. A declaratory U.S. policy of moving to eliminate nuclear weapons in a distant future will have no direct effect

Deutch, John

106

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

109

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement Enforcement Guidance Supplement EGS:01-01 Appendix E-Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 15, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues.

110

Nuclear weapons in Ukraine: Hollow threat, wasting asset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma declared on June 3 at a closed session of the Ukrainian parliament (Rada) that it should ratify START I and the May 1992 Lisbon Protocol, but temporarily retain some of the nuclear weapons on Ukrainian territory, concern increased over Kiev`s delay in carrying out its commitments to become a non-nuclear-weapon state. These continuing delays threaten an arms control process codified in START I and START II with far broader security implications. The delays and constant mixed signals from Kiev can be explained two ways, but a closer examination of each of the alternative security options Ukrainians are discussing shows they are built on false premises and would ultimately be counterproductive to genuine Ukrainian security.

Kincade, W.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Long range planning at former nuclear weapon plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the approach to planning the cleanup of former nuclear weapon manufacturing plants. The limit of backward planning is the knowledge horizon. Extension of backward planning beyond this horizon is futile. Forward planning is the customary method for planning missions extending beyond that horizon. Planning the future of former plant sites is a political activity by political decision makers. Scientists, professional planners, and public interest groups have an advisory role in this activity.

Vrouwes, J.H. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

Baker, C.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report described each step in the cycle of nuclear weapons production and defined for the first time a planned disposition path for all waste streams generated prior to 1992 as a result of weapons production.

115

AIM-98-3464 RECEIVED THE HISTORY OF NUCLEAR WEAPON SAFETY DEVICES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the thermal weaklink. The dual magnetic stronglink was fielded in the last weapon to enter the nuclear weapon stockpile. See Figure 6. Figure 6. MC383 1 Dual Stronglink Review...

116

Effects of network-average magnitude bias on yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions R. A. Clark Department...ISC, of presumed underground nuclear explosions in Kazakhstan...on estimates for underground nuclear explosions 553 explosions...utilizing a more extensive dataset, including more sources and......

R. A. Clark

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

Hampel, V.E.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

Radioactive ''hot spots'' from nuclear weapons test fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a paper presented on January 8, 1985, at the Health Physics Society Midyear Symposium, Franke and Alvarez claimed that radioactivity observed on the Savannah River Plant site on March 14, 1955, was the result of a reactor accident. The source of the observed radioactivity was, in fact, rainwater containing radioactive products from a nuclear weapon test made two days earlier in Nevada. The weapon test TEAPOT HORNET was shown to be the source of the contamination at the time, and this has been corroborated in two recent papers. The aim of this review is to show that the highly-localized radioactive fallout on the Savannah River Plant site was not unique but part of a widespread phenomenon occurring all over the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, S.M.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

123

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, known as the Treaty of Tlatelolco, seeks to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) that will extend from the US-Mexican border to Antarctica`s territorial boundaries, including large areas of open ocean. Under the treaty, signatory states pledge not to test, use, produce, manufacture or acquire nuclear weapons; to use nuclear materials and facilities {open_quotes}exclusively for peaceful purposes;{close_quotes} and not to permit the stationing or development of nuclear weapons on their territories.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Physics Division applies advanced imaging techniques to many applications, from brain imaging to neutron imaging in inertial fusion to threat detection from airborne cameras. A particular strength is the quantitative analysis of penetrating radiography using techniques such as the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE). An example from the Nuclear Event Analysis Team shows a test object (Figure 1) that is subsequently radiographed using the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. Figures 2 and 3 show the radiograph and the inferred density of the object using the BIE, which can be compared to the known object to determine accurate error estimation. Test object Figure 1. The test object consists of a 1 cm-radius cavity void surrounded by a 4.5 cm radius surrogate fissile material of tungsten, tantalum, or depleted uranium. This sphere is surrounded by a 6.5 cm-radius copper sphere. At is thickest point, the tantalum test object has an areal density of 180 g/cm2, equivalent to 9" of steel.

125

2002-2003 Engineering Accomplishments: Unconventional Nuclear Weapons Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency, DTRA, is a federal agency charged with safeguarding the nation from weapons of mass destruction, in particular nuclear weapons such as crude devices, and radiological dispersal devices (RDD), also known as dirty bombs. Both of which could be delivered using unconventional means such as by transporting them by a car or boat. Two years ago DTRA partnered with NNSA to evaluate commercially available technologies that could be deployed quickly to defend against threats posed by unconventional nuclear weapons under a program called the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) Program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was one of several National laboratories that participated in this program, which consisted in developing, deploying, and demonstrating detection systems suitable for military base protection. Two key contributions to this program by the LLNL team were the development of two Radiation Detection Buoys (RDB) deployed at Naval Base in Kings Bay in Georgia, and the Detection and Tracking System (DTS) demonstrated at Fort Leonard Wood Missouri, headquarters for the Total Force's Maneuver Support Center (MANSCEN). The RDB's were designed to detect the potential transportation of an unconventional nuclear or radiological weapon by a boat. The RDB's consisted of two commercial marine buoys instrumented with several types of detectors sensitive to gamma rays and neutrons, two key modes of energy emitted by radioactive materials. The engineering team selected a standard marine buoy as the overall system platform for this deployment since buoys are already designed to sustain the harsh marine environment, and also for their covertness, since once deployed, they look just like any other buoy on the water. Since this was the first time such a system was ever deployed, the team choose to instrument the buoys with a suite of different types of detectors with the goal to learn which detectors would be best suited for future deployments of this kind. This goal has now being achieved, and through a combination of computer modeling and experimental data, the team has gain the necessary knowledge to better understand the capabilities and limitations of RDB's, and the tradeoffs involve in the selection of the different detectors. The two LLNL RDB's are currently operational at Kings Bay, and the team is looking forward to another opportunity to design the next generation RDB's.

Hernandez, J E; Valentine, J

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regime Security Theory: Why Do States With No Clear Strategic Security Concerns Obtain Nuclear Weapons? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Current realist explanations of why states decide to develop nuclear weapons cannot account for the behavior of states that lack a clear strategic threat. An… (more)

Beasley, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Abolishing the taboo: President Eisenhower and the permissible use of nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As president, Dwight Eisenhower believed that nuclear weapons, both fission and fusion, were permissible and desirable assets to help protect U.S. national security against the… (more)

Jones, Brian Madison

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton University The United States and eight other countries...

129

Strategic culture and non-nuclear weapon outcomes: the cases of Australia, South Africa and Sweden .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis uses a "strategic culture" approach to gain insights into non-nuclear weapon outcomes in Australia, South Africa and Sweden. Strategic culture refers to the… (more)

Poore, S.E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

131

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

132

National Certification Methodology for the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a common framework and key elements of a national certification methodology called Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU). A spectrum from senior managers to weapons designers has been engaged in this activity at the two laboratories for on the order of a year to codify this methodology in an overarching and integrated paper. Following is the certification paper that has evolved. In the process of writing this paper, an important outcome has been the realization that a joint Livermore/Los Alamos workshop on QMU, focusing on clearly identifying and quantifying differences between approaches between the two labs plus developing an even stronger technical foundation on methodology, will be valuable. Later in FY03, such a joint laboratory workshop will be held. One of the outcomes of this workshop will be a new version of this certification paper. A comprehensive approach to certification must include specification of problem scope, development of system baseline models, formulation of standards of performance assessment, and effective procedures for peer review and documentation. This document concentrates on the assessment and peer review aspects of the problem. In addressing these points, a central role is played by a 'watch list' for weapons derived from credible failure modes and performance gate analyses. The watch list must reflect our best assessment of factors that are critical to weapons performance. High fidelity experiments and calculations as well as full exploitation of archival test data are essential to this process. Peer review, advisory groups and red teams play an important role in confirming the validity of the watch list. The framework for certification developed by the Laboratories has many basic features in common, but some significant differences in the detailed technical implementation of the overall methodology remain. Joint certification workshops held in June and December of 2001 and continued in 2002 have proven useful in developing the methodology, and future workshops should prove useful in further refining this framework. Each laboratory developed an approach to certification with some differences in detailed implementation. The general methodology introduces specific quantitative indicators for assessing confidence in our nuclear weapon stockpile. The quantitative indicators are based upon performance margins for key operating characteristics and components of the system, and these are compared to uncertainties in these factors. These criteria can be summarized in a quantitative metric (for each such characteristic) expressed as: (i.e., confidence in warhead performance depends upon CR significantly exceeding unity for all these characteristics). These Confidence Ratios are proposed as a basis for guiding technical and programmatic decisions on stockpile actions. This methodology already has been deployed in certifying weapons undergoing current life extension programs or component remanufacture. The overall approach is an adaptation of standard engineering practice and lends itself to rigorous, quantitative, and explicit criteria for judging the robustness of weapon system and component performance at a detailed level. There are, of course, a number of approaches for assessing these Confidence Ratios. The general certification methodology was publicly presented for the first time to a meeting of Strategic Command SAG in January 2002 and met with general approval. At that meeting, the Laboratories committed to further refine and develop the methodology through the implementation process. This paper reflects the refinement and additional development to date. There will be even further refinement at a joint laboratory workshop later in FY03. A common certification methodology enables us to engage in peer reviews and evaluate nuclear weapon systems on the basis of explicit and objective metrics. The clarity provided by such metrics enables each laboratory and our common customers to understand the meaning and logic

Goodwin, B T; Juzaitis, R J

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Steps toward a Middle East free of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Gulf War, all eyes are focused on the dangers of proliferation in the Middle East. President Bush, in his postwar address to Congress, called for immediate action to control the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the missiles used to deliver them, warning that it would be tragic if the nations of the Middle East and Persian Gulf were now, in the wake of war, to embark on a new arms race. Secretary of State James Baker has recently returned from a tour of the region, and consultations on proliferation were reportedly high on his agenda. At the same time, the fierce political antagonisms and unbridled military competitions that have long characterized the Middle East leave many skeptical as to what can realistically be done. While all states in the region - including Israel - have publicly supported the idea of establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) in the Middle East, doubt over the feasibility of the proposal runs high. Why on earth, it is asked, would Israelis give up the protection of their nuclear monopoly What assurances from their Arab adversaries or from the US could possibly replace this ultimate deterrent

Leonard, J.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

P-wave Spectra from Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......three underground explosions at the Nevada Test Site and three earthquakes recorded...nuclear explosions detonated in Nevada (Jorum and Handley) and for a...spectra from two explosions at the Nevada Test Site (Jorum and Handley) and a presumed......

Peter Molnar

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Experiences and prospects of nuclear astrophysics in underground laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impressive progress has been made in the course the last decades in understanding astrophysical objects. Increasing precision of nuclear physics data has contributed significantly to this success, but now a better understanding of several important findings is frequently limited by uncertainties related to the available nuclear physics data. Consequently it is desirable to improve significantly the quality of these data. An important step towards higher precision is an excellent signal to background ratio of the data. Placing an accelerator facility inside an underground laboratory reducing the cosmic ray induced background by six orders of magnitude is a powerful method to reach this goal, even though careful reduction of environmental and beam induced background must still be considered. Experience in the field of underground nuclear astrophysics has been gained since 20 years due to the pioneering work of the LUNA Collaboration (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) operating inside the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. Based on the success of this work presently also several other projects for underground laboratories dedicated to nuclear astrophysics are being pursued worldwide. This contribution will give a survey of the past experience in underground nuclear astrophysics as well as an outlook on future developments.

Junker, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Via Acitelli, 22, 67100 L'Aquila, Località Assergi (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

137

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

138

Plus c`est la meme chose: The future of nuclear weapons in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States perhaps more than any other nuclear weapon state has deeply questioned the future role of nuclear weapons, both in a strategic sense and in Europe. It is probably the United States that has raised the most questions about the continuing need for and efficacy of nuclear weapons, and has expressed the greatest concerns about the negative consequences of continuing nuclear weapons deployment. In the US, this period of questioning has now come to a pause, if not a conclusion. In late 1994 the United States decided to continue to pursue reductions in numbers of nuclear weapons as well as other changes designed to reduce the dangers associated with the possession of nuclear weapons. But at the same time the US concluded that some number of nuclear forces would continue to be needed for national security for the foreseeable future. These necessary nuclear forces include a continuing but greatly reduced stockpile of nuclear bombs deployed in Europe under NATO`s New Strategic Concept. If further changes to the US position on nuclear weapons in Europe are to occur, it is likely to be after many years, and only in the context of dramatic additional improvements in the political and geo-political climate in and around Europe. The future role of nuclear weapons in Europe, as discussed in this report, depends in part on past and future decisions by the United States. but it must also be noted that other states that deploy nuclear weapons in Europe--Britain, France, and Russia, as well as the NATO alliance--have shown little inclination to discontinue their deployment of such weapons, whatever the United States might choose to do in the future.

Maaranen, S.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Dombey, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Norman Dombey

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gamma-ray identification of nuclear weapon materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been an accelerating national interest in countering nuclear smuggling. This has caused a corresponding expansion of interest in the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for checkpoint monitoring, nuclear search, and within networks of nuclear and collateral sensors. All of these are fieldable instruments--ranging from large, fixed portal monitors to hand-held and remote monitoring equipment. For operational reasons, detectors with widely varying energy resolution and detection efficiency will be employed. In many instances, such instruments must be sensitive to weak signals, always capable of recognizing the gamma-ray signatures from nuclear weapons materials (NWM), often largely insensitive to spectral alteration by radiation transport through intervening materials, capable of real-time implementation, and able to discriminate against signals from commonly encountered legitimate gamma-ray sources, such as radiopharmaceuticals. Several decades of experience in classified programs have shown that all of these properties are not easily achieved and successful approaches were of limited scope--such as the detection of plutonium only. This project was originally planned as a two-year LDRD-ER. Since funding for 1997 was not sustained, this is a report of the first year's progress.

Gosnell, T. B., LLNL; Hall, J. M.; Jam, C. L.; Knapp, D. A.; Koenig, Z. M.; Luke, S. J.; Pohl, B. A.; Schach von Wittenau, A.; Wolford, J. K.

1997-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Quality Engineering Department

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted September 23, 1992 USA Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted

146

Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted September 23, 1992 USA Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted

147

A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a ... Fact Sheet Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World Jan 2, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has several missions

149

The doctrine of the nuclear-weapon states and the future of non-proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Less than a year remains before the critical conference in April 1995 to review and extend the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the main international barrier to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This is a critical moment for the United States. With the end of the Cold War, the likelihood of nuclear war with the states of the former Soviet Union has been radically reduced, but there is greatly increased concern over the potential threats from states or sub-state groups seeking to develop or acquire nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

Panofsky, W.K.H.; Bunn, G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nuclear fuel reprocessing and the problems of safeguarding against the spread of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1977, the executive branch reversed its long-standing support for nuclear fuel reprocessing, primarily because of the rick of spreading nuclear weapons. GAO reviewed safeguards technology designed to reduce such risks in Federal reprocessing facilities and found that concerns are warranted. Material in sufficient quantities to construct a nuclear weapon could be diverted and go undetected for a long time. Effective international control and safeguards over the production, storage, and use of separated plutonium are lacking. The United States should increase its efforts to: develop and ensure the use of effective safeguards for reprocessing facilities; and establish, in conjunction with major nuclear fuel users, suppliers, and reprocessors, an international system to control the storage and use of excess plutonium.

Staats, E.B.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

that gradually transfers responsibility for maintaining the security systems to Russia. Related Topics material protection MPC&A SLD second line of defense weapons material...

152

Final text of the African nuclear-weapon-free zone treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1996, African leaders will travel to Cairo, Egypt, to sign the African nuclear-weapon-free zone treaty, capping African countries` 35-year effort to ban all such weapons on the continent. Informally called the Pelindaba Treaty (ironically, the site of the South African nuclear research center where some of Pretoria`s nuclear weapons work was conducted), the accord will prohibit the development, manufacture, acquisition or possession of any nuclear explosive device as well as the dumping of radioactive material within the zone. Once it enters into force-after the 28th state deposits its instrument of ratification-Africa will become the world`s fourth nuclear-weapon-free zone. The treaty`s final text is printed provided.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Source terms for plutonium aerosolization from nuclear weapon accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The source term literature was reviewed to estimate aerosolized and respirable release fractions for accidents involving plutonium in high-explosive (HE) detonation and in fuel fires. For HE detonation, all estimates are based on the total amount of Pu. For fuel fires, all estimates are based on the amount of Pu oxidized. I based my estimates for HE detonation primarily upon the results from the Roller Coaster experiment. For hydrocarbon fuel fire oxidation of plutonium, I based lower bound values on laboratory experiments which represent accident scenarios with very little turbulence and updraft of a fire. Expected values for aerosolization were obtained from the Vixen A field tests, which represent a realistic case for modest turbulence and updraft, and for respirable fractions from some laboratory experiments involving large samples of Pu. Upper bound estimates for credible accidents are based on experiments involving combustion of molten plutonium droplets. In May of 1991 the DOE Pilot Safety Study Program established a group of experts to estimate the fractions of plutonium which would be aerosolized and respirable for certain nuclear weapon accident scenarios.

Stephens, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

155

A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Myth of Strategic Superiority: Us Nuclear Weapons and Limited Conflicts, 1945-1954.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The nuclear age provided U.S. soldiers and statesmen with unprecedented challenges. the U.S. military had to incorporate a weapon into strategic calculations without knowing whether… (more)

Morse, Eric

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Total Quality Management and nuclear weapons: A historian`s perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total Quality Management (TQM) has become a significant management theme at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper discusses the historical roots of TQM at Los Alamos and how TQM has been used in the development of nuclear weapons.

Meade, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Iraqi nuclear weapons development program. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an abstract of the final report focusing on the collection, collation, analysis, and recording of information pertaining to Iraqi nuclear weapons development and on the long term monitoring of Iraq.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

The nuclear-weapon states and article VI of the NPT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states - the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author discusses the status of these agreements and the extent to which they have been fulfilled.

Mendelsohn, J.; Lockwood, D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead ... Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program January 19, 1975

162

DIANA - A deep underground accelerator for nuclear astrophysics experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DIANA (Dakota Ion Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a proposed facility designed to be operated deep underground. The DIANA collaboration includes nuclear astrophysics groups from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, Colorado School of Mines, and the University of North Carolina, and is led by the University of Notre Dame. The scientific goals of the facility are measurements of low energy nuclear cross-sections associated with sun and pre-supernova stars in a laboratory setup at energies that are close to those in stars. Because of the low stellar temperatures associated with these environments, and the high Coulomb barrier, the reaction cross-sections are extremely low. Therefore these measurements are hampered by small signal to background ratios. By going underground the background due to cosmic rays can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. We report on the design status of the DIANA facility with focus on the 3 MV electrostatic accelerator.

Winklehner, Daniel; Leitner, Daniela [Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States); Lemut, Alberto; Hodgkinson, Adrian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

Block, D.A.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Source Characteristics of Two Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detonated at Pahute Mesa of the Nevada Test Site have been used to estimate the...contributing factor. Moment tensor|Nevada Test Site|nuclear explosion| References...structure of Silent Canyon Caldera, Nevada Test Site, Bull, seism Soc. Am., 77......

Lane R. Johnson

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.4B, Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons, dated 1-11-2010  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter the functionality of the weapon and possible cause DAU.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons - December Commission meeting

167

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture 70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons during the Cold War period will be discussed by Byron Ristvet of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. September 5, 2013 This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "Los Alamos National Laboratory's role in conjunction with the Department of Defense in meeting this challenge with new nuclear weapon

168

Nuclear weapons: Emergency preparedness planning for accidents can be better coordinated  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons will be carried on some of the ships the Navy plans to add to existing and new U.S. homeports. Coordination and planning with states and localities for public safety in the event of a nuclear weapon accident varies by service. The Navy and Army generally have not coordinated this planning as they have for other types of disasters because they believe to do so would compromise national security. The Air Force coordinates its emergency planning for all types of disasters. DOD believes that while it is possible for Navy homeports to coordinate preparedness plans on an unclassified basis it is not possible to do so at nuclear weapons storage sites because of security constraints.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Managing nuclear materials from retired weapons: An overview of U.S. plans, programs and goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1993, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) published a report entitled ``Dismantling the Bomb and Managing the Nuclear Materials``. That study evaluated the current activities as well as the future challenges inherent in retiring many thousands of nuclear weapons in the US and Russia; dismantling the warheads; and safely and securely disposing of the constituent materials.The warhead dismantlement process has been underway for a few years in both nations but long-range plans and policies are still in the early stages of development. At present both the plutonium and highly-enriched uranium removed from retired weapons is stored temporarily awaiting decisions about its ultimate fate.

Johnson, P.A. [Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

The origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program: Technical reality and Western hypocrisy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report is based on a series of papers written between 1980 and 2005 on the origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which was known to one of the authors in the late 1970s already, as well as to a number of other physicists, who independently tried without success to inform their governments and the public. It is concluded that at no point did the Western governments effectively try to stop Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which suggests that its existence was useful as a foreign policy tool, as is confirmed by its use as a major justification to wage two wars on Iraq.

Erkman, S; Hurni, J P; Klement, S; Erkman, Suren; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Klement, Stephan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NIF system-design requirements for nuclear-weapons physics experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the objectives of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to provide an aboveground experimental capability for conducting weapons-physics experiments, for maintaining nuclear competence. To achieve the high-energy-density regimes needed for a science-based stockpile stewardship program, NIF must produce conditions similar to those in nuclear weapon explosions. This imposes fundamental facility design requirements on NIF. This document summarizes those requirements for opacity, radiation-flow, equation-of-state, non-LTE and x-ray laser, hydrodynamic, and capsule-implosion experiments.

Perry, T.S. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wilde, B.H. [ed.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Out of (South) Africa: Pretoria`s nuclear weapons experience. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary focus of this paper is the impact of key South African leaders on the successful developments and subsequent rollbacks of South Africa`s nuclear weapons capability. It highlights the key milestones in the development of South Africa`s nuclear weapon capability. It also relates how different groups within South Africa (scientists, politicians, military and technocrats) interacted to successfully produce South Africa`s nuclear deterrent. It emphasizes the pivotal influence of the senior political leadership to pursue nuclear rollback given the disadvantages of its nuclear means to achieve vital national interests. The conclusions drawn from flu`s effort are the South African nuclear program was an extreme response to its own identity Crisis. Nuclear weapons became a means to achieving a long term end of a closer affiliation with the West. A South Africa yearning to be identified as a Western nation and receive guarantees of its security rationalized the need for a nuclear deterrent. The deterrent was intended to draw in Western support to counter a feared total onslaught by Communist forces in the region. Two decades later, that same South Africa relinquished its nuclear deterrent and reformed its domestic policies to secure improved economic and political integration with the West.

Horton, R.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Stopping the spread of nuclear weapons. The Heritage lectures; No. 506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This lecture is on the proliferation of nuclear arms. More precisely, it will be on how best to prevent the proliferation of nuclear arms. For as much as the policy community may disagree about the proper policies for preventing nuclear proliferation, the author thinks all share the goal of preventing proliferation. The best prescription for preventing all sorts of proliferation - biological, chemical, missile, and space technology, as well as nuclear is for the U.S. government to pursue a balanced non-proliferation policy. Such a balanced policy requires bringing four distinct approaches to addressing the proliferation problem together in a coherent fashion. These distinct approaches are: (1) deterring the use of the weapon in question, (2) defending against the use of the weapon in question, (3) destroying preemptively the weapon in question, and (4) controlling the spread of the weapon in question directly through arms control. In the authors view, a balanced and effective nonproliferation policy should not shun or slight any of these approaches. All make a unique contribution toward the whole and serve to reinforce one another in limiting the effects of proliferation and ultimately discouraging proliferation itself. This does not mean, however, that there is no requirement to make trade-offs among the four. Indeed, the real trick is assuring that there is an appropriate division of labor among the four. The author explains this general policy in terms of the specific challenges posed by the proliferation of nuclear arms.

Spring, B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

176

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

177

Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

The B61-based "Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator:" Clever retrofit or headway towards fourth-generation nuclear weapons?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is scientifically and technically possible to build an earth penetrating device that could bury a B61-7 warhead 30 meters into concrete, or 150 meters into earth, before detonating it. The device (based on knowledge and technology that is available since 50 years) would however by large and cumbersome. Better penetrator materials, components able to withstand larger stresses, higher impact velocities, and/or high-explosive driven penetration aids, can only marginally improve the device. It is conclude that the robust nuclear earth penetrator (RNEP) program may be as much motivated by the development of new technology directly applicable to next generation nuclear weapons, and by the political necessity to periodically reasses the role and utility of nuclear weapons, then by the perceived military need of a weapon able to destroy deeply buried targets.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail.

Pyper, J.W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B....

182

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled...

183

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A....

184

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling is expected to save several million dollars per year and requires no underground testing. "We're continually innovating and working to improve the way we do business, and NDLGS is a big step for us," said National Nuclear Security Administration Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Don Cook. New weapons assessment technology engineered: nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing Valveless Laser Processing

185

Utility of tactical nuclear weapons following 1990 Conventional Forces Europe reduction agreement. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not so long ago, the world was changing rapidly, the Cold War faded. At least one arms agreement, the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, which reduced the U.S. Pershing II and the Russian SS-21's missiles in the European theater, was in place. Then the euphoria evaporated. The Kremlin hardliners regained power and balked at signing a Conventional Forces Europe (CFE) agreement - a treaty which only a year ago would have reduced to approximate parity the size of United States and Soviet Forces in Europe. Was America ready for this new Soviet challenge. Thankfully the answer is still yes. The United States continues to maintain its Nuclear Triad -- land, sea and air deliverable nuclear weapons system's. On the European battlefield the U.S. maintains the ability to deliver tactical nuclear weapons to overcome the Russian Army's numerical advantage and remain responsive to the ground commander. All of this should give Kremlin hardliners (strict communist power brokers, primarily in the military and KGB) reason to pause. Given the reemergence of hostile Soviet leaders, this paper addresses the future need for land based Theater Army delivered tactical nuclear weapons in the European Theater and within Regional Theaters. It also, analyzes regional powers, indicating how they might influence nuclear strategy in a world where the Soviet Union may well be moving away from us again.

Keating, A.J.

1991-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB`S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB'S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Plutonium gamma-ray measurements for mutual reciprocal inspections of dismantled nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The O`Leary-Mikhailov agreement of March 1994 stated that the U.S. and the Russian Federation would engage in mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) of fissile materials removed from dismantled nuclear weapons. It was decided to begin with the plutonium (Pu) removed from dismantled weapons and held in storage containers. Later discussions between U.S. and Russian technical experts led to the conclusion that, to achieve the O`Leary-Mikhailov objectives, Pu MRI would need to determine that the material in the containers has properties consistent with a nuclear-weapon component. Such a property is a {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio consistent with weapons-grade material. One of the candidate inspection techniques under consideration for Pu MRI is to use a narrow region (630-670 keV) of the plutonium gamma-ray spectrum, taken with a high-purity germanium detector, to determine that it is weapons-grade plutonium as well as to estimate the minimum mass necessary to produce the observed gamma-ray intensity. We developed software (the Pu600 code) for instrument control and analysis especially for this purpose. In November 1994, U.S. and Russian scientists met at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for joint experiments to evaluate candidate Pu MRI inspection techniques. In one of these experiments, gamma-ray intensities were measured from three unclassified weapons-grade plutonium source standards and one reactor-grade standard (21% {sup 240}pu). Using our software, we determined the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of these standards to accuracies within {+-}10%, which is adequate for Pu MRI. The minimum mass estimates varied, as expected, directly with the exposed surface area of the standards.

Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Clark, D.; Gosnell, T.B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. o452.1E-Draft-8-5-14.pdf --...

190

DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight and Investigations Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM September 12, 2012 1 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on matters relating to the Department of Energy's oversight of the nuclear weapons complex. 1 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established under the National Defense Authorization Act of 2000 as a separately organized agency within the Department of Energy. This action was intended to allow NNSA to concentrate on its defense-related mission, free from other Departmental operations. Its creation was, in large measure, a reaction to highly

191

Interim storage of dismantled nuclear weapon components at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the events of 1989 and the subsequent cessation of production of new nuclear weapons by the US, the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex has shifted from production to dismantlement of retired weapons. The sole site in the US for accomplishing the dismantlement mission is the DOE Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. Pending a national decision on the ultimate storage and disposition of nuclear components form the dismantled weapons, the storage magazines within the Pantex Plant are serving as the interim storage site for pits--the weapon plutonium-bearing component. The DOE has stipulated that Pantex will provide storage for up to 12,000 pits pending a Record of Decision on a comprehensive site-wide Environmental Impact Statement in November 1996.

Guidice, S.J.; Inlow, R.O. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

194

A compilation of nuclear weapons test detonation data for U.S. Pacific ocean tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to December 1993, the explosive yields of 44 of 66 nuclear tests conducted by the United States in the Marshall Islands were still classified. Following a request from the Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands to the U.S. Department of Energy to release this information, the Secretary of Energy declassified and released to the public the explosive yields of the Pacific nuclear tests. This paper presents a synopsis of information on nuclear test detonations in the Marshall Islands and other locations in the mid-Pacific including dates, explosive yields, locations, weapon placement, and summary statistics. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Simon, S.L. [Radiation Effects Research, Washington, DC (United States); Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the ... NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test

196

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the ... NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test

197

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and...

198

Disposition of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons: Fission options and comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the United States expects to recover about 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium and the Republic of Russia expects to recover a similar amount. Ensuring that these large quantities of high-grade material are not reused in nuclear weapons has drawn considerable attention. In response to this problem, the US Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force (PDTF), in the summer of 1992, to assess a range of practical means for disposition of excess US plutonium. This report summarizes and compares the Fission Options'' provided to the Fission Working Group Review Committee (the committee) of the PDTF. The review by the committee was based on preliminary information received as of December 4, 1992, and as such the results summarized in this report should also be considered preliminary. The committee concluded that irradiation of excess weapon plutonium in fission reactors in conjunction with the generation of electricity and storing the spent fuel is a fast, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable method of addressing the safeguards (diversion) issue. When applied appropriately, this method is consistent with current nonproliferation policy. The principal effect of implementing the fission options is at most a moderate addition of plutonium to that existing in commercial spent fuel. The amount of plutonium in commercial spent fuel by the year 2000 is estimated to be 300 Mg. The addition of 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium, in this context, is not a determining factor, moreover, several of the fission options achieve substantial annihilation of plutonium.

Omberg, R.P. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Walter, C.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Disposition of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons: Fission options and comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the United States expects to recover about 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium and the Republic of Russia expects to recover a similar amount. Ensuring that these large quantities of high-grade material are not reused in nuclear weapons has drawn considerable attention. In response to this problem, the US Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force (PDTF), in the summer of 1992, to assess a range of practical means for disposition of excess US plutonium. This report summarizes and compares the ``Fission Options`` provided to the Fission Working Group Review Committee (the committee) of the PDTF. The review by the committee was based on preliminary information received as of December 4, 1992, and as such the results summarized in this report should also be considered preliminary. The committee concluded that irradiation of excess weapon plutonium in fission reactors in conjunction with the generation of electricity and storing the spent fuel is a fast, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable method of addressing the safeguards (diversion) issue. When applied appropriately, this method is consistent with current nonproliferation policy. The principal effect of implementing the fission options is at most a moderate addition of plutonium to that existing in commercial spent fuel. The amount of plutonium in commercial spent fuel by the year 2000 is estimated to be 300 Mg. The addition of 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium, in this context, is not a determining factor, moreover, several of the fission options achieve substantial annihilation of plutonium.

Omberg, R.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Walter, C.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Disposal of SNL-designed electronics assemblies associated with the nuclear weapons program: Challenges and progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the common waste streams generated throughout the nuclear weapon complex is ``hardware`` originating from the nuclear weapons program. The activities associated with this hardware at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) include design and development, environmental testing, reliability and stockpile surveillance testing, and military liaison training. SNL-designed electronic assemblies include radars, arming/fusing/firing systems, power sources, and use-control and safety systems. Waste stream characterization using process knowledge is difficult due to the age of some components and lack of design information oriented towards hazardous constituent identification. Chemical analysis methods such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) are complicated by the inhomogeneous character of these components and the fact that many assemblies have aluminum or stainless steel cases, with the electronics encapsulated in a foam or epoxy matrix. In addition, some components may contain explosives, radioactive materials, toxic substances (PCBs, asbestos), and other regulated or personnel hazards which must be identified prior to handling and disposal. In spite of the above difficulties, we have succeeded in characterizing a limited number of weapon components using a combination of process knowledge and chemical analysis. For these components, we have shown that if the material is regulated as RCRA hazardous waste, it is because the waste exhibits one or more hazardous characteristics; primarily reactivity and/or toxicity (Pb, Cd).

Chambers, W.B.; Chavez, S.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Disposal of SNL-designed electronics assemblies associated with the nuclear weapons program: Challenges and progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the common waste streams generated throughout the nuclear weapon complex is hardware'' originating from the nuclear weapons program. The activities associated with this hardware at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) include design and development, environmental testing, reliability and stockpile surveillance testing, and military liaison training. SNL-designed electronic assemblies include radars, arming/fusing/firing systems, power sources, and use-control and safety systems. Waste stream characterization using process knowledge is difficult due to the age of some components and lack of design information oriented towards hazardous constituent identification. Chemical analysis methods such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) are complicated by the inhomogeneous character of these components and the fact that many assemblies have aluminum or stainless steel cases, with the electronics encapsulated in a foam or epoxy matrix. In addition, some components may contain explosives, radioactive materials, toxic substances (PCBs, asbestos), and other regulated or personnel hazards which must be identified prior to handling and disposal. In spite of the above difficulties, we have succeeded in characterizing a limited number of weapon components using a combination of process knowledge and chemical analysis. For these components, we have shown that if the material is regulated as RCRA hazardous waste, it is because the waste exhibits one or more hazardous characteristics; primarily reactivity and/or toxicity (Pb, Cd).

Chambers, W.B.; Chavez, S.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tudies/B ackground tudies/B ackground Book 1 CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing Areas Vol. 11, April 1988 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CERCLA PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DOE'S NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE WCILEAR WEAPONS T E S r n G AREAS Prepared by Water Resources Center Desert Research Institute University of Nevada System ,Prepared for U . S . Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada under contract DE-AC08-85NV10384 A p r i l 1988 CONTENTS VOLUME I I. INTRODUCTION 1.1 11. NEVADA TEST SITE TESTING AREAS 2.1 Frenchman Flat (Area 5) 2.1.1 2.2 Yucca Flat (Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 15)

203

Strategies for the disposition of high explosives resulting from dismantlement of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many thousands of pounds of high quality main-charge explosives will result as surplus from the dismantlement of returns from the US nuclear weapons stockpile. The method most often employed for dealing with this surplus explosive is destruction by open burning. However, open burning as a means of treating excess explosives is losing favor because of environmental concerns associated with such an uncontrolled thermal destruction process. Thus, alternative processes for treatment of excess explosives from weapon dismantlement is discussed. These alternatives include: reformulation, crystalline component recovery, chemical conversion of the crystalline component to higher value products which may have civilian or military applications and, when necessary, treatment as waste in an environmentally benign fashion.

Pruneda, C.; Humphrey, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nuclear weapons, proliferation, and terrorism: U.S. response in the twenty-first century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the remaining superpower in the post-Cold War world, the US needs to re-evaluate its policy toward the growing threat to US national interests and the effects of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), specifically nuclear devices, and their use by terrorist groups against US interests abroad. As the world reacts to the implosion of the former Soviet Union, there are increased numbers of nations and possibly terrorist groups trying to become players in the international arena. This study describes the ease of obtaining the scientific knowledge, plans, and materials to enable a terrorist`s construction of a nuclear device. It also analyzes motivation of terrorist groups, concluding that a nuclear weapon, capable of inflicting violence in the extreme, fulfills the terrorist`s goal of violence in support of a political agenda or to inspire radical change. Given the guidance from the national level, this study proposes a series of policy options available to the NCA for application in an aggressive counterproliferation policy. Finally, the US must rapidly reorganize its counterproliferation structure and methods to streamline a more aggressive approach that is recognized and feared by potential nuclear terrorists; augment current political efforts with a clearly defined counterproliferation military mission and associated doctrine.

DeLawter, D.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Tectonic Strain Release by Underground Nuclear Explosions and its Effect on Seismic Discrimination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......patterns to geologic structure in Yucca Flats Nevada Test Site, in Nevada Test Site, ed. Eckel E. B., Geol. Soc. Am. Mem...of the Benham underground nuclear explosion, Nevada Test Site, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 59, 2209-2220......

M. Nafi Toksöz; Harold H. Kehrer

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear Weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Each of the enduring warheads in Table 1.6...are being refurbished under the individualized life-extension program (LEP). Their goal is not to make ... be successful, with the exception of the B61 bomb, which is ...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ``program of cooperation`` between the two countries in protecting each other`s sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons.

Johnson, M.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gosnell, T.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Aerothermoballistics of pyrophoric metal shrapnel in high speed, high Weber number flows. [From non-nuclear detonation of nuclear weapon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical simulation is presented on the aerothermoballistic behavior of pyrophoric metal shrapnel ejected at supersonic speeds from a non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear weapon. The model predicts the aerodynamic and chemical heat transfer rates and the particle thermal responses including the time and position of melt initiation. Due to the high Weber number environment, the melting particle undergoes liquid layer stripping. The theoretical model, which is incorporated in the PLUTO computer code, predicts the liquid mass loss rate, characteristic liquid droplet diameter, temperature rise across the liquid film, and the coupled particle trajectory.

Connell, L.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01, Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement Enforcement Guidance Supplement EGS:01-01 Appendix E-Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 15, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement

210

A Sandia nuclear weapon knowledge management program plan for FY 1998--2003. Volume 1: Synopsis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains a synopsis and briefing charts for a five-year plan which describes a Knowledge Management Program needed to meet Sandia`s responsibility for maintaining safety, security, reliability, and operational effectiveness of the nuclear weapon stockpile. Although the knowledge and expertise required to maintain and upgrade the stockpile continues to be critical to the country`s defense, Sandia`s historical process for developing and advancing future knowledge and expertise needs to be addressed. This plan recommends implementing an aggressive Knowledge Management Program to assure retention and furtherance of Sandia`s expertise, beginning in fiscal year 1998, as an integrated approach to solving the expertise dilemma.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

On the dangers of C. I. S. specialists with nuclear weapons experience relocating to Third World countries: A Russian view  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter presents information on the effectiveness of rules and regulations; on the role of a qualified consultant in the possible design of a nuclear weapon for a Third World country; and on the possible dangers (and their elimination) of relocating nuclear technologists.

Hogsett, V.; Canavan, B. (eds.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Army before last military transformation and the impact of nuclear weapons on the US Army during the early Cold War .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis analyzes the impact of nuclear weapon on the doctrine and force structure of the US Army during the Early Cold War (1947-1957). It… (more)

Kinman, Bret C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information (Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CLASSIFICATION OF CLASSIFICATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS-RELATED INFORMATION Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data (RD and FRD) June 2012 2 3 Purpose To familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing that information as required by  The Atomic Energy Act and  10 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 1045, Nuclear Classification and Declassification §1045.35 4 Not the Purpose This briefing does not authorize you to classify or declassify documents containing RD or FRD. Additional training is required to classify documents containing RD or FRD or identify RD or FRD within a document for redaction. Only authorized DOE

216

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA)); Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012...

218

Nuclear weapons, the end of the cold war, and the future of the international system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collapse of empires, the overthrow of dynasties, the outbreak of plagues, the onset of revolutions, and even the improvement of the human condition itself - all of these are categories of events, which means that they have happened before and will almost certainly happen again. There are very few occurrences of which it can be said that nothing like them has ever taken place; but surely what took place in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945, qualifies as such as occurrence. The first test explosion of an atomic bomb, together with the actual use of that weapon three weeks later against the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was as sharp a break from the past as any in all of history. Theory had intersected reality to produce a weapon that was regarded at the time as unlike any other that had ever been invented, and that is still so regarded today, almost half a century later. The result, it now appears, has been a fundamental, and possibly permanent, change in human behavior. `The unleashed power of the atom has changed everything save our modes of thinking,` Albert Einstein wrote in 1946, `and thus we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe.` Einstein would have been as surprised as anyone else who lived through the early Cold War years had he known that Nagasaki would be the last occasion upon which atomic weapons would be used in anger for at least the next four and one-half decades, despite the fact that the great geopolitical rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union would drag on throughout that length of time. History is full of unexpected developments, but few have been as completely unexpected as that the great powers would produce some 70,000 nuclear weapons between the end of World War II and the present day, without a single one of them having been used. Perfecting the ultimate instrument of war had made the ancient institution of war, for the first time in history, obsolete. Or so it would appear. 23 refs.

Gaddis, J.L. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Silva, Carol L. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Feasibility and options for purchasing nuclear weapons, highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium from the former Soviet Union (FSU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a recent tasking from the National Security Council, this report seeks to analyze the possible options open to the US for purchasing, from the former Soviet Union (FSU) substantial quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium recovered from the accelerated weapons retirements and dismantlements that will soon be taking place. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the implications of some of the options that now appear to be open to the United States, it being recognized that several issues might have to be addressed in further detail if the US Government, on its own, or acting with others seeks to negotiate any such purchases on an early basis. As an outgrowth of the dissolution of the Soviet Union three of the C.I.S. republics now possessing nuclear weapons, namely the Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, have stated that it is their goal, without undue delay, to become non-nuclear weapon states as defined in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Of overriding US concern is the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Third World, and the significant opportunity that the availability of such a large quantity of surplus weapons grade material might present in this regard, especially to a cash-starved FSU Republic. Additionally, the US, in its endeavor to drawdown its own arsenal, needs to assure itself that these materials are not being reconfigured into more modern weapons within the CIS in a manner which would be inconsistent with the stated intentions and publicized activities. The direct purchase of these valuable materials by the US government or by interested US private enterprises could alleviate these security concerns in a straightforward and very expeditious manner, while at the same time pumping vitally needed hard currency into the struggling CIS economy. Such a purchase would seem to be entirely consistent with the Congressional mandate indicated by the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Physical and Mathematical Description of Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) Signatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes all time and frequency analysis parameters measured with the new Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor with three input channels: (1) the 252Cf source ionization chamber (2) a detection channel; and (3) a second detection channel for active measurements. An intuitive and physical description of the various functions is given as well as a brief mathematical description and a brief description of how the data are acquired. If the fill five channel capability is used, the number of functions increases in number but not in type. The parameters provided by this new NWIS processor can be divided into two general classes: time analysis signatures including multiplicities and frequency analysis signatures. Data from measurements with an 18.75 kg highly enriched uranium (93.2 wt 0/0, 235U) metai casting for storage are presented to illustrate the various time and frequency analysis parameters.

Mattingly, J.K.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosure For Use Within A Nuclear Weapons Monitoring Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AWE and PNNL are engaged in a technical collaboration investigating techniques to enhance continuity of knowledge over Treaty Accountable Items, with emphasis on a verified nuclear weapons dismantlement process. Tamper Indicating Enclosures (TIE) will likely be deployed as part of a chain of custody regime to indicate an unauthorised attempt to access a Treaty Accountable Item, or secure authenticated monitoring equipment. In 2011, the collaboration presented a paper at the INMM annual conference held in Palm Desert, CA titled “Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosures Incorporating Embedded Optical Fibre”, which discussed the concept of integrating optical fibres into TIEs for use as a passive tamper indicating mechanism. This paper provides an update on the Fibre Optic based TIE and introduces a second passive TIE concept based on the use of Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) (PMMA). Concepts relating to deployment, tamper indication, and unique identification will be discussed.

White, Helen; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Allen, Keir; Benz, Jacob M.; McOmish, Sarah; Simmons, Kevin L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

The meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance and quality assurance programs at a former nuclear weapons facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the meteorological monitoring audit, preventative maintenance, and quality assurance programs at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), are to (1) support Emergency Preparedness (EP) programs at the Site in assessing the transport, dispersion, and deposition of effluents actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by Site operations; and (2) provide information for onsite and offsite projects concerned with the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, and remediation activities. The risk from the Site includes chemical and radioactive emissions historically related to nuclear weapons component production activities that are currently associated with storage of large quantities of radionuclides (plutonium) and radioactive waste forms. The meteorological monitoring program provides information for site-specific weather forecasting, which supports Site operations, employee safety, and Emergency Preparedness operations.

Maxwell, D.R. [DynCorp of Colorado, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

A guide to archival collections relating to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapon testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ninth edition of A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing constitutes History Associates Incorporated's (HAI) final report of its document collection, processing, and declassification efforts for the Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy. The most significant feature of this edition is the updated HAI collection effort information. We confirmed the accuracy of this information using our screening, processing, and transmittal records. Unlike previous editions, funding limitations prevented us from systematically revising the collection descriptions and point-of-contact information for this final edition. This guide has been prepared by professional historians who have a working knowledge of many of the record collections included in the following pages. In describing materials, they have tried to include enough information so that persons unfamiliar with the complexities of large record systems will be able to determine that nature of the information in, and the quality of, each record collection.

Martin, B.W. (ed.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A guide to archival collections relating to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapon testing. Ninth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ninth edition of A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing constitutes History Associates Incorporated`s (HAI) final report of its document collection, processing, and declassification efforts for the Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy. The most significant feature of this edition is the updated HAI collection effort information. We confirmed the accuracy of this information using our screening, processing, and transmittal records. Unlike previous editions, funding limitations prevented us from systematically revising the collection descriptions and point-of-contact information for this final edition. This guide has been prepared by professional historians who have a working knowledge of many of the record collections included in the following pages. In describing materials, they have tried to include enough information so that persons unfamiliar with the complexities of large record systems will be able to determine that nature of the information in, and the quality of, each record collection.

Martin, B.W. [ed.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of Navarro-Interra LLC, and supports environmental restoration efforts by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office. Safety decisions must be made before a surface crater area, or potential surface crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and surface crater formation are input into their safety decisions. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the surface collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

Pawloski, G A

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- STUDY PROGRAM DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY DOE O 452.1D and DOE O 452.2D Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the objectives of implementing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 452.1D? 2. Define the following terms as they apply to this Order: Abnormal environment High explosive detonation 3. What are the objectives of implementing DOE O 452.2D? 4. What are the general requirements of DOE O 452.2D?

230

Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Underground Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underground Exploration and Testing A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board October 1993 Yucca Mountain at #12;Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Dr. John E and Testing #12;Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Introduction

232

Is there a future role for tactical nuclear weapon systems in the national military strategy. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the purpose and role that tactical nuclear weapon systems can provide in supporting the National Military Strategy (NMS), and recommends requirements be determined using a strategy based upon political, economic and military national interests versus the current target-based strategy. To draw implications for the NMS, the analysis reviews current strategic policy guidance, summarizes the current definition of deterrence theory, and provides rationales for maintaining tactical nuclear weapon systems for deterrence and warfighting in regional contingency operations against nuclear-capable forces. Based upon this analysis, recommendations are provided for joint planning, doctrine, and training initiatives needed to enhance the efficacy of the armed services in achieving national security policy objectives.

Stobbs, E.E.

1992-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Derivation of models for nuclear weapon terrorist arming and detonation risk analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates "use control" for the on-site arming and detonation, by terrorists, of stored weapon systems. We investigate both components of weapon "use control", which we define as: (1) weapon "use denial" * that we model as a probability, Pj (denial), that represents the chances that terrorists attempting to arm a type j weapon will commit a non-recoverable error, and (2) weapon "use delay" that we model as a random variable, Tj , that represents the arming delay imposed by the use control features of a type j weapon, before detonation can occur. Using information pertaining to the physical security system at a storage site, the postulated terrorist attack force size, and simulated combat engagement outcomes, we formulate the frequency, fj , and probability, P(dj ), of on-site detonation, for generic weapon types j. We derive a model that disjoins the performance of site physical security, from that for weapon use control, if the use control random variable Tj has a Uniform or histogram distribution. This is an especially significant result where most complex distributions can be adequately approximated with a histogram. Hence, we can conduct combat simulations to obtain the physical security performance of a specific storage site independent of the use control features associated with specific weapon types that are stored, or might be stored, at the site. In turn, we can obtain the use control performance for various weapon types, independent of where they are stored and the physical security systems surrounding them. Our models can then mathematically combine physical security performance and weapon use control performance for any combination of storage facility and weapon type.

Parziale, A A

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

U.S. Department of Energy, Defense Programs, activities to support the safe, secure dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the Former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1991 President Bush announced sweeping cuts in the US nuclear weapon stockpile as well as changes in deployment to remove significant numbers of weapons from alert status and to return to the US for storage many weapons formerly based abroad in US sites. In October 1991 President Gorbachev announced similar moves for the Soviet Union. Even though the Gorbachev announcement represented a substantial step forward in reducing tension between the US and the Soviet Union, the US continued to be concerned about the deteriorating situation in the Soviet Union and the prospects for internal stability. As a result, in November 1991 the Administration began talks with the Soviets in a number of areas including field disablement of nuclear weapons to prevent unauthorized use, emergency response in the event of a weapons accident, and command and control of nuclear weapons. The Nunn-Lugar legislation assured assistance to the Soviet Union in the safe, secure dismantlement (SSD) of weapons to implement the Gorbachev commitment and in the development of measures to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting and collaborating with the Department of Defense (DOD) in several areas due to the DOE responsibilities for developing, assembling, and dismantling US warheads and as the custodian of the nuclear materials stockpile. Russia, as the successor state to the Soviet Union, controls the nuclear weapons of the Former Soviet Union. Thus, DOE`s nuclear weapon and nuclear materials expertise are being applied particularly to Russia. However, the DOE is also providing assistance to Belarus and is prepared to assist Ukraine and Kazakhstan as well if agreements can be reached. In this paper, the DOE SSD activities in support of DOD as the US Executive Agent will be discussed. Two areas will not be covered, namely, DOD activities and the purchase of highly enriched uranium.

Turner, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

236

The spread of nuclear-weapon-free zones: Building a new nuclear bargain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US), France and Britain took a small step in the direction of nuclear disarmament when they announced they would ratify the protocols of the Treaty of Rarotonga, also called the South Pacific nuclear-free-zone treaty. The author examines the protocols of this treaty and the implications for its adoption.

Davis, Z.S.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Calculated concentrations of any radionuclide deposited on the ground by release from underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rockets, and tests of nuclear ramjet engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from three types of event that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex, namely, underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rocket engines and tests of nuclear ramjet engines.

Hicks, H.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Program Mission Campaigns are multi-year, multi-functional efforts involving, to varying degrees, every site in the nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reliability of aged and remanufactured weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This technology base must with the cessation of underground nuclear testing. · Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF degrees, every site in the nuclear weapons complex. They provide specialized scientific knowledge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

GIS surface effects archive of underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new comprehensive, digital archive of more than 40 years of geologic surface effects maps produced at individual detonation sites throughout the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa nuclear testing areas of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Geographic Information System (GIS) surface effects map archive on CD-ROM (this report) comprehensively documents the surface effects of underground nuclear detonations conducted at two of the most extensively used testing areas of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1951 and 1992, numerous investigators of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency meticulously mapped the surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing. Their work documented the effects of more than seventy percent of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and all of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Pahute Mesa.

Grasso, D.N.

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Terrence R. Fehner and F.G. Gosling. Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I (pdf). DOE/MA-0003. Washington, D.C.: Department of...

243

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Why Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing Makes Sense for the Plants and Laboratories of the Nuclear Weapon Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this White Paper is to outline the benefits we expect to receive from Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing (MBE/M) for the design, analysis, fabrication, and assembly of nuclear weapons for upcoming Life Extension Programs (LEPs). Industry experiences with model-based approaches and the NNSA/DP investments and experiences, discussed in this paper, indicate that model-based methods can achieve reliable refurbished weapons for the stockpile with less cost and time. In this the paper, we list both general and specific benefits of MBE/M for the upcoming LEPs and the metrics for determining the success of model-based approaches. We also present some outstanding issues and challenges to deploying and achieving long-term benefit from the MBE/M. In conclusion, we argue that successful completion of the upcoming LEPs--with very aggressive schedule and funding restrictions--will depend on electronic model-based methods. We ask for a strong commitment from LEP managers throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex to support deployment and use of MBE/M systems to meet their program needs.

Franklin, K W; Howell, L N; Lewis, D G; Neugebauer, C A; O'Brien, D W; Schilling, S A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of Lasers to Study the Impact of Fractionation and Condensation on the Toxicity of Nuclear Weapon Fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental concept has been developed to collect data to aid in the refinement of simulation programs designed to predict the fallout effects arising from surface and shallowly buried nuclear weapon detonations. These experiments, called the Condensation Debris Experiments (CDE), are intended to study the condensation/fractionation of material that is liberated following an initial deposition of laser energy onto a small, characterized target. The CDE effort also encompasses target development and material studies as well as supporting computational efforts studying radiation hydrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and relevant neutron activation processes (not discussed here).

Vidnovic III, T; Bradley, K S; Debonnel, C S; Dipeso, G; Fournier, K; Karpenko, V P; Tobin, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Seismic verification of underground explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first nuclear test agreement, the test moratorium, was made in 1958 and lasted until the Soviet Union unilaterally resumed testing in the atmosphere in 1961. It was followed by the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, which prohibited nuclear tests in the atmosphere, in outer space, and underwater. In 1974 the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) was signed, limiting underground tests after March 1976 to a maximum yield of 250 kt. The TTBT was followed by a treaty limiting peaceful nuclear explosions and both the United States and the Soviet Union claim to be abiding by the 150-kt yield limit. A comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT), prohibiting all testing of nuclear weapons, has also been discussed. However, a verifiable CTBT is a contradiction in terms. No monitoring technology can offer absolute assurance that very-low-yield illicit explosions have not occurred. The verification process, evasion opportunities, and cavity decoupling are discussed in this paper.

Glenn, L.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

249

On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

Kunsman, D.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On the public perception of the risks from nuclear weapons: Would oralloy be more acceptable than plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We technologists generally only address risk magnitudes in our analyses, although other studies have found nineteen additional dimensions for the way the public perceives risk. These include controllability, voluntariness, catastrophic potential, and trust in the institution putting forth the risk. We and the geneml public use two different languages, and to understand what their concerns are, we need to realize that the culture surrounding nuclear weapons is completely alien to the general public. Ultimately, the acceptability of a risk is a values question, not a technical question. For most of the risk dimensions, the public would perceive no significant difference between using oralloy and plutonium. This does not mean that the suggested design change should not be proposed, only that the case for, or against, it be made comprehensively using the best information available today. The world has changed: the ending of the cold war has decreased the benefit of nuclear weapons in the minds of the public and the specter of Chernobyl has increased the perceived risks of processes that use radioactive materials. Our analyses need to incorporate the lessons pertinent to this newer world.

Kunsman, D.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Migration in alluvium of chlorine-36 and tritium from an underground nuclear test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a field experiment studying the migration in alluvium of radioactive elements away from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site in the United States. Nuclides detected in the pumped water are tritium, chlorine-36, iodine-129, and krypton-85 - all at levels below the maximum permissible concentration for drinking water in controlled areas. The chlorine-36 elution curve precedes that of tritium, and is due to an anion exclusion process. A conventional two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation does not fully describe the elution curves for tritium and chlorine-36; the tailing of the curves is longer than predicted. Successful modeling of this experiment will be important for validating codes and models to be used in the high-level nuclear waste program.

Ogard, A.E.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Wolfsberg, K.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Bentley, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

encompasses the activities necessary to assure the stockpile without underground nuclear testing. This mission includes physics and engineering design, small-scale...

253

Toward a more rigorous application of margins and uncertainties within the nuclear weapons life cycle : a Sandia perspective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual framework that is being used to define quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for application in the nuclear weapons (NW) work conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. The conceptual framework addresses the margins and uncertainties throughout the NW life cycle and includes the definition of terms related to QMU and to figures of merit. Potential applications of QMU consist of analyses based on physical data and on modeling and simulation. Appendix A provides general guidelines for addressing cases in which significant and relevant physical data are available for QMU analysis. Appendix B gives the specific guidance that was used to conduct QMU analyses in cycle 12 of the annual assessment process. Appendix C offers general guidelines for addressing cases in which appropriate models are available for use in QMU analysis. Appendix D contains an example that highlights the consequences of different treatments of uncertainty in model-based QMU analyses.

Klenke, Scott Edward; Novotny, George Charles; Paulsen Robert A., Jr.; Diegert, Kathleen V.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Neutralization of chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction using nuclear methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Science Center Reactor. M. S. Thesis. Texas A&M University. August 2001. Kruger, H. and Mcndelsohn, E. Neutralization of Chemical/Biological Ballistic Warheads by Low- Yield Nuclear Interceptors. Lawrence Livermorc National Laboratory; (UCRL...-ID-111403); August 1992. Mendelsohn, E. Neutron Shielding of Chemical/Biological Warheads to Minimize the Effects from Low-yield Nuclear Interceptors. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; (UCRL-ID-112014); October 1992. Mendelsohn, E. Effectiveness...

McAffrey, Veronica Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R. (INEEL); Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K. (SNL); Rath, J.S. (New Mexico Engineering Research Institute)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

WEAPONS ON CAMPUS REGULATION WEAPONS ON CAMPUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEAPONS ON CAMPUS REGULATION CHAPTER 20 WEAPONS ON CAMPUS 8VAC115-20-10. Definitions, including the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. "Weapon" means any firearm or any other weapon listed115-20-20. Possession of weapons prohibited. Possession or carrying of any weapon by any person

Lewis, Robert Michael

257

Supercritical-fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) cleaning of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been evaluated as a cleaning solvent for the cleaning of plutonium (Pu) metal parts. The results of the evaluation show that SCCO{sub 2} is an effective alternative to halogenated solvents that are conventionally used for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of these parts. The cleaning process was demonstrated at the laboratory scale for steel and uranium substrates and has been found to be compatible with Pu. The efficacy of this cleaning method is found to be dependent on process conditions of pressure, temperature, fluid-flow rate, as well as cleaning time. Process parameters of P > 2,500 psi, T > 40 C, and moderate fluid flow rates, produced good cleaning results in less than 10 minutes using a simple flow-through process configuration. Within the parameter range studied, cleaning efficiency generally improved with increasing process pressure and flow rate. SCCO{sub 2} cleaning is suitable for a variety of component cleaning tasks and is adaptable to precision cleaning requirements. The SCCO{sub 2} cleaning process is currently being developed for deployment for weapons production at LANL.

Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Rubin, J.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis and section of processes for the disposition of excess fissile material from nuclear weapon dismantlement in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the acceleration of nuclear disarmament efforts by the United States (US) and Russia are generating large quantities of surplus fissile nuclear materials that are no longer needed for military purposes. The safe and secure disposition of this surplus material to prevent theft or reuse in weapons has become a high priority for the US Department of Energy (USDOE). Many options exist for storage and disposition (use or disposal) of these surplus materials. The criteria, which have been developed from the basis for a preliminary ``screening`` of options, to eliminate from further consideration those options that do not meet minimal requirements. Factors, or attributes, contained in the screening and selection criteria include: (1) resistance to theft and diversion by unauthorized parties, (2) resistance to retrieval, extraction, and reuse by the host nation, (3) technical viability, (4) environmental, safety, and health impacts, (5) cost effectiveness, (6) timeliness, (7) fostering of progress and cooperation with Russia and others, (8) public and institutional acceptance, and (9) additional benefits. The evaluation of environmental impacts, in accordance with the US National Environmental Policy Ac (NEPA) process, is an integral part of the overall evaluation process. Because of the variety of physical and chemical forms of the nuclear material inventory, and because of the large number of possible disposition technologies and final forms, several hundred possible pathways to disposition have been defined and have undergone a systematic selection process. Also, because nuclear material disposition will have far ranging impacts, extensive public, in the form of public and stakeholder, input was integral to the selection process.

Myers, B.R.; Armantrout, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Erickson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Consequence modeling for nuclear weapons probabilistic cost/benefit analyses of safety retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consequence models used in former studies of costs and benefits of enhanced safety retrofits are considered for (1) fuel fires; (2) non-nuclear detonations; and, (3) unintended nuclear detonations. Estimates of consequences were made using a representative accident location, i.e., an assumed mixed suburban-rural site. We have explicitly quantified land- use impacts and human-health effects (e.g. , prompt fatalities, prompt injuries, latent cancer fatalities, low- levels of radiation exposure, and clean-up areas). Uncertainty in the wind direction is quantified and used in a Monte Carlo calculation to estimate a range of results for a fuel fire with uncertain respirable amounts of released Pu. We define a nuclear source term and discuss damage levels of concern. Ranges of damages are estimated by quantifying health impacts and property damages. We discuss our dispersal and prompt effects models in some detail. The models used to loft the Pu and fission products and their particle sizes are emphasized.

Harvey, T.F.; Peters, L.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Hall, C.; Stephens, D.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

National Security, Weapons Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Security, Weapons Science National Security, Weapons Science /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg National Security, Weapons Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at LANL is part of the DOE's stockpile stewardship program. It uses two large X-ray machines to record three-dimensional interior images of materials. In most experiments, materials (including plutonium) undergo hydrodynamic shock to simulate the implosion process in nuclear bombs and/or the effects of severe hydrodynamic stress. The tests are described as "full-scale mockups

263

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

265

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

IRAQ'S WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AFTER TWO MONTHS OF snap inspections at hundreds of sites, United Nations inspectors cannot say that Iraq has weapons of mass destruction or that it is disarming. Because Iraq has not been forth-coming, questions remain about its chemical, biological, and ...

LOIS EMBER

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

268

Salmon Site, characterization of contamination associated with an underground nuclear detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salmon Site, located in south central Mississippi, was used for two nuclear explosive tests and two methane/oxygen explosive tests between 1964 and 1970. The tests were conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome, 823 meters (m) below the ground surface. In 1972, the land surface was remediated, the site was decommissioned, and the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program was initiated to collect surface water and groundwater samples from the site and surrounding areas annually. In 1989, local citizens and political representatives raised concerns about the integrity of the shot cavity and whether there were hazardous substances in the near surface disposal and drilling mud pits. Examination of the problem shows that the most likely migration pathway is for contaminated groundwater to be pushed up an abandoned emplacement hole or re-entry boring as the salt stock closes in and pressurizes the shot cavity. Based on this scenario, the best way to determine whether leakage is occurring is to sample the aquifers over the dome. To do this, three wells are planned to be installed in each aquifer to collect representative soil and groundwater samples and to conduct aquifer testing to determine aquifer hydraulic properties. After evaluating the nature and extent of contamination, contaminant fate and transport modeling will be conducted. Surface contamination has resulted from site activities subsequent to the weapons testing and are not a result of a release during the actual testing. The old drilling mud pits and disposal areas have been investigated using surface geophysical methods, followed by soil and biota sampling and cone penetrometer testing. Based on the results of this testing, a number of shallow monitoring wells will be installed around the contaminated locations.

Deshler, R.M.; Danz, R.; Mellington, S.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A comparative study of 239,240Pu in soil near the former Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility, Golden, CO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Golden, CO released plutonium into the environment during almost 40 years of operation. Continuing concern over possible health impacts of these releases has been heightened by lack of public disclosure of the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. A dose reconstruction study for the Rocky Flats facilities, begun in 1990, provided a unique opportunity for concerned citizens to design and implement field studies without participation of the DOE, its contractors, or other government agencies. The Citizens Environmental Sampling Committee was formed in late 1992 and conducted a field sampling program in 1994. Over 60 soil samples, including both surface and core samples, were collected from 28 locations where past human activities would have minimal influence on contaminant distributions in soil. Cesium-137 activity was used as a means to assess whether samples were collected in undisturbed locations. The distribution of plutonium (as 239,240Pu) in soil was consistent with past sampling conducted by DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and others. Elevated levels of 239,240Pu were found immediately east of the Rocky Flats Plant, with concentrations falling rapidly with distance from the plant to levels consistent with background from fallout. Samples collected in areas south, west, and north of the plant were generally consistent with background from fallout. No biases in past sampling due to choice of sampling locations or sampling methodology were evident. The study shows that local citizens, when provided sufficient resources, can design and implement technical studies that directly address community concerns where trust in the regulated community and/or regulators is low.

Todd D. Margulies; Niels D. Schonbeck; Normie C. Morin-Voillequé; Katherine A. James; James M. LaVelle

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF{sub 6}) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ``transparency),`` and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear Weapons Latency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................... 14 Fig. 4. Conceptual flow of Latency tool Petri Net simulation. ........................................ 18 Fig. 5. Overall flow of Latency Tool. .............................................................................. 19 Fig. 6. Latency... density function bound simulations. .............. 43 xi Fig. 14. The expansion of one transition into a series of transitions. A simple Petri net with (a) 1 transition T1, (b) T1 replaced by two transitions in series, T1a and T1b, both half...

Sweeney, David J

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Seismic Response of a Deep Underground Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground nuclear waste repository certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ,(EPA) to store transuranic defense-related waste contaminated by small amounts of radioactive materials. Located at a depth of about 655 meters below the surface, the facility is sited in southeastern New Mexico, about 40 Department of Energy underground facilities, waste disposal. kilometers east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The U.S. (DOE) managed the design and construction of the surface and and remains responsible for operation and closure following The managing and operating contractor for the DOE at the WIPP, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, maintains two rechmiant seismic monitoring systems located at the surface and in the underground. This report discusses two earthquakes detected by the seismic monitoring system, one a duratior magnitude 5.0 (Md) event located approximately 60 km east-southeast of the facility, and another a body-wave magnitude 5.6 (rob) event that occurred approximately 260 kilometers to the south-southeast.

Sanchez, P.E.

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership...

275

S. 2466: This Act may be cited as the National Atmospheric Nuclear Testing Compensation Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, April 19, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would amend Title XXI of the Public Health Service Act to provide for the establishment of an atmospheric nuclear testing compensation program to compensate civilians living down wind of the Nevada Test Site during above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and miners exposed in underground uranium mines supplying uranium for the primary use and benefit of the nuclear weapons program. The bill describes technical assistance and information, administrative procedures for filing a petition, determination of eligibility, and amount of compensation.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of Teleseismic Signals from Underground Nuclear Explosions Originating in Four Geological Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values...to an underground explosion at Nevada test site, Can. J. earth Sci., 6...from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values......

H. S. Hasegawa

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies Spring 2011 Prof. Don Howard theirpeople, especially the poor. " Benedict joined every Pope since Pius XII in condemning nuclear weapons as inherently immoral because the nature of the technology is such that nuclear weapons inherently violates

Howard, Don

278

Proceedings of the seventh symposium on containment of underground nuclear explosions. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 of two unclassified volumes of a meeting of workers at all levels in the science and technology of containment. Papers on containment and related geological, geophysical, engineering, chemical, and computational topics were included. Particular topics in this volume include: Low-yield test beds, modeling and residual stress, material properties, collapse phenomena and shock diagnostics, stemming practices and performance, geophysics, and geosciences and weapons destruction. Individual papers are indexed separately on the data base.

Olsen, C.W. [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

On the dangers of C.I.S. specialists with nuclear weapons experience relocating to Third World countries: A Russian view. Nonproliferation Newsletter, February 1993: Volume 11, Issue 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter presents information on the effectiveness of rules and regulations; on the role of a qualified consultant in the possible design of a nuclear weapon for a Third World country; and on the possible dangers (and their elimination) of relocating nuclear technologists.

Hogsett, V.; Canavan, B. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Underground test area subproject waste management plan. Revision No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was the site of 928 underground nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. The tests were performed as part of the Atomic Energy Commission and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons testing program. The NTS is managed by the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Of the 928 tests conducted below ground surface at the NTS, approximately 200 were detonated below the water table. As an unavoidable consequence of these testing activities, radionuclides have been introduced into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. In the few instances of groundwater sampling, radionuclides have been detected in the groundwater; however, only a very limited investigation of the underground test sites and associated shot cavities has been conducted to date. The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject was established to fill this void and to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the NTS. One of its primary objectives is to gather data to characterize the deep aquifer underlying the NTS.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ITAR Categories Category I -Firearms, Close Assault Weapons and Combat Shotguns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITAR Categories Category I - Firearms, Close Assault Weapons and Combat Shotguns Category II - Guns and Associated Equipment Category XVI - Nuclear Weapons, Design and Testing Related Items Category XVII Energy Weapons Category XIX - [Reserved] Category XX - Submersible Vessels, Oceanographic and Associated

282

Weapons of mass distraction: Magicianship, misdirection, and the dark side of legitimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Los Angeles Times 27: A1. Weapons of Mass Distraction Weber,G. Dawson, (Orig. pub. 1634). Weapons of Mass DistractionCentury Encounter with Nuclear Weapons. Columbus: Ohio State

Freudenburg, William R.; Alario, Margarita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

McMillan to Lead Weapons Program Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program He will provide oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program...

284

Ban On Foreign Scientists' Visits To Weapon Labs Lifted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ban On Foreign Scientists' Visits To Weapon Labs Lifted ... Once again, foreign scientists from "sensitive" countries may be able to work with U.S. scientists at Department of Energy nuclear weapons laboratories. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Supplement Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE CONTINUED OPERATION OF THE PANTEX PLANT AND ASSOCIATED STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WEAPON COMPONENTS DOE/EIS-0225/SA-03 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Operations P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120-0030 February 2003 i Summary The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures at 10 CFR 1021.330(d) require evaluation of its site-wide environmental impact statements (EISs) at least every 5 years by preparation of a supplement analysis (SA), as provided in 10 CFR 1021.314. Based on the SA, a determination is made as to whether the existing EIS remains

286

Sandia National Laboratories/Production Agency Weapon Waste Minimization Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Plan describes activities to reduce the usage of hazardous materials and the production of hazardous material waste during the development, production, stockpile, and retirement phases of war reserve nuclear weapons and nuclear weapon test units. Activities related to the development and qualification of more benign materials and processes for weapon production and the treatment and disposal of these materials from weapon retirement are described in separate plans.

Skinrood, A.C.; Radosevich, L.G.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

288

Improving weapons of mass destruction intelligence Arnold Kanter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improving weapons of mass destruction intelligence Arnold Kanter The Scowcroft Group 900;2 Combating the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) is one of the most important foreign policy of nuclear capability by sub-national states and the security of WMD weapons, materials, and technology

Deutch, John

289

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized masses to avoid presenting classified information. As only linear processes are modeled, the results can be readily scaled by the true classified masses for use in the risk assessment. The modeling timeframe for the risk assessment was set at 1,000 years, though some calculations are extended to 2,000 years. This first section of the report endeavors to orient the reader with the environment of Amchitka and the specifics of the underground nuclear tests. Of prime importance are the geologic and hydrologic conditions of the subsurface. A conceptual model for groundwater flow beneath the island is then developed and paired with an appropriate numerical modeling approach in section 2. The parameters needed for the model, supporting data for them, and data uncertainties are discussed at length. The calibration of the three flow models (one for each test) is then presented. At this point the conceptual radionuclide transport model is introduced and its numerical approach described in section 3. Again, the transport parameters and their supporting data and uncertainties are the focus. With all of the processes and parameters in place, the first major modeling phase can be discussed in section 4. In this phase, a parametric uncertainty analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of the transport modeling results to the uncertainties present in the parameters. This analysis is motivated by the recognition of substantial uncertainty in the subsurface conditions on the island and the need to incorporate that uncertainty into the modeling. The conclusion of the first phase determines the parameters to hold as uncertain through the main flow and transport modeling. This second, main phase of modeling is presented in section 5, with the contaminant breakthrough behavior of each test site addressed. This is followed by a sensitivity analysis in section 6, regarding the importance of additional processes that could not be supported in the main modeling effort due to lack of data. Finally, the results for the individual sites are compared, the sensitivities discussed,

Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

Deterrence versus Preemption: Assessing U.S. Nuclear Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since coming into office in 2001, the Bush administration has enacted a series of controversial policies designed to create a more robust and more usable nuclear arsenal. From requiring new nuclear strike capabilities (including against non-nuclear countries), to threatening preemptive attacks, to investing billions of dollars in rebuilding the nuclear weapons production complex, the administration is systematically strengthening the role nuclear weapons play in defending the United States and its interests around the world. This presentation examines those policies and the thinking that underlies them. It questions the effectiveness of the administration's approach and explores some of the unintended consequences vis-a-vis U.S. policy toward North Korea, Iraq, Pakistan, and others. Finally, it takes a detailed look at current efforts to develop a new low-yield earth-penetrating nuclear weapon to destroy hardened underground facilities, assessing the feasibility of such a device and the potential effects of its use.

Schwartz, Stephen (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists) [Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

293

Trace Fission Product Ratios for Nuclear Forensics Attribution of Weapons-Grade Plutonium from Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nuclear terrorist attack is one of the most serious threats to the national security of the United States, and in the wake of an attack, attribution of responsibility will be of the utmost importance. Plutonium, a by-product in spent nuclear...

Osborn, Jeremy

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nuclear testing: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have examined the experimental and analytic bases for understanding the performance of each of the weapon types that are currently planned to remain in the US enduring nuclear stockpile. They have also examined whether continued underground tests at various nuclear yield thresholds would add significantly to the confidence in this stockpile in the years ahead. The starting point for this examination was a detailed review of past experience in developing and testing modern nuclear weapons, their certification and recertification processes, their performance margins, and evidence of aging or other trends over time for each weapon type in the enduring stockpile. The findings, as summarized in Conclusions 1 through 6, are consistent with US agreement to enter into a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) of unending duration, that includes a standard ``supreme national interest`` clause. Recognizing that the challenge of maintaining an effective nuclear stockpile for an indefinite period without benefit of underground tests is an important and also a new one, the US should affirm its readiness to invoke the supreme national interest clause should the need arise as a result of unanticipated technical problems in the enduring stockpile.

Drell, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON ... Under fire, Airborne Laser program director confronts challenges of revolutionary weapons system ...

WILLIAM G. SCHULZ

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Proceedings of the Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test ban monitoring. We focused on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems. The second goal of the symposium was to establish a dialogue between seismologists and explosion-source code calculators. The meeting was divided into five main sessions: explosion source phenomenology, material response modeling, numerical simulations, the seismic source, and phenomenology from near source to far field. We feel the symposium reached many of its goals. Individual papers submitted at the conference are indexed separately on the data base.

Taylor, S.R.; Kamm, J.R. [eds.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Generalized weapon effectiveness modeling .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this thesis, we compare weapon effectiveness methods to determine if current effectiveness models provide accurate results. The United States Military currently adheres to a… (more)

Anderson, Colin M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

Echelard, Tim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapon tests Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By dissembling random nuclear weapons in the stockpile and closely inspecting and testing... explosives and nuclear materials at the Nevada Test Site to gather diagnostic...

302

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The consequences of alternative environmental management goals: A non-linear programming analysis of nuclear weapons legacy clean-up at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prioritization of projects within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Complex Clean-up Program, exemplified with data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is quite sensitive to overall goals. Non-...

Donald W. Jones; Kenneth S. Redus…

304

Some facts about “weapon focus”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weapon focus” refers to the concentration of acrime witness's attention on a weapon, and the resultant reduction in ability to ... that subjects made more eye fixations on the weapon than on the check, and fixat...

Elizabeth F. Loftus; Geoffrey R. Loftus; Jane Messo

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Recovery of weapon plutonium as feed material for reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary considerations for recovering and converting weapon plutonium from various US weapon forms into feed material for fabrication of reactor fuel elements. An ongoing DOE study addresses the disposition of excess weapon plutonium through its use as fuel for nuclear power reactors and subsequent disposal as spent fuel. The spent fuel would have characteristics similar to those of commercial power spent fuel and could be similarly disposed of in a geologic repository.

Armantrout, G.A.; Bronson, M.A.; Choi, Jor-Shan [and others

1994-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Weapons Program Associate Directors named  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Associate Directors named Bob Webster has been named Associate Director for Weapon Physics and John Benner has been named Associate Director for Weapon Engineering and...

307

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

308

National Laboratory's Weapons Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program July 28, 2009 Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 28, 2009- Charles McMillan has been appointed the new principal...

309

Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz [Navarro-INTERA LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal [National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, no underground testing 6:26 Valveless laser processing One of the most difficult and costly processes in nuclear, and effectiveness of the nuclear deterrent without underground testing." Combined Technologies The system combines and engineers at LANL. The new automated testing technology is called Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS

311

Design methodology to develop a conceptual underground facility for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the design methodology employed to develop conceptual underground layouts for a prospective high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study is in conjunction with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI), project studying the disposal of high level waste in densely welded tuff. The fundamental design effort concentraes on the effects of the heat released from the decaying waste forms and the impact of this heat on ventilation, waste emplacement configurations, and rock stability. This effort will perfect the design of the waste emplacement layout including emplacement hole spacing, emplacement drift spacing, and the areal power density (APD) for the installed waste. This paper contains only viewgraphs. 11 figs.

Zerga, D.P.; Badie, A.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

Senglaub, M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Seasonal thermal signatures of heat transfer by water exchange in an underground vault  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also to the long-term temperature...underground waste storage and contaminant...underground nuclear waste storage sites is...2000), the long-term impact and...Concerning the long-term temperature...underground waste storage, underlying......

Frédéric Perrier; Pierre Morat; Toshio Yoshino; Osam Sano; Hisashi Utada; Olivier Gensane; Jean-Louis Le Mouël

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

315

hemical and biological weapons are rightly re-garded with a special sense of horror. Their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C hemical and biological weapons are rightly re- garded with a special sense of horror spread through a population. Moreover, chemical and biological weapons are especially attractive alter- natives for groups that lack the ability to construct nuclear weapons. The 1995 release of sarin gas

Spirtes, Peter

316

Nuclear presence and crisis escalation stability: prospects for peace?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the relationship between crisis escalation and the presence of nuclear actors. Nuclear weapons are typically viewed as the ultimate weapons of mass… (more)

Sanchez, Victoria Justine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Y-12 and the National Nuclear Security Administration make continuing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the safety, security and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; reduces the global danger from weapons of mass destruction; provides the...

318

Welcome to the Los Alamos Field Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

security, reliability and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction; provides...

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapons research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and model nuclear weapon performance in three dimensions. LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAMS: By upgrading Source: Rhoads, James - Space Telescope Science Institute Collection: Physics 9...

320

ASSESSING IRAQ'S WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IN THE MONTHS LEADING UP TO THE March 2003 invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush and his top officials issued a litany of serious allegations about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the threat they posed to the U.S. But their prime ...

LOIS R. EMBER

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Multiple smart weapons employment mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A digital communications armament network adaptor is described for carrying multiple smart weapons on a single wing pylon station of an aircraft, comprising: an aircraft having a weapons controller configured in compliance with MIL-STD 1553; multiple wing-mounted pylons on said aircraft, each providing a weapons station with communications and ejection and release mechanisms electrically connected to said controller for the airborne launch of smart weapons; a multiple ejector rack affixed to at least one pylon, said rack holding a plurality of smart weapons; and an electronic digital network connected between the controller and said rack-mounted smart weapons, said network located in said rack and including circuitry which receives coded digital communications from said controller and selectively rebroadcasts said communications to one of said smart weapons on said rack designated by said coded communications, thereby controlling all required functions of said designated smart weapon.

McGlynn, M.P.; Meiklejohn, W.D.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

IRAQ'S WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DESPITE SEVEN YEARS OF INtrusive United Nations inspections and decimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, Iraq was able to sequester sizable stocks of chemical and biological weapons, some missiles to deliver them, and the scientific and technical ...

LOIS EMBER

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

IRAQ HAD NO ILLICIT WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TESTIFYING BEFORE THE SENate Armed Services Committee, chief U.S. weapons inspector Charles A. Duelfer outlined key findings of a report on Iraq's prewar weapons holdings that sharply undercut the Bush Administration's primary reason for invading Iraq....

LOIS EMBER

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Antineutrino Detection for Nuclear Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

covertly acquire these special nuclear materials from: Assembled weapons Raw uranium ore Enriched uranium antineutrino monitoring infrastructure will help avert the spread of covert nuclear reactors and weaponsAntineutrino Detection for Nuclear Monitoring Draft #12;Graphic courtesy Lawrence Livermore

Mcdonough, William F.

325

'Civil' nuclear programme – serving the dual objectives of retaining the state's hegemony on citizens' basic energy needs and assuring supply of weapon grade ingredients: a case study on India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Political leaders of ambitious emerging economies of India and China, where the state has not yet reached the maturity stage, prefer nuclear power to other alternative energy sources, as it serves the dual purpose of retaining the state's hegemony on citizens' basic energy needs and assures supply of weapon grade ingredients. In contrast to North America and most of Western Europe, where growth of nuclear power has levelled out for many years, the 'greatest growth in nuclear generation' in the near future is expected in China, Japan, South Korea and India. It would be naive to believe that the political establishments are not aware of the negative consequences of nuclear power. The question may then arise as to why have the emerging economies of India, China, Brazil, etc., aligned themselves with the nuclear establishment without fully exploiting other alternative energy sources? Taking India as a case, this paper analyses secondary data and findings of various previous studies to explore an answer to this question.

Dipankar Dey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Test Procedure Conducted Energy Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons Version 1.1 2010/07/31 #12;Contents Page 0.0 Disclaimer A TASER M26 13 Appendix B TASER X26 23 #12;1 Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons 0.0 Disclaimer Energy Weapons ("CEWs") in a controlled and repeatable manner across jurisdictions. The consistent

Adler, Andy

327

Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

328

Synergic and conflicting issues in planning underground use to produce energy in densely populated countries, as Italy: Geological storage of CO2, natural gas, geothermics and nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In densely populated countries there is a growing and compelling need to use underground for different and possibly coexisting technologies to produce “low carbon” energy. These technologies include (i) clean coal combustion merged with CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS); (ii) last-generation nuclear power or, in any case, safe nuclear wastes disposal, both “temporary” and “geological” somewhere in Europe (at least in one site): Nuclear wastes are not necessarily associated to nuclear power plants; (iii) safe natural gas (CH4) reserves to allow consumption also when the foreign pipelines are less available or not available for geopolitical reasons and (iv) “low-space-consuming” renewables in terms of Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL measured in [GW h/ha/year]) as geothermics. When geothermics is exploited as low enthalpy technology, the heat/cool production could be associated, where possible, to increased measures of “building efficiency”, low seismic risks building reworking and low-enthalpy heat managing. This is undispensable to build up “smart cities”. In any case the underground geological knowledge is prerequisite. All these technologies have been already proposed and defined by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Road Map 2009 as priorities for worldwide security: all need to use underground in a rational and safe manner. The underground is not renewable in most of case histories [10,11]. IEA recently matched and compared different technologies in a unique “Clean Energy Economy” improved document (Paris, November 16–17, 2011), by the contribution of this vision too (see reference). In concert with “energy efficiency” improvement both for plants and buildings, in the frame of the “smart cities” scenarios, and the upstanding use of “energy savings”, the energetic planning on regional scale where these cities are located, are strategic for the year 2050: this planning is strongly depending by the underground availability and typology. Therefore, if both literature and European Policy are going fast to improve the concept of “smart cities” this paper stresses the concept of “smart regions”, more strategic than “smart cities”, passing throughout a discussion on the synergic and conflicting use of underground to produce energy for the “smart regions” as a whole. The paper highlights the research lines which are urgent to plan the soundest energy mix for each region by considering the underground performances case by case: a worldwide mapping, by GIS tools of this kind of information could be strategic for all the “world energy management” authorities, up to ONU, with its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the G20, the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) and the European Platforms such as the “Zero Emissions Fossil Fuel Power Plants” (EU-ZEP Platform), the Steel Platform, the Biomass Platform too. All of these organizations agree on the need for synergistic and coexistent uses of underground for geological storage of CO2, CH4, nuclear waste and geothermic exploitation. The paper is therefore a discussion of the tools, methods and approaches to these underground affecting technologies, after a gross view of the different uses of underground to produce energy for each use, with their main critical issues (i.e. public acceptance in different cases). The paper gives some gross evaluation for the Lazio Region and some hints from the Campania Region, located in Central Italy. Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL), is calculated for each renewable energy technology (solar, wind, geothermal) highlighting the potentiality of the last. Why the Italian case history among the densely populated countries? on the Italian territory is hard to find suitable areas (mostly if greenfields) to use the own underground, with respect to other European countries, due to the presence of seismotectonic activity and many faulted areas characterized by Diffuse Degassing Structures (DDSs, which are rich in CO2 and CH4). In this cases, public acceptan

Fedora Quattrocchi; Enzo Boschi; Angelo Spena; Mauro Buttinelli; Barbara Cantucci; Monia Procesi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOEIG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of...

330

All of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas to some degree since the radioactivity in the waste releases hydrogen from basic nuclear reactions. The routine release...

331

Nuclear Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR - Your article (Nature 365, 599; 1993) on the US-Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake ... nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake in not recognizing Ukraine as a legitimate successor state to the Soviet nuclear arsenal and is still insisting that ...

Arno Arrak

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership position will allow for greater integration in the planning and execution of the stockpile stewardship program. August 18, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

333

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations, accidents, and nuclear weapons. Princeton,the likelihood of a nuclear accident (Sagan 1993, 1995). “potential for a nuclear accident. Yet it seems implausible

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

COLLOQUIUM: Nuclear Famine: The Threat to Humanity from Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Nuclear Famine: The Threat to Humanity from Nuclear Weapons Dr. Alan Robock Rutgers University A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with...

335

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. This

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Imaging the ionization track of alpha recoils for the directional detection of weapons grade plutonium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the dawn of the nuclear weapons era, political, military, and scientific leaders around the world have been working to contain the proliferation of Special Nuclear Material and explosively fissile material. This paper ...

Koch, William Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle of proliferation: The more places in which this work is done, the harder it is to monitor. Weapons have been, North Korea, Pakistan, and South Africa. (South Africa abandoned its nuclear weapons in 1991. Libya

Laughlin, Robert B.

338

Bibliography of reports by US Geological Survey personnel pertaining to underground nuclear testing and radioactive waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site, and radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP Site, New Mexico, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography presents reports released to the public between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1979, by personnel of the US Geological Survey. Reports include information on underground nuclear testing and waste management projects at the NTS (Nevada Test Site) and radioactive waste projects at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, New Mexico. Reports on Project Dribble, Tatum Dome, Mississippi, previously prepared as administrative reports and released to the public as 474-series reports during 1979 are also included in this bibliography.

Glanzman, V.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Weapons Quality Assurance Community  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community Consolidated JOB/TASK Analysis 12/2011 Job Analysis Worksheet for Tasks WQA Specialist Task Source Import. Freq. #1 Monitors, inspects, analyzes and investigates complex electrical, electronic, mechanical, electro-mechanical, and nuclear components, subassemblies, and assemblies associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and other non-nuclear components as applicable QC-1, WQAPM, DesgnDefn 4 3 #2 Conducts Quality Assurance Surveys (including Product Acceptance) and oversight activities of contractor operations QC-1, WQAPM 5 2 #3 Performs verification inspection (including Contractor Acceptance Verification) of product manufactured by NNSA Contractors, QAIP development, QADRs, nonconformance activities/requirements

340

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge July 12, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres of its former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a decade of environmental cleanup work, the transfer creates the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, and marks completion of the regulatory milestones to transform a formerly contaminated site into an environmental asset. "The Department of Energy's environmental cleanup of the Rocky Flats

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility April 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

342

TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Weapon focus, arousal, and eyewitness memory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weapon focus refers to the decreased ability to ... by an eyewitness because of attention to a weapon present during that crime. In the first ... viewed a mock crime scene in which a weapon was either highly visi...

Thomas H. Kramer; Robert Buckhout; Paul Eugenio

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Eyewitness identification: Simulating the “Weapon effect”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present experiment investigates the effect of weapons on eyewitness recall and recognition using a ... experimental paradigm in which a syringe serves as weapon simulation. Contrary to previous weapon manipul...

Anne Maass; Günther Köhnken

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still catastrophic consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear weapons states, with additional states trying to develop nuclear arsenals. We use a modern climate and upper stratosphere, producing a long aerosol lifetime. The indirect effects of nuclear weapons would. [2007], who showed that a regional nuclear conflict using 100 Hiroshima-size (15 kt) nuclear weapons

Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

346

THUMBS DOWN ON DRUG WAR WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THUMBS DOWN ON DRUG WAR WEAPON ... Mycoherbicides have been viewed as a potentially potent weapon in the worldwide war on illicit drugs. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Numerical simulation investigations in weapon delivery probabilities .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study of weapon delivery probabilities has historically been focused around analytical solutions and approximations for weapon delivery accuracy and effectiveness calculations. With the relatively… (more)

Peterson, Kristofer A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Weapons production | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons production Weapons production An effective production infrastructure is critical to national security. Y-12 continues to replace World War II-era facilities to increase...

349

Underground Layout Configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

A. Linden

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Weapons in the City: Weapon Use in Chicago Homicide Cases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study used data from the homicides in Chicago 1965-1995 dataset (N=9,340) to examine the relationship between the use of certain types of weapons in… (more)

Johnson, Natalie Jo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chapter 13 -Firearms, Weapons, Destructive Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

53 Chapter 13 - Firearms, Weapons, Destructive Devices The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OAR Definitions (1) "Firearm" means a weapon or device, by whatever name known, which is designed to expel chemical action, and which is readily capable for use as a weapon. (2) "Weapon" means any knife having

354

NNSA: Working To Prevent Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

secure weapons-grade nuclear material at the Mayak Production Association in Ozersk, Russia. Completed MPC&A upgrades to 15 nuclear material buildings outside of Russia. Returned...

355

AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEADQUARTERS aII?y HEADQUARTERS aII?y 9 AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER 1 AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND . - KlRTlAND AIR FORCE BASE, NEW MEXICO - k FINAL REPORT O N AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION PROJECT RULISON .1 O c t o b e r 1969 P r e p a r e d by : CONT INENTAL TEST D I V I S ION DIRECTORATE OF NUCLEAR FIELD OPERATIONS This page intentionally left blank INDEX AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION I N PROJECT RULISON FINAL REPORT PARAGRAPH BASIC REPORT SUBJECT R e f e r e n c e s PAGE 2 G e n e r a l 1 3 P l a n n i n g 3 4 Command a n d C o n t r o l 5 O p e r a t i o n s , G r a n d ' J u n c t i o n M u n i c i p a l A i r p o r t . . ' A i r O p e r a t i o n s C e n t e r , He1 i c o p t e r P a d / ' 7.. - . M a t e r i e l : ' 8 M e d i c a l 1 9 R a d - S a f e C r a s h - R e s c u e S e c u r i t y 2 1 C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ~ d m i n i s t r a t ' i o n Summary ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT SUBJECI' 1 F r a g O r d e r 69-1 ( ~ r o j ' e c t RULISON) , AFSWC D

356

CRAD, Configuration Management- Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility.

357

Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production, nuclear weapons, and nuclear threat reduction Proton radiography, muon tomography, proton active interrogation, wide-angle, fast-response optical telescopes, and...

358

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban 1 MAY 2003 and Former Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Chemical Weapons Conference on Disarmament PRESENTATIONS Chemical Weapons Destruction CHEMICAL WEAPONS DESTRUCTION IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: Sergey Baranovsky

Sussex, University of

359

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

360

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

U.S. Nuclear Policy and the NPT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Demonstrating the U.S. Demonstrating the U.S. Commitment to Nuclear Disarmament October 18, 2011 Thomas P. D'Agostino, Administrator National Nuclear Security Administration 2 Outline - Reducing nuclear weapons - Ceasing production of weapons materials - Disposing of excess weapons materials - Managing a smaller stockpile - Strengthening the nuclear security enterprise - Transparency and verification 3 Toward a World Without Nuclear Weapons * President Obama stated the U.S. commitment to the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons * Continue focus on preventing nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism * Strengthen regional security architectures while placing increased reliance on non-nuclear deterrence capabilities * Engage with Russia in negotiations aimed at achieving substantial

363

Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5-2008 5-2008 September 2008 DOE STANDARD WEAPON QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD NNSA Weapon Quality Assurance Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1025-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1025-2008 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1025-2008 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE....................................................................................................................................

364

The Influence of Context on the “Weapon Focus” Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments investigated context effects in “weapon focus.” In Experiment 1, undergraduates who ... . The results of both experiments imply that weapon focus may occur because weapons are sur...

Kerri L. Pickel

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fighting Against the Invisible: The new weapons against chemical warfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientists. Types of Chemical Weapons. http://www.fas.org/Enzymatic systems The new weapons against chemical warfarebe reproducible in order for the weapon to be effective. To

Nguyen, Leana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.Threat and Unconventional Weapon Robert Jones, MD Brandonand as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Production in the Digital Era: Commodity or Strategic Weapon?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commodity or Strategic Weapon? © John Zysman BRIE Workingproduction is a strategic weapon and when a commodity. Forproduction into a strategic weapon liking production to the

Zysman, John

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Light Wars: The Bright Future of Laser Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Laser Weapons. Northrop Grumman. http://Goda. 2004. High energy laser weapons: technology overview.The Bright Future of Laser Weapons WAR TECH SPRING WAR TECH

Mistry, Hemma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Underground Power Cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1973 research-article Underground Power Cables J. D. Endacott Up to the present, effectively...particular, in recent years, the oil-filled cable system using cellulose paper impregnated...design of supertension underground power cable systems are considered. The limitations...

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system.

Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Weapons engineering tritium facility overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials provide an overview of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) as introductory material for January 2011 visit to SRS. Purpose of the visit is to discuss Safety Basis, Conduct of Engineering, and Conduct of Operations. WETF general description and general GTS program capabilities are presented in an unclassified format.

Najera, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Memory impairment in the weapon focus effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments are reported in which postevent source of misinformation was manipulated within weaponpresent and weapon-absent scenarios. Participants viewed slides depicting either a weapon or a newspaper event...

Jo Saunders

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Värdig ett vapen; Worthy of a Weapon.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to interpret and discuss the weapon-graves of Viking Age Birka. The weapon-grave phenomenon is deemed differential in relation… (more)

Björk, Niklas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

WEAPONS QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weapon Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Standard Reference Guide AUGUST 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ ii ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ iv PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

378

Microsoft Word - WIPP Updates_Underground Recovery Process Begins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5DR0314 002NWPR0314 NWP Media Contacts: Donavan Mager Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (575) 234-7586 www.wipp.energy.gov For Immediate Release WIPP UPDATES: Underground Recovery...

379

Effects of Weapon Noise on Hearing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...“In military spheres, the need for prevention of weapon noise-induced hearing loss is receiving ever-...

A. Dancer; R. Franke

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Chihuahua Jackets, Lego Weapons, and Vintage Bags  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chihuahua Jackets, Lego Weapons, and Vintage Bags are signs of a trend. Keywords: commerce, consumer products, internet

Charles Day

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Working toward a world without nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limiting the number of warheads is a good beginning, but getting to the end state calls for new thinking. Six specific steps can start us down that path.

Drell, Sidney D. [Stanford University, Stanford, California, US (United States)] [Stanford University, Stanford, California, US (United States)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Working toward a world without nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limiting the number of warheads is a good beginning, but getting to the end state calls for new thinking. Six specific steps can start us down that path.

Drell, Sidney D. [Stanford University, Stanford, California, US (United States)] [Stanford University, Stanford, California, US (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Debris from Tests of Nuclear Weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1957). 11. R. Carrington, Elephants (Basic Books, New York, 1959). 12. R. F...ones (9). (According to the foregoing theory, the lower parts of the curve are not...average. 8. R. Bjornerstedt, Arkiv Fysik 16, 293 (1959); and K. Low, ibid...

Jan Sisefsky

1961-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Working toward a world without nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limiting the number of warheads is a good beginning, but getting to the end state calls for new thinking. Six specific steps can start us down that path.

Drell, Sidney D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Hoover Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention: Countering the Threat from Biological Weapons Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs By Command of Her Majesty April 2002 Cm 5484 £5.00 #12;3 STRENGTHENING THE BIOLOGICAL AND TOXIN WEAPONS CONVENTION

Sussex, University of

386

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM OPERATIONAL TEST & EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES LTC Thom support assessing a weapon systems true cost and performance characteristics? S1: Can/should cost methodologies adequately address weapon systems total ownership cost (TOC)? S3: Are there critical cost

387

International Criminalization of Chemical and Biological Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Criminalization of Chemical and Biological Weapons Matthew Meselson The American. As a biologist seeking the effective elimination of biological and chemical weapons and concerned with the need or chemical weapons or who order or direct anyone to engage in these activities. Prohibitions against

Sussex, University of

388

ORGANISATION FOR THE PROHIBITION OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANISATION FOR THE PROHIBITION OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, STOCKPILING AND USE OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS AND ON THEIR DESTRUCTION OPCW #12;#12;CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, STOCKPILING AND USE OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS

Sussex, University of

389

Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons Responsible Administrative Unit for the Colorado School of Mines. Unregulated possession of weapons on the university campus creates forth the policy on the use and storage of firearms, explosives and other dangerous or illegal weapons

Szymczak, Andrzej

390

Audit Report: IG-0484 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the Nuclear Weapons Production Infrastructure Since the cessation of underground testing of nuclear weapons in the early 1990's, the Department of Energy's responsibility...

391

Nuclear Deterrence | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and reliable U.S. nuclear deterrent, which is essential to national security. Every weapon in the U.S. nuclear stockpile has components manufactured, maintained or ultimately...

392

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

393

Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

Richardson, J

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium July 13, 2006 - 3:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Sergey Kiriyenko, the director of Russia's Federal Atomic Energy Agency, have signed a joint statement reaffirming their commitment to dispose of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium by irradiation in nuclear reactors. "This statement is a clear sign of our mutual commitment to keeping dangerous nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists. We look forward to working together with the Russians to ensure that this important nonproliferation project moves forward in both Russia and the United States," Secretary Bodman said.

397

Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

explosives package in nuclear weapons. This laboratory possesses unique capabilities in neutron scattering, enhanced surveillance, radiography, and plutonium science and...

398

Nuclear choices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains part of the series New Liberal Arts, which is intended to make science and technology more accessible to students of the liberal arts. Volume in hand provides a comprehensive, multifaceted examination of nuclear energy, in nontechnical terms. Wolfson explains the basics of nuclear energy and radiation, nuclear power..., and nuclear weapons..., and he invites readers to make their own judgments on controversial nuclear issues. Illustrated with photos and diagrams. Each chapter contains suggestions for additional reading and a glossary. For policy, science, and general collections in all libraries. (ES) Topics contained include Atoms and nuclei. Effects and uses of radiation. Energy and People. Reactor safety. Nuclear strategy. Defense in the nuclear age. Nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and nuclear futures.

Wolfson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Conducted Electrical Weapon Deployed Probe Wounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deployment of probes is a common method of use for some handheld conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). Probe deployment allows for greater...

Donald M. Dawes M.D.; Jeffrey D. Ho M.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Stridsvagn 122 och Remote Weapon Station.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Den här uppsatsen behandlar stridsvagn122 och Remote Weapon Station (RWS). Det finns ett verkansglapp mellan dagens kalibrar 120 mm och 7,62 mm. Observationsmöjligheterna i… (more)

Sellberg, Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Direct-energy weapons: invisible and invincible? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A military weapon is any tool used to increase the reach or power of a nation. Simply, it can be said that each era witnesses… (more)

Deveci, Bayram Mert.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Direct-energy weapons invisible and invincible? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A military weapon is any tool used to increase the reach or power of a nation. Simply, it can be said that each era witnesses… (more)

Deveci, Bayram Mert.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

Pat Arnold

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

FAQS Reference Guide – Weapon Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the August 2008 edition of DOE-STD-1025-2008, Weapon Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

405

Enforcement Letter; Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2005 2, 2005 Dr. Michael R. Anastasio Director Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808, L-001 Livermore, CA 94550 Subject: Enforcement Letter - Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities Dear Dr. Anastasio: This letter is to inform you of the Department of Energy's (DOE) concern regarding several quality assurance-related deficiencies involving actions by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel. These deficiencies were associated with a cracked explosive event that occurred at the Pantex site in January 2004. The timing of this letter is intended to coincide with a DOE enforcement action stemming from this event. During the dismantlement of a retired nuclear weapon, for which LLNL was the design

406

Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 06/10/2013 | NR-13-06-04 Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Image courtesy of National Institutes of Health. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Using data derived from nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s and '60s, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that a small portion of the human brain involved in memory makes new neurons well into adulthood. The research may have profound impacts on human behavior and mental health. The study supports the importance of investigating the therapeutic potential of applying adult neurogenesis to the treatment of age-related cognitive disorders. Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem

407

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations, Accidents, and Nuclear Weapons. Princetondominate accident risks in the nuclear fuel cycle (Figureof Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Policy Name: Weapons Policy Originating/Responsible Department: University Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Name: Weapons Policy Originating/Responsible Department: University Safety Approval the following concerns, obstacles, and risks: · Weapons (such as Firearms and Replica Weapons) have to display Weapons as an illustration or statement of their research; · Carleton University owns Weapons

Carleton University

409

Animals that Hide Underground  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

410

PUBLIC SAFETY WEAPON CONTRACT Following is the Public Safety Weapon Storage Contract. This contract outlines The University of Montana's policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLIC SAFETY WEAPON CONTRACT Following is the Public Safety Weapon Storage Contract. This contract requires all weapons (rifles, handguns, shotguns of any type or caliber including BB guns and pellet guns.) All weapons may only be checked-in AND checked-out by the owner of the weapon. The owner must always

Steele, Brian

411

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

McMillan to Lead Weapons Program McMillan to Lead Weapons Program Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program He will provide oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program at Los Alamos to accomplish the Laboratory's core mission. July 28, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

412

Improved $?$-weapons for Higgs hunting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we use the results from Higgs searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\tau\\tau$ decay channels at LHC and indirect bounds as BR$(B \\to X_s \\gamma)$ to constrain the parameter space of a generic MSSM Higgs sector. In particular, we include the latest CMS results that look for additional Higgs states with masses up to 1 TeV. We show that the $\\tau \\tau$ channel is the best and most accurate weapon in the hunt for new Higgs states beyond the Standard Model. We obtain that present experimental results rule out additional neutral Higgs bosons in a generic MSSM below 300 GeV for any value of $\\tan \\beta$ and, for instance, values of $\\tan \\beta$ above 30 are only possible for Higgs masses above 600 GeV. ATLAS stored data has the potential to render this bound obsolete in the near future.

G. Barenboim; C. Bosch; M. L. López-Ibáñez; O. Vives

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Regimes At Work: The Nonproliferation Order And Indian Nuclear Policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis claims that by constituting a certain range of possible identities for countries, the nuclear nonproliferation regime facilitated India's forging of non-weaponized nuclear deterrence… (more)

Sasikumar, Karthika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

implements ... NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon components Posted: June 12, 2012 - 1:34pm The National Nuclear Security Administration...

415

Honoring Our Past, Securing Our Future | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear weapons into LEU fuel for U.S. power plants, generating 10 percent of U.S. electricity. Preventing nuclear smuggling and strengthening the nonproliferation regime -...

416

Study on Short Weapon in Traditional Martial Arts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short weapons were the general name of short handheld combating and fighting weapons in ancient China, and were called by ... with a variety of longer combating and fighting weapons. In ancient China, there were ...

Xiao-dao Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Weapon Scheduling Method for Cooperative Air-Defense Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By defining the weapon scheduling plan and weapon combat action, the mathematical formulation of weapon scheduling problem for cooperative air-defense operation ... the basis of discussing the primary constraints...

Liang Yu; Changfeng Xing…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Splenic Laceration and Pulmonary Contusion Injury From Bean Bag Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a New Law Enforcement Weapon: The Police Bean Bag. Annevacuation from a bean bag weapon. Am Surg 2012. 78(1):E33-complication of a nonlethal weapon. J Trauma 2002. 5. Olivas

Patel, Amar; Toohey, Shannon; Osborn, Megan Boysen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Film as a Weapon: The Cultural Question in African Liberation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Film as a Weapon: JJx; Cultural Ouestion in Africanas a social and political weapon with definite points offilms serve as a material weapon in the hands of the class

Ayu, Iyorchia D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper.

Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

If Terrorists Go Nuclear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...officials, two nuclear indus-try...urging the nuclear nations to...a terrorist attack is increasing...in the same risk category as...Prevention ofNuclear Terrorism," by the...to protect nuclear weapons against...security at civil plants. * As civil...The nuclear power industry should...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1986-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

If Terrorists Go Nuclear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...officials, two nuclear indus-try...urging the nuclear nations to...terrorist attack is increasing...the same risk category...ofNuclear Terrorism," by the...to protect nuclear weapons against...aid U.S. security, O'Keefe...at civil plants. * As civil...The nuclear power industry...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1986-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011....

424

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Sanford underground research facility at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the CUBED low-background counter. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability.

Heise, J. [Sanford Underground Research Facility, 630 East Summit Street, Lead, SD 57754 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

destruction. Dedicated to halting terrorists, Brunish studies nuclear explosion phenomenology, helping finding and characterizing underground facilities, where weapons of mass...

428

Wendee Brunish-So that others may live  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

destruction. Dedicated to halting terrorists, Brunish studies nuclear explosion phenomenology, helping finding and characterizing underground facilities, where weapons of mass...

429

Geologic constraints on clandestine nuclear testing in South Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strict limits on the development of highly compact and easily delivered multistage thermonuclear weapons and other advanced nuclear weaponry. High-yield thermonuclear weapons cannot be triggered by primaries of just a few kilotons (1), so a...

Dan M. Davis; Lynn R. Sykes

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nuclear relations in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strategic landscape of South Asia changed dramatically in 1998. With the reciprocal testing of nuclear weapons, India and Pakistan emerged from the world of threshold status to an overt posture which has yet to be fully defined. Each claims the status of a nuclear weapon state, yet the contours of that status are unclear. A number of important strategic issues have been raised by these dramatic events. This paper will attempt to examine the implications of this new posture for each country and for the region. First and foremost, the decisions to test nuclear weapons are a product of each individual state making a sovereign decision about its national security needs. Both have made clear for a number of years that their attitudes toward nuclear weapons-and by default, toward nuclear nonproliferation-will not be directed by outsiders. They have rejected the global norms that oppose the further proliferation of nuclear weapons, embodied in the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), and that embrace the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons, captured in Article VI of that treaty. The decisions reached in New Delhi and lslamabad have been questioned by many, but the tests cannot be undone and it now falls on both countries to make further decisions about what strategies will best serve them, and what obligations they must now assume. Issues such as strategic planning, weaponization, deployment, and command and control, which heretofore were relegated to the back burner, may no longer be deferred.

Joeck, N.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear Deterrence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

432

Sensitive Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Nuclear Treaties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is examined in case studies involving underground nuclear testing and location of clandestine uranium mining studies involving the location of underground nuclear explosions and detection of uranium mining sites

433

Bayesian network analysis of nuclear acquisitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SNM). 5 The definition of SNM currently encompasses plutonium and uranium with the isotopes of uranium-233 (U-233) or uranium-235 (U-235) being enriched to greater than twenty percent. Materials for Nuclear Weapons Uranium is contained in soils... the standpoint of preventing the spread of nuclear weapons, the short list of material usable for this purpose may be confined to those that are used for fission based weapons, uranium and plutonium, which are commonly referred to as Special Nuclear Materials...

Freeman, Corey Ross

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Weapon Systems Acquisition for Defense Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology is changing the shape of warfare through multidimensional influences on the components of war-making machinery. Weapon system acquisitions by a country’s armed ... , owing to the longer life-period of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPONS (DEWs): A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980, v, 113, no. 5, p. 60-63. "AF Phillips Lab Looks at Space as Battleground." BMD Monitor, September on Blinding Laser Weapons." Laser Focus World, December 1995, v. 31, p. 62-64. Armstrong, Richard B. "Directed

436

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget weapons assessment and certification requirements including weapon codes, weapons science, computing testing to determine weapon behavior. As such, ASC simulations are central to our national security. Our

437

New Proposal for the Detection of Concealed Weapons: Electromagnetic Weapon Detection for Open Areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Terrorist groups, hijackers, and people hiding guns and knifes are a constant and increasing threat Concealed weapon detection (CWO) has turned into one of the… (more)

Agurto Goya, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

439

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

440

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

hspthe harvard sussex program on chemical and biological weapons (CBW)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hspthe harvard sussex program on chemical and biological weapons (CBW) Resource Guide of the use of chemical weapons Never to develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile or retain chemical weapons Never to assist, encourage or induce, in any way, anyone to engag To destroy chemical weapons

Sussex, University of

442

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planning and oversight for programs funded by the Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Non- proliferation, for Weapons Ac- tivities and Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Federal employees at the NNSA service379 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Federal Funds General and special

443

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Technology National labs provide the science and technology to maintain and certify the nuclear stockpile in the absence of full-scale weapons testing. The facilities and...

444

Accident Response Group | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

involving nuclear weapons. The ARG staff includes scientists, engineers, technicians, health physics and safety specialist from NNSA's and the Department of Energy's national...

445

Z Machine | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

use for the nuclear weapons mission as well as increased interest by researchers in high energy density physics, condensed matter physics, planetary science, and laboratory...

446

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and refurbishment of the nuclear weapons stockpile. LLNL also possesses unique high-energy-density physics capabilities and scientific computing assets. The lab is managed by...

447

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. (40 CFR 280). The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ``roadmap`` for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Saving an Underground Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant part of the region?s agricultural economy. Though the area has few rivers and lakes, underneath it lies a supply of water that has provided groundwater for developing this economy. This underground water, the Ogallala Aquifer, is a finite.... ?We have already seen isolat- ed areas that have no irrigation water remaining and the economy has been crushed.? The region produces about 4 percent of the nation?s corn, 25 percent of the hard red winter wheat, 23 per- cent of the grain sorghum...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radiological and Depleted Uranium Weapons: Environmental and Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear weapons are due to the release of blast and thermal energy and the immediate and residual ionizing radiation energy. Most of the short-term damages to the environment and the human health are caused by the blast and thermal energies. Ionizing radiation energy received in large doses at high dose rates (victims of nuclear explosions) can produce acute radiation sickness and can even be lethal. Individuals having received lower radiation doses, or even high doses at low dose rates, may suffer from stochastic effects, primarily, the induction of cancer. Studies of exposed populations suggest the probability of developing a lethal cancer following low dose rate exposure is increased by approximately 5% for each Sv the whole-body receives. This risk is added, of course, to the risk of dying from cancer without exposure to radiation, which is more than 20% worldwide. For radiological weapons (radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs), the health effects due to radiation are expected to be minor in most cases. Casualties will mainly occur due to the conventional explosive. Fear, panic, and decontamination costs will be the major effects. Significant radiation damage to individuals would likely be limited to very few persons. Depleted uranium (DU) weapons leave in the battlefield fragmented or intact DU penetrators as well as DU dust. The latter, if inhaled, could represent a radiological risk, especially to individuals spending some time in vehicles hit by DU munitions. All studies conducted so far have shown the outdoors doses to be so low not to represent a significant risk. For those spending 10 h per year in vehicles hit by DU munitions, the risk of developing a lethal cancer is slightly higher (?0.2%).

P.R. Danesi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Yeshiva University Weapons Policy The possession of any weapon (as defined in local, state and federal statutes, and includes, without  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yeshiva University Weapons Policy The possession of any weapon (as defined in local, state in criminal prosecution. In addition, the University reserves the right to confiscate the weapon. This Policy of whether the possessor is licensed to carry that weapon. Exceptions to this Policy may only be made

Yates, Andrew

452

Nuclear rollback decisions: Future lessons?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the global political, military and ideological contest between the Soviet Union and the United States fundamentally changed the international system. At one time or another, nine countries other than the five nuclear weapon states have had nuclear weapons programs or harbored nuclear aspirations and have slowed, halted or even reversed their activities. The author examines this change and the factor behind it, as well as the new thinking on nuclear arsenal.

Reiss, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Depleted argon from underground sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nuclear power: an evil necessity for some countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR, - In a letter under the title "Nuclear power does not lead to nuclear weapons" (5 July, page 10), Mr Greenhalgh, ... group "A Power for Good", argues that there is no direct link between peaceful nuclear power and nuclear weapons. It is tragic that in this day and age such absurd ...

J. ROTBLAT

1979-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

457

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

458

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve sustainable nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as a complementary avenue to achieving a nuclear-weapons-free world. Reinforce the political... Milan Document on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation 29 January 2010 Below...

460

Examination of the proposed conversion of the U.S. Navy nuclear fleet from highly enriched Uranium to low enriched Uranium .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??.The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons creates a loophole that allows a non-nuclear-weapon country to avoid international safeguards governing fissile materials if it… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear weapons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear power, nuclear eapons link argued  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power, nuclear eapons link argued ... The problem of the spread of nuclear weapons to nations not currently possessing them—so-called horizontal proliferation—often is linked to development of commercial nuclear power. ... However, John P. Holdren, professor of energy and resources at the University of California, Berkeley, maintains that commercial nuclear power is linked intimately to horizontal proliferation and that the development of alternative energy technologies is crucial to prevent the spread. ...

1982-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

464

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Geology INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Approved as to sty)e and content by: P. A, Domenico (Chair of Committee) jj K. W. Brown (Member) C. C Mathewson (Member) J. H. S ng Head...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Screening Techniques for use in the Chemical Weapon Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical analysis is essential when dealing with issues associated with the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and its requirement to destroy all chemical weapons. Chemical analysis is required to verify declarati...

Dr A. N. Trethewey

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A meta-analytic review of the weapon focus effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This meta-analytic review examined 19 tests of the weapon focus effect—the hypothesis that the presence of a weapon during commission of a crime will negatively ... the perpetrator. A significant overall differen...

Nancy Mehrkens Steblay

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Exact and Heuristic Methods for the Weapon Target Assignment Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Weapon Target Assignment (WTA) problem is a fundamental problem arising in defense-related applications of operations research. This problem consists of optimally assigning n weapons to m targets so ...

Ahuja, Ravindra

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Choice of Weapons for the Truel Thomas S. Ferguson, UCLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Choice of Weapons for the Truel Thomas S. Ferguson, UCLA 1. Truels. The truel is the extension at each other's. 2. Choosing Weapons for the Shubik Truel 1 #12;In the Shubik truel, contestants A, B

Ferguson, Thomas S.

469

Exact and Heuristic Methods for the Weapon Target Assignment Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Weapon Target Assignment (WTA) problem is a fundamental problem arising in defense-related applications of operations research. This problem consists of optimally assigning n weapons to m targets so that the total ...

Ahuja, Ravindra K.

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pathogens as weapons : the international security implications of biological warfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation assesses the international security implications of biological weapons and the strategic consequences of their proliferation. It examines the impact of biological weapons on four key areas of concern for ...

Koblentz, Gregory D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

Spooner, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Nuclear proliferation after the Cold War  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, former Soviet republics threaten to gain control over nuclear weapons sited on their territories, and reports on North Korea, Pakistan, India, and Iraq reveal current or recent weapon development programs. This document offers a timely assessment of the prospects for nuclear nonproliferation.

Reiss, M.; Litwak, R.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A New Method for Optimal Configuration of Weapon System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper put forward a new method for Optimal Configuration of Weapon System (OCWS). It combines PROMETHEE II...

Dechao Zhou; Shiyan Sun; Qiang Wang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

476

New nuclear nations: Consequences for U.S. policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors assert that the United States (U.S.) national security community has not thought nearly enough about the implications of the potential emergence of new nuclear-weapon states before the turn of the century. The book covers the present situation, U.S. diplomatic efforts to cope with new nuclear-weapon states, and U.S. military means for coping with new nuclear-weapon states, plus conclusions and recommendations.

Blackwill, R.D.; Carnesale, A. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies TTh 11:00-12:15 204 DeBartolo Spring a research outline (narrative plus bibliography, minimum five pages) on a specific weapons technology about 20228 Spring 2011 Page 2 Ethics of Emerging Weapons Technologies Schedule: Date: Jan. 18 Jan. 20 Jan. 25

Howard, Don

478

INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of disease with introduced parasites), there is the potential that the disease can act as a `biological weapon' leading weapons ­ their diseases ­ with them, and concurrently, the emergence of disease within the native

White, Andrew

479

Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Chris Kiekintveld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Detectors Chris Kiekintveld Department of Computer Science, USA Email: lolerma@episd.edu Abstract--Biological weapons are difficult and expensive to detect. Within a limited budget, we can afford a limited number of bio-weapon detector stations. It is therefore

Ward, Karen

480

J. David Janiec Director for the Weapons and Energetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. David Janiec Director for the Weapons and Energetics Department Naval Air Systems Command Mr. J. David Janiec is the Director for the Weapons and Energetics Department of the Naval Air Systems Command teams for weapons systems, as well as leadership responsibility for over 100 contractors and over 200

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481

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION At Thessaloniki, the European Council adopted a Declaration on non-proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Member States made. The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery such as ballistic missiles

Sussex, University of

482

2012 Boise State University 1 Possession of Firearms/Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2012 Boise State University 1 Possession of Firearms/Weapons on University Owned or Controlled for the regulation of the possession of firearms and other weapons on university owned and controlled premises · Scope ­ applies to all firearms and other weapons on university owned or controlled premises

Barrash, Warren

483

Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons Erin L. McCullough1 11, 2014 (received for review May 22, 2014) The shapes of sexually selected weapons differ widely weapon shapes reflect structural adaptations to different fighting styles, yet explicit tests

Emlen, Douglas J.

484

Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495 Launched from the Advanced Surface Missile that led to the initiation of Aegis. Topics Include: · AegisOverviewandHistory · AegisBMD · AegisWeaponSEprocessensuresthatsystemsaredevelopedtomeet affordable, operationally effective, and timely mission objectives. FocusonengineeringtheWeapon

Fork, Richard

485

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven

487

Nuclear power's threat to health, safety, and freedom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power's threat to health, safety, and freedom ... In particular, they may differ on whether the nuclear power plants that are the result of the 1953 Atoms for Peace movement help or hinder the control of nuclear weapons. ...

1980-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

488

Pantex receives eight NNSA DP awards | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program. The awards are given for significant achievements in quality, productivity, cost savings, safety or creativity in support of the nuclear weapons program. Read about the...

489

NNSA honors SRS employees for excellent support | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

individual and two teams for their "significant achievement in quality, productivity, cost savings, safety or creativity in support of NNSA's nuclear weapons program." Honorees...

490

NNSA honors Y-12 employees | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

are given annually to recognize significant achievements in quality, productivity, cost savings, safety or creativity in support of NNSA's nuclear weapons program. Sep 27,...

491

Welcome to the NNSA Production Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

management of the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas, and the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tenn. Pantex handles nuclear weapons surveillance and life extension programs;...

492

Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

employees receive ... Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear weapons program Posted: October 6, 2014 - 9:09am Defense Programs 2013 Award of Excellence...

493

Nuclear proliferation and testing: A tale of two treaties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite progress in reducing stockpiles after the end of the Cold War, the disturbing actions of some nations could spread nuclear weapon capabilities and enlarge existing arsenals.

Corden, Pierce S.; Hafemeister, David

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Physicist Seymour Sack dies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1964. Sack was instrumental in developing the first stages of all of the two-stage thermonuclear devices within the nuclear stockpile. His weapon design programs introduced...

495

Underground and Ventilation System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HQ Total Nuclear Safety Program 8 7 3 2 12 Emergency Management 3 7 2 1 10 NWP Conduct of Operations 1 1 1 0 2 Maintenance Program 2 2 2 2 6 Radiation Protection Program 2 4 1 0 5...

496

Computer system reliability and nuclear war  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the devastating consequences of nuclear war, it is appropriate to look at current and planned uses of computers in nuclear weapons command and control systems, and to examine whether these systems can fulfill their intended roles.

Alan Borning

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weapon Quality Assurance Weapon Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WeaponQualityAssurance.docx Description Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1025-2008

498

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs)”. Submitted to theCalifornia’s Underground Storage Tank Program”. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks” by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Weapons Are Prohibited On Campus University of California, Irvine Police Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Are Prohibited On Campus University of California, Irvine Police Department What is a weapon? A weapon is basically anything somebody could use to hurt or harm somebody else. Weapons could that could be used to hurt somebody else What kind of weapon can't I bring to school? Most weapons

Rose, Michael R.

500

Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z