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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

2

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

3

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

4

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

5

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

6

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

7

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

8

Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FG-RPT-017 FG-RPT-017 Revision 1 Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION March 2013 (Revised May 2013 in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Completeness Review) Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001882. Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

9

Texas Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Injections into Underground...

10

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

11

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

12

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

13

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

14

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

15

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

16

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

17

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

18

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

19

Illinois Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

20

Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection Control (West Virginia) Injection Control (West Virginia) Underground Injection Control (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule set forth criteria and standards for the requirements which apply to the State Underground Injection Control Program (U.I.C.). The UIC permit program regulates underground injections by 5 classes of wells. All owners

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alaska Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply &...

22

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply &...

23

Collection and analyses of physical data for deep injection wells in Florida.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deep injection wells (DIW) in Florida are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the state of Florida through the Underground Injection Control… (more)

Gao, Jie.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14-WA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Chapter 173-218 WAC Non-endangerment Standard Triggers None specified The Safe Drinking Water Act requires Washington to implement technical criteria and standards to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. Under Chapter 173-218 WAC, the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) regulates and permits underground injection control (UIC) wells in Washington. The Environmental Protection Agency

25

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the purpose of this UIC Code to adopt underground injection control (UIC) regulations necessary to qualify the State of Arkansas to retain authorization for its Underground Injection Control Program pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended; 42 USC 300f et seq. In order

26

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 14-CA-c.3 - Application For Proposed Underground Injection Project Under the Memorandum of Agreement Between State Water Resources Control Board and DOGGR geothermal operators must file an application for underground geothermal wastewater injection with the appropriate DOGGR district office. The application must include: A chemical analysis to characterize the proposed injection fluid; A chemical analysis from the proposed zone of injection considering the characteristics of the zone; and The depth, location, and injection formation of the proposed well. Logic Chain

27

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Administrative Code R317-7 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks If the permit application does not adequately demonstrate that geothermal re-injection wells will be constructed and operated to be protective of any USDWs the issuance of a permit may be denied or delayed. 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

28

Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section regulates wells, borings, and underground storage with regards to protecting groundwater resources. The Commissioner of the Department of Health has jurisdiction, and can grant permits for proposed activities,

29

one mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, mile underground into a deep saline formation. The injection, which will occur over a three-year period and is slated to start in early 2010, will compress up to 1 million metric tonnes of CO 2 from the ADM ethanol facility into a liquid-like, dense phase. The targeted rock formation, the Mt. Simon Sandstone, is the thickest and most widespread saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, with an estimated CO 2 storage capacity of 27 to 109 billion metric tonnes. A comprehensive monitoring program, which will be evaluated yearly, will be implemented after the injection to ensure the injected CO 2 is stored safely and permanently. The RCSP Program was launched by the Office of Fossil Energy (FE)

30

Underground Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) Underground Injection Control Fee Schedule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes schedules of permit fees for state under-ground injection control permits issued by the Chief of the Office of Water Resources. This rule applies to any person who is required to apply for and

31

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 50,130 81,827 167,632 312,290 457,725 420,644 359,267 370,180 453,548 436,748 221,389 90,432 2012 74,854 56,243 240,351 263,896 357,965 323,026 263,910 299,798 357,109 327,767 155,554 104,953 2013 70,592 41,680 99,330 270,106 465,787 438,931 372,458 370,471 418,848 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators

32

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

33

Iowa Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 1,740 243 1,516 3,236 5,817 8,184 5,657 5,928 4,903 4,971 1,423 854 1991 1,166 155 231 1,829 4,897 8,985 6,518 8,058 11,039 10,758 2,782 860 1992 488 43 1,246 3,184 7,652 7,568 11,453 11,281 11,472 9,000 1,228 1,203 1993 0 0 733 5,547 6,489 7,776 10,550 10,150 12,351 8,152 2,437 0 1994 0 75 1,162 3,601 7,153 7,638 11,999 12,405 13,449 10,767 2,678 0 1995 0 0 251 1,041 5,294 9,889 12,219 17,805 13,756 8,855 1,283 391 1996 2 2 0 40 1,921 7,679 12,393 13,168 12,537 10,556 2,760 0

34

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 7,862 17,834 34,190 160,946 247,849 262,039 269,285 244,910 208,853 134,234 47,094 16,471 1995 13,614 4,932 36,048 85,712 223,991 260,731 242,718 212,493 214,385 160,007 37,788 12,190 1996 12,276 39,022 32,753 130,232 233,717 285,798 303,416 270,223 247,897 166,356 39,330 28,875 1997 16,058 14,620 25,278 93,501 207,338 258,086 250,776 252,129 233,730 152,913 53,097 10,338 1998 21,908 13,334 48,068 139,412 254,837 234,427 234,269 207,026 178,129 144,203 52,518 28,342

35

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-HI-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 23 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf 14HIC - UndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The developer must receive an Underground Injection Control Permit from the

36

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 20,366 29,330 55,297 93,538 129,284 83,943 104,001 98,054 88,961 65,486 49,635 27,285 1995 24,645 25,960 57,833 78,043 101,019 100,926 77,411 54,611 94,759 84,671 40,182 33,836 1996 34,389 48,922 38,040 76,100 98,243 88,202 88,653 109,284 125,616 91,618 37,375 48,353 1997 45,327 35,394 89,625 83,137 107,821 99,742 71,360 95,278 116,634 117,497 49,750 33,170 1998 41,880 59,324 73,582 119,021 128,323 96,261 107,136 94,705 87,920 129,117 58,026 47,924 1999 35,830 50,772 49,673 80,879 110,064 100,132 72,348 67,286 103,587 79,714 66,465 32,984

37

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,449 542 13,722 29,089 48,055 33,801 35,146 27,858 45,903 22,113 5,766 6,401 1995 2,960 9,426 8,840 10,680 42,987 47,386 37,349 22,868 31,053 25,873 15,711 3,003 1996 2,819 8,696 9,595 20,495 41,216 36,086 25,987 20,787 24,773 17,795 13,530 9,122 1997 6,982 4,857 15,669 28,479 47,040 49,438 38,542 31,080 29,596 23,973 10,066 1,975 1998 5,540 1,847 14,429 21,380 49,816 48,423 30,073 34,243 31,710 34,744 26,456 6,404 1999 4,224 3,523 10,670 17,950 41,790 42,989 40,381 26,942 30,741 20,876 18,806 4,642

38

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.12 - Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection - Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection Project < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 14-CA-c.12 - Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection Project After the end of the comment period and after reviewing any proposed revisions furnished by the Regional Board, the State Board decides whether to approve the Underground Injection Project. Logic Chain No Parents \V/ GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.12 - Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection Project (this page) \V/ No Dependents Under Development Add.png Add an Element Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.12_-_Does_the_DOGGR_Approve_the_Underground_Injection_Project&oldid=539630

39

Underground Injection Control Program Rules and Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to preserve the quality of the groundwater of the State and thereby protect groundwater contamination from contamination by discharge from injection wells and...

40

Application for Underground Injection Control Permit for the PUNA Geothermal Venture Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plans to construct and operate the 25 MW Puna Geothermal Venture Project in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The project will drill geothermal wells within a dedicated 500-acre project area, use the produced geothermal fluid to generate electricity for sale to the Hawaii Electric Light Company for use on the Island of Hawaii, and inject all the produced geothermal fluids back into the geothermal reservoir. Since the project will use injection wells, it will require an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit from the Drinking Water Section of the State of Hawaii Department of Health. The PGV Project is consistent with the State and County of Hawaii's stated objectives of providing energy self-sufficiency and diversifying Hawaii's economic base. The project will develop a new alternate energy source as well as provide additional information about the nature of the geothermal resource.

None

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application for Underground Injection Control Permit for the PUNA Geothermal Venture Project  

SciTech Connect

Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plans to construct and operate the 25 MW Puna Geothermal Venture Project in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii. The project will drill geothermal wells within a dedicated 500-acre project area, use the produced geothermal fluid to generate electricity for sale to the Hawaii Electric Light Company for use on the Island of Hawaii, and inject all the produced geothermal fluids back into the geothermal reservoir. Since the project will use injection wells, it will require an Underground Injection Control (UIC) permit from the Drinking Water Section of the State of Hawaii Department of Health. The PGV Project is consistent with the State and County of Hawaii's stated objectives of providing energy self-sufficiency and diversifying Hawaii's economic base. The project will develop a new alternate energy source as well as provide additional information about the nature of the geothermal resource.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Underground Natural Gas Storage Wells in Bedded Salt (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to natural gas underground storage and associated brine ponds, and includes the permit application for each new underground storage tank near surface water bodies and springs.

43

Cerro Prieto cold water injection: effects on nearby production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoir wells close to injection well E-6 along with theMeeting. Most of the injection wells are open to the Alphaand completing new injection wells is lower than in the East

Truesdell, A.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

GRR/Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-c - Underground Injection Control Permit Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 27 16 TAC 3.9 46 TAC 3.46 16 TAC 3.30 - MOU between the RRC and the TCEQ Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Pages from 14TXCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (4).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

46

GRR/Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 4-ID-c - Underground Injection Control < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-c - Underground Injection Control 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IDAPA 37.03.04 IDAPA 37.03.03 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks Extensive public comments can stretch the timeline since IDWR must respond to all comments, potentially hold a Fact Finding Hearing, and thoroughly review the input received in these processes prior to making a decision to issue or deny the permit. 14IDCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

47

GRR/Section 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14CACUndergroundInjectionControl.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Regulations & Policies Division 3, Chapter 4 of the California Public Resources Code Title 14, Division 2, Chapter 4 of the California Code of Regulations Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 144 Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 146 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CACUndergroundInjectionControl.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

48

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies 40 CFR 144.26: Federal UIC Regulations 40 CFR 144.83: Notification OAR 340-044: State UIC Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

49

GRR/Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 4-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-NV-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Water Resources Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14NVCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

50

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well Orlando SilvaOrlando Silva #12; The Problem CO2 or gas injection well Questions Injection of scCO2 vs. gaseous CO2. Other relevant examples: - gas and therefore the CO2 injection rate. caprock reservoir geothermal gradient hydrostatic gradient well CO2 bubble

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

53

Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

55

GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Colorado Division of Water Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not delegated

56

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1973 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050wi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:12 PM"

57

,"Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

58

,"Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:51 PM"

59

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050sc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050sc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:07 PM"

60

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:46 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

62

,"Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

63

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34349,10956 34380,12444

64

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5540us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5540us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5540US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)" 34515,2654035 34880,2371697 35246,2647124 35611,2532986

65

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34515,142243 34880,194185 35246,258468

66

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5540us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5540us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5540US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (MMcf)" 34349,23610 34380,37290 34408,91769

67

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6) is an intermediate-depth injection well designed to accept injection water in the 600 to 1000 m (2000 to 3500 ft) depth range. It has one barefoot leg, and it was drilled so that additional legs can be added later; if there are problems with intermediate-depth injection, one or more additional legs could be directionally drilled from the current well bore. Included are the reports of daily drilling records of drill bits, casings, and loggings, and descriptions of cementing, coring, and containment.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

69

Evaluation of land disposal and underground injection of shale oil wastewaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results indicate that the salinity of retort water, the principal wastewater generated by shale oil recovery operations, will be too high in most cases for irrigation of cover crops needed for effective stabilization by land disposal. Furthermore, large storage lagoons would be required to hold the retort water during the long winters encountered in the oil shale regions of Colorado, Wyoming and Utah. Land disposal cannot be carried out during prolonged periods of freezing weather. Additional problems which may arise with land disposal include air pollution from volatile constituents and groundwater pollution from refractory organics and dissolved salts in the retort water. Pretreatment requirements include the removal of ammonia which is present at toxic concentrations in retort water. Underground injection of retort water may be permitted in regions possessing favorable geological characteristics. It is anticipated that this method would be used as a last resort where effective or resonably priced treatment technology is not available. Regulatory restraints are expected to limit the use of underground injection for disposal of highly polluted shale oil wastewaters. Proving the confinement of injected wastes, a frequently difficult and expensive task, will be required to assure protection of drinking water resources.

Mercer, B.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Wakamiya, W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not just near the injection well. Note that because thisConcentrations at the injection well increase during thethe fractures away from the injection well is fast, solutes

Cotte, F.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

Corey, J.C.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cerro Prieto cold water injection: effects on nearby production wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The liquid-dominated Cerro Prieto geothermal field of northern Baja California, Mexico has been under commercial exploitation since 1973. During the early years of operation, all waste brines were sent to an evaporation pond built west of the production area. In 1989, cooled pond brines began to be successfully injected into the reservoir along the western boundary of the geothermal system. The injection rate varied over the years, and is at present about 20% of the total fluid extracted. As expected under the continental desert conditions prevailing in the area, the temperature and salinity of the pond brines change with the seasons, being higher during the summer and lower during the winter. The chemistry of pond brines is also affected by precipitation of silica, oxidation of H{sub 2}S and reaction with airborne clays. Several production wells in the western part of the field (CP-I area) showed beneficial effects from injection. The chemical (chloride, isotopic) and physical (enthalpy, flow rate) changes observed in producers close to the injectors are reviewed. Some wells showed steam flow increases, in others steam flow decline rates flattened. Because of their higher density, injected brines migrated downward in the reservoir and showed up in deep wells.

Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; De Leon, J.; Rodriguez, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gas tracer composition and method. [Process to determine whether any porous underground methane storage site is in fluid communication with a gas producing well  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for determining whether any porous underground gaseous methane storage sites is in fluid communication with a gas producing well, and if there is fluid communication, determining which site is in the fluid communication comprising injecting a different gaseous tracer mixture into each of the sites at some location in each of the site in an amount such that the presence of the tracer mixture will be detectable in the gaseous methane stored therein, each of the mixture having the properties of (1) not occurring in natural supplies of methane, (2) diffusing through any underground methane storage site in a manner very similar in rate to methane, and (3) being substantially insoluble in petroleum distillates, after a period of time sufficient for each of the tracer mixtures to diffuse through the underground site from its injection location to the well, withdrawing a sample gaseous product from the well, testing the sample gaseous product for the presence of each of the tracer mixtures.

Malcosky, N.D.; Koziar, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

77

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized methodology for evaluating the technical feasibility of projects involving the disposal of waste brine by injection into deep saline aquifers is developed, primarily from the hydrology and petroleum engineering literature. Data collection, groundwater modeling, and fluid compatibility are discussed in detail. Injection system design, economics, and regulatory considerations are more related to economic than technical feasibility, and are discussed only as they relate to technical feasibility. The methodology is utilized to make a preliminary evaluation of a proposed brine injection project in the Dove Creek area of King and Stonewall Counties, North Central Texas. Four known deep aquifers are modeled, using the SWIFT/486 software, to determine their ability to receive two cfs of brine for a project life of one hundred years. Two aquifers, the Strawn and EUenburger Formations, are predicted to be acceptable for disposal. Each aquifer would require only one disposal well which is favorable for the economics of the project. Additional data, particularly hydraulic conductivity and net aquifer thickness data, are required to make a more definitive technical feasibility determination for this project.

Spongberg, Martin Edward

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of thermally induced permeability enhancement in geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is a common means of disposing of geothermal effluents and maintaining reservoir pressures. Contrary to the predictions of two-fluid models (two-viscosity) of nonisothermal injection, an increase of injectivity, with continued injection, is often observed. Injectivity enhancement and thermally-affected pressure transients are particularly apparent in short-term injection tests at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico. During an injection test, it is not uncommon to observe that after an initial pressure increase, the pressure decreases with time. As this typically occurs far below the pressure at which hydraulic fracturing is expected, some other mechanism for increasing the near-bore permeability must explain the observed behavior. This paper focuses on calculating the magnitude of the nearbore permeability changes observed in several nonisothermal injection tests conducted at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.S.; Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Ortiz-Ramirez, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Single Well Injection Withdrawl Tracer Tests for Proppant ...  

A large question preventing optimal natural gas production from "hydrofracked" shales is how far proppants, injected to keep shale fractures open, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators approach meets the requirements for cutting straight entries and mining the proper amount of coal per cycle. Introduction The mining of soft materials, such as coal, is a large industry. Worldwide, a total of 435 million

Guestrin, Carlos

83

Current injection efficiency of InGaAsN quantum-well lasers Nelson Tansua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current injection efficiency of InGaAsN quantum-well lasers Nelson Tansua Department of Electrical-threshold current injection efficiency of quantum well QW lasers is clarified. The analysis presented here is applied to the current injection efficiency of 1200 nm emitting InGaAs and 1300 nm emitting InGaAsN QW

Gilchrist, James F.

84

A Simulator for Design & Management of Injection Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Hydraulically Fractured Wells Waterflooding and Surface Facilities Design · Performance Prediction of Vertical

Texas at Austin, University of

85

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

86

Modeling of coulpled deformation and permeability evolution during fault reactivation induced by deep underground injection of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between mechanical deformation and fluid flow in fault zones gives rise to a host of coupled hydromechanical processes fundamental to fault instability, induced seismicity, and associated fluid migration. In this paper, we discuss these coupled processes in general and describe three modeling approaches that have been considered to analyze fluid flow and stress coupling in fault-instability processes. First, fault hydromechanical models were tested to investigate fault behavior using different mechanical modeling approaches, including slip interface and finite-thickness elements with isotropic or anisotropic elasto-plastic constitutive models. The results of this investigation showed that fault hydromechanical behavior can be appropriately represented with the least complex alternative, using a finite-thickness element and isotropic plasticity. We utilized this pragmatic approach coupled with a strain-permeability model to study hydromechanical effects on fault instability during deep underground injection of CO{sub 2}. We demonstrated how such a modeling approach can be applied to determine the likelihood of fault reactivation and to estimate the associated loss of CO{sub 2} from the injection zone. It is shown that shear-enhanced permeability initiated where the fault intersects the injection zone plays an important role in propagating fault instability and permeability enhancement through the overlying caprock.

Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

89

A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vicinity of an injection well that had been in operationaway from the injection well. This modeling work iswithin 200 m of an injection well that had been in operation

Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This task involves developing a preliminary national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS). An analytical methodology for nationwise estimation of potential for USDW contamination from underground injection and the current and future resource potential associated with these areas of concern will be developed.

Not Available

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation coefficient increase. Interestingly, model results before and after hydrofracking are insensitive to adding more fractures, while slightly more sensitive to aperture increase, making SWIW tests a possible means of discriminating between these two potential hydrofracking effects. Finally, we investigate the possibility of inferring relevant information regarding the fracture-matrix system physical parameters from the BTCs obtained during SWIW testing.

Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

93

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

94

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport modeling of injection well scaling and acidizingto a field geothermal injection well system, to investigateespecially near the injection well. CALCITE DISSOLUTION

Xu, Tianfu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. Well 46A-19RD, located in the southwestern portion of this field is currently the focus of a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. Petrologic and petrographic investigations of the well show that quartz diorite and granodiorite are dominant lithologies. Dikes of granophyre, containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, potassium feldspar, and

96

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

97

OVERVIEW: UNDERGROUND INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collected, edited and integrated large amounts of information to create this technical reference document. During development of the original overview in 1991, the detailed editorial/technical assistance of Tom Belk (Office of Drinking Water), Marc Herman (Supe rfund Branch, Region VIII) an d Marion Yoder (Office of Regional C ounsel, Region VIII) helped to improve the readability of this document. Virginia Rose (Drinking Water Branch) made the original document possible by retyping numerous drafts containing never-ending changes.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAsAlGaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical injection and coherent control of a ballistic charge current in GaAs�AlGaAs quantum wells of Hache´ et al.,2,3 but in this article we report injection into the plane of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells specific to quantum wells. Although we expect the underlying physics of injection and control of currents

Sipe,J. E.

99

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes]. The detail of the model for current injection model for quantum well heterostructure is described in Ref. [18 Keywords: III-Nitride InGaN QWs Light-emitting diodes Efficiency-droop a b s t r a c t Current injection

Gilchrist, James F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

File:05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 33 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:55, 12 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:55, 12 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (33 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 13:12, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:12, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (26 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

102

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Heavy Oil is abundant in California. It is a very viscous fluid, which must be thinned in order to flow from wells at economical rates. The best method of oil viscosity reduction is by cyclic steam injection into the oil-containing rock formations. Making steam in conventional generators fueled with Natural Gas is, however, a costly process. The main objective of this Project is to reduce the cost of the required steam, per Barrel of Oil produced. This is made possible by a combination of Patented new technologies with several known methods. The best known method for increasing the production rate from oil wells is to use horizontal drainholes, which provide a much greater flow area from the oil zone into the well. A recent statistic based on 344 horizontal wells in 21 Canadian Oil fields containing Heavy Oil shows that these are, on the average six times more prolific than vertical wells. The cost of horizontal wells, however, is generally two to three times that of a vertical well, in the same field, so our second goal is to reduce the net cost of horizontal wells by connecting two of them to the same vertical casing, well head and pumping system. With such a well configuration, it is possible to get two horizontal wells for the price of about one and a half times the price of a single vertical well.

Gondouin, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Matched boundary extrapolation solutions for CO2 well injection into a saline aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface solution for carbon dioxide injection  into Interface  Solutionfor  Carbon  Dioxide  Injection  into IPCC  Special  Report  on  Carbon  Dioxide  Capture  and 

Houseworth, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Summary report: Assessment of deep injection well associated surface soils at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes sampling activities and analytical results of the chemical and radiological content of surface soils from storm water retention basins and drainage ditches associated with eight deep injection wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The results of the sampling effort were intended to support permitting of the injection wells by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources. In August 1992, the surface soils associated with eight storm water retention basins and ditches were sampled. All samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with a written sampling and analysis plan. The samples were analyzed by an off-Site contract laboratory, and the results were compared to local and regional soil analytical data to determine the presence of contaminants. The results indicated that the surface soils from the storm water retention basins and ditches did not have concentrations of metals or radionuclides greater than the range of concentrations found in local and regional soils. Volatile organic compounds were below detection limits.

Pole, S.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

106

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The Midway-Sunset Field (CA) is the largest Heavy Oil field in California and steam injection methods have been successfully used for more than 30 years to produce the Heavy Oil from many of its unconsolidated sand reservoirs. In partnership with another DOE/ERIP grantee, our Company has acquired an 80 ac. lease in the SE part of this field, in order to demonstrate our respective technologies in the Monarch sand, of Miocene Age, which is one of the reservoirs targeted by the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. This reservoir contains a 13 API oil, which has a much higher market value, as a Refinery Feedstock, than the 5 to 8 API Vaca Tar, used only as road paving material. This makes it easier to justify the required investment in a vertical well equipped with two horizontal drainholes. The economic viability of such a project is likely to be enhanced if Congress approves the export to Japan of a portion of the 27 API (1% Sulfur) AK North Slope oil, which currently is landed in California in preference to lighter and sweeter Far East imported crudes. This is a major cause of the depressed prices for California Heavy Oil in local refineries, which have reduced the economic viability of all EOR methods, including steam injection, in California. Two proposals, for a Near-Term (3 y.) and for a Mid-Term (6 y.) project respectively, were jointly submitted to the DOE for Field Demonstration of the Partners` new technologies under the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. The previous design of a special casing joint for the Oxnard field well was reviewed and adapted to the use of existing Downhole Hardware components from three suppliers, instead of one. The cost of drilling and completion of a well equipped with two horizontal drainholes was re-evaluated for the conditions prevailing in the Midway Sunset field, which are more favorable than in the Oxnard field, leading to considerable reductions in drilling rig time and cost.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Predicting the rate by which suspended solids plug geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard membrane filtration tests were used to evaluate injection at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Southern California. Results indicate that direct injection into reservoir zones with primary porosity is not feasible unless 1 ..mu..m or larger particulates formed during or after the energy conversion process are removed. (JGB)

Owens, L.B.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Netherton, R.; Thorson, L.

1978-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Estimation of CO2 injection well requirements into saline aquifers for pre-feasibility CCS economics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sub-surface saline aquifers are candidates as CO2 injection sites because they could have significant storage potential. One of the long-standing issues in assessing such storage… (more)

Bukhteeva, Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and production wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan, were examined in an effort to establish relationships (1) between productivity of large-diameter wells and slim holes, (2) between injectivity and productivity indices and (3) between productivity index and borehole diameter. The production data from Oguni boreholes imply that the mass production from large-diameter wells may be estimated based on data from slim holes. Test data from both large- and small-diameter boreholes indicate that to first order the productivity and the injectivity indices are equal. Somewhat surprisingly, the productivity index was found to be a strong function of borehole diameter; the cause for this phenomenon is not understood at this time.

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Abe, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R. D. R. Bhat, and J. E. Sipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All-optical injection and control of spin and electrical currents in quantum wells Ali Najmaie, R of the injected carriers. This degeneracy is lifted in a quantum well semiconductor structure due to confinement injection of electrical and spin currents in the plane of a GaAs quantum well and its control through

Sipe,J. E.

112

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, W.B. III.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Protocol for laboratory research on degradation, interaction, and fate of wastes disposed by deep-well injection: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research investigation was to develop a laboratory protocol for use in determining degradation, interaction, and fate of organic wastes disposed in deep subsurface reservoirs via disposal wells. Knowledge of the ultimate fate of deep-well disposed wastes is important because provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) require that by August 1988, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must show that the disposal of specified wastes by deep-well injection is safe to human health and the environment, or the practice must be stopped. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) developed this protocol primarily by transferring some of its expertise and knowledge of laboratory protocol relevant to improved recovery of petroleum. Phenol, because it is injected into deep, subsurface reservoirs for disposal, was selected for study by the EPA. Phenol is one waste product that has been injected into the Frio formation; therefore, a decision was made to use phenol and sedimentary rock from the Frio formation for a series of laboratory experiments to demonstrate the protocol. This study investigates the adsorption properties of a specific reservoir rock which is representative of porous sedimentary geologic formations used as repositories for hazardous organic wastes. The developed protocol can be used to evaluate mobility, adsorption, and degradation of an organic hazardous waste under simulated subsurface reservoir conditions. 22 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs.

Collins, A.G.; Crocker, M.E.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Bachaquero-01 reservoir, Venezuela-increasing oil production by switching from cyclic steam injection to steamflooding using horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachaquero-01 reservoir of the Lagunillas field is located in the eastern part of the Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. The field is operated by the national oil company of Venezuela, PDVSA (Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A.). The Bachaquero-01 heavy oil reservoir lies at about 3,000 ft. ss. and contains 7.037 BSTB of 1 1.7 degrees API gravity oil with an in-situ viscosity of 635 cp. Cold production began in 1960, but since 1971 the reservoir was produced under a massive cyclic steam injection system. To-date some 370 cyclic-steam injection welts have produced from the reservoir, yielding a cumulative oil recovery of only about 5.6% of initial oil-in-place. The reservoir pressure has dropped from an initial 1,370 psia to its present value of about 700 psia. Maximum oil production peaked at 45.0 MSTB/D in 1991, and has since continued to decline. To arrest production decline, three horizontal cyclic-steam injection wells were drilled and completed in the reservoir in 1995-1997. The horizontal sections were from 1,280 to 1,560 ft long and were drilled in locations with existing vertical cyclic steam injection welts. Three-dimensional thermal-compositional simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the three horizontal welts under cyclic steam injection and steamflooding. The Cartesian model dimensions of the three horizontal welts were 11x22x4, 11x27x5, and 12x20x5. In the steamflooding scheme investigated, the existing horizontal welts were used as injectors while existing (and new) vertical welts surrounding the horizontal welts were used as producers. Simulation results indicate oil recovery under cyclic steam injection to be about 15% of initial oil-in-place, compared to about 25% under steamflooding with no new producers, and about 50% under steamflooding with additional producers. The main advantages of steamflooding over cyclic steam injection were in the re-pressurization and improved thermal efficiency for the Bachaquero-01 reservoir. Higher oil recovery with additional wells resulted from improved areal sweep efficiency. Further study is planned to investigate steamflooding for the rest of the reservoir.

Rodriguez, Manuel Gregorio

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Downward two-phase flow effects in heat-loss and pressure-drop modeling of steam injection wells  

SciTech Connect

Modelling of the pressure drop and heat loss in steam injection wells has undergone a gradual evolution since the heavy interest in enhanced oil recovery by steam injection in the mid-60's. After briefly reviewing the evolution of steam models this paper presents a model which advances the state-of-the-art of steam modelling. The main advance presented in this paper is modelling the effects of the various flow regimens that occur during steam injection. The paper describes the formulation of a two-phase downward vertical flow pressure drop model which is not limited by the ''no-slip'' homogeneous flow assumptions in most previously published models. By using different correlations for mist, bubble, and slug flow, improved pressure drop calculations result, which in turn improve temperature predictions. The paper describes how the model handles temperature predictions differently in the single and two-phase steam flow situations. The paper also describes special features in the model to account for layered soil properties, soil dry out, cyclic injection, coupling heat losses, and reflux boiling in wet annuli. Two examples problems are presented which illustrate some of these features.

Galate, J.W.; Mitchell, R.F.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fifth quarter of this project, progress was made concerning four of the stated objectives of the project. First, extensive sensitivity studies, based on reservoir simulation, have been performed on a field example to assess the effects of wellbore friction, inflow, skin, length, and diameter of the well, etc. on the productivity of a horizontal well. Secondly, the authors have launched a new phase of the project on developing models for scale-up and coarse grid pseudo functions for horizontal wells in heterogeneous reservoirs. The available methods have been applied to an example problem and their performance and limitations have been analyzed. Thirdly, the authors are in the process of developing a new analytical solution for the coning and cresting critical rates for horizontal wells. Finally, experimental data bases will be used to test the authors` newly developed general mechanistic model for two-phase flow.

Fayers, F.J.; Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Carrier heating in quantum wells under optical and current injection of electron-hole pairs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrier heating in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) under optical interband pumping in the spontaneous-emission mode has been studied. The electron temperature was determined as a function of the pumping intensity. The effect of the electric field on the photoluminescence spectrum was examined. The change in the carrier concentration with the drive current in the spontaneous- and stimulated-emission modes in InGaAsSb/InAlGaAsSb QWs was determined from electroluminescence spectra. The rise in the temperature of hot carriers, which results in the increase in the carrier concentration with the drive current, was roughly estimated.

Vorobjev, L. E., E-mail: LVor@rphf.spbstu.ru; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Firsov, D. A.; Zerova, V. L.; Panevin, V. Yu.; Sofronov, A. N.; Thumrongsilapa, P. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Research and Education Center for Nanotechnology (Russian Federation); Vasiljev, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Shterengas, L.; Kipshidze, G.; Hosoda, T.; Belenky, G. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

Jorda, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production and injection data from nine slim holes and sixteen large-diameter wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu, Japan were analyzed in order to establish relationships (1) between injectivity and productivity indices, (2) between productivity/injectivity index and borehole diameter, and (3) between discharge capacity of slim holes and large-diameter wells. Results are compared with those from the Oguni and Sumikawa fields. A numerical simulator (WELBOR) was used to model the available discharge rate from Takigami boreholes. The results of numerical modeling indicate that the flow rate of large-diameter geothermal production wells with liquid feedzones can be predicted using data from slim holes. These results also indicate the importance of proper well design.

Garg, S.K. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)] [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States)] [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos Hills, CA (United States); Azawa, Fumio [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Gotoh, Hiroki [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)] [Idemitsu Oita Geothermal Co. Ltd., Oita (Japan)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

K. B. Campbell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

LLNL Capabilities in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) has received renewed interest as a potential technology for producing hydrogen at a competitive price particularly in Europe and China. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) played a leading role in this field and continues to do so. It conducted UCG field tests in the nineteen-seventies and -eighties resulting in a number of publications culminating in a UCG model published in 1989. LLNL successfully employed the ''Controlled Retraction Injection Point'' (CRIP) method in some of the Rocky Mountain field tests near Hanna, Wyoming. This method, shown schematically in Fig.1, uses a horizontally-drilled lined injection well where the lining can be penetrated at different locations for injection of the O{sub 2}/steam mixture. The cavity in the coal seam therefore gets longer as the injection point is retracted as well as wider due to reaction of the coal wall with the hot gases. Rubble generated from the collapsing wall is an important mechanism studied by Britten and Thorsness.

Friedmann, S J; Burton, E; Upadhye, R

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

SciTech Connect

Dissolution of silica, silicate, and calcite minerals in the presence of a chelating agent (NTA) at a high pH has been successfully performed in the laboratory using a high-temperature flow reactor. The mineral dissolution and porosity enhancement in the laboratory experiment has been reproduced by reactive transport simulation using TOUGHREACT. The chemical stimulation method has been applied by numerical modeling to a field geothermal injection well system, to investigate its effectiveness. Parameters from the quartz monzodiorite unit at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) were used. Results indicate that the injection of a high pH chelating solution results in dissolution of both calcite and plagioclase minerals, and avoids precipitation of calcite at high temperature conditions. Consequently reservoir porosity and permeability can be enhanced especially near the injection well.

Xu, Tianfu; Rose, Peter; Fayer, Scott; Pruess, Karsten

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area. While drilling NDW-1, fluid samples were collectedorigin of the fluid collected while drilling the new well

Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

133

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Underground Layout Configuration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

A. Linden

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing.

Robert Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.12 - Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Does the DOGGR Approve the Underground Injection Project < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List...

137

Vitrified underground structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

Murphy, Mark T. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Stottlemyre, James A. (Richland, WA); Tixier, Jr., John S. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Elastic and elastoplastic finite element simulations of injection into porous reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground gas injection has attracted remarkable attention for natural gas storage and carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic sequestration applications. Injection of natural gas into depleted hydrocarbon… (more)

Chamani, Amin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-20-05 has been removed and drummed as a best management practice and will be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. It is recommended that the liquids be removed from the holding tank wells and the sumps of the two outer holding tanks within the BOP Shop, and the sumps be grouted, and the holding tanks filled in to the BOP Shop floor surface. The preferred corrective action alternatives were ev

Boehlecke, Robert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Interaction, compatibilities and long-term environmental fate of deep-well-injected EOR fluids and/or waste fluids with reservoir fluids and rocks - state-of-the-art. [206 references  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of environmental research of injected enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and/or waste fluids is presented with respect to (1) interactions and compatibilities with reservoir fluids and rocks, and (2) their long-term environmental fate. Major environmental impacts associated with EOR are: (1) possible contamination of surface and groundwater, and (2) possible contamination of land. Although the report focuses on EOR fluids, many other liquid wastes also are considered. When EOR chemicals and/or waste fluids are injected into deep wells for oil recovery or disposal, they may pose environmental problems unless the injection process, oil recovery process, or waste disposal process is carefully planned and executed. This report discusses injection waters, water compatibilities, formation rocks with emphasis on clay minerals, corrosion, bacterial problems, EOR operations, waste fluid injection operations, injection well design, radioactive wastes, transport and fate processes, and mathematical models. 206 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Collins, G.; Kayser, M.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

143

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

144

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area • 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. • Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. • No Corrective Action Plan is required. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 546. • Corrective Action Unit 546 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this document. No analytes were detected at concentrations exceeding final action levels. However, contaminants of concern were presumed to be present in the subsurface soil at CAS 09-20-01. Therefore, the corrective action of close in place was selected as the preferred alternative for this CAS. Potential source material was removed from CAS 06-23-02; therefore, the corrective action of clean closure was selected as the preferred alternative at this CAS.

Alfred Wickline

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

Farrell, Roger, A.

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Pipelines and Underground Gas Storage (Iowa) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These rules apply to intrastate transport of natural gas and other substances via pipeline, as well as underground gas storage facilities. The construction and operation of...

147

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience from the natural gas storage industry. In: Rokkeof the underground natural gas storage wells in operation inof the underground natural gas storage wells in the EU. The

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO 2geology of the Desert Peak Geothermal Field: A case history,

Xu, Tianfu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

McKay, A.S.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario  

SciTech Connect

Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A Tier 2 evaluation was conducted, and a FAL of 185,000 micrograms per kilogram was calculated for chlordane at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 based on an occasional use area exposure scenario. This evaluation of chlordane based on the Tier 2 FAL determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) The surface soil surrounding the main concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and chlordane above the FALs. This soil, along with the COCs, was subsequently removed at CAS 23-20-01. (2) The sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin at the large concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained lead and benzo(a)pyrene above the FALs. This contamination was limited to the sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin and did not migrate to the subsurface features beneath it. The contaminated and the concrete box of the catch basin were subsequently recovered at CAS 23-20-01.

David Strand

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Vibrations from underground blasting  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines has investigated vibration levels produced by blasting at four underground sites to establish how such factors as type of explosive, delay blasting, charge weight, and geology affect amplitudes of ground motion. A summary of the work is presented and the results of further analysis of the data are discussed. Square root scaling was found applicable to two of the underground sites and could be applied with minor error to all the sites. Comparison of empirical propagation equations in the different rock types indicates that although the site effect is apparent, the combined data may be used as a basis for engineering estimates of vibration amplitudes from subsurface blasting in many different rock types. Recommendations for predicting and minimizing vibration amplitudes from underground blasts are given.

Snodgrass, J.J.; Siskind, D.E.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 01-25-01, AST Release • CAS 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole • CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quick egress from deep underground  

SciTech Connect

A method of storage of missiles deep underground in a protected environment capable of withstanding nuclear blasts while allowing access for maintenance and rapid egress when necessary-- even after exposure to severe environments due to an explosion at or near the surface of the earth. To accomplish this, the objects to be stored are contained in a closed container of positive buoyancy in quicksand. A shaft is excavated in the earth and filled with sand. The water content of the sand backfill is controlled and maintained at that percentage of saturation which will provide the best compromise between rapidity and ease of container egress on one hand and resistance to hostile surface environments on the other. Means for the introduction of additional water at the bottom of the sand-filled shaft are provided. When the sand column is fluidized by the injection of water at the bottom thereof, quicksand is formed in the shaft and the container can be drawn to the bottom by a tether line. When water injection is stopped, the sand returns to its normal solid condition and provides a protective layer for the buried container while restraining it in its deep buried position. The sand, in its normal tightly packed solid condition also acts to preserve the egress path to the surface by preventing the entry of dislodged earth material in the attack environment. To access the container for maintenance or for use of the contents, the shaft is again fluidized allowing the container to float to the surface.

Funston, N.E.

1976-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Underground Infrastructure Research and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

productivity, environmental improvement and renewal of the aging underground infrastructure. OrganizationalCenter for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education CUIRE Board Members Sam Arnaout Pipe Association Tim Kennedy, AMERON NOV Chad Kopecki, Dallas Water Utilities David Marshall, Tarrant

Texas at Arlington, University of

157

Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Animals that Hide Underground  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

159

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Underground Distribution Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising costs of new infrastructure, increasing demand, and a declining number of available workers will drive utilities to operate as efficiently as possible. The practice of overbuilding infrastructure to improve or maintain reliability will be viewed as cost-inefficient. Utilities will be forced to operate distribution systems more dynamically and efficiently. Distribution sensors will help provide the needed information to utilities to achieve the goal of dynamic efficiency. The Underground Distributi...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimization of Injection Scheduling in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- of wells,and (2) allocating a total speci6cd injection rate among chosen injectors. The alloca- tion is defined as the fieldwide break- through lindex, B. Injection is optimized by choosing injection wells questions: (1) Which wells should be made injectors? (2) How should the total nquired injection rate

Stanford University

162

Yet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive fault injection tech- niques, like clock or voltage glitches, are well taken into accountYet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection K. TOBICH1,2, P. MAURINE1 Injection, Electromag- netic Attacks, RSA, Chinese Remainder Theorem 1 Introduction Fault injection

163

Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA); Udell, Kent (Berkeley, CA); Buetnner, Harley M. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process. 4 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.; Buetnner, H.M.; Aines, R.D.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Depleted Argon from Underground Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H. [Augustana College, Physics Department, 2001 South Summit Ave., Sioux Fall, SD 57197 (United States); Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Distribution Grounding of Underground Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase I of a two-phase project to assess industry practices and standards for grounding and bonding of medium-voltage underground residential distribution (URD) and underground commercial distribution (UCD) circuits and worker safety in worksites with these systems.The report includes an overview of the issues and concerns associated with underground distribution systems safety and, in particular, worker safety in worksites. It identifies the industry and utility ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the injection well to^ production wells along high conductivity fractures. A powerful method for investigat- ing fields typically choose a configuration for injection wells after a number of development wells have of cooler injected fluids at producing wells. The goal of the current #12;- 10 - work is to provide

Stanford University

168

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

169

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

171

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

172

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

173

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

174

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

175

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

176

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

177

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

178

Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

179

The consequences of high injected carrier densities on carrier localisation and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the concentration of the randomly distributed In atoms on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN quantum wells. On the basis of this comparison of theory with experiment we attribute the reduction in the S- shape temperature dependence to the saturation... , the buffer layer was grown in a Thomas Swan 6x2” metalorganic vapour-phase epitaxy reactor using trimethyl gallium (TMG), silane (SiH4) and ammonia (NH3) as precursors, with hydrogen as the carrier gas. The GaN buffer layer was deposited at 1020 ºC on a...

Hammersley, S; Watson-Parris, D; Dawson, P; Godfrey, M; Badcock, T; Kappers, M; McAleese, C; Oliver, R; Humphreys, C

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Science and Technology Gaps in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is an appropriate technology to economically access the energy resources in deep and/or unmineable coal seams and potentially to extract these reserves through production of synthetic gas (syngas) for power generation, production of synthetic liquid fuels, natural gas, or chemicals. India is a potentially good area for underground coal gasification. India has an estimated amount of about 467 billion British tons (bt) of possible reserves, nearly 66% of which is potential candidate for UCG, located at deep to intermediate depths and are low grade. Furthermore, the coal available in India is of poor quality, with very high ash content and low calorific value. Use of coal gasification has the potential to eliminate the environmental hazards associated with ash, with open pit mining and with greenhouse gas emissions if UCG is combined with re-injection of the CO{sub 2} fraction of the produced gas. With respect to carbon emissions, India's dependence on coal and its projected rapid rise in electricity demand will make it one of the world's largest CO{sub 2} producers in the near future. Underground coal gasification, with separation and reinjection of the CO{sub 2} produced by the process, is one strategy that can decouple rising electricity demand from rising greenhouse gas contributions. UCG is well suited to India's current and emerging energy demands. The syngas produced by UCG can be used to generate electricity through combined cycle. It can also be shifted chemically to produce synthetic natural gas (e.g., Great Plains Gasification Plant in North Dakota). It may also serve as a feedstock for methanol, gasoline, or diesel fuel production and even as a hydrogen supply. Currently, this technology could be deployed in both eastern and western India in highly populated areas, thus reducing overall energy demand. Most importantly, the reduced capital costs and need for better surface facilities provide a platform for rapid acceleration of coal-gas-fired electric power and other high value products. In summary, UCG has several important economic and environmental benefits relevant to India's energy goals: (1) It requires no purchase of surface gasifiers, reducing capital expense substantially. (2) It requires no ash management, since ash remains in the subsurface. (3) It reduces the cost of pollution management and emits few black-carbon particulates. (4) It greatly reduces the cost of CO2 separation for greenhouse gas management, creating the potential for carbon crediting through the Kyoto Clean Development Mechanism. (5) It greatly reduces the need to mine and transport coal, since coal is used in-situ.

Upadhye, R; Burton, E; Friedmann, J

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related to the 2008 injection of CO2 at the ZERT field site, Bozeman, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum accumulation; (2) contamination from a surface sourcepetroleum well, and reach then dissolve in underground sources

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related to the 2008 injection of CO2 at the ZERT Field Site, Bozeman, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum accumulation; (2) contamination from a surface sourcepetroleum well, and reach then dissolve in underground sources

Kharaka, Y.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

-OGP 04 (1) -Predicting Injectivity Decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- OGP 04 (1) - Predicting Injectivity Decline in Water Injection Wells by Upscaling On-Site Core, resulting in injectivity decline of injection wells. Particles such as biomass, corrosion products, silt on permeability. These data were then processed, upscaled to model injection wells and, finally, history matched

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

184

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Increased Power Flow Guidebook - Underground Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities must consider a number of factors when evaluating uprating and upgrading options for underground transmission cables. This comprehensive guidebook documents the state-of-science for increasing power flow capacities of underground transmission cables. It provides an overview of underground transmission cable ratings and uprating techniques so that the maximum utilization can be obtained from the existing underground transmission infrastructure.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Water intrusion in underground structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a study of the permissible groundwater infiltration rates in underground structures, the consequences of this leakage and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. Design guides and codes do not restrict, ...

Nazarchuk, Alex

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Dynamic Underground Stripping: In situ steam sweeping and electrical heating to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 7000 gallons of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.S.; Ziagos, J.P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sensors for Underground Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different sensors are needed for underground distribution applications. These include sensors for temperature monitoring to track possible overload issues and other issues that can cause heating in underground systems (for example, arcing), sensors for fault detection and characterization, and sensors for voltage and current monitoring to support a wide range of applications (for example, SCADA, volt/var control, and load flow management). In 2008, EPRI evaluated the present state of medium-...

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Depleted argon from underground sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Indiana Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 997 821 771 1,207 1,916 1,673 2,268 3,772 4,202 2,896 1,993 539 1991 91 245 158 710 1,849 1,107 2,920 3,845 4,606 4,490 3,131 501 1992 98 349 429 1,076 1,611 2,638 5,174 4,168 5,309 3,579 926 413 1993 681 526 882 1,587 2,170 2,733 4,564 4,464 4,276 2,659 911 475 1994 328 565 519 609 934 2,541 5,229 4,565 4,175 3,340 1,546 305 1995 439 80 786 1,211 1,057 1,831 2,892 3,751 4,791 4,578 2,437 483 1996 262 870 948 968 1,028 2,560 4,317 6,153 3,943 3,112 2,407 696 1997 609 435 815 546 893 2,117 3,322 3,775 4,610 3,523 2,584 175 1998 648 87 86 508 1,235 1,495 2,999 4,082 4,578 3,026 2,710 581

196

Louisiana Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 17,712 15,346 15,364 11,228 15,333 18,647 19,527 17,703 19,665 19,333 15,705 14,621 1991 2,280 4,842 12,957 13,291 22,317 22,447 17,260 17,261 23,603 27,512 9,950 4,281 1992 7,699 4,109 13,109 16,478 29,243 21,440 20,695 21,713 23,276 24,685 7,374 3,230 1993 4,314 1,638 8,805 14,315 34,776 33,317 27,192 28,570 32,062 21,236 21,232 2,111 1994 3,737 9,288 9,922 26,592 34,270 23,811 30,757 28,317 24,211 15,673 13,387 4,560 1995 3,922 3,407 18,010 20,556 23,957 33,196 27,885 16,834 27,100 25,285 5,363 4,060 1996 7,445 9,971 7,106 16,287 22,178 26,529 35,343 38,303 39,009 27,599 10,386 8,996 1997 10,921 11,877 35,874 23,219 30,520 31,455 30,290 31,277 36,960 34,440 13,787 11,704

197

Wyoming Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 22 16 140 1,047 1,248 1,648 2,162 1,899 2,415 1,135 222 191 1991 56 467 479 368 908 1,922 2,233 1,628 1,090 1,135 423 164 1992 0 73 211 356 439 605 1,402 465 861 525 208 194 1993 8 15 557 1,247 1,443 2,426 2,423 1,875 1,433 1,533 482 163 1994 145 16 930 1,339 1,692 771 1,125 1,524 1,444 1,060 412 138 1995 17 76 89 67 863 1,452 1,588 1,896 1,849 1,265 236 52 1996 13 0 66 974 2,862 1,764 2,169 836 641 540 243 312 1997 157 0 47 372 1,205 2,308 3,418 2,734 2,461 986 222 170 1998 23 0 8 265 1,430 3,462 2,814 2,015 2,621 1,499 926 150 1999 0 0 573 1,322 2,151 1,668 2,300 1,377 1,064 519 360 124

198

Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 303 22 31 220 304 296 185 322 301 225 78 84 1999 326 59 50 220 278 267 249 236 414 109 45 125 2000 127 269 47 282 291 224 222 222 350 299 62 60 2001 83 244 244 434 532 402 274 322 362 275 242 25 2002 95 92 0 186 683 339 344 283 434 327 44 183 2003 51 220 70 276 458 504 482 823 671 147 102 203 2004 325 454 190 347 1,013 415 611 1,104 894 1,138 303 279 2005 599 566 319 458 699 560 923 747 783 834 2,614 595 2006 587 274 376 275 377 615 1,035 837 1,422 308 374 517 2007 202 314 1,140 800 1,090 647 863 556 1,213 1,125 115 729 2008 532 962 491 1,000 950 1,040 980 1,167 950 833 471 1,092

199

Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 272,001 466,852 440,062 373,435 371,989 420,828 1973-2013 Alaska 1,895 1,065 1,131 977 1,518 1,981 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 270,106 465,787 438,931 372,458 370,471 418,848 2011-2013 Alabama 2,934 2,058 1,226 2,464 1,142 1,743 1994-2013 Arkansas 213 515 402 406 433 204 1990-2013 California 21,631 36,229 28,781 15,933 13,891 20,028 1990-2013 Colorado 2,863 5,575 7,902 8,359 10,862 9,051 1990-2013 Illinois 15,713 28,662 35,608 33,014 36,051 39,558 1990-2013 Indiana 461 2,204 2,677 2,868 3,774 5,015 1990-2013

200

Oklahoma Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 4,366 3,193 6,903 5,872 11,548 13,440 11,689 10,380 8,709 8,453 8,353 2,367 1991 26 3,253 7,982 15,800 16,462 10,864 4,815 6,272 10,749 9,706 3,437 4,853 1992 1,358 3,452 5,980 8,163 10,270 11,596 17,116 11,326 13,627 11,199 2,570 812 1993 1,709 2,183 3,139 17,592 30,401 25,865 16,422 17,249 15,631 12,044 1,415 7,600 1994 692 1,521 7,130 20,751 26,772 15,711 17,419 13,891 9,370 6,950 2,330 1,038 1995 1,144 1,218 4,867 9,018 18,190 15,120 9,480 6,202 10,541 14,552 2,750 1,727 1996 871 3,814 4,043 9,051 19,783 12,404 11,191 17,682 19,846 13,803 1,849 2,730 1997 3,164 3,776 11,894 14,013 19,122 13,736 7,711 12,725 17,542 22,393 4,205 2,208

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

West Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 2,636 3,056 7,714 11,094 19,622 17,419 16,104 16,323 13,930 7,415 6,785 4,120 1991 843 2,207 5,193 12,543 15,471 16,359 15,601 10,248 9,551 8,573 5,375 2,288 1992 1,013 1,191 1,116 9,299 25,331 21,514 19,498 21,430 15,698 16,466 5,155 936 1993 467 42 1,620 11,145 39,477 28,118 20,621 18,991 20,910 11,087 7,110 863 1994 331 2,543 4,529 21,836 25,960 28,392 28,083 23,234 21,272 9,826 3,695 1,516 1995 1,637 1,663 6,487 10,136 25,124 25,049 23,910 12,599 18,493 16,438 2,473 1,948 1996 3,579 5,076 2,329 20,784 34,294 29,814 32,943 20,814 28,469 17,457 2,164 2,890 1997 1,987 2,401 2,869 6,756 25,269 32,158 27,135 24,684 20,412 14,862 4,930 836

202

Washington Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 929 289 499 863 0 2,707 2,937 2,937 1,101 622 906 507 1991 833 586 299 3,139 1,705 2,716 2,138 291 308 0 1,447 753 1992 436 149 945 1,205 1,824 1,543 1,336 1,618 1,578 979 785 895 1993 750 383 2,192 1,363 4,359 1,112 2,036 1,280 2,258 340 326 3,176 1994 1,579 318 1,268 3,455 2,882 2,005 1,945 965 1,330 503 1,263 1,192 1995 541 827 1,671 1,661 2,601 2,020 1,565 829 2,494 464 1,696 1,447 1996 808 2,027 1,081 1,609 2,176 3,349 1,470 2,279 1,441 655 1,978 1,252 1997 2,356 844 100 1,041 6,091 3,816 1,351 399 2,304 257 1,145 313 1998 2,718 32 296 937 4,485 3,086 967 3,957 1,836 722 1,817 2,284

203

Oregon Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 0 0 0 1,181 1,508 1,244 764 636 372 188 0 0 1991 0 0 0 0 713 1,554 1,458 1,092 674 339 23 0 1992 0 0 0 0 1,572 1,540 1,194 1,010 453 195 0 149 1993 0 0 0 0 1,636 1,291 1,175 1,036 575 487 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 1,216 1,506 1,202 1,081 688 264 0 0 1995 0 182 0 867 1,179 1,034 695 0 490 0 0 0 1996 - - - - 841 1,365 1,318 509 121 262 - - 1997 0 24 0 0 1,300 1,681 1,301 1,178 411 97 267 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 1,968 1,188 1,143 1,141 28 0 205 1999 0 0 0 0 13 2,018 2,119 1,316 1,546 0 593 0 2000 0 0 0 0 894 2,101 2,270 2,074 720 720 103 11 2001 0 0 0 0 2,151 2,561 2,295 1,860 845 0 775 0

204

Utah Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 217 15 3 133 1,503 1,503 7,253 6,393 5,871 3,255 768 282 1991 85 0 2,099 2,224 2,645 5,554 6,015 3,813 3,940 2,080 1,316...

205

Utah Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 609 640 580 1970's 547 883 906 2,320 999 1,340 1,069 1,446 1,180 1,193 1980's 2,381 11,107...

206

Alabama Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 8 12 26 71 106 95 103 93 85 55 25 14 1995 0 122 0 0 44 42 41 252 592 156 24 101 1996 231 185 141 192 390 670 318 395 440 166 63 160 1997 297 101 63 168 271 161 108 286 262 251 27 27 1998 26 0 81 245 188 623 25 203 139 613 76 0 1999 0 0 14 645 547 213 333 202 459 0 166 67 2000 48 534 44 51 232 606 166 0 0 42 12 286 2001 411 304 85 323 207 618 250 293 370 414 529 109 2002 711 278 182 349 240 54 357 139 106 318 515 536 2003 242 818 564 938 1,089 821 970 633 1,283 1,128 606 1,098 2004 201 619 736 845 1,429 1,595 571 894 1,718 3,022 636 468 2005 976 1,778 917 855 1,230 797 1,687 804 2,301 2,019 1,364 845

207

Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 466,852 440,062 373,435 371,989 420,828 339,960 1973-2013 Alaska 1,065 1,131 977 1,518 1,981 1,627 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 465,787 438,931 372,458 370,471 418,848 338,332 2011-2013 Alabama 2,058 1,226 2,464 1,142 1,743 896 1994-2013 Arkansas 515 402 406 433 204 110 1990-2013 California 36,229 28,781 15,933 13,891 20,028 14,296 1990-2013 Colorado 5,575 7,902 8,359 10,862 9,051 8,258 1990-2013 Illinois 28,662 35,608 33,014 36,051 39,558 35,792 1990-2013 Indiana 2,204 2,677 2,868 3,774 5,015 3,670 1990-2013

208

Colorado Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 538 235 252 265 1,274 4,266 6,279 5,212 5,012 1,957 1,734 650 1991 992 654 483 61 2,494 3,876 4,219 4,449 5,296 3,296 2,611 2,153 1992 0 301 61 53 158 2,168 4,187 6,308 5,942 2,708 395 779 1993 1,476 514 1,328 277 3,434 5,426 4,400 5,097 4,898 19,867 1,773 2,642 1994 349 561 1,525 594 6,187 1,887 5,096 5,311 5,305 1,318 1,652 1,401 1995 1,508 1,548 1,831 1,379 3,769 6,416 6,446 4,716 4,341 2,877 3,680 1,206 1996 1,050 3,496 1,026 1,484 3,363 5,288 5,602 4,106 4,955 2,693 2,316 2,429 1997 1,773 489 1,563 1,182 6,370 5,785 6,044 5,081 5,610 3,253 1,570 669 1998 884 80 2,100 615 6,732 4,651 4,354 6,274 6,162 3,100 3,713 1,125

209

Kentucky Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,591 7,852 5,644 4,269 4,991 5,462 7,829 7,379 7,268 5,324 3,591 2,996 1991 1,910 2,777 4,468 4,883 2,671 3,345 5,395 4,818 4,660 4,074 4,315 4,110 1992 5,509 3,635 2,314 2,151 1,697 2,787 4,724 4,202 5,539 10,882 3,272 2,656 1993 1,967 990 928 2,687 7,049 7,985 7,838 5,873 7,014 3,907 1,397 482 1994 431 928 1,526 6,100 10,571 9,346 9,742 7,138 4,696 4,684 3,438 1,230 1995 1,189 478 2,868 4,780 13,288 7,749 8,687 5,375 6,889 4,882 1,009 1,369 1996 625 2,061 2,137 2,635 6,489 14,262 13,389 10,275 8,975 4,913 1,788 1,948 1997 1,674 1,585 1,826 3,461 8,209 9,043 7,464 6,799 8,296 5,231 2,932 553

210

Ohio Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 2,095 2,783 8,487 12,731 23,624 20,221 19,895 19,615 18,355 13,780 9,089 3,777 1991 474 569 2,278 13,918 24,470 20,782 18,348 18,211 16,615 12,371 5,205 819 1992 46 383 775 11,319 27,233 30,305 29,147 24,617 16,672 14,358 4,364 790 1993 152 278 1,376 10,017 30,894 32,804 30,187 28,001 26,720 12,055 3,036 109 1994 1,075 1,772 2,164 19,428 30,107 32,303 33,898 27,173 22,437 13,196 7,269 837 1995 617 1,176 1,782 7,066 28,599 32,073 31,206 24,033 18,978 13,053 2,159 608 1996 826 2,927 1,712 16,095 30,586 37,488 36,425 29,901 24,140 15,350 2,100 1,091 1997 1,494 1,211 2,351 11,510 34,696 38,150 34,738 32,628 24,009 15,174 3,656 709

211

Utah Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 217 15 3 133 1,503 1,503 7,253 6,393 5,871 3,255 768 282 1991 85 0 2,099 2,224 2,645 5,554 6,015 3,813 3,940 2,080 1,316 2,475 1992 389 1,210 2,719 3,032 3,970 3,612 3,759 4,834 3,898 3,111 506 182 1993 0 6 93 168 6,607 6,471 5,034 5,017 4,968 5,083 501 541 1994 45 195 3,861 2,050 6,133 4,069 5,508 6,269 8,509 4,218 1,026 624 1995 71 1,029 918 1,645 4,350 6,226 7,254 3,681 2,323 1,721 2,729 256 1996 7 276 904 1,589 5,596 6,757 6,824 4,746 3,130 1,729 596 214 1997 319 928 4,246 3,658 4,481 8,422 8,176 5,300 3,235 2,823 1,129 86 1998 0 0 999 1,310 3,551 4,004 3,501 3,561 3,993 1,954 799 73

212

California Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 2,676 4,631 11,774 22,230 26,798 17,079 11,773 10,071 10,383 17,080 11,528 1,051 1991 1,964 7,531 6,205 21,709 28,179...

213

California Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 71,148 58,085 77,617 1970's 80,260 89,373 118,758 92,331 129,945 105,167 107,749 109,760 108,432...

214

Ohio Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 142,717 169,955 168,142 1970's 182,405 188,916 163,884 179,078 152,580 183,032 146,228 188,721...

215

Ohio Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 2,095 2,783 8,487 12,731 23,624 20,221 19,895 19,615 18,355 13,780 9,089 3,777 1991 474 569 2,278 13,918 24,470 20,782...

216

Michigan Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 222,800 255,365 257,737 1970's 344,524 296,475 275,460 299,766 287,776 322,960 342,010 372,262...

217

Michigan Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 9,245 1,582 10,686 31,603 52,870 66,300 76,718 72,178 53,824 26,587 11,504 2,212 1991 1,032 3,107 15,520 34,937 50,769...

218

Colorado Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,391 6,849 8,663 1970's 8,757 5,839 8,502 10,673 11,444 13,420 16,987 21,717 20,630 25,334...

219

Colorado Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 538 235 252 265 1,274 4,266 6,279 5,212 5,012 1,957 1,734 650 1991 992 654 483 61 2,494 3,876 4,219 4,449 5,296 3,296...

220

Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Alaska 1973-1975 Lower 48 States 3,421,813 2,825,427 2011-2012 Alabama 20,009 31,208 21,020 23,026 22,766 21,195 1968-2012 Arkansas 5,695 5,023 4,108 4,672 4,628 2,848 1967-2012 California 214,469 237,364 199,763 226,810 263,067 218,663 1967-2012 Colorado 38,619 39,034 45,861 43,250 51,469 59,096 1967-2012 Connecticut 1973-1996 Delaware 1967-1975 Georgia 1974-1975 Idaho 1974-1975 Illinois 243,789 260,333 259,421 247,458 258,690 249,953 1967-2012 Indiana 22,686 22,874 24,399 21,943 23,864 19,878 1967-2012 Iowa 70,329 70,022 79,012 76,407 77,783 66,774 1967-2012 Kansas 113,399 115,669 102,406 113,253 119,823 93,460 1967-2012 Kentucky 70,682 77,503 71,972 85,167 77,526 64,483 1967-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Alaska 1973-1975 Lower 48 States 3,421,813 2,825,427 2011-2012 Alabama 20,009 31,208 21,020 23,026 22,766 21,195 1968-2012 Arkansas 5,695 5,023 4,108 4,672 4,628 2,848 1967-2012 California 214,469 237,364 199,763 226,810 263,067 218,663 1967-2012 Colorado 38,619 39,034 45,861 43,250 51,469 59,096 1967-2012 Connecticut 1973-1996 Delaware 1967-1975 Georgia 1974-1975 Idaho 1974-1975 Illinois 243,789 260,333 259,421 247,458 258,690 249,953 1967-2012 Indiana 22,686 22,874 24,399 21,943 23,864 19,878 1967-2012 Iowa 70,329 70,022 79,012 76,407 77,783 66,774 1967-2012 Kansas 113,399 115,669 102,406 113,253 119,823 93,460 1967-2012 Kentucky 70,682 77,503 71,972 85,167 77,526 64,483 1967-2012

222

Illinois Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 119,125 143,180 153,497 1970's 190,661 214,871 237,098 233,112 232,284 294,689 235,310 293,311...

223

New Mexico Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 383 74 383 1970's 398 5,067 12,589 4,160 1,005 2,378 472 39 1980's 2,871 2,801 19,894 2,500...

224

New Mexico Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 502 1,137 1,088 2,198 1,190 1,665 3,674 3,203 2,048 3,187 1,857 602 1991 341 245 267 3,130 3,097 3,033 1,930 790 3,099...

225

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven

226

Second invitational well-testing symposium proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The symposium dealt with the state of the art of injection of fluids underground, and its application to geothermal systems in particular. Separate abstracts were prepared for fourteen papers and three abstracts of papers were listed by title. Three papers were previously abstracted for EDB.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

228

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

229

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

230

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

231

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

232

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

233

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

234

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

235

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

236

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

239

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermoelastic stress on injection well fracturing. SPE38N) LBNL NCSN POWER PLANTS INJECTION WELLS EVENTS LBNLNCSN POWER PLANTS INJECTION WELLS EVENTS Aidlin 11 - LBNL

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

2009 underground/longwall mining buyer's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to underground mining operations. An index by product category is included.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... interstate pipeline companies rely heavily on underground storage to facilitate load balancing and system ... costs. "Open Access ... independent operators ...

242

Underground Transmission Systems Reference Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Transmission Systems Reference Book covers all stages of cable system design and operation, from initial planning studies to failure analysis. It contains contributions from many of the industry's experts and represents practices from all parts of the United States.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

An analytical solution for transient gas flow in a multi-well system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with extraction and injection wells. The transient solutionthe extraction (or injection) well as a line sink (orwill be applied at the injection well. Although (11) and (

Shan, Chao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Underground gasification of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a method for the gasification of coal in situ which comprises drilling at least one well or borehole from the earth's surface so that the well or borehole enters the coalbed or seam horizontally and intersects the coalbed in a direction normal to its major natural fracture system, initiating burning of the coal with the introduction of a combustion-supporting gas such as air to convert the coal in situ to a heating gas of relatively high calorific value and recovering the gas. In a further embodiment the recovered gas may be used to drive one or more generators for the production of electricity.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV); Komar, Charles A. (Uniontown, PA)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Letter Report: Scoping Analysis of Gas Phase Transport from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report documents the results of a computer model to quantify the travel time of tritium (radioactive hydrogen) from an underground nuclear detonation in 1969 toward a proposed producing gas well located 1,500 feet (457 meters) away.

Clay Cooper

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1935" U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1935" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:04:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" "Sourcekey","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

247

Midwest Underground Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Technology Underground Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Underground Technology Facility Midwest Underground Technology Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Midwest Underground Technology Energy Purchaser Midwest Underground Technology Location Champaign IL Coordinates 40.15020987°, -88.29149723° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.15020987,"lon":-88.29149723,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Underground Transmission Vault Inspection Using Robotic Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground power lines require inspection and maintenance to ensure long-term performance and reliable operation. In addition to terminations at both ends of the underground lines, access to the lines for inspection and maintenance is obtained through underground vaults or manholes. General practices require utility personnel to enter the vaults for visual inspection and to make the necessary measurements using portable instruments.The Electric Power Research Institute has developed the ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The European HDR project at Soultz sous forets: Stimulation of the second deep well and first circulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By February 1995 the European HDR project at Soultz was operating 6 boreholes: 2 deep hydraulic test wells (GPK-1, 3590 m & GPK-2, 3876 m) and 4 seismic observation wells with depths between 1500 and 2200 m. In 1993 the first section of a deep underground exchanger had been created through massive stimulation (injection of some 45000 m³ of water). Between November 1994 until January 1995 a second deep well, GPK-2, was drilled at the periphery of this exchanger. A complex test programme involving the stimulation of GPK-2 (connecting it to the existing exchanger) and various circulation experiments with different production techniques (flash throttled and unthrottled, submersible pump) and varying injection rates was performed between June and August 1995.

Baumgartner, J.; Jung, R.; Gerard, A.; Baria, R.; Garnish, J.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

252

Underground Storage Tank Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects

253

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","62013"...

254

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","62013" ,"Release...

255

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","62013" ,"Release...

256

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

257

Cryogenic slurry for extinguishing underground fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic slurry comprising a mixture of solid carbon dioxide particles suspended in liquid nitrogen is provided which is useful in extinguishing underground fires.

Chaiken, Robert F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kim, Ann G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kociban, Andrew M. (Wheeling, WV); Slivon, Jr., Joseph P. (Tarentum, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cover story: Digging up the hacking underground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hacking underground is driven by three things: money, information, and reputation. Danny Bradbury takes a walk through its dark tunnels

Danny Bradbury

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

260

CFD Simulation of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a process in which coal is converted to syngas in-situ. UCG has gained popularity recently as it could be used… (more)

Sarraf Shirazi, Ahad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

262

Existing and Proposed Underground Storage Facilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 158 Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends Table F1. Summary of Existing Underground Natural Gas Storage, by Region and Type of ...

263

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

264

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967"...

265

,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

266

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

267

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

268

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

269

,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

270

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

271

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

272

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

273

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

274

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

275

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

276

,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

277

,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

278

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2011,"6301988" ,"Release...

279

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release...

280

,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Underground Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Underground Natural Gas...

282

,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Underground Natural Gas...

283

,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Underground Natural Gas...

284

,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Underground Natural Gas...

285

,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Underground Natural Gas...

286

,"West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Underground Natural...

287

,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Underground Natural Gas...

288

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural...

289

,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Underground Natural...

290

,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Underground Natural Gas...

291

,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Underground Natural Gas...

292

,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Underground Natural Gas...

293

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas...

294

,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Underground Natural Gas...

295

,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas...

296

,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Underground Natural...

297

,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Underground Natural Gas...

298

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural...

299

,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Underground Natural Gas...

300

,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Underground Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Underground Natural Gas...

302

,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Underground Natural Gas...

303

,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Underground Natural Gas...

304

,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Underground Natural Gas...

305

,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Underground Natural Gas...

306

,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Underground Natural...

307

,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

308

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

309

Summary of Data from DOE-Subsidized Field Trial No.1 of Downhole Oil/Water Separator Technology, Texas Well Bilbrey 30-Federal No. 5 Lea County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This reports, DOWS technology reduced the quality of produced water that is handled at the surface by separating it from the oil downhole and simultaneously injecting it underground. The two primary components of a DOWS system are an oil/water separation system and at least one pump to lift oil to the surface and inject the water. Two basic types of DOWS have been developed -- one type using hydrocyclones to mechanically separate oil and water and one relying on gravity separation that takes place in the well bore.

Veil, John A.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Underground storage tank management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

312

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County,...

314

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

315

The Value of Underground Storage in Today's Natural Gas Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration iii The Value of Underground Storage in Today's Natural Gas Industry Preface The Value of Underground Storage in Today's Natural ...

316

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...

317

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net...

318

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals...

319

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)...

320

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

322

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

323

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

324

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update The aggregate peak capacity for U.S. underground natural gas storage is ...

325

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Base...

326

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity Lower 48 States Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity...

327

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Working...

328

Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

329

Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

330

Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

331

Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

332

Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

333

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

334

Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

335

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

336

Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

337

New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

338

Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

339

Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

340

Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

342

Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

343

Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

344

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

345

Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

346

Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

347

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

348

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

349

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

350

Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

351

Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

352

Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

353

Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

354

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

355

Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

356

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

357

Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

358

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

359

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

360

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

362

Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

363

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

364

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

365

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

366

Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

367

Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

368

Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

369

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

370

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital...

371

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy recovery by water injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several analytical and numerical studies that address injection and thermal breakthrough in fractured geothermal reservoirs are described. The results show that excellent thermal sweeps can be achieved in fractured reservoirs, and that premature cold water breakthrough can be avoided if the injection wells are appropriately located.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Tsang, C.F.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Underground-desiccant cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Underground-Desiccant Cooling System relies on the successful coordination of various components. The central feature of the system is a bed of silica gel which will absorb moisture from house air until the gel has become saturated. When this point has been reached, the silica gel must be regenerated by passing hot air through it. For this project, the hot air is produced by air-type solar collectors mounted on the roof and connected with the main air-handling system by means of ducts attached to the outside of the house. As the air is dehumidified its temperature is raised somewhat by the change of state. The dried but somewhat heated air, after leaving the silica gel bed, passes through a rock bin storage area and then past a water coil chiller before being circulated through the house by means of the previously existing ductwork. The cooling medium for both the rock bin and the chiller coil is water which circulates through underground pipes buried beneath the back yard at a depth of about 10 to 12 ft. When the silica gel is being regenerated by the solar collectors, house air bypasses the desiccant bed but still passes through the rock bin and the chiller coil and is cooled continuously. The system is designed for maximum flexibility so that full use can be made of the solar collectors. Ducting is arranged so that the collectors provide heat for the house in the winter and there is also a hot-water capability year-round.

Finney, O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Underground coal mining technology: An overview and a look ahead  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining systems have kept pace with developments that have occurred in other types of mining. A diversified group of machines are now available with high horsepower motors, built-in microprocessor technology, and numerous options to satisfy miners' needs in various geological environments. The results will be a greater degree of mechanization and recovery of coal from inclined seams, thins seams, and seams mined in lifts from shallow as well as deeper deposits. This article is based on a general survey carried out by the authors to determine the current status of mechanization and systems development in underground coal mining. It indicates that the next two decades will see increasing use of longwall mining, which has already reached a high degree of sophistication.

Singhal, R.K. (Canmet Coal Research Lab., Devon, Alberta (CA)); Fytas, K. (Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)); Lama, R.D. (Kembla Coal and Coke Proprietary Ltd., Wollongong, NSW (AU))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ENGINEERING STUDY ON UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages, disadvantages, and cost of constructing a auclear power reactor underground are outlinedData on underground construction of hydroelectric plants, other structures, and underground reactor projects in Norway and Sweden are reviewed. A hypothetical underground Experimental Boiling Water Reactor design and sketch are given with cost estimates(T.R.H.)

Beck, C.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" 32888,-1451 32919,-3625 32947,-1954 32978,-938 33008,0 33039,2640 33069,2937 33100,2937 33131,1069 33161,205 33192,81...

377

Best practices for underground diesel emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US NIOSH and the Coal Diesel Partnership recommend practices for successfully using ceramic filters to control particulate emitted from diesel-powered equipment used in underground coal mines. 3 tabs.

Patts, L.; Brnich, M. Jr. [NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290CA2"...

379

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:20:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070CA2"...

380

,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:20:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060CA2"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

382

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

383

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

384

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

385

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

386

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 6:20:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060TX2"...

387

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

388

Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source deployed in the injection well. We first present thehas two wells, an injection well and a dedicated monitoringa sonic log of the injection well. We assumed the volume

Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

First Edition Underground Distribution Reference Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing a first edition of the Underground Distribution Systems Reference (Bronze Book). This report will join the EPRI series of transmission and distribution technical reference reports, commonly known by the color of their covers. The report will be a desk and field compendium on the general principles involved in the planning, design, manufacture, installation design, installation, testing, operation, and maintenance of underground distribution syste...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

391

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

392

Modeling of contaminant transport in underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study and discuss the impact of contaminants produced from underground coal gasification on groundwater, a coupled seepage-thermodynamics-transport model for underground gasification was developed on the basis of mass and energy conservation and pollutant-transport mechanisms, the mathematical model was solved by the upstream weighted multisell balance method, and the model was calibrated and verified against the experimental site data. The experiment showed that because of the effects of temperature on the surrounding rock of the gasification panel the measured pore-water-pressure was higher than the simulated one; except for in the high temperature zone where the simulation errors of temperature, pore water pressure, and contaminant concentration were relatively high, the simulation values of the overall gasification panel were well fitted with the measured values. As the gasification experiment progressed, the influence range of temperature field expanded, the gradient of groundwater pressure decreased, and the migration velocity of pollutant increased. Eleven months and twenty months after the test, the differences between maximum and minimum water pressure were 2.4 and 1.8 MPa, respectively, and the migration velocities of contaminants were 0.24-0.38 m/d and 0.27-0.46 m/d, respectively. It was concluded that the numerical simulation of the transport process for pollutants from underground coal gasification was valid. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Lanhe Yang; Xing Zhang [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geosciences

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Atmospheric Muon Flux at Sea Level, Underground, and Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical sea-level muon spectrum at energies above 1 GeV and the underground/underwater muon intensities at depths up to 18 km w.e. are calculated. The results are particularly collated with a great body of the ground-level, underground, and underwater muon data. In the hadron-cascade calculations, the growth with energy of inelastic cross sections and pion, kaon, and nucleon generation in pion-nucleus collisions are taken into account. For evaluating the prompt muon contribution to the muon flux, we apply two phenomenological approaches to the charm production problem: the recombination quark-parton model and the quark-gluon string model. To solve the muon transport equation at large depths of homogeneous medium, a semi-analytical method is used. The simple fitting formulas describing our numerical results are given. Our analysis shows that, at depths up to 6-7 km w. e., essentially all underground data on the muon intensity correlate with each other and with predicted depth-intensity relation for conventional muons to within 10%. However, the high-energy sea-level data as well as the data at large depths are contradictory and cannot be quantitatively decribed by a single nuclear-cascade model.

E. V. Bugaev; A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Model study of historical injection in the Southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. the migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. while both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injectate as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Model study of historical injection in the southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. The migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. While both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the-second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injected as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Model study of historical injection in the southeast Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three component model study of the historical injection of two wells in the Unit 13 area demonstrates that the recovery of injection derived steam is influenced by the geologic structure of the bottom of the reservoir and the relative location of injection wells. The migration of injectate from the first injection well, located up structure from the second, quenched the area around the second injector before it started operation. While both wells had similar cumulative mass injected, nearly five times more injection derived steam is recovered from the first injector than the-second. Sensitivity runs were made to three cases of increasing matrix capillary pressure. The recovery of injection derived steam increases with higher values of capillarity. The interaction of structure at the bottom of the reservoir, injection well locations, and matrix capillarity all influence the recovery efficiency of injected as steam. The model developed in this study will be used to evaluate injection strategies at The Geysers.

Faulder, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Pressure buildup during supercritical carbon dioxide injection from a partially penetrating borehole into gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vicinity of the injection well. While a large injectionby pumping it down into an injection well. While the actuala small part of the injection well (typically, a few meters

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is centered on one CO 2 injection well and consists of about1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing researchabove active CO 2 injection wells and the uplift pattern

Rutqvist, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

405

Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

Routh, J.W.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ................................... 19 FIGURE 3.13: ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL WITH A PAIR OF INJECTION AND PRODUCTION WELLS. ................... 20 FIGURE 3.14: TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODEL WITH PRODUCTION AND INJECTION WELLS AT THE CENTER.......... 20 and an injection well was placed in the corner diagonally opposite. The maximum production rate of the well

Stanford University

407

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

408

Potential underground risks associated with CAES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAES in geologic media has been proposed to help 'firm' renewable energy sources (wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy was available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive renewable energy time periods. Such a storage media may experience hourly (perhaps small) pressure swings. Salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES, but not in a mode where renewable energy sources are supported. Reservoirs, both depleted natural gas and aquifers represent other potential underground storage vessels for CAES, however, neither has yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for CAES.

Kirk, Matthew F.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Broome, Scott Thomas; Pfeifle, Thomas W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high density of steam injection wells for thermal recovery.kilometres 20 miles Steam-injection wells per km 2 (mi 2 )average number of steam injection well blowouts and blowouts

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground February 5, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis The Air Products and...

413

Forced cooling of underground electric power transmission lines : design manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methodology utilized for the design of a forced-cooled pipe-type underground transmission system is presented. The material is divided into three major parts: (1) The Forced-cooled Pipe-Type Underground Transmission ...

Brown, Jay A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990...

415

Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 84,808...

416

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990...

417

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations Ignasi in forthcoming publications. Keywords-grounding analysis; earthing analysis, underground substations; I to a river (at substations next to hydroelectric dams), or the grounding system of a buried electrical

Colominas, Ignasi

418

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

419

Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

420

Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

422

Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

423

Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

424

Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

425

Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

426

Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

427

Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

428

Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

429

Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

430

Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

431

Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

432

Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

433

Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

434

Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

435

Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

436

Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

437

Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

438

New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

439

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration report, The Basics of Underground Storage, http:www.eia.doe.govpuboilgasnaturalgasanalysispublicationsstoragebasicsstoragebasics.html. 2 Working gas is...

440

Commercial-Scale Tests Demonstrate Secure CO2 Storage in Underground Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe SeCure Co 2 STorage in unDergrounD FormaTionS Two industry-led commercial-scale projects, the Sleipner Project off the coast of Norway and the Weyburn Project in Ontario, Canada, have enhanced the option of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in underground geologic formations. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated in both projects, primarily by providing rigorous monitoring of the injected CO 2 and studying CO 2 behavior to a greater extent than the project operators would have pursued on their own - creating a mutually beneficial public/private partnership. The most significant outcome from both field projects is that CO 2 leakage has not been observed, nor is there any indication that CO 2 will leak in the future.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Magnetic detection of underground pipe using timed-release marking droplets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system 10 and method of detecting an underground pipe 12 injects magnetic marking droplets 16 into the underground pipe 12 which coat the inside of the pipe 12 and may be detected from aboveground by a magnetometer 28. The droplets 16 include a non-adhesive cover 32 which allows free flow thereof through the pipe 12, with the cover 32 being ablatable for the timed-release of a central core 30 containing magnetic particles 30a which adhere to the inside of the pipe 12 and are detectable from aboveground. The rate of ablation of the droplet covers 32 is selectively variable to control a free flowing incubation zone 12a for the droplets 16 and a subsequent deposition zone 12b in which the magnetic particles 30a are released for coating the pipe 12.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Garden Hills, NY)

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

442

Operational experience during the LHC injection tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the LHC injection tests of 2008. two injection tests took place in October and November 2009 as preparation for the LHC restart on November 20, 2009. During these injection tests beam was injected through the TI 2 transfer line into sector 23 of ring 1 and through TI 8 into the sectors 78, 67 and 56 of ring 2. The beam time was dedicated to injection steering, optics measurements and debugging of all the systems involved. Because many potential problems were sorted out in advance, these tests contributed to the rapid progress after the restart. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these tests as well as related measurement results.

Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

October 15, 2001 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICE PART 1 ­ GENERAL 1.01 SUMMARY Underground steam and condensate distribution systems includingOctober 15, 2001 02558-1 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM AND CONDENSATE SERVICE CONSTRUCTION STANDARD SPECIFICATION SECTION 02558 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM AND CONDENSATE

444

A Method for Detecting Miners in Underground Coal Mine Videos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting miners in underground coal mine videos is significant for the production safety. But, the miners are very similar to the background in underground coal mine videos, it is difficult to detect. In this paper, we proposed a method to detect miners ... Keywords: moving detection, miner detection, underground coal mine video

Limei Cai; Jiansheng Qian

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Utilization of Oil Shale Retorting Technology and Underground Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes the world's oil shale development and status of underground dry distillation technology and, through case studies proved the advantages of underground dry distillation technology. Global oil shale resource-rich, many countries in the ... Keywords: oil shale, ground retorting, underground dry distillation, shale oil, long slope mining

Chen Shuzhao; Guo Liwen; Xiao Cangyan; Wang Haijun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Underground Structure Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Science and Technology {limo, liu}@cse.ust.hk ABSTRACT Environment monitoring in coal mines, Underground, Coal Mine 1. INTRODUCTION A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is a self-organized wireless network and widths of several meters) has been a crucial task to ensure safe working conditions in coal mines where

Liu, Yunhao

448

Electrical Safety Practices in Underground Transmission Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses utility safety practices relating to underground transmission cables and provides analytical approaches and worked examples for induced voltages and currents for several scenarios that may be encountered by utilities.BackgroundSafety is of paramount importance in all areas of utility system operations. All utilities have safety practices and procedures in place to protect their workers and the public ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Robotic location of underground chemical sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes current progress in a project to develop robotic systems for locating underground chemical sources. There are a number of economic and humanitarian applications for this technology. Finding unexploded ordinance, land mines, and sources ... Keywords: Chemical diffusion, Chemical source location, De-mining, Robotics

R. Andrew Russell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1983 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Underground Energy Storage Program approach, structure, history, and milestones are described. Technical activities and progress in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage and Compressed Air Energy Storage components of the program are then summarized, documenting the work performed and progress made toward resolving and eliminating technical and economic barriers associated with those technologies. (LEW)

Kannberg, L.D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Hoe Creek Underground Gasification site occupies 80 acres of land located in Campbell County, Wyoming. The site was used to investigate the process and environmental parameters of underground coal gasification technologies in the 1970s. The Department of Energy¿s (DOE) current mission is limited to completing environmental remediation activities at the site. This property is owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM),

453

Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks

454

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells

455

Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty in the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithology and hydraulic conductivity from the 1999 model as well as the uncertainty in the other flow and transport parameters from the 2000 DDA model. Additionally, the new model focuses on a much smaller region than was included in the earlier models, that is, the subsurface within the UC-1 land withdrawal area where the 1999 model predicted radionuclide transport will occur over the next 1,000 years. The purpose of this unclassified document is to present the modifications to the CNTA groundwater flow and transport model, to present the methodology used to calculate contaminant boundaries, and to present the Safe Drinking Water Act and risk-derived contaminant boundaries for the Faultless underground nuclear test CAU.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Jeff Daniels; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Blasting to stabilize abandoned underground mines in eastern and midwestern coal fields: A feasibility study. Open File Report  

SciTech Connect

The study was designed to assist individuals involved with problem of abandoned mines that are subsiding. The study analyzed the practicality and desirability of using blasting to stabilize subsiding abandoned underground mines. Application of blasting to subsidence problems could provide a valuable alternative technology to classical methods of injecting fill material into abandoned mines to fill voids and prevent subsidence. By blasting, subsidence can be induced in a controlled manner, completed, and the site returned to its desired usage.

1991-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

458

Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

Turner, William E. (Durham, CT); Perry, Carl A. (Middletown, CT); Wassell, Mark E. (Kingwood, TX); Barbely, Jason R. (Middletown, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Cobern, Martin E. (Cheshire, CT)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

Greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system is described wherein the radiant energy of the sun or wasted thermal energy is accumulated in the soil below the floor of the greenhouse over a prolonged period of time, and spontaneous release of the accumulated energy into the interior of the greenhouse begins in the wintertime due to a time lag of heat transfer through the soil. The release of the accumulated energy lasts throughout the winter.

Fujie, K.; Abe, K.; Uchida, A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bangkok area grid extensions go underground  

SciTech Connect

To reinforce electricity supply in the growing load center of Bangkok, the Metropolitan Electricity Authority is constructing a 230-kV underground, oil-filled cable system from Bangkapi substation, located on the outskirts of the city, to Chidlom substation in the heart of the city's business area. The project covers design, supply, and delivery to site of all the materials and equipments, installation, assembly of equipment and commissioning tests of the system.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electrical Safety Practices of Underground Transmission Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety is of paramount importance in all areas of utility system operations. All utilities have safety practices and procedures in place to protect their workers and the public and are diligent about monitoring compliance. However, underground transmission cables present unique requirements that might not be covered in existing utility safety practices. This report addresses the grounding requirements and induced voltage calculation procedures that should be considered when performing operation, mainten...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

GRR/Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-OR-d - Exploration Injection Permit 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-044-0012: Authorization of Underground Injection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-OR-d.1 - Is this New Injection Activity or a Renewal? The developer must follow one of two different procedures if the developer

466

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss in class I waste injection wells, in: Apps J.A. andR.F. , An overview of injection well history in the Unitedmeasures for Class I injection wells, in Apps J.A. and Tsang

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Hydrogeology Seminar, Berkeley, CA, July 8-9, 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underground water deep injection wells and basins of liquidCH2M H i l l , Class I Injection Well Survey-Phase I Report;underground water deep injection wells and basins of liquid

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Underground Transmission Cable System Installation and Construction Practices Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Installation and construction remain the most expensive implementation components of underground transmission cable systems. Recent advancements in underground transmission have led to more demand for best practices and innovative ways to reduce installation and construction costs in a cable project. EPRI has funded many projects over the years to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of underground transmission cable installation. Other organizations such as Association of Edison Illuminating Compa...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

472

,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

473

Reaching Underground Sources (from MIT Energy Initiative's Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reaching Underground Sources (from MIT Energy Initiative's Energy Futures, Spring 2012) American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Reaching...

474

U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline and Underground Storage Expansions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and complementary components of the U.S. natural gas system. While mainline gas transmission ...

475

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

476

,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013"...

477

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

478

PNNL offers 'virtual tour' of Shallow Underground Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNNL offers 'virtual tour' of Shallow Underground Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

479

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

480

NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Twitter YouTube NNSA Commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Last Underground Nuclear Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground injection wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

482

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

483

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

484

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

485

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

486

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

487

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301935" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release Date:","10312013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngstorsumd...

488

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013"...

489

NETL: News Release - Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 22, 2003 Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground Salt Caverns Could Boost Global LNG Trade Novel Process May be Half the Cost of Conventional Liquid Tank Terminals...

490

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and the environment

491

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release...

492

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","82013" ,"Release...

493

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release...

494

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1984 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground Energy Storage (UES) Program activities during the period from April 1984 through March 1985 are briefly described. Primary activities in seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involved field testing of high-temperature (>100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) at St. Paul, laboratory studies of geochemical issues associated with high-temperatures ATES, monitoring of chill ATES facilities in Tuscaloosa, and STES linked with solar energy collection. The scope of international activities in STES is briefly discussed.

Kannberg, L.D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Method of locating underground mines fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

Laage, Linneas (Eagam, MN); Pomroy, William (St. Paul, MN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Studies of injection into naturally fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model for studies of cold water injection into naturally fractured reservoirs has been developed. The model can be used to design the flow rates and location of injection wells in such systems. The results obtained using the model show that initially the cold water will move very rapidly through the fracture system away from the well. Later on, conductive heat transfer from the rock matrix blocks will retard the advancement of the cold water front, and eventually uniform energy sweep conditions will prevail. Where uniform energy sweep conditions are reached the cold waer movement away from the injection well will be identical to that in a porous medium; consequently maximum energy recovery from the rock matrix will be attained. The time of uniform energy sweep and the radial distance from the injection well where it occurs are greatly dependent upon the fracture spacing, but independent of the fracture aperture.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Lai, C.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

498

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

500

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z