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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

P-wave Spectra from Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......three underground explosions at the Nevada Test Site and three earthquakes recorded...nuclear explosions detonated in Nevada (Jorum and Handley) and for a...spectra from two explosions at the Nevada Test Site (Jorum and Handley) and a presumed......

Peter Molnar

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effects of network-average magnitude bias on yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions R. A. Clark Department...ISC, of presumed underground nuclear explosions in Kazakhstan...on estimates for underground nuclear explosions 553 explosions...utilizing a more extensive dataset, including more sources and......

R. A. Clark

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Source Characteristics of Two Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detonated at Pahute Mesa of the Nevada Test Site have been used to estimate the...contributing factor. Moment tensor|Nevada Test Site|nuclear explosion| References...structure of Silent Canyon Caldera, Nevada Test Site, Bull, seism Soc. Am., 77......

Lane R. Johnson

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tectonic Strain Release by Underground Nuclear Explosions and its Effect on Seismic Discrimination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......patterns to geologic structure in Yucca Flats Nevada Test Site, in Nevada Test Site, ed. Eckel E. B., Geol. Soc. Am. Mem...of the Benham underground nuclear explosion, Nevada Test Site, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 59, 2209-2220......

M. Nafi Toksöz; Harold H. Kehrer

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Seismic verification of underground explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first nuclear test agreement, the test moratorium, was made in 1958 and lasted until the Soviet Union unilaterally resumed testing in the atmosphere in 1961. It was followed by the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, which prohibited nuclear tests in the atmosphere, in outer space, and underwater. In 1974 the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) was signed, limiting underground tests after March 1976 to a maximum yield of 250 kt. The TTBT was followed by a treaty limiting peaceful nuclear explosions and both the United States and the Soviet Union claim to be abiding by the 150-kt yield limit. A comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT), prohibiting all testing of nuclear weapons, has also been discussed. However, a verifiable CTBT is a contradiction in terms. No monitoring technology can offer absolute assurance that very-low-yield illicit explosions have not occurred. The verification process, evasion opportunities, and cavity decoupling are discussed in this paper.

Glenn, L.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis of Teleseismic Signals from Underground Nuclear Explosions Originating in Four Geological Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values...to an underground explosion at Nevada test site, Can. J. earth Sci., 6...from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values......

H. S. Hasegawa

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Seismic yield determination of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at the Shagan River test site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1986a, Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic...Nuttli's method to estimate yield of Nevada test site explosions recorded on Lawrence...magnitude and explosion yield for Nevada Test Site explosions. He also applied......

Frode Ringdal; Peter D. Marshall; Ralph W. Alewine

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Calculations on seismic coupling of underground explosions in salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the results of a theoretical study of seismic coupling and decoupling of underground explosions in a salt medium. A series of chemical and nuclear explosions was carried out years ago in salt domes for the Cowboy and the Dribble programs to provide experimental data on seismic coupling for both tamped explosions and explosions in cavities. The Cowboy program consisted of a series of chemical explosions, and the Dribble program consisted of the tamped nuclear Salmon event, the Sterling nuclear event in the Salmon cavity, and an associated site calibration effort. This report presents the results of extensive computer calculations, which are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The calculations were extended to give general results on seismic coupling in salt. The measure of seismic coupling for most of this work was the residual reduced displacement potential (residual RDP). The decoupling associated with a shot in a cavity was expressed as the ratio of the resulting residual RDP to that of an equal-sized tamped shot.

Heusinkveld, M.E.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides supplemental details on selected topics to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Cancels DOE M 452.2-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-1A.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Safety of Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes responsibilities and requirements to ensure the safety of routine and planned nuclear explosive operations and associated activities and facilities. Cancels DOE O 452.2A and DOE G 452.2A-1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.2C.

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Empirical measurements of tectonic moment release in nuclear explosions from teleseismic surface waves and body waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......23) to estimate M, for explosions at the Nevada Test Site and at Balapan, interpreting Nevada explosions...empirical approach to events at the USA nuclear test site in Nevada. Underground nuclear tests are in many ways ideally suited for analysis......

Göran Ekström; Paul G. Richards

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Teleseismic observations of aftershocks immediately following an underground explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......at least one explosion (the Nevada Test Site explosion, Greeley) commenced...among mall magnitude events on Nevada test site, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc...at least one explosion (the Nevada Test Site explosion, Greeley) commenced......

A. Douglas

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - amchitka underground nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underground nuclear Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amchitka underground nuclear Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Underground Nuclear...

26

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

A Nuclear Explosive Safety Study (NESS) is performed on all DOE Nuclear Explosive Operations (NEOs) in accordance with DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program; DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety; and DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes.

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

28

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3015-2001 3015-2001 February 2001 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-97 January 1997 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3015-2001 iii CONTENTS FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

SciTech Connect: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Program Document: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research...

30

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS Thomas Rauscher 1 , Friedrich. of Astron. and Astroph., Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract The majority of nuclear­Feshbach). The global parametrizations of the nuclear properties needed for predictions far off stability probe our

Rauscher, Thomas

33

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

35

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by cdornburg Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons Programs,...

37

Nuclear Explosive and Weapons Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been linked to this document. Show All Cancels: DOE O 5610.10, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program on Apr 29, 1996 Canceled by: DOE O 452.1A, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon...

38

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority,...

39

An analysis of P times reported in the Reviewed Event Bulletin for Chinese underground explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disturbance to determine if a nuclear test really took place. The Treaty states...for P times from explosions at the Nevada Test Site observed out to distances of 20...An analysis of P travel times for Nevada Test Site explosions recorded at regional......

A. Douglas; A. M. O'Mongain; D. Porter; J. B. Young

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearExplosiveSafetyStudy.docx Description Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

43

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

44

Nuclear Fusion Driven by Coulomb Explosion of Methane Clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Fusion Driven by Coulomb Explosion of Methane Clusters† ... However, the distributions obtained for Coulomb explosion lack the high-energy tail manifested for the thermal distribution (Figure 4), which is of considerable importance for thermonuclear reactions. ...

Isidore Last; Joshua Jortner

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Experiences and prospects of nuclear astrophysics in underground laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impressive progress has been made in the course the last decades in understanding astrophysical objects. Increasing precision of nuclear physics data has contributed significantly to this success, but now a better understanding of several important findings is frequently limited by uncertainties related to the available nuclear physics data. Consequently it is desirable to improve significantly the quality of these data. An important step towards higher precision is an excellent signal to background ratio of the data. Placing an accelerator facility inside an underground laboratory reducing the cosmic ray induced background by six orders of magnitude is a powerful method to reach this goal, even though careful reduction of environmental and beam induced background must still be considered. Experience in the field of underground nuclear astrophysics has been gained since 20 years due to the pioneering work of the LUNA Collaboration (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) operating inside the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. Based on the success of this work presently also several other projects for underground laboratories dedicated to nuclear astrophysics are being pursued worldwide. This contribution will give a survey of the past experience in underground nuclear astrophysics as well as an outlook on future developments.

Junker, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Via Acitelli, 22, 67100 L'Aquila, Località Assergi (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

Hampel, V.E.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted September 23, 1992 USA Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted

49

Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted September 23, 1992 USA Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted

50

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS)...

51

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B....

52

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled...

53

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A....

54

Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions | Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions July 06, 1962

55

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude nuclear explosion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear explosion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude nuclear explosion Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Imaging of the atmosphere...

57

LANL highlights explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights explosives work LANL highlights explosives work Posted By Office of Public Affairs For more than 70 years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a frontrunner in explosives research, development and applications. To

58

DIANA - A deep underground accelerator for nuclear astrophysics experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DIANA (Dakota Ion Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a proposed facility designed to be operated deep underground. The DIANA collaboration includes nuclear astrophysics groups from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, Colorado School of Mines, and the University of North Carolina, and is led by the University of Notre Dame. The scientific goals of the facility are measurements of low energy nuclear cross-sections associated with sun and pre-supernova stars in a laboratory setup at energies that are close to those in stars. Because of the low stellar temperatures associated with these environments, and the high Coulomb barrier, the reaction cross-sections are extremely low. Therefore these measurements are hampered by small signal to background ratios. By going underground the background due to cosmic rays can be reduced by several orders of magnitude. We report on the design status of the DIANA facility with focus on the 3 MV electrostatic accelerator.

Winklehner, Daniel; Leitner, Daniela [Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States); Lemut, Alberto; Hodgkinson, Adrian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

59

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

at the micron scale in its microdetonics laboratory, and utilizing multiple firing tanks for larger scale explosives experiments. No other facility in the world supports such...

60

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project » Signature Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion The world's first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, when a plutonium implosion device was tested at a site located 210 miles south of Los Alamos on the barren plains of the Alamogordo Bombing Range, known as the Jornada del Muerto. Inspired by the poetry of John Donne, J. Robert Oppenheimer code-named the test Trinity. Hoisted atop a 150-foot tower, the plutonium device, or Gadget, detonated at precisely 5:30 a.m. over the New Mexico desert, releasing 18.6 kilotons of power, instantly vaporizing the tower and turning the surrounding asphalt and sand into green glass.

62

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

63

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency (1) Serves as a member or chair of the NESSG. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph A 5 3 (2) Provides guidance on and interpretation of nuclear explosive safety (NES) requirements and policy. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph B 5 4 (3) Drafts policy directives for the DOE/NNSA, Nuclear Explosive Safety Operations Branch (NESB) and reviews DOE/NNSA policies on NES. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 5 3 (4) Provides instruction and guidance regarding NES to individuals assigned NES responsibilities. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph E 5 3-4 (5) Monitors ongoing NEOs to ensure compliance with NES standards and

64

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. o452.1E-Draft-8-5-14.pdf --...

65

NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

66

Migration in alluvium of chlorine-36 and tritium from an underground nuclear test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a field experiment studying the migration in alluvium of radioactive elements away from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site in the United States. Nuclides detected in the pumped water are tritium, chlorine-36, iodine-129, and krypton-85 - all at levels below the maximum permissible concentration for drinking water in controlled areas. The chlorine-36 elution curve precedes that of tritium, and is due to an anion exclusion process. A conventional two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation does not fully describe the elution curves for tritium and chlorine-36; the tailing of the curves is longer than predicted. Successful modeling of this experiment will be important for validating codes and models to be used in the high-level nuclear waste program.

Ogard, A.E.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Wolfsberg, K.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Bentley, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Comparison of radiation safety and nuclear explosive safety disciplines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1945, U.S. Navy Captain William Parsons served as the weaponeer aboard the Enola Gay for the mission to Hiroshima (Shelton 1988). In view of the fact that four B-29s had crashed and burned on takeoff from Tinian the night before, Captain Parsons made the decision to arm the gun-type weapon after takeoff for safety reasons (15 kilotons of TNT equivalent). Although he had no control over the success of the takeoff, he could prevent the possibility of a nuclear detonation on Tinian by controlling what we now call the nuclear explosive. As head of the Ordnance Division at Los Alamos and a former gunnery officer, Captain Parsons clearly understood the role of safety in his work. The advent of the pre-assembled implosion weapon where the high explosive and nuclear materials are always in an intimate configuration meant that nuclear explosive safety became a reality at a certain point in development and production not just at the time of delivery by the military. This is the only industry where nuclear materials are intentionally put in contact with high explosives. The agency of the U.S. Government responsible for development and production of U.S. nuclear weapons is the Department of Energy (DOE) (and its predecessor agencies). This paper will be limited to nuclear explosive safety as it is currently practiced within the DOE nuclear weapons

Winstanley, J. L.

1998-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Title The Containment of Underground Nuclear Explosions OTA-1SC...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

like krypton and xenon, are nonreactive and are sampled by compressing air in pressure tanks. Tritium, which is the radioactive form of hydrogen, is reactive but occurs in the...

69

New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Applications for homeland security, emergency planning Instruments in Argonne's Terahertz Test Facility, such as the one Sami Gopalsami is using, can detect trace chemicals at the part-per-billion level.

70

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

71

Discrimination Between Earthquakes and Underground Explosions Employing an Improved Ms Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......propagation, available Nevada Test Site explosion yields are...in the California-Nevada region, J. geophys...propagation, availableNevada Test Site explosion yields are...Halliday (1970) and Nevada Test Site (NTS) explo- sion......

P. D. Marshall; P. W. Basham

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY "To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and safety by providing dual-agency judgment and responsibility for the safety, security, and use control (surety) of nuclear weapons. To establish nuclear explosive surety standards and nuclear weapon design surety requirements. To address surety vulnerabilities during all phases of the nuclear weapon life cycle and to upgrade surety during weapon stockpile refurbishments and/or new weapon

73

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JM O 452.1D, Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Nuclear Explosive Safety, Safety and Security...

74

Sensitive Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Nuclear Treaties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is examined in case studies involving underground nuclear testing and location of clandestine uranium mining studies involving the location of underground nuclear explosions and detection of uranium mining sites

75

Surrogate Nuclear Explosion Debris for Measurement Validation and Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT There is intense interest in characterizing nuclear explosion debris following the terrorist use of a nuclear weapon or improvised nuclear device. The quality of the laboratory analyses of such samples is critical if action is to be taken based on those analyses. Thus, validating methods against well characterized nuclear debris is of interest, however, actual nuclear explosion debris is difficult to obtain. PNNL has embarked on a program to develop laboratory methods to synthesize materials which mimic nuclear explosion debris with respect to selected characteristics. Which characteristics are mimicked depends on the application. For tests of laboratory radioanalytical capabilities, materials with relatively few characteristics in common with actual debris are useful. For other applications, material properties may need to match real debris to a greater extent, e.g., for fate and transport studies the chemical behavior should match real debris in detail. We will describe methods by which these materials can be produced and highlight some of the issues associated with such operations.

Eiden, Gregory C.; Liezers, Martin; Harvey, Scott D.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Szechenyi, Scott C.; Gerlach, David C.; Eckberg, Alison D.; Garcia, Ben J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Farmer, Orville T.; Bachelor, Paula P.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the ... NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test

77

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the ... NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test

78

Myth of nuclear explosions at waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 25 years ago, an event is said to have occurred in the plains immediately west of the southern Ural mountains of the Soviet Union that is being disputed to this very day. One person says it was an explosion of nuclear wastes buried in a waste disposal site; other people say it was an above-ground test of an atomic weapon; still others suspect that an alleged contaminated area (of unknown size or even existence) is the result of a series of careless procedures. Since the event, a number of articles about the disposal-site explosion hypothesis written by a Soviet exile living in the United Kingdom have been published. Although the Soviet scientist's training and background are in the biological sciences and his knowledge of nuclear physics or chemistry is limited, people who oppose the use of nuclear energy seem to want to believe what he says without question. The work of this Soviet biologist has received wide exposure both in the United Kingdom and the United States. This report presents arguments against the disposal-site explosion hypothesis. Included are discussions of the amounts of plutonium that would be in a disposal site, the amounts of plutonium that would be needed to reach criticality in a soil-water-plutonium mixture, and experiments and theoretical calculations on the behavior of such mixtures. Our quantitative analyses show that the postulated nuclear explosion is so improbable that it is essentially impossible and can be found only in the never-never land of an active imagination. 24 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

Stratton, W.R.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear Explosives Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

85-2007 85-2007 September 2007 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................1

80

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiation of Rayleigh Wave Energy from Nuclear Explosions and Collapses in Southern Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rayleighwavesgenerated by some southern Nevada nuclear explosions and cavity collapses...waves propagating from southern Nevada across the western United States...collapses Rayleigh waves from some Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions recorded by a......

Robert P. Massé

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Type I X-ray Bursts: How Nuclear Physics Shapes the Explosion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

star, as well as probing the underlying nuclear physics processes during the thermonuclear explosion on the surface of the neutron star. In most cases, the rapid...

84

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1185-2007 CHANGE NOTICE No.1 April 2010 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1185-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds DOE-STD-1185-2007 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

85

The Soviet program for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of utilizing the weapons of war to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind is as old as civilization itself. Perhaps the most famous reference to this basic desire is recorded in the Book of Micah where the great prophet Isiah called upon his people `to turn your spears into pitchforks and your swords into plowshares.` As the scientists at Los Alamos worked on developing the world`s first atomic bomb, thoughts of how this tremendous new source of energy could be used for peaceful purposes generally focused on using the thermal energy generated by the slow fission of uranium in a reactor, such as those being used to produce Plutonium to drive electric power stations. However, being scientists in a new, exciting field, it was impossible to avoid letting their minds wander from the task at hand to other scientific or non-military uses for the bombs themselves. During the Manhattan Project, Otto Frisch, one of the pioneers in the development of nuclear fission process in the 1930s, first suggested using an atomic explosion as a source for a large quantities of neutrons which could used in scientific experiments designed to expand their understanding of nuclear physics. After the war was over, many grandiose ideas appeared in the popular press on how this new source of energy should be to serve mankind. Not to be left out of the growing enthusiasm for peaceful uses of atomic energy, the Soviet Union added their visions to the public record. This document details the Soviet program for using nuclear explosions in peacetime pursuits.

Nordyke, M.D.

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters J that these clusters can explode with sufficient kinetic energy to drive nuclear fusion. Irradiating deuterium clusters

Ditmire, Todd

87

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test Site, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test and 1996 following events (seven nuclear explosions, three earthquakes) that occurred on the Lop Nor test Abstract Ð We test the hypothesis that the existence of an observable non-zero isotropic component

Ritzwolle, Mike

88

Spectral discrimination between Soviet explosions and earthquakes using short-period array data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and from peaceful nuclear explosions (PNE...high-frequency energy than the shallow...5Hz, the Soviet nuclear explosions appear...high- frequency energy than earthquakes...US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore...decoupling and underground nuclear test monitoring using......

Steven R. Taylor; Peter D. Marshall

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

90

Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides guidance on the application of requirements for nonreactor nuclear facilities and explosives facilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.1, Nuclear and Explosives Safety Design Criteria. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nuclear-waste facility on high alert over risk of new explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is mined out of a ... of a salt bed 655 metres underground, and stores low- and medium-level military nuclear ...

Declan Butler

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

The comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and Seismological Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...political context of global monitoring of underground nuclear...the Nevada Test Site. Monitoring active nuclear test...that none of them are surreptitious nuclear explosions in...chal- lenges for CTBT monitoring will be to sustain the...

Thorne Lay

93

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise - Application to Nuclear Explosive Safety (NES)(U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities and infrastructure that support nuclear weapons are facing significant challenges. Despite an admirable record and firm commitment to make safety a primary criterion in weapons design, production, handling, and deployment - there is growing apprehension about terrorist acquiring weapons or nuclear material. At the NES Workshop in May 2012, Scott Sagan, who is a proponent of the normal accident cycle, presented. Whether a proponent of the normal accident cycle or High Reliability Organizations - we have to be diligent about our safety record. Constant vigilance is necessary to maintain our admirable safety record and commitment to Nuclear Explosive Safety.

Morris, Tommy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research performed under Laboratory Research and Development Project 05-ERD-019, entitled ''A New Capability for Regional High-Frequency Seismic Wave Simulation in Realistic Three-Dimensional Earth Models to Improve Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. A more appropriate title for this project is ''A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. This project supported research for a radically new approach to nuclear explosion monitoring as well as allowed the development new capabilities in computational seismology that can contribute to NNSA/NA-22 Programs.

Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

Underground Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underground Exploration and Testing A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board October 1993 Yucca Mountain at #12;Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Dr. John E and Testing #12;Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Introduction

98

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Engineering, Building 208, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass A6enue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion

Yuen, Walter W.

99

Calculated concentrations of any radionuclide deposited on the ground by release from underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rockets, and tests of nuclear ramjet engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from three types of event that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex, namely, underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rocket engines and tests of nuclear ramjet engines.

Hicks, H.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Metadata of the chapter that will be visualized online Chapter Title Seismic Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 10 nuclear test explosions were conducted. About 500 of 11 these were carried out in the atmosphere with some regional concentra- 14 tions, and aroused widespread public opposition to 15 nuclear testing. A few nuclear tests were carried out under- 16 water and in space. The great majority, about 1,500, were

Foulger, G. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GIS surface effects archive of underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new comprehensive, digital archive of more than 40 years of geologic surface effects maps produced at individual detonation sites throughout the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa nuclear testing areas of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Geographic Information System (GIS) surface effects map archive on CD-ROM (this report) comprehensively documents the surface effects of underground nuclear detonations conducted at two of the most extensively used testing areas of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1951 and 1992, numerous investigators of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency meticulously mapped the surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing. Their work documented the effects of more than seventy percent of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and all of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Pahute Mesa.

Grasso, D.N.

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Proceedings of the Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test ban monitoring. We focused on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems. The second goal of the symposium was to establish a dialogue between seismologists and explosion-source code calculators. The meeting was divided into five main sessions: explosion source phenomenology, material response modeling, numerical simulations, the seismic source, and phenomenology from near source to far field. We feel the symposium reached many of its goals. Individual papers submitted at the conference are indexed separately on the data base.

Taylor, S.R.; Kamm, J.R. [eds.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON F I N A L OPERATIONAL WAB$OACTIVI TY REPORT PRODUCT1 ON TESTS FEBRUARY 1972 PEACEFUL APPLICATIONS DIVISION NEVADA OPER4TIONS OFFICE This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS Subject Page N o . Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgements i i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . Introduction 1 I1 . F i r s t Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I11 . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 IV . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 V . Data Tables A . First Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 B . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 C . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Figures I . Road Map of Northwest Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . I1 . Total 3~ and 8

105

Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Strategies for the disposition of high explosives resulting from dismantlement of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many thousands of pounds of high quality main-charge explosives will result as surplus from the dismantlement of returns from the US nuclear weapons stockpile. The method most often employed for dealing with this surplus explosive is destruction by open burning. However, open burning as a means of treating excess explosives is losing favor because of environmental concerns associated with such an uncontrolled thermal destruction process. Thus, alternative processes for treatment of excess explosives from weapon dismantlement is discussed. These alternatives include: reformulation, crystalline component recovery, chemical conversion of the crystalline component to higher value products which may have civilian or military applications and, when necessary, treatment as waste in an environmentally benign fashion.

Pruneda, C.; Humphrey, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Explosives Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory. An experimental explosive is shown igniting during small-scale impact testing. Nuclear weapons energetic materials science, technology and engineering expertise...

108

Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Krauss, R.A. [Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions. 1982 Asilomar Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the proceedings of a Federal Emergency Management Agency-sponsored Conference on fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions (with passing attention to earthquakes and other nonnuclear mishaps). This conference, the fifth of an annual series (formally called Blast/Fire Interaction Conferences), was held during the week of April 25, 1982, again at Asilomar, California.

Martin, S.B.; Alger, R.S. (eds.)

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- STUDY PROGRAM DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY DOE O 452.1D and DOE O 452.2D Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the objectives of implementing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 452.1D? 2. Define the following terms as they apply to this Order: Abnormal environment High explosive detonation 3. What are the objectives of implementing DOE O 452.2D? 4. What are the general requirements of DOE O 452.2D?

111

Experimental results of USSR nuclear explosion decoupling measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was presented at the 14th annual PL/DARPA Seismic Research Symposium on September 16, 1992. In it, we describe a decoupling experiment undertaken by the former Soviet Union at Azghir, north of the Caspian Sea. The properties of the cavity are given, including a rough description of the geology (salt-dome overlain by 275 m radius sphere, 987 m deep), velocities, densities, etc. These shots had larger yields than the Salmon-Sterling decoupling experiments undertaken by the U.S. in the mid-sixties. Like the U.S. experiment, this Soviet experiment did not achieve full decoupling. The energy decoupling factor (computed from statistical relationships between the yield and amplitude-distance curves rather than spectra) increased to a maximum of 30 as distance increase. Based on our observations and theoretical limits to decoupling, we conclude that a fully decoupled 1 kt explosion could be observed at a distance of 2,500 km.

Adushkin, V.V.; Kitov, I.O.; Sultanov, D.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear Explosives Safety Evaluation Process (DOE-STD-3015-2004)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3015-2004 November 2004 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-2001 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY EVALUATION PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. DOE-STD-3015-2004 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and is available for use with DOE O 452.1, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, and DOE O 452.2, SAFETY OF

113

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

117

Seismic yield determination of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at the Shagan River test site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Akhmetov K. S., Orlov I. V., 1973, Geology of Coal and Oil Shale Deposits of the USSR, Jubilee depositNedraMoscow, 217-230...V., 1973. Jubilee deposit, in Geology of Coal and Oil Shale Deposifs of the USSR, pp. 217-230, Nedra, Moscow......

Frode Ringdal; Peter D. Marshall; Ralph W. Alewine

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Proceedings of the seventh symposium on containment of underground nuclear explosions. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 of two unclassified volumes of a meeting of workers at all levels in the science and technology of containment. Papers on containment and related geological, geophysical, engineering, chemical, and computational topics were included. Particular topics in this volume include: Low-yield test beds, modeling and residual stress, material properties, collapse phenomena and shock diagnostics, stemming practices and performance, geophysics, and geosciences and weapons destruction. Individual papers are indexed separately on the data base.

Olsen, C.W. [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Uncertainty in Prediction of Radionuclide Gas Migration from Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...maximum efficiency when the period of oscillation and the timescale for diffusion between...R. Waichler. 2004. Evaluation of xenon gas detection as a means for identifying...United States unsaturated zone Xe-133 xenon GeoRef, Copyright 2014, American Geosciences...

Amy B. Jordan; Philip H. Stauffer; George A. Zyvoloski; Mark A. Person; Jonathan K. MacCarthy; Dale N. Anderson

120

Proceedings of the seventh symposium on containment of underground nuclear explosions. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of two unclassified volumes of a meeting of workers at all levels in the science and technology of containment. Papers on containment and related geological, geophysical, engineering, chemical, and computational topics were included. Particular topics included in this volume are: General containment,tunnel and LOS topics, cavity conditions, and LYNER and chemical kiloton. Individual papers are indexed separately on the data base.

Olsen, C.W. [ed.] [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

A human reliability analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology used in a human reliability analysis (HRA) conducted during a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process performed at the Pantex plant. The probability of human errors during the disassembly process is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons processing. The methods include the systematic identification of potential human-initiated or enabled accident sequences using an accident-sequence fault tree, the extensive use of walkthroughs and videotaping of the disassembly process, and hands-on testing of postulated human errors. THERP modeling of rule-based behavior and operational data analysis of errors in skill-based behavior are described. A simple method for evaluating the approximate likelihood of nonmalevolent violations of procedures was developed and used to examine the process. The HRA occurred concurrently with process design, so considerable interaction between the analysts and designers occurred and resulted in design changes that are discussed in the paper.

Bott, T.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R. (INEEL); Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K. (SNL); Rath, J.S. (New Mexico Engineering Research Institute)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A hazards analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology used in a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process. Potential accident sequences were identified using an accident-sequence fault tree based on operational history, weapon safety studies, a hazard analysis team composed of weapons experts, and walkthroughs of the process. The experts provided an initial screening of the accident sequences to reduce the number of accident sequences that would be quantified. The accident sequences that survived the screening process were developed further using event trees. Spreadsheets were constructed for each event tree, the accident sequences associated with that event tree were entered as rows on the spreadsheet, and that spreadsheet was linked to spreadsheets with initiating-event frequencies, enabling event probabilities, and weapon response probabilities. The probability and frequency distribution estimates used in these spreadsheets were gathered from weapon process operational data, surrogate industrial data, expert judgment, and probability models. Frequency distributions were calculated for the sequences whose point-value frequency represented 99% of the total point-value frequency using a Monte Carlo simulation. Partial differential importances of events and distributions of accident frequency by weapon configuration, location, process, and other parameters were calculated.

Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Salmon Site, characterization of contamination associated with an underground nuclear detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salmon Site, located in south central Mississippi, was used for two nuclear explosive tests and two methane/oxygen explosive tests between 1964 and 1970. The tests were conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome, 823 meters (m) below the ground surface. In 1972, the land surface was remediated, the site was decommissioned, and the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program was initiated to collect surface water and groundwater samples from the site and surrounding areas annually. In 1989, local citizens and political representatives raised concerns about the integrity of the shot cavity and whether there were hazardous substances in the near surface disposal and drilling mud pits. Examination of the problem shows that the most likely migration pathway is for contaminated groundwater to be pushed up an abandoned emplacement hole or re-entry boring as the salt stock closes in and pressurizes the shot cavity. Based on this scenario, the best way to determine whether leakage is occurring is to sample the aquifers over the dome. To do this, three wells are planned to be installed in each aquifer to collect representative soil and groundwater samples and to conduct aquifer testing to determine aquifer hydraulic properties. After evaluating the nature and extent of contamination, contaminant fate and transport modeling will be conducted. Surface contamination has resulted from site activities subsequent to the weapons testing and are not a result of a release during the actual testing. The old drilling mud pits and disposal areas have been investigated using surface geophysical methods, followed by soil and biota sampling and cone penetrometer testing. Based on the results of this testing, a number of shallow monitoring wells will be installed around the contaminated locations.

Deshler, R.M.; Danz, R.; Mellington, S.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

129

TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Use of P coda for determination of yield of nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......explosions in granite at the Nevada Test Site and Algeria: joint determination...receiver effects for Lg waves from Nevada Test Site explosions, Bull. seism. Soc...transverse Lg from explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides fairly satisfactory......

I. N. Gupta; R. R. Blandford; R. A. Wagner; J. A. Burnetti; T. W. McElfresh

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE-STD-1185-2004; Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STD-1185-2004 STD-1185-2004 August 2004 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1185-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1185-2004

132

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Single Guided Mode Theory of Long Range Infrasonic Propagation from Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The trend of research on the problem of giving an adequate theoretical interpretation to the pressure waveforms recorded following nuclear explosions has been towards progressively more realistic models of the atmosphere resulting in lengthy numerical computations to determine and superimpose the atmosphere's natural modes of guided propagation. Such computations and existing data indicate that the earliest portion of such waveforms may be attributed to a pseudomode analogous to that predicted by Lamb for the isothermal atmosphere. Recently Bretherton and Garrett have succeeded in isolating and deriving the dispersion relation for this mode using perturbation techniques. In the present paper this analysis is extended with the derivation of an approximate set of partial differential equations not involving height which include the effects of winds horizontal gradients and nonlinearities and which may be considered as governing the two?dimensional propagation over the earth's surface of the Lamb mode. The solution for nuclear explosion excitation is given for the case of a stratified atmosphere with farfield nonlinear effects neglected and is compared with numerical computations based on the multimode theory.

Allan D. Pierce

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Evaluation of the electromagnetic effects due to direct lighting to nuclear explosive areas at Pantex. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the effort to quantify the electromagnetic environments in the nuclear explosive areas at Pantex due to direct lightning. The fundamental measure of the threat to nuclear safety is assumed to be the maximum voltage between any two points in an assembly area, which is then available for producing arcing or for driving current into critical subsystems of a nuclear weapon. This maximum voltage has been computed with simple analytical models and with three-dimensional finite-difference computer codes.

Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Soviet program for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive review is given of the US and Russian efforts on peaceful uses of nuclear explosions (PNE). The Soviet PNE program was many times larger than the US Plowshare program in terms of both the number of applications explored with field experiments and the extent to which they were introduced into industrial use. Several PNE applications, such as deep seismic sounding and oil stimulation, have been explored in depth and appear to have had a positive cost benefit at minimal public risk. Closure of runaway gas wells is another possible application where all other techniques fail. However, the fundamental problem with PNEs is the fact that, if they are to be economically significant, there must be widespread use of the technology, involving large numbers of sites, each of which presents a potential source of radioactivity to the environment and nearby communities. Russia now has more than 100 sites where significant high-level radioactivity has been buried. Experience over the last 20 years in US and in today`s Russia shows that it is virtually impossible to gain public acceptance of such applications of nuclear energy. In addition, PNEs also pose a difficult problem in the arms control area. Under a comprehensive test ban, any country conducting PNEs would, in appearance if not in fact, receive information useful for designing new nuclear weapons or maintaining an existing nuclear stockpile, information denied to the other parties to the treaty. 6 tabs, 10 figs.

Nordyke, M.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Seismic Response of a Deep Underground Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground nuclear waste repository certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ,(EPA) to store transuranic defense-related waste contaminated by small amounts of radioactive materials. Located at a depth of about 655 meters below the surface, the facility is sited in southeastern New Mexico, about 40 Department of Energy underground facilities, waste disposal. kilometers east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The U.S. (DOE) managed the design and construction of the surface and and remains responsible for operation and closure following The managing and operating contractor for the DOE at the WIPP, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, maintains two rechmiant seismic monitoring systems located at the surface and in the underground. This report discusses two earthquakes detected by the seismic monitoring system, one a duratior magnitude 5.0 (Md) event located approximately 60 km east-southeast of the facility, and another a body-wave magnitude 5.6 (rob) event that occurred approximately 260 kilometers to the south-southeast.

Sanchez, P.E.

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Maximum Reasonable Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production Facilities and Their Effect on Monitoring Nuclear Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Saey, et al., 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5×109 Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kephart, Rosara F.; Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saey, Paul R. [Vienna University of Technology, Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna (Austria)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized masses to avoid presenting classified information. As only linear processes are modeled, the results can be readily scaled by the true classified masses for use in the risk assessment. The modeling timeframe for the risk assessment was set at 1,000 years, though some calculations are extended to 2,000 years. This first section of the report endeavors to orient the reader with the environment of Amchitka and the specifics of the underground nuclear tests. Of prime importance are the geologic and hydrologic conditions of the subsurface. A conceptual model for groundwater flow beneath the island is then developed and paired with an appropriate numerical modeling approach in section 2. The parameters needed for the model, supporting data for them, and data uncertainties are discussed at length. The calibration of the three flow models (one for each test) is then presented. At this point the conceptual radionuclide transport model is introduced and its numerical approach described in section 3. Again, the transport parameters and their supporting data and uncertainties are the focus. With all of the processes and parameters in place, the first major modeling phase can be discussed in section 4. In this phase, a parametric uncertainty analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of the transport modeling results to the uncertainties present in the parameters. This analysis is motivated by the recognition of substantial uncertainty in the subsurface conditions on the island and the need to incorporate that uncertainty into the modeling. The conclusion of the first phase determines the parameters to hold as uncertain through the main flow and transport modeling. This second, main phase of modeling is presented in section 5, with the contaminant breakthrough behavior of each test site addressed. This is followed by a sensitivity analysis in section 6, regarding the importance of additional processes that could not be supported in the main modeling effort due to lack of data. Finally, the results for the individual sites are compared, the sensitivities discussed,

Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will evaluate these detector systems on the bench top and eventually in RASA systems to insure reliable and practical operation.

Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effect of a non-linear boundary layer on the radiation from earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......linear (~ u1)~{div{T rede nition of the Lame parameters as k?kz2igu~k', j?jz2i(f{(2/3)g)u~j'. It is thus understood that our results......

Ari Ben-Menahem

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling regional seismic waves from underground nuclear explosion. Report for 17 March 1987-30 March 88  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two main topics are presented: the effects of ocean continent transition zones on L - g waves; and modeling regional Love waves with 2-D velocity structures. Hybrid regional and teleseismic SH mode sum seismograms are produced after propagation through a regional transition zone or other heterogeneity that exists as part of a longer, mostly plane-layered, path. In particular the effects of ocean continent transition regions of geometry for propagation along a partially oceanic path is at most a factor of four. Extending the oceanic path length changes this factor to at most 6. This is inadequate to explain the observed attenuation of Lg. Thus, additional effects, must be considered to provide a complete explanation of the attenuation of Lg. Long period seismograms recorded at Pasadena of earthquakes occurring along a profile to Imperial Valley are studied in terms of source phenomena versus path effects. Some of the events have known source parameters, determined by teleseismic or near-field studies, and are used as master events in a forward modeling exercise to derive the Green's functions that describe the propagation effects along the profile. Both timing and waveforms of records are matched by synthetics calculated from 2-dimensional velocity models. The best 2-dimensional section begins at Imperial Valley with a thin crust containing the basin structure and thickens towards Pasadena.

Clayton, R.W.; Harkrider, D.G.; Helmberger, D.V.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Aneutronic H + {sup 11}B nuclear fusion driven by Coulomb explosion of hydrogen nanodroplets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a reaction design for table-top nuclear fusion between two distinct nuclei, with high-energy nuclei being produced by a Coulomb explosion (CE) of homonuclear nanodroplets of one reagent reacting with a solid target of a second reagent. This scheme was applied for a theoretical-computational study of the table-top aneutronic p+{sup 11}B{yields}3{alpha}+8.7 MeV reaction generated by a source of high-energy (0.3-6 MeV) protons produced by a CE of hydrogen nanodroplets driven by ultra-intense, femtosecond, near-infrared laser pulses and which penetrate into a solid {sup 11}B target. The averaged reaction probability and the yield for {sup 11}B(p,{alpha})2{alpha} fusion were calculated from the energy-dependent reaction probability, which was obtained from the ratio of the large fusion cross sections and the stopping power of the protons, and by the proton kinetic energy distribution function, which was obtained from scaled electron and ion dynamics simulations. The fusion yields were determined in the nanodroplet size range and in the laser intensity domain, satisfying the conditions of weak laser intensity attenuation within a single nanodroplet and within an assembly of exploding nanodroplets in the macroscopic plasma filament. The highest values of the fusion yield of 10{sup 8} per laser pulse were attained for the largest nanodroplets with initial radii of 200 nm at the laser peak intensity of 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}. The {sup 11}B(p,{alpha})2{alpha} fusion yields for the exploding hydrogen nanodroplet source-solid {sup 11}B cylindrical target are higher by three to four orders of magnitude than the yields of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} per laser pulse from a laser-irradiated mixed boron-hydrocarbon solid and from a CE of boron-hydrogen heteronuclear nanodroplets. The high efficiency for fusion within the exploding nanodroplets source-cylindrical solid target design provides guidelines for the optimization of yields for table-top nuclear fusion.

Last, Isidore; Ron, Shlomo; Jortner, Joshua [School of Chemistry, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of Navarro-Interra LLC, and supports environmental restoration efforts by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office. Safety decisions must be made before a surface crater area, or potential surface crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and surface crater formation are input into their safety decisions. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the surface collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

Pawloski, G A

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Seismic source functions for explosions in a non-spherical cavity embedded in a scattering environment: application to the regional discrimination of nuclear explosions and earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......logs, UE20f, Pahuta Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Technical Letter, Special...explosions at East Kazakh and Nevada test sites, Bull. seism. Soc. Am...logs, UEZOf, Pahuta Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Technical Letter, Special......

Ari Ben-Menahem

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

Echelard, Tim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

147

Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz [Navarro-INTERA LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal [National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Design methodology to develop a conceptual underground facility for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the design methodology employed to develop conceptual underground layouts for a prospective high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study is in conjunction with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI), project studying the disposal of high level waste in densely welded tuff. The fundamental design effort concentraes on the effects of the heat released from the decaying waste forms and the impact of this heat on ventilation, waste emplacement configurations, and rock stability. This effort will perfect the design of the waste emplacement layout including emplacement hole spacing, emplacement drift spacing, and the areal power density (APD) for the installed waste. This paper contains only viewgraphs. 11 figs.

Zerga, D.P.; Badie, A.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Seasonal thermal signatures of heat transfer by water exchange in an underground vault  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also to the long-term temperature...underground waste storage and contaminant...underground nuclear waste storage sites is...2000), the long-term impact and...Concerning the long-term temperature...underground waste storage, underlying......

Frédéric Perrier; Pierre Morat; Toshio Yoshino; Osam Sano; Hisashi Utada; Olivier Gensane; Jean-Louis Le Mouël

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Explosive nucleosynthesis: nuclear physics impact using neutrino-driven wind simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present nucleosynthesis studies based on hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae and their subsequent neutrino-driven winds. Although the conditions found in these simulations are not suitable for the rapid neutron capture (r-process) to produce elements heavier than A$\\sim$130, this can be solved by artificially increasing the wind entropy. In this way one can mimic the general behavior of an ejecta where the r-process occurs. We study the impact of the long-time dynamical evolution and of the nuclear physics input on the final abundances and show that different nuclear mass models lead to significant variations in the abundances. These differences can be linked to the behavior of nuclear masses far from stability. In addition, we have analyzed in detail the effect of neutron capture and beta-delayed neutron emission when matter decays back to stability. In all our studied cases, freeze out effects are larger than previously estimated and produce substantial changes in the post freeze out abundances.

A. Arcones; G. Martinez-Pinedo

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Proposed risk evaluation guidelines for use by the DOE-AL Nuclear Explosive Safety Division in evaluating proposed shipments of nuclear components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The licensing requirements of 10 CFR 71 (US Code of Federal Regulations) are the primary criteria used to license proposed US Department of Energy (DOE) shipments of nuclear components. However, if a shipment cannot meet 10 CFR 71 requirements, a Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) is prepared to document: (1) the degree of compliance of proposed DOE shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations, and (2) the risk associated with the proposed shipments. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Division (NESD) of the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Area Office (DOE-AL) is responsible for evaluating TSRAs and for preparing Safety Evaluation Reports (SERs) to authorize the off-site transport. Hazards associated with the transport may include the presence of fissile material, chemically and radiologically toxic uranium, and ionizing radiation. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has historically considered only radiological hazards in licensing the transport of radiological material because the US Department of Transportation considers licensing requirements of nonradiological (i.e., chemically toxic) hazards. The requirements of 10 CFR 71 are based primarily on consideration of radiological hazards. For completeness, this report provides information for assessing the effects of chemical toxicity. Evaluating the degree of compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 71 is relatively straightforward. However, there are few precedents associated with developing TSRA risk assessments for packages that do not comply with all of the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The objective of the task is to develop Risk Evaluation Guidelines for DOE-AL to use when evaluating a TSRA. If the TSRA shows that the Risk Evaluation Guidelines are not exceeded, then from a risk perspective the TSRA should be approved if there is evidence that the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle has been applied.

Just, R.A.; Love, A.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nuclear fusion of deuterons with light nuclei driven by Coulomb explosion of nanodroplets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical-computational studies of table-top laser-driven nuclear fusion of high energy (up to 15 MeV) deuterons with 7Li 6Li T and D demonstrate the attainment of high fusion yields. The reaction design constitutes a source of Coulomb exploding deuterium nanodroplets driven by an ultraintense near-infrared femtosecond Gaussian laser pulse (peak intensity 2?×?1018–5?×?1019?W cm?2) and a solid hollow cylindrical target containing the second reagent. The exploding nanodroplets source is characterized by the deuteron kinetic energies their number and the laser energy absorbed by a nanodroplet. These were computed by scaled electron and ion dynamics simulations which account for intra-nanodroplet laser intensity attenuation and relativistic effects. The fusion yields Y are determined by the number of the source deuterons and by the reaction probability. When laser intensity attenuation is weak within a single nanodroplet and throughout the nanodroplets assembly Y exhibits a power law increase with increasing the nanodroplet size. Y is maximized for the nanodroplet size and laser intensity corresponding to the "transition" between the weak and the strong intensity attenuation domains. The dependence of Y on the laser pulse energyW scales as W 2 for weak assembly intensity attenuation and as W for strong assembly intensity attenuation. This reaction design attains the highest table-top fusion efficiencies (up to 4?×?109?J?1 per laser pulse) obtained up to date.

Shlomo Ron; Isidore Last; Joshua Jortner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

154

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Synergic and conflicting issues in planning underground use to produce energy in densely populated countries, as Italy: Geological storage of CO2, natural gas, geothermics and nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In densely populated countries there is a growing and compelling need to use underground for different and possibly coexisting technologies to produce “low carbon” energy. These technologies include (i) clean coal combustion merged with CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS); (ii) last-generation nuclear power or, in any case, safe nuclear wastes disposal, both “temporary” and “geological” somewhere in Europe (at least in one site): Nuclear wastes are not necessarily associated to nuclear power plants; (iii) safe natural gas (CH4) reserves to allow consumption also when the foreign pipelines are less available or not available for geopolitical reasons and (iv) “low-space-consuming” renewables in terms of Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL measured in [GW h/ha/year]) as geothermics. When geothermics is exploited as low enthalpy technology, the heat/cool production could be associated, where possible, to increased measures of “building efficiency”, low seismic risks building reworking and low-enthalpy heat managing. This is undispensable to build up “smart cities”. In any case the underground geological knowledge is prerequisite. All these technologies have been already proposed and defined by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Road Map 2009 as priorities for worldwide security: all need to use underground in a rational and safe manner. The underground is not renewable in most of case histories [10,11]. IEA recently matched and compared different technologies in a unique “Clean Energy Economy” improved document (Paris, November 16–17, 2011), by the contribution of this vision too (see reference). In concert with “energy efficiency” improvement both for plants and buildings, in the frame of the “smart cities” scenarios, and the upstanding use of “energy savings”, the energetic planning on regional scale where these cities are located, are strategic for the year 2050: this planning is strongly depending by the underground availability and typology. Therefore, if both literature and European Policy are going fast to improve the concept of “smart cities” this paper stresses the concept of “smart regions”, more strategic than “smart cities”, passing throughout a discussion on the synergic and conflicting use of underground to produce energy for the “smart regions” as a whole. The paper highlights the research lines which are urgent to plan the soundest energy mix for each region by considering the underground performances case by case: a worldwide mapping, by GIS tools of this kind of information could be strategic for all the “world energy management” authorities, up to ONU, with its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the G20, the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) and the European Platforms such as the “Zero Emissions Fossil Fuel Power Plants” (EU-ZEP Platform), the Steel Platform, the Biomass Platform too. All of these organizations agree on the need for synergistic and coexistent uses of underground for geological storage of CO2, CH4, nuclear waste and geothermic exploitation. The paper is therefore a discussion of the tools, methods and approaches to these underground affecting technologies, after a gross view of the different uses of underground to produce energy for each use, with their main critical issues (i.e. public acceptance in different cases). The paper gives some gross evaluation for the Lazio Region and some hints from the Campania Region, located in Central Italy. Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL), is calculated for each renewable energy technology (solar, wind, geothermal) highlighting the potentiality of the last. Why the Italian case history among the densely populated countries? on the Italian territory is hard to find suitable areas (mostly if greenfields) to use the own underground, with respect to other European countries, due to the presence of seismotectonic activity and many faulted areas characterized by Diffuse Degassing Structures (DDSs, which are rich in CO2 and CH4). In this cases, public acceptan

Fedora Quattrocchi; Enzo Boschi; Angelo Spena; Mauro Buttinelli; Barbara Cantucci; Monia Procesi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear Explosives Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This draft has been scheduled for final review before the Directives Review Board on 10/16/14. All major comments and concerns should be provided to your DRB representative, following your organization process. If you do not know who your representative is, please see the list of DRB members at https://www.directives.doe.gov/beta/references/directives-review-board. If your office is represented by Ingrid Kolb, Director, Office of Management, please submit your major concerns and comments to the DRB Liaison, Camille Beben (Camille.Beben@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-1014). All major comments and concerns should be submitted by COB 10/16/2014.

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

All of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas to some degree since the radioactivity in the waste releases hydrogen from basic nuclear reactions. The routine release...

158

Accidental Explosions*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... several important instances of accidental explosions on record which have occurred in the manufacture of pyrotechnic compositions and other articles of explosive nature, in consequence of a liability to the ... small quantity of an easily oxidisable oil or fat in connection with their application to pyrotechnic purposes. In one instance, some signal lights, composed of a mixture of ingredients ...

1875-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bibliography of reports by US Geological Survey personnel pertaining to underground nuclear testing and radioactive waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site, and radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP Site, New Mexico, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography presents reports released to the public between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1979, by personnel of the US Geological Survey. Reports include information on underground nuclear testing and waste management projects at the NTS (Nevada Test Site) and radioactive waste projects at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, New Mexico. Reports on Project Dribble, Tatum Dome, Mississippi, previously prepared as administrative reports and released to the public as 474-series reports during 1979 are also included in this bibliography.

Glanzman, V.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

Routh, J.W.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc.- WEA-2009-02  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Pacific Underground Construction, Inc. related to a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe explosion that occurred in Sector 30 of the linear accelerator facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).

162

DOE Explosives Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Underground Layout Configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

A. Linden

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Explosive complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Explosive complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Explosives Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

212-2012 212-2012 June 2012 DOE STANDARD EXPLOSIVES SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1212-2012 i TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. PURPOSE, SCOPE and APPLICABILITY, EXEMPTIONS, WAIVERS, ABBREVIATIONS, ACRONYMS, AND DEFINITIONS .......... 1 1.0. PURPOSE ............................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Scope and Applicability.............................................................................. 1 2.0. STANDARD ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT ...................................... 3 3.0. EXEMPTIONS ....................................................................................................... 4

167

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a novel explosive using a new class of materials in which an energetic binder is chemically attached to a particulate solid explosive using an innovative technique. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Applications: Plastic and extrudable explosive replacement Demolition Seismic prospecting Geographical mapping Oil & gas industry Quarrying Mining Construction Military and law enforcement Flexible shaped charges Shock hardening Explosive welding Sheet explosives Detonating cord (cased or bare) Benefits: Compatible with standard explosives Safer than current technology (i.e. insensitive to impact and other

168

Detonation probabilities of high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The probability of a high explosive violent reaction (HEVR) following various events is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons dismantlement. In this paper, we describe the development of response curves for insults to PBX 9404, a conventional high-performance explosive used in US weapons. The insults during dismantlement include drops of high explosive (HE), strikes of tools and components on HE, and abrasion of the explosive. In the case of drops, we combine available test data on HEVRs and the results of flooring certification tests to estimate the HEVR probability. For other insults, it was necessary to use expert opinion. We describe the expert solicitation process and the methods used to consolidate the responses. The HEVR probabilities obtained from both approaches are compared.

Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Bement, T.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

Kury, John W. (Danville, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Summary of a joint US-Japan study of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a nuclear explosive device by a terrorist group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a joint US-Japan study to establish a mutual understanding, through scientific-based study, of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device (NED). 4 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a very high degree of effectiveness are: -) diluting HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 10% U-235; -) storing Pu in nuclear fuel that is not man portable and with a dose rate greater or equal to 10 Gy/h at 1 m; -) storing Pu or HEU in heavy items, i.e. not transportable, provided the removal of the Pu or HEU from the item requires a purification/processing capability; and -) converting Pu and HEU to very dilute forms (such as wastes) that, without any security barriers, would require very long acquisition times to acquire a Category I quantity of Pu or of HEU. 2 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a high degree of effectiveness are: -) converting HEU-fueled research reactors into LEU-fueled research reactors or dilute HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 20% U-235; -) converting U/Al reactor fuel into U/Si reactor fuel. Other approaches have been assessed as moderately or totally inefficient to reduce the attractiveness of nuclear materials.

Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inoue, N.; Kuno, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sagara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Ebbinghaus, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box L-168, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Murphy, J.; Dalton, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

172

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

173

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.4B, Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons, dated 1-11-2010  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter the functionality of the weapon and possible cause DAU.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Underground Power Cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1973 research-article Underground Power Cables J. D. Endacott Up to the present, effectively...particular, in recent years, the oil-filled cable system using cellulose paper impregnated...design of supertension underground power cable systems are considered. The limitations...

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The physics, chemistry and dynamics of explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the development of nuclear fusion as an energy source. The...range from the Big Bang, to thermonuclear explosions in stars, to...reactions or solar coronal thermonuclear reactions, they are not...include magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear energy sources, mentioned...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system.

Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Microsoft Word - WIPP Updates_Underground Recovery Process Begins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5DR0314 002NWPR0314 NWP Media Contacts: Donavan Mager Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (575) 234-7586 www.wipp.energy.gov For Immediate Release WIPP UPDATES: Underground Recovery...

180

Coal-mining Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , or ' permitted' explosive, as it is called, is by no means a flameless explosive. If we are to learn anything about the mechanism of ignition of a ...

1928-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explosives embedded in a polymer matrix. As such, they all rely on weak forces, such as surface tension, for adhesion between the explosive particles and binder material. This...

182

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

Scribner, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

184

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

186

Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Media Room > Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Media Room > Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Press Release Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark Dec 16, 2013 Project on time, under budget and scheduled to be completed next summer WASHINGTON, D.C. - Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High Explosives Pressing Facility at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, this month passed the 85 percent construction completion mark and is on schedule and under budget. The new 45,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility will provide safer, more reliable production by consolidating high explosives operations from numerous buildings and greatly reducing the movement of high explosives within the plant. High explosives are a key component of a nuclear weapon,

187

Web Feature Nuclear Stewardship: Lessons from a Not-So-Remote Island  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geotimes - March 2002 - Amchitka Island Yage 1 ot 6 Geotimes - March 2002 - Amchitka Island Yage 1 ot 6 Web Feature Nuclear Stewardship: Lessons from a Not-So-Remote Island John Eichelberger, Jeff Freymueller. Graham Hill and Matt Patrick The authors' work at Amchitka is part of a program of independent risk assessment of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites funded by DOE and managed by the Consortium for Risk Assessment for Stakeholder Participation (CRESPII). The views expressed here are our own, with the intent to stimulate constructive discussion, and may differ from those of CRESPII management or of DOE. In 1971, the United States set off its largest underground nuclear test. The 5-megaton Cannikin explosion was deemed too large for the Nevada Test Site, and at the time the underground nuclear test

188

Explosives going dark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives going dark Explosives going dark 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Explosives going dark An enhanced biomarker developed at Los Alamos can be used in the field to detect explosives and other hazardous materials. November 25, 2013 Explosives going dark This fluorescent protein, developed at Los Alamos, is unusually stable even when briefly boiled, making it useful for unconventional applications, such as sniffing out explosives and toxins. An enhanced green fluorescent protein stops glowing when explosives are present. Nitroorganic high explosives, including TNT and RDX, as well as certain other toxins, poisons, and nerve agents, have been shown to suppress an ultraviolet excitation mechanism that causes a fluorescent biomarker to

189

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Inspection tester for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

192

Inspection tester for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Detonation in Liquid Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Laboratory, on the initiative of Dr. A. H. Davis, into the process of detonation in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the ... in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the detonation Waves in transparent liquid explosives—the sensitivity of some of which can be varied by ...

D. CRONEY

1948-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE Explosives Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

Plastic explosives Mike Hopkins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic explosives Mike Hill Mike Hopkins Doug Ravenel What this talk is about The poster The HHRH The reduced E4 -term 1.1 Plastic explosives: A C4 analog of the Kervaire invariant calculation Conference of Virginia Mike Hopkins Harvard University Doug Ravenel University of Rochester #12;Plastic explosives Mike

Ravenel, Douglas

196

Animals that Hide Underground  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

197

Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper.

Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Performance Work Statement For Environmental Characterization and Remediation Services 29 February 2008 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background: The primary mission of the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NSO) has been to conduct testing of nuclear and conventional explosives in conjunction with the research and development of nuclear tests. Most of the field testing was done at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and included approximately 828 underground test sites, and 100 atmospheric test locations. In addition to radioisotopes associated with the tests, other contaminants included oils, solvents, gasoline, heavy metals such as lead, and unexploded ordnance. Approximately 1,375 square miles in size, the site is larger than the State of Rhode

200

Plutonium Pits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To ensure the reliability, safety, and security of nuclear weapons without underground nuclear testing; weapons go through a surveillance process, where they are regularly taken...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

203

Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined.

Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Notice of Violation, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc- WEA-2009-02  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued a Final Notice of Violation (WEA-2009-02) to Pacific Underground Construction, Inc. for violations of 10 C.F.R. 851 associated with a polyvinyl chloride pipe explosion that occurred in Sector 30 of the linear accelerator facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on September 13, 2007.

205

The Sanford underground research facility at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the CUBED low-background counter. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability.

Heise, J. [Sanford Underground Research Facility, 630 East Summit Street, Lead, SD 57754 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Coal dust explosibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports US Bureau of Mines (USBM) research on the explosibility of coal dusts. The purpose of this work is to improve safety in mining and other industries that process or use coal. Most of the tests were conducted in the USBM 20 litre laboratory explosibility chamber. The laboratory data show relatively good agreement with those from full-scale experimental mine tests. The parameters measured included minimum explosible concentrations, maximum explosion pressures, maximum rates of pressure rise, minimum oxygen concentrations, and amounts of limestone rock dust required to inert the coals. The effects of coal volatility and particle size were evaluated, and particle size was determined to be at least as important as volatility in determining the explosion hazard. For all coals tested, the finest sizes were the most hazardous. The coal dust explosibility data are compared to those of other hydrocarbons, such as polyethylene dust and methane gas, in an attempt to understand better the basics of coal combustion.

Kenneth L. Cashdollar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Explosives Detection, Testing, Ballistics and Armor Development...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives Detection, Testing, Ballistics, and Armor Development Programs Locations: National Security Test Range, Trace Explosives Detection Facility, Bulk Explosives Detection...

208

Explosives tester with heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

210

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

211

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

212

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. (40 CFR 280). The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ``roadmap`` for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Saving an Underground Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant part of the region?s agricultural economy. Though the area has few rivers and lakes, underneath it lies a supply of water that has provided groundwater for developing this economy. This underground water, the Ogallala Aquifer, is a finite.... ?We have already seen isolat- ed areas that have no irrigation water remaining and the economy has been crushed.? The region produces about 4 percent of the nation?s corn, 25 percent of the hard red winter wheat, 23 per- cent of the grain sorghum...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty...

216

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Depleted argon from underground sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

The effects of 450 kg surface explosions at the E layer of the ionosphere. Los Alamos Source Region Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A network of hf ionospheric sounders consisting of two transmitter and two receiver stations was deployed to detect the effects of acoustic waves generated by surface ground motion following an underground nuclear test (UGT) at the Nevada Test Site. The frequency of the transmissions were chosen so that the hf radio waves were totally reflected in the E layer of the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 100 km. The transmissions were highly stable cw tones at two frequencies separated by 100 kHz so that two altitudes separated by approximately .5 km could be sensed. The network sampled four geographic locations in the ionosphere ranging from almost directly overhead of the UGT out to a horizontal range of 60 km. The ionospheric sounders detected disturbances on all the paths beginning at approximately 325 s after the UGT which persisted for up to 100 s. These disturbances will be described in detail in a later paper. Shortly after the UGT an extended series of ionospheric disturbances were detected which we ascribe to the arrival of acoustic shock waves at the E layer caused by the surface detonation of ordinance with effective yields of 450 kg of high explosive during an unrelated exercise conducted by the U. S. Air Force at a nearby bombing range. The conjunction of these disturbances produced a direct comparison of the effects of UGT`s and surface explosions in the ionosphere. In this paper we describe the effects produced by the surface explosions and interpret the disturbance in terms of diffraction induced by electron density changes accompanying the passage of the acoustic waves from the explosions through the reflection altitudes.

Fitzgerald, T.J.; Carlos, R.C.

1992-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

224

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

225

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The politics of verification: Limiting the testing of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1982 to 1990, the United States and the Soviet Union renegotiated verification arrangements for two unratified arms control agreements that had nevertheless been observed since 1977: the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty. The negotiations yielded new verification procedures, changed attitudes regarding Soviet compliance, and established useful precedents for further restrictions on nuclear testing. The negotiations also demonstrated how technical arguments can be misused to promote a particular political agenda-in this case, the continued testing of nuclear weapons. By misrepresenting the uncertainties in US monitoring procedures, and then falsely characterizing these uncertainties as a fatal flaw of seismic verification techniques, opponents of a nuclear test ban clouded the sensitive issue of verification enough to delay progress towards a complete ban on nuclear weapons testing. The primary obstacle to further restrictions on nuclear testing was not the feasibility of adequate verification, but rather the unwillingness of several US administrations to address the real question of whether the United States and other nuclear weapon states should, in the interest of global nuclear nonproliferation, end the development of new nuclear weapons designs that require confirmation by underground nuclear tests. 51 refs., 6 figs.

Vink, G.E. van der (IRIS Consortion on Seismology, Arlington, VA (United States)); Paine, C.E. (Natural Reources Defense Council, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Idaho Explosives Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

Edward L. Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; J. Keith Jewell; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury; Jeffery B. Klinger

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Explosive Detection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Idaho Explosive Detection System  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

Klinger, Jeff

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Idaho Explosive Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

Klinger, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Explosion suppression system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A New Seismic Data System for Determining Nuclear Test Yields At the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important capability in conducting underground nuclear tests is to be able to determine the nuclear test yield accurately within hours after a test. Due to a nuclear test moratorium, the seismic method that has been used in the past has not been exercised since a non-proliferation high explosive test in 1993. Since that time, the seismic recording system and the computing environment have been replaced with modern equipment. This report describes the actions that have been taken to preserve the capability for determining seismic yield, in the event that nuclear testing should resume. Specifically, this report describes actions taken to preserve seismic data, actions taken to modernize software, and actions taken to document procedures. It concludes with a summary of the current state of the data system and makes recommendations for maintaining this system in the future.

LEE, JONATHAN W.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Underground test area subproject waste management plan. Revision No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was the site of 928 underground nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. The tests were performed as part of the Atomic Energy Commission and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons testing program. The NTS is managed by the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Of the 928 tests conducted below ground surface at the NTS, approximately 200 were detonated below the water table. As an unavoidable consequence of these testing activities, radionuclides have been introduced into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. In the few instances of groundwater sampling, radionuclides have been detected in the groundwater; however, only a very limited investigation of the underground test sites and associated shot cavities has been conducted to date. The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject was established to fill this void and to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the NTS. One of its primary objectives is to gather data to characterize the deep aquifer underlying the NTS.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

237

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Geology INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Approved as to sty)e and content by: P. A, Domenico (Chair of Committee) jj K. W. Brown (Member) C. C Mathewson (Member) J. H. S ng Head...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

Spooner, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven

244

Underground and Ventilation System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HQ Total Nuclear Safety Program 8 7 3 2 12 Emergency Management 3 7 2 1 10 NWP Conduct of Operations 1 1 1 0 2 Maintenance Program 2 2 2 2 6 Radiation Protection Program 2 4 1 0 5...

245

Explosive Synchronization is Discontinuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spontaneous explosive is an abrupt transition to collective behavior taking place in heterogeneous networks when the frequencies of the nodes are positively correlated to the node degree. This explosive transition was conjectured to be discontinuous. Indeed, numerical investigations reveal a hysteresis behavior associated with the transition. Here, we analyze explosive synchronization in star graphs. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the transition to (and out) collective behavior is indeed discontinuous. The discontinuous nature of the transition is related to the nonlinear behavior of the order parameter, which in the thermodynamic limit exhibits multiple fixed points. Moreover, we unravel the hysteresis behavior in terms of the graph parameters. Our numerical results show that finite size graphs are well described by our predictions.

Vladimir Vlasov; Yong Zou; Tiago Pereira

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

explosion: Role of hydrogen thermonuclear explosion in support of cometary hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deuteron fusion rates and that a thermonuclear explosion may compete with a thermo-chemical explosion

Y. E. Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and Seismological Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The predominant role for seismology will instead involve screening of all detected events to ensure that none of them are surreptitious nuclear explosions in violation of the Treaty. Applying seismology to detect nuclear explosions anywhere in the world is...

Thorne Lay

248

An experimental study of steam explosions involving chemically reactive metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of molten zirconium-water explosions was conducted. A 1-kg mass of zirconium melt was dropped into a column of water. Explosions took place only when an external trigger was used. In the triggered tests, the extent of oxidation of the zirconium melt was very extensive. However, the explosion energetics estimated were found to be very small compared to the potential chemical energy available from the oxidation reaction. Zirconium is of particular interest, since it is a component of the core materials of the current nuclear power reactors. This paper describes the test apparatus and summarizes the results of four tests conducted using pure zirconium melt.

Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microcantilever detector for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever. 2 figs.

Thundat, T.G.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs)”. Submitted to theCalifornia’s Underground Storage Tank Program”. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks” by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

explosives package in nuclear weapons. This laboratory possesses unique capabilities in neutron scattering, enhanced surveillance, radiography, and plutonium science and...

253

Ethylene Oxide Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE occasional occurrence of ethylene oxide explosions during the fumigation of dried fruit has led us to undertake a detailed ... yielded results somewhat like those for acetaldehyde1,2.. Cool flames can be initiated in ethylene oxide – air mixtures in the neighbourhood of 330° C. at atmospheric pressure. ...

J. H. BURGOYNE; F. A. BURDEN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

None

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

None

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The scenario follows from relaxing assumptions of symmetry and involves a detonation born near the stellar surface. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of a deflagration that results in the formation of a buoyancy-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion following the deflagration redistributes mass in a way that ensures production of intermediate-mass and iron group elements with ejecta having a strongly layered structure and a mild amount of asymmetry following from the early deflagration phase. This asymmetry, combined with the amount of stellar expansion determined by details of the evolution (principally the energetics of deflagration, timing of detonation, and structure of the progenitor), can be expected to create a family of mildly diverse Type Ia supernova explosions.

T. Plewa; A. C. Calder; D. Q. Lamb

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Logistics background study: underground mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

259

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

260

High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

Farrell, Roger, A.

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization with more accurately locating all types of explosions. October 25, 2013 A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole. This model is used as the starting point to calculate the full SALSA3D velocity model. A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole.

262

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization with more accurately locating all types of explosions. October 25, 2013 A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole. This model is used as the starting point to calculate the full SALSA3D velocity model. A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole.

263

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

destruction. Dedicated to halting terrorists, Brunish studies nuclear explosion phenomenology, helping finding and characterizing underground facilities, where weapons of mass...

265

Wendee Brunish-So that others may live  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

destruction. Dedicated to halting terrorists, Brunish studies nuclear explosion phenomenology, helping finding and characterizing underground facilities, where weapons of mass...

266

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

267

Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Explosive scabbling of structural materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Kirkham, John (Newbury, GB2)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE to host workshop to explore use of WIPP as 'next generation' underground laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop to Explore Use of WIPP Workshop to Explore Use of WIPP As 'Next Generation' Underground Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., June 9, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office is sponsoring the "Workshop on the Next Generation U.S. Underground Science Facility" June 12-14 at the Pecos River Village Conference Center, 711 Muscatel, in Carlsbad. The purpose of the workshop is to explore the potential use of the DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground as a next generation laboratory for conducting nuclear and particle astrophysics and other basic science research, and how that might be accomplished. "WIPP's underground environment represents one of only a few choices open to the research community for siting experiments that require shielding from cosmic rays," said Dr.

272

high explosives | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

experts have been honored with a Defense Programs Award of Excellence for their help in securing supply of a critical material for the Departments of Energy and Defense.The...

273

Supernova Explosions and Neutron Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current picture of the collapse and explosion of massive stars and the formation of neutron stars is reviewed. According to the favored scenario, however by no means proven and undisputed, neutrinos deposit the energy of the explosion in the stellar medium which surrounds the nascent neutron star. Observations, in particular of Supernova~1987A, suggest that mixing processes play an important role in the expanding star, and multi-dimensional simulations show that these are linked to convective instabilities in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star. Convectively enhanced energy transport inside the neutron star can have important consequences for the neutrino emission and thus the neutrino-heating mechanism. This also holds for a suppression of the neutrino interactions at nuclear densities. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, general relativity, and a better understanding of the neutrino interactions in neutron star matter may be crucial to resolve the problem that state-of-the-art spherical models do not yield explosions even with a very accurate treatment of neutrino transport by solving the Boltzmann equation.

H. -Th. Janka; K. Kifonidis; M. Rampp

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Deformation of underground deep cavities in rock salts at their long-term operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground deep cavities are created in rock salts of various morphological types with the purpose of storage of petroleum, gas and nuclear wastes. It is well known that the rock salt has rheological properties, which can result in closure of caverns and loss of their stability. In the evaporitic rocks, especially those containing halite, time-dependent deformation is pronounced even at comparatively low stress levels. At high stress levels this creep becomes a dominant feature of the mechanical behavior of salt rocks. So the knowledge of creep behavior of rock salt is of paramount importance in underground storage application of gas, petroleum products and nuclear wastes.

Zhuravleva, T.; Shafarenko, E. [Podzemgasprom, STC, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Midwest Underground Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Technology Underground Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Underground Technology Facility Midwest Underground Technology Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Midwest Underground Technology Energy Purchaser Midwest Underground Technology Location Champaign IL Coordinates 40.15020987°, -88.29149723° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.15020987,"lon":-88.29149723,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Radiography used to image thermal explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. October 9, 2012 Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. Proton radiography (pRad) at LANSCE imaged thermal explosions at high speeds to provide a real-time look at how an explosion unfolds and releases its energy. Specifically, it is important to know the range of temperature over which ignition may occur and the subsequent power of the explosion.

277

Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel listed dust found in cotton gins, or gin dust, fueled two explosions in the past. OSHA is required by law to regulate facilities handling explosible dusts to provide a safe working environment for employees. The dust handling facilities must test...

Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

( 'tams Dlvllan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirement from a thermal standpoint is that the thermal battery and safe-arm timers be at 40°F minimum and thermal battery timers be at +40°F minimum operating temperature immediately at the time of treir~ ( ·'tams Dlvl·lan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE STOWAGE THERMAL CONSTRAINTS LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE

Rathbun, Julie A.

279

Might underground waste repositories blow up?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some writers have presented possible scenarios in which a subcritical underground deposit of plutonium or other fissile material might be changed into a critical configuration. The underground criticalities that occurred in Gabon some 1.7 billion years ago in deposits of natural uranium is cited. Other scientists assert that it is virtually impossible that such a configuration could develop in an underground repository. The author presents the pros and cons of these views. 5 refs.

Hippel, F. von [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nevada National Security Site | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

federal agencies. It provides the government with the capability to return to underground nuclear testing should the President deem it necessary. NNSS is contractor-run by National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

January 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Y-12 Press Release Jan 3, 2014 Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High...

282

Underground Storage Tank Regulations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects

283

Unsteady heat losses of underground pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic expressions are presented for the unsteady temperature distribution of the ground and heat losses of an underground pipeline for an arbitrary...

B. L. Krivoshein; V. M. Agapkin

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",8,"Monthly","102014","1151973" ,"Release...

285

Pipelines and Underground Gas Storage (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules apply to intrastate transport of natural gas and other substances via pipeline, as well as underground gas storage facilities. The construction and operation of such infrastructure...

286

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967"...

287

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",12,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

288

Cryogenic slurry for extinguishing underground fires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic slurry comprising a mixture of solid carbon dioxide particles suspended in liquid nitrogen is provided which is useful in extinguishing underground fires.

Chaiken, Robert F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kim, Ann G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kociban, Andrew M. (Wheeling, WV); Slivon, Jr., Joseph P. (Tarentum, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

290

Hawaii Underground Injection Control Permitting Webpage | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Underground Injection Control Permitting Webpage Author State of Hawaii Department of...

291

Shock desensitizing of solid explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

Davis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Donor free radical explosive composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas in Underground...

295

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

296

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs Studies on Accumulation of Starch, Sugars and Oil Cover: Starch granules in cells of fresh potato tuber visualised by iodine staining. #12;Carbon By increasing knowledge of carbon allocation in underground storage organs and using the knowledge to improve

297

Measurement of 37Ar to support technology for On-site Inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Site Inspection (OSI) is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclide isotopes created by an underground nuclear explosion are a valuable signature of a Treaty violation. Argon-37 is produced from neutron interaction with calcium in soil, 40Ca(n,{\\alpha})37Ar. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for completion of an inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This paper presents a low-background internal-source gas proportional counter with an 37Ar measurement sensitivity level equivalent to 45.1 mBq/SCM in whole air.

C. E. Aalseth; A. R. Day; D. A. Haas; E. W. Hoppe; B. J. Hyronimus; M. E. Keillor; E. K. Mace; J. L. Orrell; A. Seifert; V. T. Woods

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Form Type...

299

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

300

Progress Continues Toward Closure of Two Underground Waste Tanks...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Progress Continues Toward Closure of Two Underground Waste Tanks at Savannah River Site Progress Continues Toward Closure of Two Underground Waste Tanks at Savannah River Site...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Simulation Analysis of Fire Feature on Underground Substation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground transformer substations constructed with non-dwelling buildings have a ... out simulation analysis of fire feature on underground substation. The corresponding fire protection strategy is also...

Xin Han; Xie He; Beihua Cong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

303

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

304

Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > NPO Press Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > NPO Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark January 3, 2014 Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High Explosives Pressing Facility at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, this month passed the 85 percent construction completion mark and is on schedule and under budget. Download Press Release Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr General Information NPO Press Releases Public Contact Us Mission Links NEPA Reading Room NPO Press Releases January 2014 (1) March 2013 (1) January 2013 (2) October 2012 (1) September 2012 (1) July 2012 (1) June 2012 (3) April 2012 (1) March 2012 (1)

305

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

EXPERIMENTS, CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES AND SCHEDULES FOR AN UNDERGROUND RESEARCH FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface and underground facilities as we11 as operation andconstruction of the underground facility. However, because

Korbin, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Depleted Argon from Underground Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H. [Augustana College, Physics Department, 2001 South Summit Ave., Sioux Fall, SD 57197 (United States); Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Focused evaluation of selected remedial alternatives for the underground test area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County in southern Nevada, was the location of 928 nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. Of the total tests, 824 were nuclear tests performed underground. This report describes the approach taken to determine whether any specific, proven, cost-effective technologies currently exist to aid in the removal of the radioactive contaminants from the groundwater, in the stabilization of these contaminants, and in the removal of the source of the contaminants.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Computed tomography on small explosive parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated three small explosive parts for the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas using computed tomography (CT). A medium resolution, fan beam system was used to test imaging capabilities for small holes drilled into one of the parts, and to identify any inhomogeneities, cracks, voids, and inclusions if present in the other two parts. This system provides volumetric imaging. Its information is qualitative in that is allows us to see interior features but it cannot provide quantitative attenuation data. A second part of the investigation was to perform effective atomic number computed tomography on the parts using energy dispersive spectroscopy methods. We wanted to experimentally identify the {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} chemical composition of the materials in the explosive and its shell and to detect any possible inhomogeneities in composition. A single beam, nuclear spectroscopy based system was used for this work. The radiation source was a silver anode x-ray tube. By measuring x-ray attenuation at specific energies (characteristic lines and narrow bands of continuum) we are able to quantitatively determine linear attenuation coefficients. By using ratios of such measurements, density cancels out and we effectively have ratios of mass attenuation coefficients. Through a look-up scheme of mass attenuation coefficients for different elements, we can determine the weighted average chemical composition, as averaged by x-ray attenuation. We call this averaged composition the effective atomic number ({open_quotes}Z{sub eff}{close_quotes}). We thereby obtain cross sectional images of a parameter related to the averaged chemistry of the object. Such images and the underlying data can reveal, for instance, segregation of explosive and binder.

Ryon, R.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nuclear War  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several chapters in Last Aid warrant the attention of the medical profession. What is known and not known about acute biologic effects following a nuclear explosion is described. The social, physical, and environmental impact of nuclear war on urban population centers is described. How nuclear weapons could affect the composition of the ozone layer and the effects this could have on human survival, including possible interruption of the aquatic ecosystem to produce single-cell organisms for the food cycle, especially seafood is noted.

MacLeod, G.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Surface detonation in type Ia supernova explosions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the evolution of thermonuclear supernova explosions when the progenitor white dwarf star ignites asymmetrically off-center. Several numerical simulations are carried out in two and three dimensions to test the consequences of different initial flame configurations such as spherical bubbles displaced from the center, more complex deformed configurations, and teardrop-shaped ignitions. The burning bubbles float towards the surface while releasing energy due to the nuclear reactions. If the energy release is too small to gravitationally unbind the star, the ash sweeps around it, once the burning bubble approaches the surface. Collisions in the fuel on the opposite side increase its temperature and density and may -- in some cases -- initiate a detonation wave which will then propagate inward burning the core of the star and leading to a strong explosion. However, for initial setups in two dimensions that seem realistic from pre-ignition evolution, as well as for all three-dimensional simulations the collimation of the surface material is found to be too weak to trigger a detonation.

F. K. Roepke; S. E. Woosley

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Japan considers nuclear-free future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It’s official: nuclear power will have a much smaller role in Japan’s energy future than was once thought. Since the meltdowns and gas explosions at ... and gas explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in March 2011, all of Japan’s remaining reactors have been shut down for inspections and maintenance. Last week the ...

David Cyranoski

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nuclear power browning out  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

Hendrik Schatz

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

318

Underground Coal Gasification in the USSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By accomplishing in a single operation the extraction of coal and its conversion into a gaseous fuel, underground gasification makes it possible to avoid the heavy capital investments required for coal gasification

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Best practices for underground diesel emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US NIOSH and the Coal Diesel Partnership recommend practices for successfully using ceramic filters to control particulate emitted from diesel-powered equipment used in underground coal mines. 3 tabs.

Patts, L.; Brnich, M. Jr. [NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

UEME : the underground electronic music experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global electronic music scene has remained underground for its entire lifespan, momentarily materializing during an event, a place defined by the music performed and the people who desire the experience. As festivals ...

Ciraulo, Christopher Samuel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear Winter: Global Consequences of Multple Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with an average atmospheric transmittance of...The temperature recovery in this in-stance...with changes in atmospheric radiative trans-port...mixing of surface waters. Howev-er, variations in atmospheric zonal circu-lation...

R. P. Turco; O. B. Toon; T. P. Ackerman; J. B. Pollack; Carl Sagan

1983-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Move to test nuclear waste site draws fire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Move to test nuclear waste site draws fire ... The Department of Energy has stirred up a storm of opposition by taking administrative action, bypassing Congress, that would enable it to start testing an underground nuclear waste repository in New Mexico. ...

RICHARD SELTZER

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

325

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff`s position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design.

Nataraja, M.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management; Brandshaug, T. [Itasca Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design.

Nataraja, M.S. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management); Brandshaug, T. (Itasca Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tandem Accelerator with Vacuum Insulation for Boron-Neutron-Capture Therapy and Detection of Explosives by Resonance Absorption of ?-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The status of the design work on an electrostatic tandem-accelerator with vacuum insulation for 2.5 MeV protons and ... neutron therapy and the detection of explosives by nuclear-resonance absorption of ?-rays.

G. I. Dimov; Yu. I. Bel'chenko; G. S. Krainov; R. A. Salimov…

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Comparative Study of the Elastic Wave Radiation from Earthquakes and Underground Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and distance coverage from the Nevada Test Site; we also chose an earth- quake...Location 1963 13 Sept. 5.8 Tuff Nevada Test Site 1963 26 Oct. 4.9 Granite Sand...4 h = 15 km Churchill City, Nevada Origin time Epicentral (GMT......

D. G. Lambert; E. A. Flinn; C. B. Archambeau

1972-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Modeling Surface Waves from Aboveground and Underground Explosions in Alluvium and Limestone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reinke@dtra.mil The May 2012 HUMBLE REDWOOD III (HRIII) experiment series...alluvium conducted as part of the HUMBLE REDWOOD I and II (HRI and HRII) experiments...limestone as part of the May 2012 HUMBLE REDWOOD III (HRIII) experiment series...

Jessie L. Bonner; David R. Russell; Robert E. Reinke

332

The physics, chemistry and dynamics of explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...scenarios that range from the Big Bang, to thermonuclear explosions in stars, to magnetohydrodynamic...chemical reactions or solar coronal thermonuclear reactions, they are not generally...explosions include magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear energy sources, mentioned previously...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Use of Safety Explosives in Mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... England Institute of Mechanical Engineers in 1888, to investigate and report upon the subject of flameless explosives in relation to their degree of safety in mines. Experiments with various explosives ...

1894-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Detonation Phenomena in Homogeneous Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... In considering the effect of the container on the detonation of an explosive charge, the natural impulse is to look for an interpretati9n of ... is usually meant the resistance offered by the envelope to the lateral expansion of the detonation products. It is known, however, that the initial mass movement of the pro- ...

ELWYN JONES

1956-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Removing High Explosives from Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

337

Geschichte der Explosivstoffe The Manufacture of Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in mining operations black powder is being gradually ousted in favour of the so-called flameless explosives.

H.

1896-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

explosively consolidating nanopowders to yield fully dense, consolidated, nanostructured thermoelectric material nemir.pdf More Documents & Publications Enhancing the...

339

A Comparison of Popular Remedial Technologies for Petroleum Contaminated Soils from Leaking Underground Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underground Storage Tanks. Chelsea: Lewis Publishers.and Underground Storage Tank Sites. Database on-line.Michigan Underground Storage Tank Rules. Database on-line.

Kujat, Jonathon D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Assessing the Effectiveness of California's Underground Storage Tank Annual Inspection Rate Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaks from Underground Storage Tanks by Media Affected Soilfrom Underground Storage Tank Facilities Cities CountiesCities Counties Leaks per Underground Storage Tank Facility

Cutter, W. Bowman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helms Underground Powerhouse - Pumped storage project Figurelayout of underground powerhouse complex—Helms Pumped57. Helms Underground Powerhouse Pumped Storage Project

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Attenuation of multiphase surface waves in the Basin and Range province, part I: Lg and Lg coda  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from underground nuclear explosions, Bull...measures of elastic energy in estimating source...Wennerberg L., 1987. Energy flux model of seimsic...determination of yield of nuclear explosions, Geophys...from underground nuclear explosions, Bull...measures of elastic energy in estimating source......

J. Xie; B. J. Mitchell

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Debris from a nuclear explosion · Debris from a radiological dispersal device Nuclear Forensic GoalsNuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism Kenneth G relationships Nuclear Forensics require high-level expertise, undisputed signatures & extremely high fidelity

Perkins, Richard A.

344

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

345

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

346

Spot test kit for explosives detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

348

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

349

Explosives detection system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

Toohey, Darin W.

351

Notification for Underground Storage Tanks (EPA Form 7530-1)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notification for Underground Storage Tanks (EPA Form 7530-1) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Notification for Underground Storage Tanks...

352

Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ground Motions from and House Response to Underground Aggregate Mining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest because many urban quarries have gone underground or are considering doing so. Three cracks were to determine future blasting controls for a underground aggregate quarry near Franklin, KY (Revey, 2005

354

Rectifiers used on the London Underground Railways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Lunn to the Institution of Electrical Engftieers on November 7, a description of the rectifier substations is given and also much useful information of the working of these rectifiers for traction ... there is little vibration; but in these respects the rectifier is much superior. The substation buildings for operating the traction system of the London Underground are in very densely populated ...

1935-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Simon Shackley #12;The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Dr Simon Shackley of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) in the United Kingdom. The objectives were to identify the main dangers

Watson, Andrew

357

Detection of Underground Marlpit Quarries Using High Resolution Seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of Underground Marlpit Quarries Using High Resolution Seismic B. Piwakowski* (Ecole of high resolution reflection seismic for the detection and location of underground marlpit quarries of the geological structure, the results show that the detection of marlpit underground quarries, often considered

Boyer, Edmond

358

Dealing with at-risk populations in radiological/nuclear emergencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE...Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents...Security Council Interagency Policy Coordination Subcommittee for...Response to Radiological and Nuclear Threats. Planning guidance......

Diana Wilkinson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

Miley, Harry

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gen. Frank Klotz tours NNSS | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

offers one of the safest, most secure locations anywhere in the U.S. weapons complex to conduct nuclear explosive operations. Scientists at DAF work on special nuclear material,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

Miley, Harry

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

362

Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks

363

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Hoe Creek Underground Gasification site occupies 80 acres of land located in Campbell County, Wyoming. The site was used to investigate the process and environmental parameters of underground coal gasification technologies in the 1970s. The Department of Energy¿s (DOE) current mission is limited to completing environmental remediation activities at the site. This property is owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM),

364

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells

365

Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method and apparatus for detecting explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

Moore, David Steven (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stewardship A new video shows how researchers use scientific guns to induce shock waves into explosive materials to study their performance and properties January 1, 2015...

368

Explosives detection with a frequency modulation spectrometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An explosives detection instrument was designed and tested at SRI International. The instrument uses frequency modulation spectroscopy with midinfrared lead-salt diode lasers to...

Riris, H; Carlisle, C B; McMillen, D F; Cooper, D E

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radioxenon detections in the CTBT International Monitoring System likely related to the announced nuclear test in North Korea conducted on February 12, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Observations of the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe and 131mXe collected at the IMS stations RN38 and RN58 on April 7-8, and April 12-13 2013, respectively, are unique with respect to the measurement history of these stations. Comparison of measured data with calculated isotopic ratios as well as analysis using atmospheric transport modeling indicate that it is likely that the xenon measured was created in the underground nuclear test conducted by North Korea on February 12, 2013, and released 7 weeks later. More than one release is required to explain all observations. The 131mXe source terms for each release were calculated to 7x1011 Bq, corresponding to about 1-10% of the total xenon inventory for a 10-kt explosion, depending on fractionation and release scenario. The observed ratios could not be used to obtain any information regarding the fissile material that was used in the test.

Ringbom, Anders; Axelssson, A.; Aldener, M.; Auer, M.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Fritioff, T.; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Nikkinen, Mika; Popov, Vladimir Y.; Popov, Y.; Ungar, R. Kurt; Wotawa, G.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simulation of turbulent explosion of hydrogen-air mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L = s0L ? ?L for small values of ? and the Markstein length scale L can be positive or negative [10]. The stretch rate is defined as the rate of change of flame area per unit area, A, ie., ? = (dA/dt)/A and it is given as ? = (2/rf)(drf/dt), for a spher... ]. Also, fundamental understanding of hydrogen combustion is important from safety view points, for example generation and accumulation of hydrogen in nuclear reactors [7] and rupturing of a pressurised hydrogen storage tank can lead to explosions. A...

Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Explosive double salts and preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicants have discovered a new composition of matter which is an explosive addition compound of ammonium nitrate (AN) and diethylenetriamine trinitrate (DETN) in a 50:50 molar ratio. The compound is stable over extended periods of time only at temperatures higher than 46.degree. C., decomposing to a fine-grained eutectic mixture (which is also believed to be new) of AN and DETN at temperatures lower than 46.degree. C. The compound of the invention has an x-ray density of 1.61 g/cm.sup.3, explodes to form essentially only gaseous products, has higher detonation properties (i.e., detonation velocity and pressure) than those of any mechanical mixture having the same density and composition as the compound of the invention, is a quite insensitive explosive material, can be cast at temperatures attainable by high pressure steam, and is prepared from inexpensive ingredients. Methods of preparing the compound of the invention and the fine-grained eutectic composition of the invention are given.

Cady, Howard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

OPTICAL, ELECTROMAGNETIC, AND SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONS—PART II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONS—PART...of the explosion of a nuclear device at very high...might accompany the nuclear explosions and might...temperature-limited vacuum noise diode and the...synchro- tron particle accelerator. The generation of...

Allen M. Peterson

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

374

Thermal treatment of high explosives at Mason & Hanger/Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pantex plant presently processes about 45,000 kg (100,000 lb) of high explosives annually by outdoor burning. About half of the explosives are weapon components weighing over 5 kg (10 lb) which come directly out of nuclear weapons being removed from the stockpile. The other half is generated from various support processes, special tests, etc. Burning serves the three-fold purpose of demilitarizing, removing all classified characteristics, and eliminating the severe hazard posed by the explosives themselves. Transporting such large quantities of classified high explosives for such processing at another site would be prohibitive. Computerized atmospheric modelling of the burning process was conducted during the past year. The results were somewhat surprising in that oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, two ``criteria pollutants,`` were not of great concern even though it is known that high explosives contain significant amounts of nitrogen and they generate measureable amounts of carbon monoxide when they are burned. Rather, it was determined that hydrogen fluoride gas is of much greater concern, and stringent controls on the burning operation have been implemented to address this concern. Although the amount of fluorine-containing explosive must be restricted, other kinds of air emissions are not a great concern. This favorable situation is largely due to the flat, featureless, sparsely inhabited terrain, the distance to the nearest plant boundary, the wind, the lack of stagnant atmospheric conditions, and the tremendous rate of heat release.

Patterson, W.E.; Phelan, P.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons Responsible Administrative Unit for the Colorado School of Mines. Unregulated possession of weapons on the university campus creates forth the policy on the use and storage of firearms, explosives and other dangerous or illegal weapons

Szymczak, Andrzej

376

Fading of Detonation in Cones of Explosive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... boundary diameter of an explosive is the smallest diameter of charge in which a stable detonation wave can be established. It is characteristic of the explosive and its physical condition, ... condition, and is a criterion of 'fading', that is, the tendency of the detonation to die out. A boundary diameter may be determined by experiments with cylindrical charges ...

D. W. WOODHEAD; R. WILSON

1951-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Spread of Detonation in High Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... W. C. F. Shepherd makes the interesting observation that in the initial stages of detonation in a cylindrical cartridge of high explosive initiated with a detonator, a phase, referred ... of high explosive initiated with a detonator, a phase, referred to as the pre-detonation phase, is often noticeable during which the rate of propagation of the reaction is ...

ELWYN JONES; DUGALD MITCHELL

1948-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

Atkinson, David

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Explosive laser light initiation of propellants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

Piltch, M.S.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Letter, NEL-2013-01 - January 7, 2013 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant October 4, 2012 Preliminary Notice of...

382

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Flooding of an underground facility at Yucca Mountain: A summary of NRC review plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are developing review plans for a potential high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This early preparation of NRC`s review program will ensure that important technical issues related to compliance with 10 CFR Part 60 will be identified before receipt of a license application. Under the siting criteria of NRC`s Part 60, one of the potentially adverse conditions is the potential for flooding of the underground facility by surface waters. The Department of Energy (DOE) should evaluate this and other conditions in a license application. This paper summarizes the NRC staff`s plans to review DOE`s demonstration of compliance with Part 60 regarding potential flooding of an underground facility. We present these plans recognizing that the Congress is currently considering changes in how a HLW repository would be licensed.

Coleman, N.M.; Wescott, R.G.; Johnson, T.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Detonation theory of liquid and aluminized liquid explosives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Non-ideal behavior of condensed explosives with metal particle additives has been observed experimentally. In general, adding metal particles to a homogeneous explosive leads to a… (more)

Li, Yumin, 1961-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo,...

387

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

388

New Approaches to Nuclear Proliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...uranium, and HMX, a high explosive used in detonating nuclear warheads. The inspectors also found nucle-ar weapon parts, including...disintegrates, it will be impossible to keep nuclear control systems intact. The drastic condition of the post-Soviet econ-omies creates...

Joseph S. Nye Jr.

1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the purpose of this UIC Code to adopt underground injection control (UIC) regulations necessary to qualify the State of Arkansas to retain authorization for its Underground Injection Control Program pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended; 42 USC 300f et seq. In order

390

The Overlooked Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...working toward developing a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, but the Obama Administration pulled the license...10 Macfarlane A. , in Uncertainty Underground: Yucca Mountain and the Nation's High-Level Nuclear Waste , Macfarlane...

Allison M. Macfarlane

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Waste Management in the United States—Starting Over  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selection of Yucca Mountain prevented the...Unreliable funding source...The Yucca Mountain program will...nuclear waste disposal” (17...Underground—Yucca Mountain and the Nation's...Sweden, SNF disposal site , www...

Rodney C. Ewing; Frank N. von Hippel

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section regulates wells, borings, and underground storage with regards to protecting groundwater resources. The Commissioner of the Department of Health has jurisdiction, and can grant permits for proposed activities,

393

Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah...

394

Idaho Underground Injection Control Program Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho Underground Injection Control Program Webpage Author Idaho Department of...

395

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than Salt Caverns",8,"Monthly","102014","115...

396

Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 78 Underground Storage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tanks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 78...

397

Hawaii Department of Health Underground Storage Tank Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract This webpage provides information on the regulation of underground storage tanks. Author State of Hawaii Department of Health Published State of Hawaii, Date Not...

398

Hawaii Underground Injection Control Program Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Underground Injection Control Program Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

399

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

400

Underground coal gasification : overview of an economic and environmental evaluation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper examines an overview of the economic and environmental aspects of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) as a viable option to the above ground Surface… (more)

Kitaka, Richard Herbertson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control Program) webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Ground Water...

402

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and the environment

403

Nuclear Structure Aspects in Nuclear Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Astrophysics as a broad and diverse field of study can be viewed as a magnifier of the impact of microscopic processes on the evolution of macroscopic events. One of the primary goals in Nuclear Astrophysics is the understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes that take place in the cosmos and the simulation of the correlated stellar and explosive burning scenarios. These simulations are strongly dependent on the input from Nuclear Physics which sets the time scale for all stellar dynamic processes--from giga-years of stellar evolution to milliseconds of stellar explosions--and provides the basis for most of the signatures that we have for the interpretation of these events--from stellar luminosities, elemental and isotopic abundances to neutrino flux from distant supernovae. The Nuclear Physics input comes through nuclear structure, low energy reaction rates, nuclear masses, and decay rates. There is a common perception that low energy reaction rates are the most important component of the required nuclear physics input; however, in this article we take a broader approach and present an overview of the close correlation between various nuclear structure aspects and their impact on nuclear astrophysics. We discuss the interplay between the weak and the strong forces on stellar time scales due to the limitations they provide for the evolution of slow and rapid burning processes. The effects of shell structure in nuclei on stellar burning processes as well as the impact of clustering in nuclei is outlined. Furthermore we illustrate the effects of the various nuclear structure aspects on the major nucleosynthesis processes that have been identified in the last few decades. We summarize and provide a coherent overview of the impact of all aspects of nuclear structure on nuclear astrophysics.

Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Key tests set for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is about to undergo some tests. The tests will be conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in a coal seam owned by Washington Irrigation and Development Co. A much-improved UCG system has been developed by Stephens and his associates at LLNL - the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) method. Pritchard Corp., Kansas City, has done some conceptual process design and has further studied the feasibility of using the raw gas from a UCG burn as a feedstock for methanol synthesis and/or MTG gasoline. Each method was described. (DP)

Haggin, J.

1983-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Explosives disposal demonstration projects. Progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains quarterly reports on two projects. The first is undertaking the environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Research objectives are organized under four general tasks: field testing and produced water treatment, bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and soils, vadose zone remediation, and chromium remediation. The other project goal is to demonstrate generation of diamond by explosive compression of Carbon 60 and Carbon 70 and mixtures of these fullerenes. The intent is to exploit expertise developed by Pantex and other DOE Laboratories in the area of understanding and modeling of explosive compression for initiation of nuclear fission reactions to explosively compress carbon in the form of fullerenes with the goal of transforming the material into the diamond phase.

Charbeneau, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

408

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Hand-book of Modern Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... explosives in fiery mines has a chapter to itself. The description of the tests of flameless powders is of especial interest; in fact, the official reports of the tests of ...

1890-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and steam explosion (Playne, 1984), pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Azzam, 1989), alkali treatment of soybean straw to improve digestibility (Felix, Hill, and Diarra, 14 1990), ammoniation of wheat straw to improve nutritive...

Ashok, Ganesh

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Seismic Aspects of the Heligoland Explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . The explosion was initiated by means of electric detonators, each incorporating a one-second pyrotechnic delay to enable the electric circuits to complete their work before the commencement of the ...

P. L. WILLMORE

1947-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Describes technique of explosively consolidating nanopowders to yield fully dense, consolidated, nanostructured thermoelectric material

413

The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations

Andre Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

414

A major purpose of the Techni-Information Center k to provide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement of the ground shock produced by the explosions. 1. INTRODUCTION Th~ underground nuclear test where all U.S. underground nuclear testing Is conducted. In this regard we have initiated a program testing as related to undergrouti nuclear testing. Scaie modeling of explosions to simulate the attack

415

Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium–Deuterium (D–D) neutron generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium–Deuterium (D–D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82 MeV) following radiative neutron capture by 14N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D–D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 1010 fast neutrons per second (E=2.5 MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based ?-ray detectors to different explosives is described.

K. Bergaoui; N. Reguigui; C.K. Gary; C. Brown; J.T. Cremer; J.H. Vainionpaa; M.A. Piestrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Spectroscopic studies of shocked and detonating explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time observation techniques including single-pulse Raman scattering, time-resolved infrared spectral photography, emission spectroscopy and fast-framing photography have been used to study chemical and physical changes in shock-loaded and detonating explosive materials. Experiments have focused on how material variables such as density and particle size may affect emission characteristics in detonating high explosives (HEs). We have also studied effects of pressure and temperature on vibrational frequencies in shocked HEs. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 30 - Nuclear Energy and Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Safety in nuclear industries is a very serious topic due to its greater accident consequence as seen in Chernobyl, and also due to the pictorial perceptions of nuclear accidents being similar to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear explosions. This chapter points out some important safety aspects of the nuclear industry. Beginning with the current laws and regulations of nuclear safety, this chapter reviews different types of nuclear reactors, nuclear waste treatment systems, reliability of nuclear system, operations of reactors, incident reporting, and a short review of previous accident history. Finally, historical Rasmussen reports are reviewed.

Sam Mannan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Simulation of neutrons produced by high-energy muons underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the Monte Carlo simulation used to interpret the measurement of the muon-induced neutron flux in the Boulby Underground Laboratory (North Yorkshire, UK), recently performed using a large scintillator veto deployed around the ZEPLIN-II WIMP detector. Version 8.2 of the GEANT4 toolkit was used after relevant benchmarking and validation of neutron production models. In the direct comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental data, we find that the simulation produces a 1.8 times higher neutron rate, which we interpret as over-production in lead by GEANT4. The dominance of this material in neutron production allows us to estimate the absolute neutron yield in lead as (1.31 ± 0.06)×10?3 neutrons/muon/(g/cm2) for a mean muon energy of 260 GeV. Simulated nuclear recoils due to muon-induced neutrons in the ZEPLIN-II target volume (?1-year exposure) showed that, although a small rate of events is expected from this source of background in the energy range of interest for dark matter searches, no event survives an anti-coincidence cut with the veto.

A. Lindote; H.M. Araújo; V.A. Kudryavtsev; M. Robinson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Underground facility area requirements for a radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, managed by the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Preliminary waste descriptions and preliminary areal power density calculations have been completed, and the Topopah Spring Member has been recommended as the emplacement unit. Using these data, an effort has begun to determine the area needed for the underground facility. This report describes work performed to determine the area needed to emplace waste equivalent to 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) initially loaded in commercial power reactors. The area needed for support functions is also described. The total area of the underground facility depends on the types of waste received, the amount of each type of waste received, the areal power density assumed, and the emplacement configuration chosen (horizontal or vertical emplacement). The areas range from about 1240 acres to about 1520 acres. For vertical emplacement of the reference inventory of spent fuel, 1520 acres are required. A significant finding of this report is the importance of low-heat-producing wastes (defense high-level waste, West Valley high-level waste, cladding hulls, transuranic waste, and spent fuel hardware) when calculating the area required for the underground facility. If other wastes are included and the spent fuel capacity is reduced consistent with a total capacity of 70,000 MTU, the area required will be smaller.

Mansure, A.J.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D{sub 2}O electrochemistry incident at SRI International  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell.

Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

Bradley K. Griffith

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations The department, acting through the commission, is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations governing underground storage tanks and is authorized to seek the approval of the United States Environmental Protection Agency to operate the state underground storage tank program in lieu of the federal program. In addition to specific authorities provided by this chapter, the department is authorized, acting through the commission, to

423

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

424

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since February Incidents Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since...

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced underground gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mulder1 Summary: where all current underground activities take place except for oil and gas extraction and mining... with reluctant public perception still hamper such underground...

426

The Remote Video Monitoring System Design and Development for Underground Substation Construction Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the current situation of underground substation construction in China, we design and development ... image enhancement technology, the construction of underground substation can be clearly and accurately tra...

Siguo Zheng; Yugan You; Fanguang Li; Gang Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - american underground science Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underground science Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american underground science Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Studying the Universe...

428

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cycle Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. The mission of NE-54 is primarily focused on activities related to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle which includes mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment. Uranium Mining Both "conventional" open pit, underground mining, and in situ techniques are used to recover uranium ore. In general, open pit mining is used where deposits are close to the surface and underground mining is used

429

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

430

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives. Aslam and D. S. Stewart TAM Department# University of Illinois Urbana# IL 61801 USA Abstract# Detonation Shock Dynamics #DSD# can be used to model the e#ects that shock curvature # has on detonation speed D n

Aslam, Tariq

431

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives. Aslam and D. S. Stewart TAM Department, University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 USA Abstract: Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) can be used to model the eects that shock curvature has on detonation speed Dn

Aslam, Tariq

432

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. I: Models and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is very important and necessary to perform quantitative hazard analysis for possible accidental leakage from an underground gas storage cavern in salt rock. An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from salt caverns is presented in this paper, which was constituted by a revised model for gas leakage rate calculation, a consequence analysis and a model of probability assessment for harm. The presented method was validated by comparing the analytical results with the data collected from the real accidents (including the leakage, jet fire, fireball and vapor cloud explosion). It is indicated that the proposed method was more accurate than the TNT equivalence method for vapor cloud explosion and gave more reasonable results when applied to the consequence analysis for the thermal radiation from jet fire and fireball.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Yadong Zhang; Hao Wu; Linjian Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Posted By Office of Public Affairs In early November, medical isotope producers met with nuclear explosion

434

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Report on technical feasibility of underground pumped hydroelectric storage in a marble quarry site in the Northeast United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic aspects of constructing a very high head underground hydroelectric pumped storage were examined at a prefeasibility level. Excavation of existing caverns in the West Rutland Vermont marble quarry would be used to construct the underground space. A plant capacity of 1200 MW and 12 h of continuous capacity were chosen as plant operating conditions. The site geology, plant design, and electrical and mechanical equipment required were considered. The study concluded that the cost of the 1200 MW underground pumped storage hydro electric project at this site even with the proposed savings from marketable material amounts to between $581 and $595 per kilowatt of installed capacity on a January 1982 pricing level. System studies performed by the planning group of the New England Power System indicate that the system could economically justify up to about $442 per kilowatt on an energy basis with no credit for capacity. To accommodate the plant with the least expensive pumping energy, a coal and nuclear generation mix of approximately 65% would have to be available before the project becomes feasible. It is not expected that this condition can be met before the year 2000 or beyond. It is therefore concluded that the West Rutland underground pumped storage facility is uneconomic at this time. Several variables however could have marked influence on future planning and should be examined on periodic basis.

Chas. T. Main, Inc.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Explosive hydrogen burning during type I X-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Explosive hydrogen burning in type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) is driven by charged particle reactions creating isotopes with masses up to A {approx} 100. Since charged particle reactions in a stellar environment are very temperature sensitive, we use a realistic time-dependent general relativistic and self-consistent model of type I X-ray bursts to provide accurate values of the burst temperatures and densities. This allows a detailed and accurate time-dependent identification of the reaction flow from the surface layers through the convective region and the ignition region to the neutron star ocean. Using this, we determine the relative importance of specific nuclear reactions in the X-ray burst.

Fisker, J L; Schatz, H; Thielemann, F

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program (Informational Purposes Only)  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This draft has been scheduled for final review before the Directives Review Board on 12-4-2014. All major comments and concerns should be provided to your DRB representative, following your organization process. If you do not know who your representative is, please see the list of DRB members at https://www.directives.doe.gov/beta/references/directives-review-board. If your office is represented by Ingrid Kolb, Director, Office of Management, please submit your major concerns and comments to the DRB Liaison, Camille Beben (Camille.Beben@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-4014). All major comments and concerns should be submitted by COB 12-2-2014.

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

DOE O 452.2E, Nuclear Explosives Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This draft has been scheduled for final review before the Directives Review Board on 10/16/14. All major comments and concerns should be provided to your DRB representative, following your organization process. If you do not know who your representative is, please see the list of DRB members at https://www.directives.doe.gov/beta/references/directives-review-board. If your office is represented by Ingrid Kolb, Director, Office of Management, please submit your major concerns and comments to the DRB Liaison, Camille Beben (Camille.Beben@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-1014). All major comments and concerns should be submitted by COB 10/16/2014.

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful...

440

Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored therein, which may occur as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Security training symposium: Meeting the challenge: Firearms and explosives recognition and detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These conference proceedings have been prepared in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Security Training Symposium on Meeting the Challenge -- Firearms and Explosives Recognition and Detection,'' November 28 through 30, 1989, in Bethesda, Maryland. This document contains the edited transcripts of the guest speakers. It also contains some of the speakers' formal papers that were distributed and some of the slides that were shown at the symposium (Appendix A).

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lightcurves of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe of the explosion mechanism and their use in cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermonuclear supernovae are valuable for cosmology but their physics is not yet fully understood. Modeling the development and propagation of nuclear flame is complicated by numerous instabilities. The predictions of supernova light curves still involve some simplifying assumptions, but one can use the comparison of the computed fluxes with observations to constrain the explosion mechanism. In spite of great progress in recent years, a number of issues remains unsolved both in flame physics and light curve modeling.

S. Blinnikov; E. Sorokina

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supernova Explosions Supernova Explosions Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions Childs1a-Supernovasm.png Deep inside a dying star in a galaxy far, far away, a carbon fusion flame ignites. Ignition may happen in the middle or displaced slightly to one side, but this simulation explores the consequences of central ignition. In a localized hot spot, represented here by a deformed sphere with an average radius of 100 km, carbon is assumed to have already fused to iron, producing hot ash (~10 billion K) with a density about 20% less than its surroundings. As the burning progresses, this hot buoyant ash rises up and interacts with cold fuel. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers give rise to shear and turbulence, which interacts with the flame, causing it to move faster. In about 2 seconds, the energy released blows the entire white dwarf star up,

444

Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Experiments Upon the Explosions of Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of such experiments* B. Reference to previous experimental work. C* Object of present s e r i e s of experiments. (See plan of experiments.) a. Heat produced by explosion of H~C mixture. b. Duration of pressure. c• .Rate of combustion and explosion. d. E f f e... as possible the heat produced by the explosion under c e r t a i n conditions. I t i s true that the t o t a l amount of heat / developed may be c a l c u l a t e d matematically i f s u f f i c i e n t data i s a v a i l a b l e , but i t i s also true...

Stone, Fred

1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

"DIANA" - A New, Deep-Underground Accelerator Facility for Astrophysics Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility 1.4 km below ground. DIANA is part of the US proposal DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) to establish a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory in the former gold mine of Homestake in South Dakota, USA. DIANA would consist of two high-current accelerators, a 30 to 400 kV variable, high-voltage platform, and a second, dynamitron accelerator with a voltage range of 350 kV to 3 MV. As a unique feature, both accelerators are planned to be equipped with either high-current microwave ion sources or multi-charged ECR ion sources producing ions from protons to oxygen. Electrostatic quadrupole transport elements will be incorporated in the dynamitron high voltage column. Compared to current astrophysics facilities, DIANA could increase the available beam densities on target by magnitudes: up to 100 mA on the low energy accelerator and several mA on the high energy accelerator. An integral part of the DIANA project is the development of a high-density super-sonic gas-jet target which can handle these anticipated beam powers. The paper will explain the main components of the DIANA accelerators and their beam transport lines and will discuss related technical challenges.

Leitner, M.; Leitner, D.; Lemut, A.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed. 7 figs.

Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fire Simulation, Evacuation Analysis and Proposal of Fire Protection Systems Inside an Underground Cavern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire Simulation, Evacuation Analysis and Proposal of Fire Protection Systems Inside an Underground Cavern

Stella, Carlo

451

A study of the feasibility of construction of underground storage structures in soft soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Page 44 46 Construction Procedure for an Underground Storage Structure for Liquid Materials Construction Procedure for an Underground Storage Structure for Solid Materials 46 48 Geotechnical Considerations in the Construction Procedure... Introduction Page 44 46 Construction Procedure for an Underground Storage Structure for Liquid Materials Construction Procedure for an Underground Storage Structure for Solid Materials 46 48 Geotechnical Considerations in the Construction Procedure...

Rosner, Stephen Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Explosions of O-Ne-Mg Cores, the Crab Supernova, and Subluminous Type II-P Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of simulations of stellar collapse and explosions in spherical symmetry for progenitor stars in the 8-10 solar mass range with an O-Ne-Mg core. The simulations were continued until nearly one second after core bounce and were performed with the Prometheus/Vertex code with a variable Eddington factor solver for the neutrino transport, including a state-of-the-art treatment of neutrino-matter interactions. Particular effort was made to implement nuclear burning and electron capture rates with sufficient accuracy to ensure a smooth continuation, without transients, from the progenitor evolution to core collapse. Using two different nuclear equations of state (EoSs), a soft version of the Lattimer & Swesty EoS and the significantly stiffer Wolff & Hillebrandt EoS, we found no prompt explosions, but instead delayed explosions, powered by neutrino heating and the neutrino-driven baryonic wind which sets in about 200 ms after bounce. The models eject little nickel ( 0.46, which suggests a chemical composition that is not in conflict with galactic abundances. No low-entropy matter with Ye << 0.5 is ejected. This excludes such explosions as sites of a low-entropy r-process. The low explosion energy and nucleosynthetic implications are compatible with the observed properties of the Crab supernova, and the small nickel mass supports the possibility that our models explain some subluminous Type II-P supernovae.

F. S. Kitaura; H. -Th. Janka; W. Hillebrandt

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

454

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

455

Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) Prince George&#039;s County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Retail Supplier Tribal Government Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment A gas storage company may invoke eminent domain to acquire property in Prince George's County for underground gas storage purposes. The area acquired must lie not less than 800 feet below the surface of a maximum of 12,000 acres of land, and may be owned by a public body. A permit from the Department of the Environment, along with an order from the Public Service Commission, is required prior to the use of eminent domain. The Act contains further information on eminent domain, landowner, and property

456

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Los Alamos Underground Med Pipelines -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos Underground Med Los Alamos Underground Med Pipelines - NM 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Los Alamos Underground Med Pipelines ( NM.02 ) Eliminated - Remedial action being performed by the Los Alamos Area Office of the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Lines NM.02-1 Location: Los Alamos , New Mexico NM.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 NM.02-1 Site Operations: From 1952 to 1965, underground pipelines or industrial waste lines were used at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to transport liquid wastes from Technical Areas 1, 3, 48, and 43 to a chemical waste treatment plant (Technical Area 45). NM.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Remedial action being performed by another DOE office NM.02-1

457

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act, which permits the building of reserves for withdrawal in periods of peak demand, was created to promote the economic development of the State of Georgia and provide for more economical distribution of gas to the domestic, commercial, and industrial consumers of the State. Any gas utility desiring to utilize or operate an

458

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation

459

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to underground storage facilities for petroleum and

460

Appendix E: Underground Storage Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix E: Underground Storage Tank Data #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix E identification service Contents Status ( ) date to Corrective action Tank Out-of- assessment number date regulatory Installation Capacity Preliminary date (gallons) investigation Environmental agency Petroleum USTs

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NM Underground Storage Tank RegistrationLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2012 Legal Citation...

462

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 39,062 39,062...

463

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1302015 12:57:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070CO2"...

464

ARM 17-56 - Underground Storage Tanks Petroleum and Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tanks Petroleum and Chemical Substance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-56 -...

465

Alaska Underground Storage Tanks Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanks Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska Underground Storage Tanks Website Author Division of Spill Prevention and Response...

466

30 TAC, part 1, chapter 334 Underground storage tanks general...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground storage tanks general provisions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 30 TAC, part 1, chapter 334...

467

Investigating dynamic underground coal fires by means of numerical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......available within the combustion centre. Combustion will only proceed whenever...controls the overall combustion rate. For numerical...transport-only and a chemistry-only part. Common...rate of underground coal fires by oxygen transport......

S. Wessling; W. Kessels; M. Schmidt; U. Krause

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:49:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NY2"...

469

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:49:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NY2"...

470

Underground helium travels to the Earth's surface via aquifers...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carried to the surface with the flow of water. The only place where helium is made on Earth is underground, where deep veins of uranium and thorium give off atoms of helium as...

471

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16.............................................................................................21 Coal and Methane Production

Maxwell, Bruce D.

472

Physical security of cut-and-cover underground facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid designers, generic physical security objectives and design concepts for cut-and-cover underground facilities are presented. Specific aspects addressing overburdens, entryways, security doors, facility services, emergency egress, security response force, and human elements are discussed.

Morse, W.D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

474

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060NY2"...

475

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060NY2"...

476

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

477

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 5, 2014 March 2014 Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Haul Truck Fire at the...

478

One-man video verite: thoughts on Scenes from underground  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis considers the making of a documentary videotape on the Red Line Subway Extension project in Cambridge and Somerville, Massachusetts entitled Scenes From Underground. It traces my initial plans for an expository ...

Strongin, Barry

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

ABSTRACTS:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Effect Research in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Jun TAKADA1...Hiroshima Univ. Development of Nuclear fuel cycle has been promoting as an important energy policy in our country in the 21st...Siberia with underground nuclear explosions, restricted......

Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 21 Century; Public Radioprotection

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Announcements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy, Earth Sciences Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regu- latory Commision, Mail Stop 113055, Washington, D...P-coda and LG waves from underground nuclear explosions in Eurasia W. Mitronovas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground nuclear explosions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Program for 56th Annual Meeting, Eastern Section, Seismological Society of America-Oct. 10–12 - St. Louis, MO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy, Earth Sciences Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regu- latory Commision, Mail Stop 113055, Washington, D...P-coda and LG waves from underground nuclear explosions in Eurasia W. Mitronovas...

482

Proceedings for 56th Annual Meeting, Eastern Section, Seismological Society of America-Oct. 10-12 - St. Louis, MO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy, Earth Sciences Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regu- latory Commision, Mail Stop 113055, Washington, D...P-coda and LG waves from underground nuclear explosions in Eurasia W. Mitronovas...

483

SSA annual Meeting Announcement - Austin, TX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy, Earth Sciences Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regu- latory Commision, Mail Stop 113055, Washington, D...P-coda and LG waves from underground nuclear explosions in Eurasia W. Mitronovas...

484

Abstracts for Papers Presented at the 56th Annual Meeting ESSSA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy, Earth Sciences Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U. S. Nuclear Regu- latory Commision, Mail Stop 113055, Washington, D...P-coda and LG waves from underground nuclear explosions in Eurasia W. Mitronovas...

485

Post detonation nuclear forensics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of working backwards from the debris of a nuclear explosion to attempt to attribute the event to a particular actor is singularly difficult technically. However, moving from physical information of any certainty through the political steps that would lead to national action presents daunting policy questions as well. This monograph will outline the operational and physical components of this problem and suggest the difficulty of the policy questions that remain.

Davis, Jay [The Hertz Foundation, 2300 First Street, Suite 250, Livermore, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

486

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

487

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the...

488

The Epicentres and Origin Times of Some Large Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......verified by locating a number of explosions at the Nevada test site, where accurately known shot points were available...verified by locating a number of explosions at the Nevada test site, where accurately known shot points were available......

C. Blamey; P. G. Gibbs

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Waste package and underground facility design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the waste package and the underground facility for radioactive waste disposal presents many challenges never before addressed in an engineering design effort. The designs must allow for handling and emplacement of the waste and must ensure that the waste will be isolated over time periods that extend beyond those normally dealt with in engineering solutions. Once developed, these designs must be defended in a licensing arena to allow construction and operation of the disposal system. The design of the waste package and the repository is being conducted iteratively. Each iteration of the design is accompanied by an assessment of the performance of the design and an assessment of remaining design issues. These assessments are used to establish the basis for the next design phase. Design requirements are assessed and revised as necessary before the initiation of each design phase. In addition, the design effort is being closely integrated with the siting effort through the application of an issue identification and resolution strategy.

Frei, M.W.; Dayem, N.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Idaho Explosives Detection System: Development and Enhancements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying bulk explosives into military bases. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of sodium iodide (NaI) detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A computer connects to the system by Ethernet and is able to control the system remotely. The system was developed to detect bulk explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. In 2004, a full-scale prototype IEDS system was built for testing and continued development. System performance was successfully tested using different types of real explosives with a variety of cargo at the INL from November 2005 through February 2006. Recently, the first deployable prototype system was constructed and shipped to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and will be in operation by March 2007. The capability of passively detecting radiological material within a delivery truck has also been added.

Edward L Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Ann E. Egger; Paul J. Petersen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

EXPLOSIONS CAUSED BY COMMONLY OCCURRING SUBSTANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the nature of the operations is such that these explosions...that the limit of a safe oil as fixed by the 'flashing...ignition was found in the boiler fires, which were 60...in this report to the fundamental dis-tinctions between...a fire under a steam boiler, and that this vapor...

Charles E. Munroe

1899-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

492

Spread of Detonation in High Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... In a note1 on the spread of detonation in a mass of high explosive from the point of initiation, Weibull demonstrates that, ... initiation, Weibull demonstrates that, in a cylindrical cartridge of compressed T.N.T., detonation is propagated with a uniform and constant speed in all directions from the detonator. ...

DUGALD MITCHELL; STEWART PATERSON

1947-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

495

Toward Improved Fidelity of Thermal Explosion Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present results of an effort to improve the thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of HMX based explosive like LX04 and LX10 for thermal cook-off. The original HMX model and analysis scheme were developed by Yoh et.al. for use in the ALE3D modeling framework. The current results were built to remedy the deficiencies of that original model. We concentrated our efforts in four areas. The first area was addition of porosity to the chemical material model framework in ALE3D that is used to model the HMX explosive formulation. This is needed to handle the roughly 2% porosity in solid explosives. The second area was the improvement of the HMX reaction network, which included the inclusion of a reactive phase change model base on work by Henson et.al. The third area required adding early decomposition gas species to the CHEETAH material database to develop more accurate equations of state for gaseous intermediates and products. Finally, it was necessary to improve the implicit mechanics module in ALE3D to more naturally handle the long time scales associated with thermal cook-off. The application of the resulting framework to the analysis of the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) experiments will be discussed.

Nichols, A L; Becker, R; Howard, W M; Wemhoff, A

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

496

Explosive Cyclogenesis over the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on explosively developing extratropical cyclones over the northeast portion of the Pacific Ocean have been compiled. A climatology of those events which deepened by 1 Bergeron (24 mb day?1 deepening at 60°N) or more is discussed. The maximum ...

T. S. Murty; G. A. McBean; B. McKee

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Explosive transients: a time-variable sky  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Calculations of the amount of gas involved suggest around...least. The absorbing gas exists before the outburst...physics improves. What drives the explosion? Work on...objects, such as Supernova News, an early warning system...ambient medium provides a natural explanation for afterglow......

David Bersier; Mike Bode; Shiho Kobayashi; Carole Mundell; Iain Steele

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less of energy fluence.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

500

AMERICAN POLICY AND IRAN'S NUCLEAR PROGRAMME: THE CHINA ANALOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AMERICAN POLICY AND IRAN'S NUCLEAR PROGRAMME: THE CHINA ANALOGY For historians of American policy toward China in the 1960s, the current nuclear crisis over Iran has some eerie and suggestive parallels. The first Chinese nuclear test explosion took place in October 1964, thus breaking into the monopoly held

Heinke, Dietmar