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1

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground Gasification of Coal Reported ... RESULTS of a first step taken toward determining the feasibility of the underground gasification of coal were reported recently to the Interstate Oil Compact Commission by Milton H. Fies, manager of coal operations for the Alabama Power Co. ...

1947-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

5

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16.............................................................................................21 Coal and Methane Production

Maxwell, Bruce D.

6

Underground Coal Gasification in the USSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By accomplishing in a single operation the extraction of coal and its conversion into a gaseous fuel, underground gasification makes it possible to avoid the heavy capital investments required for coal gasification

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

8

Coal properties and system operating parameters for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the model experiment for underground coal gasification, the influence of the properties for gasification agent and gasification methods on underground coal gasifier performance were studied. The results showed that pulsating gasification, to some extent, could improve gas quality, whereas steam gasification led to the production of high heating value gas. Oxygen-enriched air and backflow gasification failed to improve the quality of the outlet gas remarkably, but they could heighten the temperature of the gasifier quickly. According to the experiment data, the longitudinal average gasification rate along the direction of the channel in the gasifying seams was 1.212 m/d, with transverse average gasification rate 0.069 m/d. Experiment indicated that, for the oxygen-enriched steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio was 2:1, gas compositions remained stable, with H{sub 2} + CO content virtually standing between 60% and 70% and O{sub 2} content below 0.5%. The general regularities of the development of the temperature field within the underground gasifier and the reasons for the changes of gas quality were also analyzed. The 'autopneumatolysis' and methanization reaction existing in the underground gasification process were first proposed.

Yang, L. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Kinetics of steam gasification of bituminous coals in terms of their use for underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The kinetics of steam gasification was examined for bituminous coals of a low coal rank. The examined coals can be the raw material for underground coal gasification. Measurements were carried out under isothermal conditions at a high pressure of 4 MPa and temperatures of 800, 900, 950, and 1000 °C. Yields of gasification products such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane were calculated based on the kinetic curves of formation reactions of these products. Also carbon conversion degrees are presented. Moreover, calculations were made of the kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and hydrogen formation reaction in the coal gasification process. The parameters obtained during the examinations enable a preliminary assessment of coal for the process of underground coal gasification.

Stanis?aw Porada; Grzegorz Czerski; Tadeusz Dziok; Przemys?aw Grzywacz; Dorota Makowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Simon Shackley #12;The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Dr Simon Shackley of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) in the United Kingdom. The objectives were to identify the main dangers

Watson, Andrew

12

Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Hoe Creek Underground Gasification site occupies 80 acres of land located in Campbell County, Wyoming. The site was used to investigate the process and environmental parameters of underground coal gasification technologies in the 1970s. The Department of Energy¿s (DOE) current mission is limited to completing environmental remediation activities at the site. This property is owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM),

14

Key tests set for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is about to undergo some tests. The tests will be conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in a coal seam owned by Washington Irrigation and Development Co. A much-improved UCG system has been developed by Stephens and his associates at LLNL - the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) method. Pritchard Corp., Kansas City, has done some conceptual process design and has further studied the feasibility of using the raw gas from a UCG burn as a feedstock for methanol synthesis and/or MTG gasoline. Each method was described. (DP)

Haggin, J.

1983-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Underground coal gasification : overview of an economic and environmental evaluation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper examines an overview of the economic and environmental aspects of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) as a viable option to the above ground Surface… (more)

Kitaka, Richard Herbertson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluating the feasibility of underground coal gasification in Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is a clean coal technology that converts in situ coal into a low- to medium-grade product gas without the added expense of mining and reclamation. Potential candidates for UCG are those coal resources that are not economically recoverable or that are otherwise unacceptable for conventional coal utilization processes. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), through the sponsorship of the US Trade and Development Agency and in collaboration with the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), is undertaking a feasibility study for the application of UCG in the Krabi coal mining area, 620 miles south of Bangkok in Thailand. The EERC`s objective for this project is to determine the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of demonstrating and commercializing UCG at a selected site in the Krabi coal mining area. This paper addresses the preliminary developments and ongoing strategy for evaluating the selected UCG site. The technical, environmental, and economic factors for successful UCG operation are discussed, as well as the strategic issues pertaining to future energy expansion in southern Thailand.

Young, B.C.; Harju, J.A.; Schmit, C.R.; Solc, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Boysen, J. [B.C. Technologies, Ltd., Laramie, WY (United States); Kuehnel, R.A. [International Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences, Delft (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Techno-economic assessment of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) for upgrading bitumen from oil sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the techno-economic viability of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada, for the servicing of the oil sands bitumen upgrading industry. Hydrogen production for bitumen upgrading is predominantly achieved via steam methane reforming (SMR); which involves significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with considerable feedstock (natural gas) cost volatility. UCG is a formidable candidate for cost-competitive environmentally sustainable hydrogen production; given its negligible feedstock cost, the enormity of deep coal reserves in Western Canada and the favourable CO2 sequestration characteristics of potential UCG sites in the Western Canadian sedimentary basin (WCSB). Techno-economic models were developed for UCG and SMR with and without CCS, to estimate the cost of hydrogen production including delivery to a bitumen upgrader. In this paper, at base case conditions, a 5% internal rate of return (IRR) differential between UCG and SMR was considered so as to account for the increased investment risk associated with UCG. The cost of UCG hydrogen production without CCS is estimated to be $1.78/kg of H2. With CCS, this increases to range of $2.11–$2.70/kg of H2, depending on the distance of the site for CO2 sequestration from the UCG plant. The SMR hydrogen production cost without CCS is estimated to be $1.73/kg of H2. In similar fashion to UCG, this rises to a range of $2.14 to $2.41/kg of H2 with the consideration of CCS. Lastly, for hydrogen production without CCS, UCG has a superior cost competitiveness in comparison to SMR for an IRR differential less than 4.6%. This competitive threshold rises to 5.4% for hydrogen production with CCS.

Babatunde Olateju; Amit Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Underground coal gasification field experiment in the high-dipping coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article the experimental conditions and process of the underground gasification in the Woniushan Mine, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province are introduced, and the experimental results are analyzed. By adopting the new method of long-channel, big-section, and two-stage underground coal gasification, the daily gas production reaches about 36,000 m{sup 3}, with the maximum output of 103,700 m{sup 3}. The daily average heating value of air gas is 5.04 MJ/m{sup 3}, with 13.57 MJ/m{sup 3} for water gas. In combustible compositions of water gas, H{sub 2} contents stand at over 50%, with both CO and CH{sub 4} contents over 6%. Experimental results show that the counter gasification can form new temperature conditions and increase the gasification efficiency of coal seams.

Yang, L.H.; Liu, S.Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, W. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources & Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigating dynamic underground coal fires by means of numerical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......available within the combustion centre. Combustion will only proceed whenever...controls the overall combustion rate. For numerical...transport-only and a chemistry-only part. Common...rate of underground coal fires by oxygen transport......

S. Wessling; W. Kessels; M. Schmidt; U. Krause

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Overall requirements for an advanced underground coal extraction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents overall requirements on underground mining systems suitable for coal seams exploitable in the year 2000, with particular relevance to the resources of Central Appalachia. These requirements may be summarized as follows: (1) Production Cost: demonstrate a return on incremental investment of 1.5 to 2.5 times the value required by a low-risk capital project. (2) Miner Safety: achieve at least a 50% reduction in deaths and disabling injuries per million man-hours. (3) Miner Health: meet the intent of all applicable regulations, with particular attention to coal dust, carcinogens, and mutagens; and with continued emphasis on acceptable levels of noise and vibration, lighting, humidity and temperature, and adequate work space. (4) Environmental Impact: maintain the value of mined and adjacent lands at the pre-mining value following reclamation; mitigation of off-site impacts should not cost more than the procedures used in contemporary mining. (5) Coal Conservation: the recovery of coal from the seam being mined should be at least as good as the best available contemporary technology operating in comparable conditions. No significant trade-offs between production cost and other performance indices were found.

Goldsmith, M.; Lavin, M.L.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

Not Available

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

25

Modelling rock–water interactions in flooded underground coal mines, Northern Appalachian Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Office of Surface Mining 3 Parkway Center...flooded underground coal mines in northern Appalachia, USA. In early...the Effects of Coal Mining, Greene County...Seam of Northern Appalachia. In: Proceedings Eastern Coal Mine Geomechanics...

Eric F. Perry

26

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio...

27

A life cycle comparison of greenhouse emissions for power generation from coal mining and underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the emissions from energy and equipment use of underground coal mining, the data from the office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) hypothetical eastern U.S. underground coalmine is used (EERE

Zeshan Hyder; Nino S. Ripepi…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Coal combustion products (CCPs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

combustion products (CCPs) combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the largest segment of U.S. electricity generation (45 percent in 2010), finding a sustainable solution for CCPs is an important environmental challenge. When properly managed, CCPs offer society environmental and economic benefits without harm to public health and safety. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has made an important contribution in this regard. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Coal Combustion Products Fossil Energy Research Benefits

29

Chemical and physical controls on waters discharged from abandoned underground coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abandoned underground coal mines D. L. Lopez M...mines in high-sulphur coal are a major source of acid mine drainage in Appalachia. Studies of mines in...abandoned underground coal mines, tailing deposits...1995, with records of mining dating to as early as...

D. L. López; M. W. Stoertz

30

Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity Estimates for Intact Coal Barriers Between Closed Underground Mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...discharges were obtained from industry reports stored at the Consol...mining beneath surface water and waste impoundments: In Proceedings...associated with underground coal gasification: Canadian Geotechnical Journal...underground mining United States waste disposal water quality West...

KURT J. McCOY; JOSEPH J. DONOVAN; BRUCE R. LEAVITT

31

A review of the factors influencing the physicochemical characteristics of underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the physicochemical characteristics of the oxidation zone, the reduction zone, and the destructive distillation and dry zone in the process of underground coal gasification (UCG) were explained. The effect of such major factors as temperature, coal type, water-inrush or -intake rate, the quantity and quality of wind blasting, the thickness of coal seams, operational pressure, the length, and the section of gasification gallery on the quality of the underground gas and their interrelationship were discussed. Research showed that the temperature conditions determined the underground gas compositions; the appropriate water-inrush or -intake rate was conducive to the improvement in gas heat value; the properties of the gasification agent had an obvious effect on the compositions and heat value of the product gas. Under the cyclically changing pressure, heat losses decreased by 60%, with the heat efficiency and gasification efficiency being 1.4 times and 2 times those of constant pressure, respectively. The test research further proved that the underground gasifier with a long channel and a big cross-section, to a large extent, improved the combustion-gasification conditions.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Site Characterization, Sustainability Evaluation and Life Cycle Emissions Assessment of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), although not a new concept, is now attracting considerable global attention as a viable process to provide a âcleanâ and economic… (more)

Hyder, Zeshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

34

The commercial feasibility of underground coal gasification in southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a clean coal technology with the commercial potential to provide low- or medium-Btu gas for the generation of electric power. While the abundance of economic coal and natural gas reserves in the United States of America (USA) has delayed the commercial development of this technology in the USA, potential for commercial development of UCG-fueled electric power generation currently exists in many other nations. Thailand has been experiencing sustained economic growth throughout the past decade. The use of UCG to provide electric power to meet the growing power demand appears to have commercial potential. A project to determine the commercial feasibility of UCG-fueled electric power generation at a site in southern Thailand is in progress. The objective of the project is to determine the commercial feasibility of using UCG for power generation in the Krabi coal mining area located approximately 1,000 kilometers south of Bangkok, Thailand. The project team has developed a detailed methodology to determine the technical feasibility, environmental acceptability, and commercial economic potential of UCG at a selected site. In the methodology, hydrogeologic conditions of the coal seam and surrounding strata are determined first. These results and information describing the local economic conditions are then used to assess the commercial potential of the UCG application. The methodology for evaluating the Krabi UCG site and current project status are discussed in this paper.

Solc, J.; Young, B.C.; Harju, J.A.; Schmit, C.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Boysen, J.E. [B.C. Technologies, Ltd., Laramie, WY (United States); Kuhnel, R.A. [IIASES, Delft (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermophysical models of underground coal gasification and FEM analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, mathematical models of the coupled thermohydromechanical process of coal rock mass in an underground coal gasification panel are established. Combined with the calculation example, the influence of heating effects on the observed values and simulated values for pore water pressure, stress, and displacement in the gasification panel are fully discussed and analyzed. Calculation results indicate that 38, 62, and 96 days after the experiment, the average relative errors for the calculated values and measured values for the temperature and water pressure were between 8.51-11.14% and 3-10%, respectively; with the passage of gasification time, the calculated errors for the vertical stress and horizontal stress gradually declined, but the simulated errors for the horizontal and vertical displacements both showed a rising trend. On the basis of the research results, the calculated values and the measured values agree with each other very well.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Requirements for the conceptual design of advanced underground coal-extraction systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents conceptual design requirements for underground coal mining systems having substantially improved performance in the areas of production cost and miner safety. Mandatory performance levels are also set for miner health, environmental impact, and coal recovery. In addition to mandatory design goals and constraints, the document identifies a number of desirable system characteristics which must be assessed in terms of their impact on production cost and their compatibility with other system elements. Although developed for the flat-lying, moderately thick seams of Central Appalachia, these requirements are designed to be easily adaptable to other coals. This document results from the initial phase of a program to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced equipment suitable for the resources remaining beyond the year 2000. The requirements developed are meant to implement the broad systems performance goals formulated by Goldsmith and Lavin (1980) by providing a rational point of departure for the design of underground mining systems with emphasis on Central Appalachian coals. Because no one has yet attempted to design to these requirements, they may contain some inconsistencies and need clarification in some areas. Accordingly, the authors would very much appreciate commments and suggestions from those who have used or critically reviewed these requirements.

Gangal, M.D.; Lavin, M.L.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

39

Assessment of ground subsidence hazard near an abandoned underground coal mine using GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study constructs a hazard map for ground subsidence around abandoned underground coal mines (AUCMs) at Samcheok City in ... ) model, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). To evaluate the factors related...

Ki-Dong Kim; Saro Lee; Hyun-Joo Oh; Jong-Kuk Choi; Joong-Sun Won

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Characterizing a lignite formation before and after an underground coal gasification experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZING A LIGNITE FORMATION BEFORE AND AFTER AN UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION EXPERIMENT A Thesis by USMAN AHMED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay, 1981 Major Subject: Petrol eum Engineering CHARACTERIZING A LIGNITE FORMATION BEFORE AND AFTER AN UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION EXPERIMENT A Thesis by USMAN AHMED approved as to sty1e and content by: airma o i ee Head f...

Ahmed, Usman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Consensus Coal Production Forecast for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rate Forecasts 19 5. EIA Forecast: Regional Coal Production 22 6. Wood Mackenzie Forecast: W.V. Steam to data currently published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), coal production in the state in this report calls for state production to decline by 11.3 percent in 2009 to 140.2 million tons. During

Mohaghegh, Shahab

42

Coal production 1984. [USA; 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Production 1984 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (PL 93-275) as amended. All data presented in this report, except the total production table presented in the Highlights section, the demonstrated reserve base data presented in Appendix A, and the 1983 coal preparation and shipments data presented in Appendix C, were obtained from Form EIA-7A, ''Coal Production Report,'' from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1984. These mining operations accounted for 99.4% of total US coal production and represented 76.3% of all US coal mining operations in 1984. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1984.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sensitivity analysis for the GIS-based mapping of the ground subsidence hazard near abandoned underground coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground subsidence around abandoned underground coal mines can cause much loss of life ... by sensitivity analysis in geographic information system (GIS). Spatial data for the subsidence area,...

Hyun-Joo Oh; Seung-Chan Ahn; Jong-Kuk Choi; Saro Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Management of dry flue gas dsulfurization by-products in underground mines - an update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the U.S. produced about 100 million tons of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) primarily from conventional coal-fired boilers. The requirement to reduce SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions to comply with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) force utilities to adopt advanced combustion and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, such as wet scrubbers, fluidized bed combustion (FBC), dry sorbent duct or furnace injection. These technologies will double to triple the amount of FGD by-products while only slightly increasing the amounts of conventional combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag. This paper describes a program concerned with the underground disposal of combustion products in abandoned underground coal mines.

Chugh, Y.P.; Thomasson, E.M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOEIJEA-1219 DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION CAMPBELL COUNTY, WYOMING October 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process. or service by trade name, trademark, manufac-

46

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi Coal Mine site, Thailand. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the U.S Trade and Development Agency. The report summarizes the accomplishments of field, analytical data evaluation and modeling activities focused on assessment of underground coal gasification (UCG) feasibility at Krabi over a two year period. The overall objective of the project was to determine the technical issues, environmental impact, and economic of developing and commercializing UCG at the site in Krabi. The report contains an Executive Summary followed by these chapters: (1) Project Overview; (2) Project Site Characterization; (3) Inorganic and Thermal Materials Characterization; (4) Technical and Economic Feasibility of UCG At the Krabi Site; (5) Conclusions and Recommendations; (6) Acknowledgments; (7) References.

Boysen, J.; Sole, J.; Schmit, C.R.; Harju, J.A.; Young, B.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) in an environmentally sound manner is a major issue facing the coal and utility industries in the US today. Disposal into abandoned sections of underground coal mines may overcome many of the surface disposal problems along with added benefits such as mitigation of subsidence and acid mine drainage. However, many of the abandoned underground coal mines are located far from power plants, requiring long distance hauling of by-products which will significantly contribute to the cost of disposal. For underground disposal to be economically competitive, the transportation and handling cost must be minimized. This requires careful selection of the system and optimal design for efficient operation. The materials handling and system economics research addresses these issues. Transportation and handling technologies for CCBs were investigated from technical, environmental and economic points of view. Five technologies were found promising: (1) Pneumatic Trucks, (2) Pressure Differential Rail Cars, (3) Collapsible Intermodal Containers, (4) Cylindrical Intermodal Tanks, and (5) Coal Hopper Cars with Automatic Retractable Tarping. The first two technologies are currently being utilized in transporting by-products from power plants to disposal sites, whereas the next three are either in development or in conceptualization phases. In this research project, engineering design and cost models were developed for the first four technologies. The engineering design models are in the form of spreadsheets and serve the purpose of determining efficient operating schedules and sizing of system components.

Sevim, H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Review of underground coal gasification technologies and carbon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is thought that the world coal reserve is close to 150?years, which only includes recoverable reserves using conventional techniques. Mining is the typical method of extracting coal, but it has been estimat...

Stuart J Self; Bale V Reddy; Marc A Rosen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

50

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

51

Southwest Virginia underground coal mine map database and base maps - synopsis of an ongoing coalfield project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1991, the Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy of the Commonwealth of Virginia entered into an agreement with the office of Surface Mining to prepare a coal mine map database and to produce 1:24,000 scale individual coal-bed base maps showing documented underground mined areas throughout the Southwest Virginia coal field. The project results are to provide public, industry, and all levels of government a much-needed means of initial evaluation of many coalfield related concerns. The completed maps will be incorporated into an integrated geographic information system (GIS). Evaluating the entire coalfield involved a preliminary review of 48 quadrangles. Ongoing detailed, accurate information gathering of extensive underground mine map files was necessary to provide a needed organized map database. Construction of coalfield index maps of information gathered to date provide insight into coalfield-wide outcrop patterns, mine distributions, and coal-bed trends. A completed set of individual maps, referenced to the underground mine map database, showing the types of mining applicable per coal bed quadrangle is the designated project output.

Sites, R.S.; Hostettler, K.K. (Division of Mineral Resources, Charlottesville, VA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky is analyzed using both the developed baseline mine concept and the traditional geologic investigative approach.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators approach meets the requirements for cutting straight entries and mining the proper amount of coal per cycle. Introduction The mining of soft materials, such as coal, is a large industry. Worldwide, a total of 435 million

Stentz, Tony

54

A modified version of the geomechanics classification for entry design in underground coal mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geomechanics Classification was modified for entry and roof support design in underground room-and-pillar coal mines. Adjustment multipliers were introduced to incorporate the influence of strata weatherability, high horizontal stresses, and the roof support reinforcement factor into the existing classification system. Sixty-two case histories of both standing and fallen mine roof were collected from two mines in the northern Appalachian coalfield. Twenty-seven engineering and geologic parameters were recorded for each case. A partial correlation analysis was carried out on the cases to establish which parameters have a significant impact upon the supported stand-up time of coal mine roof. Survival analysis, a statistical technique used in medical research to assess the effect of a drug or treatment on a patient's life expectancy, was conducted together with stepwise multiple regression to derive values for the adjustment multipliers. A practical example is included to illustrate the application of the modified Geomechanics Classification to underground coal mine design.

Newman, D.A.; Bieniawski, Z.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Mathematical modelling of some chemical and physical processes in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification normally involves two vertical wells which must be linked by a channel having low resistance to gas flow. There are several ways of establishing such linkage, but all leave a relatively open horizontal hole with a diameter on the order of a meter. To increase our understanding of the chemical and physical processes governing underground coal gasification LLNL has been conducting laboratory scale experiments accompanied by mathematical modelling. Blocks of selected coal types are cut to fit 55 gallon oil drums and sealed in place with plaster. A 1 cm. diameter hole is drilled the length of the block and plumbing attached to provide a flow of air or oxygen/steam mixture. After an instrumented burn the block is sawed open to examine the cavity. Mathematical modelling has been directed towards predicting the cavity shape. This paper describes some sub-models and examines their impact on predicted cavity shapes.

Creighton, J. R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky, is next analyzed, using both the new baseline mine concept and traditional geologic investigative approach. The baseline mine concept presented is intended as a framework, providing a consistent basis for further analyses to be subsequently conducted in other geographic regions. The baseline mine concept is intended as a tool to give system designers a more realistic feel of the mine environment and will hopefully lead to acceptable alternatives for advanced coal extraction system.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

Johnson, Eric E.

58

Underground coal gasification (UCG) gas to methanol and MTG-gasoline: an economic and sensitivity study, Task B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, identified as Task B, examines the technical and economic aspects of the production of methanol and MTG-Gasoline using gas from an underground coal gasification (UCG) facility. The report is a sequel to a previous study performed in 1981 and identified as Task A. The Task A report, titled Cost Saving Concepts on the Production of Methanol from Underground Gasified Coal, examined the economics of producing fuel grade methanol using UCG gas. In this study we examine the economics of producing MTG-Gasoline as well as a number of other aspects of the economics of upgrading UCG gas. Capital and operating costs for three different capacities of MTG-Gasoline plant are presented. These are 1600 BPD, 4800 BPD, and 9600 BPD. These capacities are equivalent to fuel grade methanol plants having capacities of 4000 BPD, 12,000 BPD, and 24,000 BPD - the methanol capacities considered in the previous studies. The economics of the MTG-Gasoline plant were developed using published information and our best estimate of the processing steps in the MTG-Gasoline process. As part of this study, several sensitivity studies were undertaken to examine the sensitivity of both methanol and MTG-Gasoline product cost to changes in technical and economic parameters. Table 1.1 lists the various sensitivity studies undertaken. All cost figures are in first quarter 1982 dollars.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast For  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast For West Virginia: 2011 Update Prepared for the West December 2011 © Copyright 2011 WVU Research Corporation #12;#12;W.Va. Consensus Coal Forecast Update 2011 i Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 Recent Developments 3 Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast

Mohaghegh, Shahab

60

Development of a GIS-based monitoring and management system for underground coal mining safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal mine safety is of paramount concern to mining industry. Mine accidents have various causes and consequences including catastrophic failure of mine, substantial economic losses and most notably loss of lives. Therefore, any initiative in mine monitoring is of vital importance for progressing safety surveillance and maintenance. This paper presents the development of a geographic information system (GIS)-based monitoring and management system for underground mine safety in three levels as constructive safety, surveillance and maintenance, and emergency. The developed model integrates the database design and management to the monitoring system implementation which encompasses query and analysis operations with the help of web and desktop applications. Interactive object-oriented graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to visualize information about the entities gathered from the model and also to provide analysis operations based on the graphical representations and demonstrations using data tables and map objects. The research methodology essentially encompasses five main stages: (i) designing a conceptual database model; (ii) development of a logical model in terms of entity-relationship (ER) diagrams; (iii) development of a physical model based on physical constraints and requirements; (iv) development of \\{GUIs\\} and implementation of the developed model, analysis and queries; (v) verification and validation of the created model for Ömerler underground coal mine in Turkey. The proposed system is expected to be an efficient tool for improving and maintaining healthy standards in underground coal mines which can possibly be extended to a national GIS infrastructure.

Seda ?alap; Mahmut Onur Karsl?o?lu; Nuray Demirel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Central Appalachia: Coal mine productivity and expansion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal mine productivity is a key determinant of coal prices and vice versa. This report, focusing on supplies of very low sulfur coal in the eastern United States, presents alternative scenarios of how the price-productivity relationship may evolve in response to growing utility demand. It also documents the next tier of projects where the coal industry is prepared to expand capacity. 19 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Suboleski, S.C.; Frantz, R.L.; Ramani, R.V.; Rao, G.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Mining Engineering Section); Price, J.P. (Resource Dynamics Corp., Vienna, VA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a {open_quotes}paste{close_quotes} mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for placing the coal combustion by-products underground, and to conduct a demonstration of the technologies on the surface. Therefore, this quarter has been largely devoted to developing specifications for equipment components, visiting fabrication plants throughout Southern Illinois to determine their capability for building the equipment components in compliance with the specifications, and delivering the components in a timely manner.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Determining coal permeabilities through constant pressure production interference testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kurt Schubarth, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Stephen A. Holditch The determination of format1on propert1es 1s important to the success of any underground coal gasification (UCG) project. There are many ways.... : "Hydrological Site Characterization for In-Situ Coal Gasification, " 6th Underground Coal Conversion Symposium, July 13-17, 1980. Schrider, L. A. and Jennings, J. W. : "An Underground Coal Gasification Experiment, Hanna, Wyoming, " 1974, SPE 4993. 3. van...

Schubarth, Stephen Kurt

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Assessment and management of roof fall risks in underground coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents caused by roof falls are commonly faced problems of underground coal mines. These accidents may have detrimental effects on workers in the form of injury, disability or fatality as well as mining company due to downtimes, interruptions in the mining operations, equipment breakdowns, etc. This study proposes a risk and decision analysis methodology for the assessment and management of risk associated with mine roof falls in underground coal mines. In the proposed methodology, risk assessment requires the determination of probabilities, possible consequences and cost of consequences. Then the risk is managed by the application of decision-making principles. The probabilities are determined by the analysis of 1141 roof fall data from 12 underground mines in the Appalachian region. The consequences are assessed based on the type of injuries observed after roof falls and the place of the mining activity. The cost of consequences is modeled by the so-called “relative cost criterion”. A decision analysis framework is developed in order to manage the evaluated risk for a single mine. Then this model is extended to a regional model for the management of the roof fall risks in the mines of whole Appalachia. The proposed model is illustrated with an example and it is found to be a powerful technique for coping with uncertainties and the management of roof fall risks.

H.S.B. Duzgun; H.H. Einstein

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Underground Gasification: An Alternate Way to Exploit Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality of the product gas were pre-dictable...spec-ulate that the cost of gas from the Soviet process...gasification could allow gas to leak out of the chamber...future, and the sole remaining question will be the economics...how it affects marine life are among the most complex...

THOMAs H. MAUGH II

1977-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gravel bulkheads for confining hydraulic backfilling of abandoned underground coal mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work the author describes the use of gravel bulkheads for confining hydraulic backfilling of abandoned underground coal mines that are simply refilled or, as in the case of the Portal Park swimming pool in Colorado Springs, rebuilt in the area over the abandoned mine. Hydraulic backfilling was the void filling method favored when the Portal Park pool began to tip, and gravel bulkheads confining walls were developed to confine the backfilling effort to areas under the pool. This work describes these bulkheads.

Van Dyke, M.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A feasibility study for underground coal gasification at Krabi Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to evaluate the technical, economical, and environmental feasibility of underground coal gasification (UCG) in the Krabi Mine, Thailand, was conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in cooperation with B.C. Technologies (BCT) and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The selected coal resource was found suitable to fuel a UCG facility producing 460,000 MJ/h (436 million Btu/h) of 100--125 Btu/scf gas for 20 years. The raw UCG gas could be produced for a selling price of $1.94/MMBtu. The UCG facility would require a total investment of $13.8 million for installed capital equipment, and annual operating expenses for the facility would be $7.0 million. The UCG gas could be either cofired in a power plant currently under construction or power a 40 MW simple-cycle gas turbine or a 60 MW combined-cycle power plant.

Solc, J.; Steadman, E.N. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Boysen, J.E. [BC Technologies, Laramie, WY (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Problems of Expanding Coal Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metallurgical or coking coal marketed widely here and abroad. Appalachian coal generally has a high...are characteristic of Appalachia, al-though there has also been extensive strip mining including destructive...Mid-western bituminous coal has a large market as...

John Walsh

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Directory of coal production ownership, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ownership patterns in the coal industry are highly complex. Many producers are diversified into other lines of activity. The pattern and extent of this diversification has varied through time. In the past, steel and nonferrous metals companies had major coal industry involvement. This is still true today. However, other types of enterprises have entered the industry de novo or through merger. Those of greatest significance in recent times have involved petroleum and particularly public utility companies. This report attempts to identify, as accurately as possible, production ownership patterns in the coal industry. The audience for this Directory is anyone who is interested in accurately tracing the ownership of coal companies to parent companies, or who is concerned about the structure of ownership in the US coal industry. This audience includes coal industry specialists, coal industry policy analysts, economists, financial analysts, and members of the investment community.

Thompson, B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

An investigation of the noise dynamics in a southern illinois underground coal mine.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noise in an underground coal mine has dominant components generated mainly from three sources: (1) continuous mining machine (CMM) (2) roof bolters and (3) cars/vehicles which are transporting personnel end/or coal. Each of these three noise sources also has a number of well defined sub?sources with their own noise characteristics. The CMM noise is comprised mainly of noisegenerated by coal cutting drum wet scrubber for dust control and coal transport conveyor (called also the CMM’s tail). Roof bolter’s noise is generated during the drilling of the roof bolt holes in the bolting process. Personnel and coaltransportationvehiclesgeneratenoise from the power driven system. The personnel most exposed to these noises are operators of these machines and associated support personnel. Three selected techniques with appropriate instrumentation were used to monitor exposure of the personnel to the noise and noise energy over a period of time. The most common technique is based on the use of personal noise dosimeters. The sound level meters (both pressure and power) were also used to collect noise data in form of instantaneous readings and also to check calibration of other sound measuring instruments. Most useful information was obtained from continuous recordings of the noise over time. This paper discusses the variability or dynamics of the generatednoise in both frequency and time domains

Marek Szary; Yoginder Chugh; William Bell; Joseph Hirschi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Coal Production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

03 03 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279603 Varnish cache server Coal Production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

73

Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi coal mine site, Thailand: Volume 1. Progress report, December 1--31, 1995; Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The objective of this report was to determine the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of developing, demonstrating, and commercializing underground coal gasification (UCG) at the Krabi coal mine site in Southern Thailand. This is Volume 1, the Progress Report for the period December 1, 1995, through December 31, 1995.

Young, B.C.; Schmit, C.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Reclamation of abandoned coal refuse piles and underground adit entries in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews reclamation activities conducting during 1984-85 in the Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Under this integrated reclamation project, four sites comprising 14 acres of highly acidic abandoned coal refuse were treated and 43 abandoned adit underground mine entries were closed. The techniques used were cost-effective and could be applied in reclaiming other coal minesites in Appalachia. 9 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Muncy, J.A.; Buckner, E.R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Coal Combustion Products Extension Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to 40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be expanded at OSU, with support from state and federal agencies, utilities, trade groups, and the university, to focus on the following four specific areas of promise: (a) Expanding use in proven areas (such as use of fly ash in concrete); (b) Removing or reducing regulatory and perceptual barriers to use (by working in collaboration with regulatory agencies); (c) Developing new or under-used large-volume market applications (such as structural fills); and (d) Placing greater emphasis on FGD byproducts utilization.

Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

U. S. monthly coal production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States....

78

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

79

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

80

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application of decision tree model for the ground subsidence hazard mapping near abandoned underground coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Subsidence of ground caused by underground mines poses hazards to human life and property. This study analyzed the hazard to ground subsidence using factors that can affect ground subsidence and a decision tree approach in a geographic information system (GIS). The study area was Taebaek, Gangwon-do, Korea, where many abandoned underground coal mines exist. Spatial data, topography, geology, and various ground-engineering data for the subsidence area were collected and compiled in a database for mapping ground-subsidence hazard (GSH). The subsidence area was randomly split 50/50 for training and validation of the models. A data-mining classification technique was applied to the GSH mapping, and decision trees were constructed using the chi-squared automatic interaction detector (CHAID) and the quick, unbiased, and efficient statistical tree (QUEST) algorithms. The frequency ratio model was also applied to the GSH mapping for comparing with probabilistic model. The resulting GSH maps were validated using area-under-the-curve (AUC) analysis with the subsidence area data that had not been used for training the model. The highest accuracy was achieved by the decision tree model using CHAID algorithm (94.01%) comparing with QUEST algorithms (90.37%) and frequency ratio model (86.70%). These accuracies are higher than previously reported results for decision tree. Decision tree methods can therefore be used efficiently for GSH analysis and might be widely used for prediction of various spatial events.

Saro Lee; Inhye Park

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Separation of solids from coal liquefaction products using sonic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. This project seeks to improve the effectiveness of coal liquefaction by novel application of sonic and ultrasonic energy to separation of solids from coal liquefaction streams.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash and bottom ash are produced as by-products of coal-fired electricity generation. In many countries coal ashes are by-products of the coal combustion, their properties are influenced by the nature of understanding behavior of masonry products made from coal ashes. The objective of this research program

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

84

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

EIS-0004: Coal Loan Guarantee Program (P.L. 94-163)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to address the potential impacts of implementing the Coal Loan Guarantee Program to encourage the production of low and high sulfur coal by small underground coal producers.

87

Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others. Key milestones included producing hydrogenated coal in the Hydrotreating Facility for the first time. The facility is now operational, although digital controls have not yet been completely wired. In addition, ultrasound is being used to investigate enhanced dissolution of coal. Experiments have been carried out.

Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Logistics background study: underground mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Coal combustion products 2007 production and use report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Coal Ash Association's 2007 Annual Coal Combustion Products (CCP) are derived from data from more than 170 power plants. The amount of CCPs used was 40.55%, a decrease of 2.88% from 2006, attributed to reduced fuel burn and a decrease in demand in the building industry. Figures are given for the production of fly ash, flue gas desulfurization gypsum, bottom ash, FBC ash and boiler slag. The article summarises results of the survey. 1 ref., 1 tab.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Survey of tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, and shallow light oil fields of the United States for underground coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey was conducted to identify areas of the United States where tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or shallow light oil fields might be suitably associated with coal deposits for production of oil by in situ thermal recovery methods using heat derived from underground coal gasification (UCG) processes. The survey is part of a Department of Energy-sponsored program to develop new applications for UCG technology in utilizing coal resources that are unattractive for mining. Results from the survey indicate tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or light oil fields are probably or possibly located within 5 miles of suitable coal in 17 states (Table 1). Especially promising areas are in the Uinta Basin of Utah; the North Slope of Alaska; the San Miguel deposit in southwest Texas; the Illinois-Eastern Interior Basin area of western Kentucky, southwestern Indiana and Illinois; the tri-state area of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma; and the northern Appalachian Basin in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. The deposits in these areas warrant further evaluation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Trudell, L.G.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feed-stocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others.

Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size ... Plasma gasification is widely applied because of its clean syngas production performance and high chemical reactivity accelerated by the free radicals produced by plasma. ... The syngas composition produced from plasma gasification at same conditions is affected by the physicochemical properties of coals. ...

Sang Jun Yoon; Jae Goo Lee

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

95

The methods of steam coals usage for coke production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, high volatile bituminous coals are broadly used for metallurgical coke production in Russia. The share of such coals in the coking blend is variable from 20 to 40% by weight. There are some large coal deposits in Kuznetskii basin which have coals with low caking tendency. The low caking properties of such coals limit of its application in the coking process. At the same time the usage of low caking coals for coke production would allow flexibility of the feedstock for coke production. Preliminary tests, carried out in COAL-C's lab has shown some differences in coal properties with dependence on the size distribution. That is why the separation of the well-caking fraction from petrographically heterogeneous coals and its further usage in coking process may be promising. Another way for low caking coals application in the coke industry is briquettes production from such coals. This method has been known for a very long time. It may be divided into two possible directions. First is a direct coking of briquettes from the low caking coals. Another way is by adding briquettes to coal blends in defined proportion and combined coking. The possibility of application of coal beneficiation methods mentioned above was investigated in present work.

Korobetskii, I.A.; Ismagilov, M.S.; Nazimov, S.A.; Sladkova, I.L.; Shudrikov, E.S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

97

Fracture-zone dewatering to control ground water inflow in underground coal mines. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines investigation focuses on the identification and control of ground-water inflow problems that occur in the active sections of underground Appalachian coal mines. A fracture inflow survey of eight underground mines was conducted. Three types of mine fracture intercepts were identified, which are typical of wet section mining conditions. A mine in Preston County, WV was selected as the site for a fracture-zone dewatering experiment. Fracture trace analysis was used to site dewatering wells in a fracture valley setting ahead of mine development. The design, implementation, and results of the dewatering experiment are presented. The investigation suggests that fracture zones are responsible for the sudden release of stored ground water, which often occurs as mining sections advance beneath fracture valley topography. It is concluded, therefore, that dewatering operations that are designed to intercept the component of ground water that is stored in fracture zones will be most effective in controlling infiltration to active mine sections.

Schmidt, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chapter 8 - Coal Seam Degasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chapter discusses various techniques for coal seam degasification. All coal seams are gassy but they differ in their degree of gassiness. Pre-mining and post-mining techniques for underground coal mines are discussed. With good planning, 50–80% of in-situ gas in coal can be removed before mining improving both safety and productivity. Similarly, 50–80% of gas from mined-out areas (gobs) can be removed to minimize ventilation air requirements. Gas transport in underground mines and economics of coal seam degasification are also discussed.

Pramod Thakur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Land reclamation and strip-mined coal production in appalachia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantifies the short-run impacts of reclamation on strip mining costs, coal prices, production, and employment in Appalachia. A process analysis model is developed and used to estimate short-run strip-mined coal supply functions under conditions of alternative reclamation requirements. Then, an econometric model is developed and used to estimate coal demand relations. Our results show that full reclamation has rather minor impacts. In 1972, full reclamation would have increased strip-mined coal production costs an average of $0.35 per ton, reduced strip-mined coal production by 10 million tons, and cost approximately 1600 jobs in Appalachia.

William Lin; Robert L Spore; Edmund A Nephew

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EIA - Weekly U.S. Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Production U.S. Coal Production Report No.: DOE/EIA 0218/50 Report Released: December 19, 2013 Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 Week Ended Year-To-Date1 52 Weeks Ended Coal-Producing Region and State (thousand short tons) 12/14/2013 12/7/2013 12/15/2012 12/14/2013 12/14/2012 Percent Change 12/14/2013 12/15/2012 Percent Change Alabama 355 351 338 17,644 18,754 -5.9 18,343 19,394 -5.4 Alaska 42 41 45 1,675 1,964 -14.7 1,764 2,045 -13.7 Arizona 151 149 141 7,328 7,226 1.4 7,596 7,513 1.1 Arkansas 1 1 3 37 92 -59.3 44 96 -54.6 Colorado 487 473 419 22,198 27,630 -19.7 23,090 28,655 -19.4 Illinois 997 983 890 50,272 46,828 7.4 52,170 48,271 8.1 Indiana 737 728 693 36,141 35,248 2.5 37,590 36,686 2.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessing the utility of coal’s elementary composition in predicting the yield of coking products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elementary analysis of the organic mass of coal does not provide sufficient information to predict the yield of coking products, since it does not reflect the...

M. L. Ulanovskii

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Production of Oil from Coal in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... British Commonwealth there are cheaper supplies of coal than in Great Britain, as well as reserves of brown coal and ... of brown coal and lignite. Dr. Parker stated that bombing attacks between May and September 1944 caused a reduction ...

1947-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned underground coal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Universitet, Department of Theoretical Physics Collection: Physics 4 Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting Summary: John R. Baza DirectorCoal Minerals Abandoned Mine...

107

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

108

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

109

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

CO2 Storage in Shallow Underground and Surface Coal Mines: Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine saturated with C-type (alkaline) fly ash that reacts with flue gas can provide an additional mechanism of chemical trapping (5). ... In addition, we thank Robert Virta, Mineral Commodity Specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey, for providing a digital map of swelling clay in high-resolution raster format, Garrett Veloski, for vectorization of the raster data, and Robert Dilmore, for developing the GIS database for the clay-and-coal map, expert advice on verifying the mineral stabilization aspects, and editorial input. ... Ozdemir, E. Chemistry of the adsorption of carbon dioxide by Argonne premium coals and a model to simulate CO2 sequestration in coal seams. ...

Vyacheslav N. Romanov; Terry E. Ackman; Yee Soong; Robert L. Kleinman

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Coal combustion by-products: State regulatory overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are generated from the combustion of coal for energy production. Approximately 82 million tons of CCBs are produced each year by electric utilities. (1991 Coal Combustion By-Product Production and Use, American Coal Ash Association, 1992.) There are several common types of CCBs produced by coal combustion--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, flue gas desulfurization material (FGD) and fluidized bed combustion byproducts (FBC). Some CCBs, such as fly ash, have pozzolanic properties and may have cementitious properties, both of which are advantageous for engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) in ASTM C-618 has created two classifications of useful and quality coal ash, Class F ash and Class C ash. Each class of coal ash has different pozzolanic and cementitious characteristics. Coal ash can be utilized in many manufacturing, mining, agricultural, engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. This is a review by state of regulations concerning coal combustion by-products.

Jagiella, D. [Howard and Howard Attorneys, Peoria, IL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Acoustically sensing the presence of methane and carbon dioxide in underground coal mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A WSN can be used to continuously sense monitor and transmit data to a centralized control station in a under ground coal mine. A fact limiting the possibility is the presence of highly humid condition in UG coal mines. Current sensors cannot work continuously over prolonged period in UG coal mine environment. This paper describes a multi-aspect data fusion approach for acoustical sensors which make it possible to measure the build up of methane and carbon dioxide in UG coal mine environment. Suggested approach takes time of flight phase and attenuation of sonic pulses to determine the build up of methane and carbon dioxide. Suggested approach is more power efficient in comparison to existing sensors. A temperature sensor is used to accommodate change in characteristics of sonic pulses.

A. Singh; M. Radhakrishna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

114

PRODUCTION OF LOW-ENERGY, 100% BY-PRODUCT CEMENT UTILIZING COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ever-increasing quantity of by-products generated from burning coal in the production of electricity has brought about the need for new areas of utilization. This… (more)

Rust, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Panel data analysis of U.S. coal productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze labor productivity in coal mining in the United States using indices of productivity change associated with the concepts of panel data modeling. This approach is valuable when there is extensive heterogeneity ...

Stoker, Thomas M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 13. Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Alabama w w - - w w 14,594 85.99 Arkansas w w - - - - w w Colorado w w - - w w w w Illinois 24,811 76.45 - - 35,506 67.22 60,317 71.02 Indiana 16,445 94.65 - - - -

117

Underground Gasification of Coal in the U.S.S.R  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... S.S.R., however, the first practical work was begun in 1933 on the gasification of the coal in tlie seam. This is reached by two shafts connected by ... necessitates the labour of miners to sink the shafts and to tunnel the seam before gasification can begin. In a new installation in the Donetz coalfield, the seam will be ...

1941-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A PILOT SCALE FACILITY FOR FABRICATION AND MARKETING OF LIGHTWEIGHT-COAL COMBUSTION BYPRODUCTS-BASED SUPPORTS AND MINE VENTILATION BLOCKS FOR UNDERGROUND MINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this program was to develop a pilot scale facility, and design, fabricate, and market CCBs-based lightweight blocks for mine ventilation control devices, and engineered crib elements and posts for use as artificial supports in underground mines to replace similar wooden elements. This specific project was undertaken to (1) design a pilot scale facility to develop and demonstrate commercial production techniques, and (2) provide technical and marketing support to Fly Lite, Inc to operate the pilot scale facility. Fly Lite, Inc is a joint venture company of the three industrial cooperators who were involved in research into the development of CCBs-based structural materials. The Fly-Lite pilot scale facility is located in McLeansboro, Illinois. Lightweight blocks for use in ventilation stoppings in underground mines have been successfully produced and marketed by the pilot-scale facility. To date, over 16,000 lightweight blocks (30-40 pcf) have been sold to the mining industry. Additionally, a smaller width (6-inch) full-density block was developed in August-September 2002 at the request of a mining company. An application has been submitted to Mine Safety and Health Administration for the developed block approval for use in mines. Commercialization of cribs and posts has also been accomplished. Two generations of cribs have been developed and demonstrated in the field. MSHA designated them suitable for use in mines. To date, over 2,000 crib elements have been sold to mines in Illinois. Two generations of posts were also demonstrated in the field and designated as suitable for use in mines by MSHA. Negotiations are currently underway with a mine in Illinois to market about 1,000 posts per year based on a field demonstration in their mine. It is estimated that 4-5 million tons CCBs (F-fly ash or FBC fly ash) may be utilized if the developed products can be commercially implemented in U.S. coal and non-coal mines.

Yoginder P. Chugh

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radon concentrations in three underground lignite mines in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......being operated by the Aegean Lignite Enterprise (Ege Linyitleri...determined in three underground lignite mines, namely Tuncbilek...which is the main state body of lignite coal production, processing...of TKi. GLi Tuncbilek coal reserve, which is located on the mid-west......

S. Çile; N. Altinsoy; N. Çelebi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Beneficial use of coal combustion products continues to grow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2007 the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) released results of the Coal Combustion Products Production (CCP) and use survey. Production was 124,795,000 tons while beneficial use was 54,203,000 tons, a utilization rate of over 43%, 3% higher than in 2005. The article includes graphs of 40 years of CCP production and use and projected trade of CCP utilization until 2011. It also gives 2006 figures for Production and use of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, FGD gypsum and other FGD products, and FBC ash. 3 refs., 3 figs.

MacDonald, M. [American Coal Ash Association (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

122

ULTRA CLEAN COAL PRODUCTION USING DENSE MEDIUM SEPARATION FOR THE SILICON MARKET.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of high quality silicon requires the use of ultraclean coal containing less than 1.5% ash. The magnetite used to clean the coal in… (more)

Amini, Seyed Hassan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Pitch Production Using Solvent Extraction of Coal: Suitability as Carbon Anode Precursor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Albertan coal has been used to produce extracts as precursor for production of anode coke. Coal extractability was studied using digestion with Tetralin in a… (more)

Mohammad Ali Pour, Mehdi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

127

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

128

Coal production forecast and low carbon policies in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With rapid economic growth and industrial expansion, China consumes more coal than any other nation. Therefore, it is particularly crucial to forecast China's coal production to help managers make strategic decisions concerning China's policies intended to reduce carbon emissions and concerning the country's future needs for domestic and imported coal. Such decisions, which must consider results from forecasts, will have important national and international effects. This article proposes three improved forecasting models based on grey systems theory: the Discrete Grey Model (DGM), the Rolling DGM (RDGM), and the p value RDGM. We use the statistical data of coal production in China from 1949 to 2005 to validate the effectiveness of these improved models to forecast the data from 2006 to 2010. The performance of the models demonstrates that the p value RDGM has the best forecasting behaviour over this historical time period. Furthermore, this paper forecasts coal production from 2011 to 2015 and suggests some policies for reducing carbon and other emissions that accompany the rise in forecasted coal production.

Jianzhou Wang; Yao Dong; Jie Wu; Ren Mu; He Jiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Forward and reverse combustion gasification of coal with production of high-quality syngas in a simulated pilot system for in situ gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This research focused on the feasibility and stability of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite and bituminous coal with oxygen or oxygen–steam mixtures as gasification agents, especially reverse combustion gasification. A high-quality syngas (H2 and CO) could be obtained using the reverse combustion gasification technique combined with forward combustion gasification in a pilot system for in situ gasification. The gasification time was extended more than 25% using the reverse combustion approach. The controlling conditions for reverse combustion gasification were obtained by comparing and analyzing experimental data. The results show the relationship between the inject gas flow within certain limits and velocity of the gasification flame was linear during reverse combustion. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in a pilot-scale underground gasifier during experiments. The combustion gasification of coal was carried out experimentally for over 5 days. The average effective content (H2 and CO) of syngas was in the range of 60–70%, meeting the requirement of synthesis gas. The optimal ranges of gasifying lignite and bituminous coal were found to be 1.5–2.0 and 1.3–1.75, respectively. The product gas flow was proportional to oxygen blast. These are expected to provide useful guidance on practical underground coal gasification operations and to give experimental evidence in support of theory.

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Dongyu Liang; Xuan Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modeling of coal bed methane (CBM) production and CO2 sequestration in coal seams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed to predict the coal bed methane (CBM) production and carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in a coal seam accounting for the coal seam properties. The model predictions showed that, for a CBM production and dewatering process, the pressure could be reduced from 15.17 MPa to 1.56 MPa and the gas saturation increased up to 50% in 30 years for a 5.4 × 105 m2 of coal formation. For the CO2 sequestration process, the model prediction showed that the CO2 injection rate was first reduced and then slightly recovered over 3 to 13 years of injection, which was also evidenced by the actual in seam data. The model predictions indicated that the sweeping of the water in front of the CO2 flood in the cleat porosity could be important on the loss of injectivity. Further model predictions suggested that the injection rate of CO2 could be about 11 × 103 m3 per day; the injected CO2 would reach the production well, which was separated from the injection well by 826 m, in about 30 years. During this period, about 160 × 106 m3 of CO2 could be stored within a 21.4 × 105 m2 of coal seam with a thickness of 3 m.

Ekrem Ozdemir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Caustic washing for refining of direct coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive research and development sponsored by the U.S. DOE/PETC over the past two decades has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of direct coal liquefaction products. High-quality coal-derived distillates are obtainable from catalytic two-stage liquefaction (TSL) processes, such as those developed at the Wilsonville, AL pilot plant and the Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. (HTI) pilot plant and bench units. The products of the Wilsonville and HTI TSL operations are suitable as high quality feedstocks for producing transportation fuels in a refinery. These products have important quality advantages over crude petroleum: they are distillates boiling below about 700{degrees}F and are thus virtually free of resid and metals, and they have very low sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents. The coal liquids have carbon and hydrogen contents and Watson characterization factors within the range of crude petroleums. However, relative to crude petroleum, the crude coal products have elevated oxygen contents. This report describes the removal of phenols from coal liquids by caustic washing, and the the recovery of the cresylic acid by-product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

133

SNG Production from Coal: A Possible Solution to Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In some areas of the world, natural gas demand cannot be fully satisfied either by domestic sources or foreign imports, while abundant coal resources are available. The conversion of coal to Substitute Natural Gas, SNG, by coal gasification and subsequent syngas methanation is one of the possible solutions to solve the problem. Foster Wheeler has developed a simple process for SNG production, named VESTA, utilizing catalysts from Clariant. The process concept has been proven by laboratory tests, and a demonstration unit will soon be completed. The VESTA process is very flexible and can handle syngas coming from several sources such as coal, biomass, petroleum coke and solid waste. In this paper our overview of the technology and its development status will be outlined.

Letizia Romano; Fabio Ruggeri; Robert Marx

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Numerical study on convection diffusion for gasification agent in underground coal gasification. Part I: establishment of mathematical models and solving method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this article is to discuss the distribution law of the gasification agent concentration in a deep-going way during underground coal gasification and the new method of solving the problem for the convection diffusion of the gas. In this paper, the basic features of convection diffusion for the gas produced in underground coal gasification are studied. On the basis of the model experiment, through the analysis of the distribution and patterns of variation for the fluid concentration field in the process of the combustion and gasification of the coal seams within the gasifier, the 3-D non-linear unstable mathematical models on the convection diffusion for oxygen are established. In order to curb such pseudo-physical effects as numerical oscillation and surfeit which frequently occurred in the solution of the complex mathematical models, the novel finite unit algorithm, the upstream weighted multi-cell balance method is advanced in this article, and its main derivation process is introduced.

Yang, L.H.; Ding, Y.M. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COAL MARKET MODULE COAL MARKET MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Production Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Distribution Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Export Component The coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. The CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply

139

Ash reduction in clean coal spiral product circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes the Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer{trademark} technology for high capacity fine wet cleaning with long-lasting high open-area urethane screen panels. After field trials, a Stack Sizer fitted with a 100-micron urethane panel is currently processing approximately 40 stph of clean coal spiral product having about 20% ash at McCoy-Elkhorn's Bevin Branch coal preparation plant in Kentucky, USA. Product yield is about 32.5 short tons per hour with 10% ash. The material is then fed to screen bowl centrifuges for further processing. At Blue Diamond Coal's Leatherwood preparation plant similar Stacker Sizers are achieving the same results. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 2 photo.

Brodzik, P.

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

John M. Andresen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Premium distillate products from direct liquefaction of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The net liquid products from modern coal liquefaction processes are lower boiling and have much lower end points (mostly under 400{degree}C) than crude petroleum. Coal liquids have very low concentrations of heteroatoms, particularly S, and metals, and are free of resids and asphaltenes. High yields of low-S (0.01--0.03 wt %) naphtha, kerosene, and diesel fuel fractions can be obtained simply by atmospheric distillation, with a total yield of light fuel fractions ranging from 68 to 82 LV% (W260D exclusive). The coal naphtha has a low aromatics content (5--13 LV%), readily meeting projected year-2000 requirements. Its low Reid vapor pressure allows light components from other sources to be blended. The coal light distillate of in appropriate boiling range will be a good low-S blending stock for the light diesel fuel pool. The heavy distillate can be refined into a low-S No. 4 diesel fuel/fuel oil. This fraction, along with the >343{degree}C atmospheric bottoms, can be catalytically cracked or hydrocracked to make light liquid fuels. Thus, modern coal liquids should no longer be envisioned as thick liquids (or even solids) with high concentrations of aromatics and asphaltenes. Products obtained from advanced coal liquefaction technologies are more like light naphthene-base petroleum, but with lower heteroatoms and metals contents, and they are free of resids. Coal liquids are likely to be co-refined in existing petroleum refineries; and hydroprocessing of various severities would be needed for different fractions to produce quality blending stocks for refinery fuel pools.

Zhou, P.Z. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Winschel, R.A. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Klunder, E.B. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)]|[USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

Kruse, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Central Appalachia: Production potential of low-sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vast preponderance of eastern US low sulfur and 1.2-lbs SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance coal comes from a relatively small area composed of 14 counties located in eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia and western Virginia. These 14 counties accounted for 68% of all Central Appalachian coal production in 1989 as well as 85% of all compliance coal shipped to electric utilities from this region. A property-by-property analysis of total production potential in 10 of the 14 counties (Floyd, Knott, Letcher, Harlan, Martin and Pike in Kentucky and Boone, Kanawha, Logan and Mingo in West Virginia) resulted in the following estimates of active and yet to be developed properties: (1) total salable reserves for all sulfur levels were 5.9 billion tons and (2) 1.2-lbs. SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance'' reserves totaled 2.38 billion tons. This potential supply of compliance coal is adequate to meet the expanded utility demand expected under acid rain for the next 20 years. Beyond 2010, compliance supplies will begin to reach depletion levels in some areas of the study region. A review of the cost structure for all active mines was used to categorize the cost structure for developing potential supplies. FOB cash costs for all active mines in the ten counties ranged from $15 per ton to $35 per ton and the median mine cost was about $22 per ton. A total of 47 companies with the ability to produce and ship coal from owned or leased reserves are active in the ten-county region. Identified development and expansion projects controlled by active companies are capable of expanding the region's current production level by over 30 million tons per year over the next twenty years. Beyond this period the issue of reserve depletion for coal of all sulfur levels in the ten county region will become a pressing issue. 11 figs., 12 tabs.

Watkins, J. (Hill and Associates, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The estimated energy ultimate recoverable reserves (URR) from the logistic model is 2750 quadrillion BTU (2900, coal reserves, coal production forecast, peak coal, USA energy, non- linear fitting #12;3 1 reported coal reserves of any nation, containing approximately 28% of the world

Khare, Sanjay V.

145

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). Figure 19. Coal Market Module Demand Regions Figure 20. Coal Market Module Supply Regions

147

An analysis of weep holes as a product detection device for underground compensated LPG storage systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weep holes have been used widely to detect the presence of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) in brine for underground compensated storage systems. When the brine level drops below the weep hole, LPG product enters the brine production system causing an increase in both tubing head pressure and flow rate. To prevent cavern overfill, a cavern shutdown is initiated upon detection of LPG in the surface brine system by pressure or flow instruments at the tubing head. In this study, we have investigated the multiphase flow characteristics of weep hole LPG detection systems to correctly estimate the operating limits. A simple and easy to use model has been developed to predict the tubing head pressure and flow rate increases. The model can be used to implement safer and more efficient operation procedures for underground compensated LPG storage systems. The model predictions for a typical field case are presented. An analysis of weep holes as product detection devices for LPG storage reservoirs has been carried out. It was found that the increases in pressure and flow rates at the tubing head change as a function of injection flow rate of the product. Therefore, a thorough consideration of cavern operating parameters is necessary to evaluate the use constant pressure and flow rate values to initiate emergency shut down of the cavern.

Sarica, C.; Demir, H.M.; Brill, J.P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Productivity change of coal-fired thermal power plants in India: a Malmquist index approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......productivity. Keywords: coal-fired power plants...infrastructure for the socio- economic development of a...Manufacturing industry, Economic and Political Weekly...Performance analysis of coal fired power plants...PRODUCTIVITY CHANGE OF COAL-FIRED THERMAL POWER...Asia Pacific Annual Economic Association (APEA......

S. K. Behera; J. A. Farooquie; A. P. Dash

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

151

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

152

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High melting temperature synthetic pitches (Synpitches) were created using coal derivatives produced from a solvent extraction technique. Solvent extraction is used to separate hydrocarbons from mineral matter as well as other insolubles. Mild hydrogenation can be used to chemically modify resultant material to produce a true pitch. There are three main techniques which can be used to tailor the softening point of the Synpitch. First, the softening point can be controlled by varying the conditions of hydrogenation, chiefly the temperature, pressure and residence time in a hydrogen overpressure. Second, by selectively distilling light hydrocarbons, the softening point of the remaining pitch can be raised. Third, the Synpitch can be blended with another mutually soluble pitch or hydrocarbon liquid. Through such techniques, spinnable isotropic Synpitches have been created from coal feedstocks. Characteristics of Synpitches include high cross-linking reactivity and high molecular weight, resulting in carbon fibers with excellent mechanical properties. To date, mechanical properties have been achieved which are comparable to the state of the art achievable with conventional coal tar pitch or petroleum pitch.

Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DESEVAL-TRANS program is developed for the purpose of helping the engineer to design and economically evaluate coal combustion byproduct transportation systems that will operate between the power plant and the disposal site. The objective of the research project was to explore the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of disposing coal combustion byproducts in underground mines in Illinois. The DESEVAL-TRANS (short for Design and Evaluation of Transportation Systems) was developed in the Materials Handling and Systems Economics branch of the overall project. Four types of coal combustion byproducts were targeted for transportation and handling: Conventional fly ash; Scrubber sludge; Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) fly ash; and Spent-bed ash. Several transportation and handling systems that could handle these byproducts were examined. These technologies were classified under three general categories: Truck; Rail; and Container. The purpose of design models is to determine the proper number of transport units, silo capacity, loading and unloading rates, underground placement capacity, number of shifts, etc., for a given case, defined by a distance-tonnage combination. The cost computation models were developed for the determination of the operating and capital costs. An economic evaluation model, which is common to all categories, was also developed to establish the cost-per-ton of byproduct transported.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EIA - Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Monthly U.S. Coal Production and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Report No.: DOE/EIA 0218/48 Report Released: December 05, 2013 Next Release Date: January 09, 2014 Week Ended Year-To-Date1 Month Ended January - November Coal-Producing Region and State (thousand short tons) 11/30/2013 12/1/2012 11/30/2013 11/30/2012 November 2013 November 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Alabama 314 339 16,938 18,080 1,450 1,425 16,938 18,080 -6.3 Alaska 37 45 1,592 1,875 171 188 1,592 1,875 -15.1 Arizona 133 142 7,029 6,947 614 586 7,029 6,947 1.2 Arkansas 1 3 35 86 5 12 35 86 -59.4 Colorado 529 551 21,238 26,718 1,985 2,519 21,238 26,718 -20.5 Illinois 882 894 48,292 45,053 4,089 3,729 48,292 45,053 7.2 Indiana 653 696 34,676 33,865 3,022 2,909 34,676 33,865 2.4

157

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heng Ban Heng Ban Principal Investigator University of Alabama at Birmingham 1150 10th Avenue South Birmingham, AL 35294-4461 205-934-0011 hban@uab.edu Environmental and Water Resources OxidatiOn Of Mercury in PrOducts Of cOal cOMbustiOn Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. A variety of mercury reduction technologies are under commercial development, but an improved understanding of the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the transformations and capture of mercury in boilers and pollution control devices is required to achieve necessary performance and cost reduction levels. Oxidized mercury is more easily captured by pollution control devices, such as Selective

158

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Application of SEM Techniques to the Characterization of Coal and Coal Ash Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal is a major source of fuel for...(1)...The last decade has seen a significant increase in the use of coal for power generation. The increased demand for coal and the tendency to use a variety of coals to meet...

Michael L. Jones; David P. Kalmanovitch…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Analyses of environmental impacts of underground coal mining in an arid region using remote sensing and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influences of coal mining in an arid environment on vegetation coverage, land-use change, desertification, soil and water loss were discussed. A series of available TM/ETM+ images with no cloud cover from ...

Zheng-fu Bian; Hai-xia Zhang; Shao-gang Lei

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 900°C. raw Illinois coal, the ash content was quite low.30% from the feed coal on a moisture and ash free basis. In~ Solids (ash, FeSx. , unreacted coal) L . - - - - - - I

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Solvent Refined Coal II. Catalysts III. Purpose andSondreal, E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect ofAnthraxylon - Kinetics of Coal Hydrogenation," Ind. and Eng.

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Coal as Raw Material for Carbon Production: Some New Aspects [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

20 March 1981 research-article Coal as Raw Material for Carbon Production...Characteristic changes in the constitution of hard coals (such as the nature and abundance of functional...bearing on the rational utilization of coal in the coke and carbon industries. For...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Hydrogen permeation data for several perovskite membranes BCN (BaCe{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (SrCe{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar in this project. However, it is known that the cerate-based perovskite materials can react with CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the stability issue of the proton conducting perovskite materials under CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S environments was examined. Tests were conducted in the Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit for powder and disk forms of BCN and SCE. Perovskite materials doped with zirconium (Zr) are known to be resistant to CO{sub 2}. The results from the evaluation of the chemical stability for the Zr doped perovskite membranes are presented. During this reporting period, flowsheet simulation was also performed to calculate material and energy balance based on several hydrogen production processes from coal using high temperature membrane reactor (1000 C), low temperature membrane reactor (250 C), or conventional technologies. The results show that the coal to hydrogen process employing both the high temperature and the low temperature membrane reactors can increase the hydrogen production efficiency (cold gas efficiency) by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Using either high temperature or low temperature membrane reactor process also results in an increase of the cold gas efficiencies as well as the thermal efficiencies of the overall process.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUBÂ’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

167

Best practices for underground diesel emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US NIOSH and the Coal Diesel Partnership recommend practices for successfully using ceramic filters to control particulate emitted from diesel-powered equipment used in underground coal mines. 3 tabs.

Patts, L.; Brnich, M. Jr. [NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microsoft Word - 2012_EIA_Coal_Production_Estimates_Comparison.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. December 2013

169

Microsoft Word - Coal Production Estimates Evaluation.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 November 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. November 2012

170

Strata-movement concepts and the hydrogeological impact of underground coal mining. [Effects of subsidence on permeability of rock above longwall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of mining-engineering concepts and studies in mine hydrology suggests a conceptual model linking the strata deformation, hydraulic property changes, and ground-water impacts due to underground coal mining. The pressure-arch deformation pattern about a small opening creates a local zone of increased permeabilities and dewatering in the seam and immediate roof, but should not hydraulically affect shallower aquifiers. Networks of supported headings, rooms, and pillars intensely drain lower aquifiers but only slightly affect higher strata except in areas of naturally high permeability. Longwall mining causes extensive, high-reaching, well-defined zones of stress, fracturing, and hydraulic impact, the maximum permeability increases being in the tensile zones immediately above the panel and at the sides of the subsidence trough. In shallow aquifiers, permeabilities and ground-water velocities increase, and hydraulic gradients decline independently of mine drainage. A study of a deep coal mine in the Appalachian Plateau, Pennsylvania indicated: probable hydraulic connections between the mine and shallow aquifiers in a principle valley area; no obvious response of water levels in shallow aquifiers to undermining by supported headings; and rapid, considerable declines in such water levels in response to nearby longwall mining. These results are consistent with the conceptual model.

Booth, C.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DELAYED COKING OF SOLVENT EXTRACTED COAL FOR PRODUCTION OF ANODE GRADE COKE: CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLID AND LIQUID PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigates the feasibility of using high temperature solvent extraction of coal to produce feedstock for the production of anode grade coke through delayed… (more)

Karri, Vamsi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Production of catalyst supports for coking and sorbents from brown coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal activation of brown coal for production of porous carbon materials in a set-up with fluidized oxidation catalyst has been studied.

M. L. Shchipko; V. B. Fenelonov; E. V. Shevtsov…

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Influence of coal quality factors on seam permeability associated with coalbed methane production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cleats are natural fractures in coal that serve as permeability avenues for darcy flow of gas and water to the well bore during production. Theoretically,… (more)

Wang, Xingjin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization of Pennsylvania Coal Combustion Products for Beneficial Use in Mine Land Reclamation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over 130 million tons of coal combustion products (CCPs) are produced each year in the U.S. Less than half of these CCPs will be utilized… (more)

Braun, Gregory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimate. The overall economics of hydrogen production from this new process was assessed and compared with conventional hydrogen production technologies from coal. Several proton-conducting perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) were successfully tested in a new permeation unit at temperatures between 800 and 1040 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bars. The experimental data confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing hydrogen partial pressure at the feed side. The highest hydrogen flux measured was 1.0 cc/min/cm{sup 2} (STP) for the SCTm membrane at 3 bars and 1040 C. The chemical stability of the perovskite membranes with respect to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S can be improved by doping with Zr, as demonstrated from the TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis) tests in this project. A conceptual design, using the measured hydrogen flux data and a modeling approach, for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without a substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions. Flowsheet simulations show that the coal to hydrogen process employing the proposed membrane reactor concept can increase the hydrogen production efficiency by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Preliminary economic analysis also shows a 30% cost reduction for the proposed membrane reactor process, assuming membrane materials meeting DOE's flux and cost target. Although this study shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier, placing the membrane module outside the gasifier in a closely coupled way in terms of temperature and pressure can still offer the same performance advantage. This could also avoid the complicated fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues when the membrane module is installed inside the gasifier. Future work should be focused on improving the permeability and stability for the proton-conducting membranes, testing the membranes with real syngas from a gasifier and scaling up the membrane size.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. The Hydrotreatment Facility is being prepared for trials with coal liquids. Raw coal tar distillate trials have been carried out by heating coal tar in the holding tank in the Hydrotreatment Facility. The liquids are centrifuged to warm the system up in preparation for the coal liquids. The coal tar distillate is then recycled to keep the centrifuge hot. In this way, the product has been distilled such that a softening point of approximately 110 C is reached. Then an ash test is conducted.

Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coal precursors for production of carbon and graphite products. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this program was to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. These include binder and impregnation pitches, Coke for graphite electrodes, Cokes for anodes and specialty graphite, matrices for C/C composites and raw material for mesophase pitch fibers. Previous work in this program has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for achieving this objective. The current effort involved screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. The program involved an initial characterization of small-scale extracts using standard analytical methods and mesophase formation studies. This was followed by feedback to the WVU Group and to the CPC partners with recommendation of material for scaleup. Similar analytical and mesophase studies on some of the scaled-up extracts was performed. The activation of the coal extraction residues for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon was investigated. A further task was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of the studies are summarized in this report.

Lewis, I.C.; Lewis, R.T.; Mayer, H.K. [Ucar Carbon Co., Inc., Parma, OH (United States)

1996-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

GIS-based pre-mining land damage assessment for underground coal mines in high groundwater area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal mining cause different degrees of damage to both land and ecosystems. Evaluation of disturbed land is a fundamental and prerequisite work for land reclamation and rehabilitation. However, most of those evaluations were carried out when mining was under process or after it cease. This paper proposes an innovative assessment model for pre-evaluation which could be implemented before mining activity begins. A geographic information system (GIS) was constructed to evaluate land damage. Three natural condition factors and three geological condition factors were chosen for evaluation. The results show that: land damage was categorised as five degrees, which are negligible, slight, moderate, severe, and very severe. Furthermore, very severely damaged areas are mainly concentrated in the northwest part of the coal mine, whereas slight damaged areas are mainly concentrated in the southwest. The developed coupling technique was used to forecast land damage, and provide reference for reclamation work.

Wu Xiao; Zhenqi Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Solvent extraction of bituminous coals using light cycle oil: characterization of diaromatic products in liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many studies of the pyrolytic degradation of coal-derived and petroleum-derived aviation fuels have demonstrated that the coal-derived fuels show better thermal stability, both with respect to deposition of carbonaceous solids and cracking to gases. Much previous work at our institute has focused on the use of refined chemical oil (RCO), a distillate from the refining of coal tar, blended with light cycle oil (LCO) from catalytic cracking of vacuum gas oil. Hydroprocessing of this blend forms high concentrations of tetralin and decalin derivatives that confer particularly good thermal stability on the fuel. However, possible supply constraints for RCO make it important to consider alternative ways to produce an 'RCO-like' product from coal in an inexpensive process. This study shows the results of coal extraction using LCO as a solvent. At 350{sup o}C at a solvent-to-coal ratio of 10:1, the conversions were 30-50 wt % and extract yields 28-40 wt % when testing five different coals. When using lower LCO/coal ratios, conversions and extract yields were much smaller; lower LCO/coal ratios also caused mechanical issues. LCO is thought to behave similarly to a nonpolar, non-hydrogen donor solvent, which would facilitate heat-induced structural relaxation of the coal followed by solubilization. The main components contributed from the coal to the extract when using Pittsburgh coal are di- and triaromatic compounds. 41 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Josefa M. Griffith; Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). EMS Energy Institute

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Trace elements in brown coal and its products of combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of 38 elements in brown coal, bottom ash and size fractionated ESP coal ash from the Belchatów I Power Plant were determined by INAA. Based on enrichment factors calculated relatively to iron an...

U. Tomza; P. Kaleta

1986-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Coking Plants, Coal-to-gas Plants, Gas Production and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This environmental brief covers various coal upgrading technologies, incl. coking and low-temperature carbonization as processes yielding the target products coke and gas plus tar products and diverse...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coal - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, mining, and prices. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Coal overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly PDF XLS Annual Coke overview PDF XLS Coal-fired power plants Existing generating units in the U.S. by state, company and plant 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 Go Prices Additional formats Weekly spot prices (Coal News and Markets) Coal futures near-month contract final settlement price (weekly NYMEX) Average sales price: PDF XLSBy state and mine type PDF XLSBy state and disposition PDF XLSBy state and underground mining method PDF XLSBy state, county, and number of mines PDF XLSBy state and coal rank PDF XLSBy mine production range and mine type Average consumer prices by end use sector, Census division, and state,

185

Diffusion Characterization of Coal for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores the concept of displacement of sorbed methane and enhancement of methane recovery by injection of CO2 into coal, while sequestering CO2. The… (more)

Chhajed, Pawan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

187

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Resource targets for advanced underground coal-extraction systems. [Identification of location and geology of deposit for which greatest savings can be realized by advanced mining systems in 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies resource targets appropriate for federal sponsorship of research and development of advanced underground coal mining systems. In contrast to previous research, which focused on a particular resource type, this study made a comprehensive examination of both conventional and unconventional coals, with particular attention to exceptionally thin and thick seams, steeply dipping beds, and multiple seam geometry. The major thrust of the targeting analysis was forecasting which coals would be of clear commercial significance at the beginning of the 21st century under three widely different scenarios for coal demand. The primary measure of commercial importance was an estimate of the aggregate dollar savings realized by consumers if advanced technology were available to mine coal at prices at or below the price projected for conventional technology in the year 2000. Both deterministic and probabilistic savings estimates were prepared for each demand scenario. The results indicate that the resource of primary importance is flat-lying bituminous coal of moderate thickness, under moderate cover, and located within the lower 48 states. Resources of secondary importance are the flat-lying multiple seams and thin seams (especially those in Appalachia). The rather substantial deposits of bituminous coal in North Alaska and the deeply buried lignites of the Gulf Coast present transportation and ground control problems which appear to postpone their commercial importance well beyond 2000. Steeply dipping coals, abandoned pillars, and exceptionally thick western coals may be important in some regions or sub-regions, but the limited tonnage available places them in a position of tertiary importance.

Hoag, J.H.; Whipple, D.W.; Habib-Agahi, H.; Lavin, M.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analytical determination of strain energy for the studies of coal mine bumps.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coal mine bumps occur in most countries where coal is mined by underground methods. Coal bumps can be characterized as unstable releases of strain energy… (more)

Xu, Qiang, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. • The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. • To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. • Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Appalachia: the land of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Appalachian region of the United States is an area known worldwide for its long history as a source of coal. If any area of the Unted States is to gain from the projected growth of the coal industry, both domestic and international, it would surely be the coal mining areas of this region, including its biggest coal producing states - Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. An important facet of the region's coal industry is not only the presence of the giant coal companies but also the small, independent operator. These men are owner-operators and every dollar spent for their operations must bring a return. There is no room for error. WORLD COAL editors have recently traveled to areas in Appalachia and visited mines that are run by these independent operators. One such area was Harlan County, Kentucky. Virtually all mining done in Harlan is underground. Shaft mines are uncommon; most operations have access to exposed seams in the hillsides. Most of the small operations in this region use room and pillar mining and productivity is quite good. It is imperative that the transportation infrastructure be improved so that the expected increased movement of coal out of the region be handled efficiently. Potential domestic consumers of coal from Appalachia are numerous. New England, New York, the mid-Atlantic states, and the South are all looking to this nearby region to help reduce their dependence on oil. Other countries also are looking to the area.

Schneiderman, S.J. (ed.)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves Nathan G.F. Reaver a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-linear fitting Coal is the bulwark of US energy production making up about a third of all energy with US reserves. We forecast future US coal production, in both raw tonnage and energy, using a multi or 44% of all historical carbon dioxide emissions from the US fossil fuel consumption came from US coal

Khare, Sanjay V.

196

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the handling and transport of dry coal combustion residues and for the underground placement in abandoned coal mines and assess associated environmental impacts. Although parts of the Residue Characterization portion of the program were delayed because residue samples were not obtained, other parts of the program are proceeding on schedule. The delays in obtaining residue samples were primarily caused by adverse weather conditions, the shut-down of one unit at the City Water, Light, and Power Company Plant for routing maintenance and problems due to conflicting schedules of utility and program personnel. However, by the end of the quarter most residue samples had been obtained, and the residue characterization studies were under way. Progress is described for five studies: environmental assessment and geotechnical stability and subsidence impacts; residue characterization; physico-chemical characterization of residues; identification and assessment of handling/transportation systems for FGD residues; and residue handling and transport.

Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

198

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products: Consortium Byproducts Recycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) The mission of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing. The overall goals of CBRC are to: Increase the overall national rate of byproduct use by to ~ 50 % by 2010 Increase the number of “allowable” byproduct uses under state regulations by ~ 25% Double of the current rate of FGD byproduct use CBRC is a unique partnership that integrates the electric power industry, State and Federal regulatory agencies, and academia to form a strong, cohesive consortium to guide the national and regional research priorities of the CBRC. CBRC is managed by the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University and is administered by regional centers at the University of Kentucky (Eastern Region), Southern Illinois University (Midwest Region) and the University of North Dakota (Western Region). Primary funding for CBRC is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL).

199

Selection of Coal Gasification Parameters for Injection of Gasification Products Into a Blast Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical study was performed on the influence of blast parameters on the course of the processes in the volume of a blast furnace and smelting rates by injection of low-grade coal gasification products. It w...

I. G. Tovarovsky; A. E. Merkulov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nitrogen bases in the coking products of coal (composition, methods of isolation, and utilization) (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compositions and yields of nitrogen bases during thermochemical transformations of the organic mass of coals are presented. The dependence of the distribution ... nitrogen in the products of thermal refining ...

N. D. Rus'yanova; B. E. Kogan; M. A. Kosareva

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A global coal production forecast with multi-Hubbert cycle analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on economic and policy considerations that appear to be unconstrained by geophysics, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) generated forty carbon production and emissions scenarios. In this paper, we develop a base-case scenario for global coal production based on the physical multi-cycle Hubbert analysis of historical production data. Areas with large resources but little production history, such as Alaska and the Russian Far East, are treated as sensitivities on top of this base-case, producing an additional 125 Gt of coal. The value of this approach is that it provides a reality check on the magnitude of carbon emissions in a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario. The resulting base-case is significantly below 36 of the 40 carbon emission scenarios from the IPCC. The global peak of coal production from existing coalfields is predicted to occur close to the year 2011. The peak coal production rate is 160 EJ/y, and the peak carbon emissions from coal burning are 4.0 Gt C (15 Gt CO2) per year. After 2011, the production rates of coal and CO2 decline, reaching 1990 levels by the year 2037, and reaching 50% of the peak value in the year 2047. It is unlikely that future mines will reverse the trend predicted in this BAU scenario.

Tadeusz W. Patzek; Gregory D. Croft

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Coal-bed methane production in eastern Kansas: Its potential and restraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1921 and again in 1988, workers demonstrated that the high volatile A and B coals of the Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group can be produced economically from vertically drilled holes, and that some of these coals have a gas content as high as 200 ft{sup 3}/ton. Detailed subsurface mapping on a county-by-county basis using geophysical logs shows the Weir coal seam to be the thickest (up to 6 ft thick) and to exist in numerous amoeba-shaped pockets covering several thousand acres. Lateral pinch-out into deltaic sands offers a conventional gas source. New attention to geophysical logging shows most coals have a negative SP response, high resistivities, and densities of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. Highly permeable coals cause lost circulation during drilling and thief zones during cementing, and they are the source of abundant unwanted salt water. Low-permeability coals can be recognized by their high fracture gradients, which are difficult to explain but are documented to exceed 2.2. Current successful completions use both limited-entry, small-volume nitrogen stimulations or an open hole below production casing. Subsurface coals are at normal Mid-Continent pressures and may be free of water. Initially, some wells flow naturally without pumping. Saltwater disposal is often helped by the need for water in nearby waterflood projects and the easy availability of state-approved saltwater disposal wells in Mississippi and Arbuckle carbonates. Recent attempts to recomplete coal zones in slim-hole completions are having mixed results. The major restraints to coal-bed methane production are restricted to low permeability of the coals and engineering problems, not to the availability or gas content of the coals.

Stoeckinger, B.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Process for forming coal compacts and product thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for forming durable, mechanically strong compacts from coal particulates without use of a binder is disclosed. The process involves applying a compressive stress to a particulate feed comprising substantially water-saturated coal particles while the feed is heated to a final compaction temperature in excess of about 100.degree. C. The water present in the feed remains substantially in the liquid phase throughout the compact forming process. This is achieved by heating and compressing the particulate feed and cooling the formed compact at a pressure sufficient to prevent water present in the feed from boiling. The compacts produced by the process have a moisture content near their water saturation point. As a result, these compacts absorb little water and retain exceptional mechanical strength when immersed in high pressure water. The process can be used to form large, cylindrically-shaped compacts from coal particles (i.e., "coal logs") so that the coal can be transported in a hydraulic coal log pipeline.

Gunnink, Brett (Columbia, MO); Kanunar, Jayanth (Arlington, MA); Liang, Zhuoxiong (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

207

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

208

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

209

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

210

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

211

Estimates of central Appalachian coal reserves by cost of production and sulfur content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides information on the quantity, quality, and production costs for all minable coal reserves in the major coal-producing counties of central Appalachia, a region that contains the large majority of low-sulfur and compliance coal reserves in the eastern US. Presently, the best source of detailed reserve information in the Appalachian region is the estimates produced by the mining and land holding companies that control the reserves. The authors have been able to obtain overall reserve estimates based on the detailed geological and engineering studies conducted by these companies. In areas where this information does not exist, the authors have relied on published estimates of reserves and modified these estimates based on known conditions on surrounding properties. This reserve information has been combined with data on coal quality and mining costs to produce cost curves for all minable coal reserves by sulfur content. Results to date indicate that most of the major coal-producing counties in central Appalachia will be able to increase production levels significantly on a sustainable basis for at least the next 20 years, without major real increases in coal prices.

Watkins, J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Thermal-destruction products of coal in the blast-furnace gas-purification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lean, poorly clinkering coal and anthracite used to replace coke in blast furnaces has a considerable content of volatile components (low-molecular thermaldestruction products), which enter the water and sludge of the blast-furnace gas-purification system as petroleum products. Therefore, it is important to study the influence of coal on the petroleum-product content in the water and sludge within this system. The liberation of primary thermal-destruction products is investigated for anthracite with around 4 wt % volatiles, using a STA 449C Jupiter thermoanalyzer equipped with a QMC 230 mass spectrometer. The thermoanalyzer determines small changes in mass and thermal effects with high accuracy (weighing accuracy 10{sup -8} g; error in measuring thermal effects 1 mV). This permits experiments with single layers of coal particles, eliminating secondary reactions of its thermal-destruction products.

A.M. Amdur; M.V. Shibanova; E.V. Ental'tsev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Russia Institute of Metallurgy

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of clean, affordable energy is essential for the prosperity and security of the United States and the world in the 21st century. Emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into the atmosphere are an inherent part of electricity generation, transportation, and industrial processes that rely on fossil fuels. These energy-related activities are responsible for more than 80 percent of the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, and most of these emissions are CO{sub 2}. Over the last few decades, an increased concentration of CO{sub 2} in the earth's atmosphere has been observed. Carbon sequestration technology offers an approach to redirect CO{sub 2} emissions into sinks (e.g., geologic formations, oceans, soils and vegetation) and potentially stabilize future atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. Coal seams are attractive CO{sub 2} sequestration sinks, due to their abundance and proximity to electricity-generation facilities. The recovery of marketable coalbed methane (CBM) provides a value-added stream, potentially reducing the cost to sequester CO{sub 2} gas. Much research is needed to evaluate this technology in terms of CO{sub 2} storage capacity, sequestration stability, commercial feasibility and overall economics. CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the US DOE, has embarked on a seven-year program to construct and operate a coal bed sequestration site composed of a series of horizontally drilled wells that originate at the surface and extend through two overlying coal seams. Once completed, all of the wells will be used initially to drain CBM from both the upper (mineable) and lower (unmineable) coal seams. After sufficient depletion of the reservoir, centrally located wells in the lower coal seam will be converted from CBM drainage wells to CO{sub 2} injection ports. CO{sub 2} will be measured and injected into the lower unmineable coal seam while CBM continues to drain from both seams. In addition to metering all injected CO{sub 2} and recovered CBM, the program includes additional monitoring wells to further examine horizontal and vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. This is the fifth Technical Progress report for the project. Progress this period was focused on reclamation of the north access road and north well site, and development of revised drilling methods. This report provides a concise overview of project activities this period and plans for future work.

William A. Williams

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Preparation and evaluation of coal extracts as precursors for carbon and graphite products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coal extraction process coupled with coal hydrotreatment has been shown capable of producing suitable precursors for a variety of commercially important carbon and graphite products. The N-methylpyrolidone (NMP) extracts of hydrotreated coals have been analytically and chemically characterized and shown to have properties acceptable for use as binder and impregnation pitch. Mesophase formation studies have demonstrated their capability for producing both needle and anode grade coke as well as precursors for mesophase pitch fibers. A graphite artifact has been produced using a coal extract as a binder and coke derived from the extract as a filler. Further evaluation of the extract materials is being carried out by industrial members of the Carbon Products Consortium.

Zondlo, J.W.; Stiller, A.W.; Stansberry, P.G. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of clean, affordable energy is essential for the prosperity and security of the United States and the world in the 21st century. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions to the atmosphere are an inherent part of energy-related activities, such as electricity generation, transportation, and building systems. These energy-related activities are responsible for roughly 85% of the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, and 95% of these emissions are dominated by CO{sub 2}. Over the last few decades, an increased concentration of CO{sub 2} in the earth's atmosphere has been observed. Many scientists believe greenhouse gases, particularly CO{sub 2}, trap heat in the earth's atmosphere. Carbon sequestration technology offers an approach to redirect CO{sub 2} emissions into sinks (e.g., geologic formations, oceans, soils, and vegetation) and potentially stabilize future atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. Coal seams are attractive CO{sub 2} sequestration sinks, due to their abundance and proximity to electricity-generation facilities. The recovery of marketable coal bed methane (CBM) provides a value-added stream, reducing the cost to sequester CO{sub 2} gas. Much research is needed to evaluate this technology in terms of CO{sub 2} storage capacity, sequestration stability, commercial feasibility and overall economics. CONSOL Energy, with support from the U.S. DOE, is conducting a seven-year program to construct and operate a coal bed sequestration site composed of a series of horizontally drilled wells that originate at the surface and extend through overlying coal seams in the subsurface. Once completed, the wells will be used to initially drain CBM from both the upper (mineable) and lower (unmineable) coal seams. After sufficient depletion of the reservoir, centrally located wells in the lower coal seam will be converted from CBM drainage wells to CO{sub 2} injection ports. CO{sub 2} will be measured and injected into the lower unmineable coal seam while CBM continues to drain from both seams. In addition to metering all injected CO{sub 2} and CBM produced, the program includes a plan to monitor horizontal migration of CO{sub 2} within the lower seam. This is the second Technical Progress report for the project. Progress to date has been focused on pre-construction activities; in particular, attaining site approvals and securing property rights for the project. This report provides a concise overview of project activity this period and plans for future work. This is the second semi-annual Technical Progress report under the subject agreement. During this report period, progress was made in completing the environmental assessment report, securing land and coal rights, and evaluating drilling strategies. These aspects of the project are discussed in detail in this report.

Gary L. Cairns

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of Continuous Solvent Extraction Processes for Coal Derived Carbon Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE NETL-sponsored effort seeks to develop continuous processes for producing carbon products from solvent-extracted coal. A key process step is removal of solids from liquefied coal. Three different processes were compared: gravity separation, centrifugation using a decanter-type Sharples Pennwalt centrifuge, and a Spinner-II centrifuge. The data suggest that extracts can be cleaned to as low as 0.5% ash level and probably lower using a combination of these techniques.

Elliot B. Kennel

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Coal operators prepare for a prosperous new year  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are given of the Coal Age 2008 annual Forecast Survey of 17 coal mining executives which reinforces that 2008 could be a very good year. Coal operators are planning to invest in new equipment, development and new coal mine start-ups, based on a number of demand- and supply-side fundamentals. 71% of those surveyed thought coal production in 2008 would increase from 2007 levels and US exports are expected to climb due to the weak dollar. If the tax credit on synfuels expires on 31 December 2007 production of coal synfuel will likely cease. Asked about expensive planned purchases, companies answers ranged from $80,000 for an underground scoop to $500 m for a new mine installation. However, most producers admit they will not be able to operate at full capacity. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coal Liquefaction Product Gas Analysis with an Automated Gas Chromatograph  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......similar gas streams. For example, it has been easily extended for analyzing gases generated in coal gasification and oil shale retorting by other Gulf researchers. Conclusions It is clear from the above discussion that the Carle TCD/FID GC performed......

Ajay Sood; Richard B. Pannell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Gasification of Coal in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) However, the extensive utilization of coal leads to many problems, such as air pollution and resource waste, because of the inefficient and unclean utilization method. ... Argon would sink to the bottom of the reactor, and air would come up because of the difference in density between these two gases. ...

Rihua Lan; Hui Jin; Liejin Guo; Zhiwei Ge; Simao Guo; Ximin Zhang

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, and porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, hydrotreatment of solvent was completed in preparation for pitch fabrication for graphite electrodes. Coal digestion has lagged but is expected to be complete by next quarter. Studies are reported on coal dissolution, pitch production, foam synthesis using physical blowing agents, and alternate coking techniques.

Dady B. Dadyburjor; Mark E. Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; J. Joshua Maybury; Alfred H. Stiller; Joseph M. Stoffa; John W. Zondlo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 22. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 0.71 - 1.69 1.66 Arkansas 0.59 - - 0.59 Colorado 1.90 - 6.38 5.93 Illinois 3.65 - 6.60 4.86 Indiana 3.25 - - 3.25 Kentucky Total 2.43 1.77 - 2.39 Kentucky (East) 1.61 1.77 - 1.62 Kentucky (West) 3.61 - - 3.56 Maryland 1.80 - - 1.80 Montana - - 7.47 7.47 New Mexico - - 5.19 5.19 Ohio 2.44 - 4.96 4.02 Oklahoma 2.37 - - 2.37 Pennsylvania Total 2.25 0.92 3.79

225

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 3. Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 139 20 12,410 12,570 Arkansas 96 - - 96 Colorado 757 - 22,889 23,646 Illinois 18,969 - 23,868 42,837 Indiana 15,565 - - 15,565 Kentucky Total 56,179 2,018 - 58,198 Kentucky (East) 22,090 2,010 - 24,100 Kentucky (West) 34,089 9 - 34,098 Maryland 797 - - 797 Montana - - 5,708 5,708 New Mexico - - 4,960 4,960 Ohio 3,903 7 14,214 18,125 Oklahoma 349 - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 11,367 52 33,623 45,041 Pennsylvania (Anthracite)

226

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 7. Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Total Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 12,410 - 139 6,669 12,549 6,669 Alaska - 2,052 - - - 2,052 Arizona - 7,493 - - - 7,493 Arkansas - - 96 - 96 - Colorado 1,673 2,655 21,955 2,265 23,628 4,920 Illinois 2,897 - 39,939 5,649 42,837 5,649 Indiana - - 15,558 21,156 15,558 21,156 Kentucky Total 3,951 552 53,891 31,507 57,842 32,059 Kentucky (East) - 552 23,753 23,572 23,753 24,124 Kentucky (West) 3,951 - 30,138 7,935 34,089 7,935 Louisiana

227

EFFECTS OF COFIRING LIGNIN AND BIOSOLIDS WITH COAL ON FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin, derived from municipal solid waste and biosolid feedstocks using Masada Resource Group's patented CES OxyNol{trademark} process, and acidified biosolids were evaluated as supplemental fuels with coal for producing steam and electricity. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale (550,000-Btu/hr [580-MJ/hr]) combustion system to evaluate the effects of coal characteristics, blend mixture (on a dry wt% basis) and furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) on boiler heat-exchange surface slagging and fouling, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} production, fly ash characteristics, and combustion efficiency. The effects of blending lignin and acidified biosolids with coal on fuel handling and pulverization characteristics were also addressed. An 80 wt% Colorado--20 wt% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal blend from the Tennessee Valley Authority Colbert Steam Plant, hereafter referred to as the Colbert coal, and a bituminous Pittsburgh No. 8 coal were tested. The lignin and acidified biosolids were characterized by possessing higher moisture content and lower carbon, hydrogen, and heating values relative to the coals. Ash contents of the fuels were similar. The lignin also possessed higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}, CaO, and SO{sub 3} and lower concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, and N relative to the coals. The sulfur content of lignin could be reduced through a more thorough washing and drying of the lignin in an efficient commercial-scale dewatering device. Acidified biosolids were distinguished by higher concentrations of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MgO and lower SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to the other fuels. Trace element concentrations, especially for Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni, were generally greater in the lignin and acidified biosolid fuels relative to the Colbert coal. Maximum trace element emission factors were calculated for 95:5 Colbert coal--lignin and 90:5:5 Colbert coal--lignin--acidified biosolid blends and compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission factors for pulverized coal-fired units that are unequipped with pollution control devices. Calculated maximum trace element emission factors for the fuel blends were generally less than or within the range of those for the uncontrolled coal-fired units, except for Cr and Pb which were greater.

Kevin C. Galbreath

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Section 5 - Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal has the longest history of use among the fossil fuels, with use as a fuel dating to 3000 BC in China and Wales. Marco Polo’s “Description of the World” (1298) comments on many novel customs and practices of China, including the use of “stones that burn like logs” (coal). By the thirteenth century the mining of coal was widespread in England in regions such as Durham, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and North and South Wales. By the early seventeenth century nearly half of England’s maritime trade consisted of coal exports. Coal was the fuel that launched the Industrial Revolution in Europe and then the United States. By the late 1890s, the U.S. assumed the lead in world coal production. Britain now ranked second, after having been the world leader since the beginnings of the formal industry in the 1500s. Germany was third, an indication of its growing industrial power relative to continental rival France. Coal’s leading role in energy use peaked in the early twentieth century, after which it was supplanted by oil and natural gas. By the late twentieth century China’s rapid economic expansion, surging demand for electricity, and prodigious coal resources combined to propel it to become the world leader in production. Continuous improvements in coal mining technology have produced lower costs, improved safety, and greater labor productivity. John Buddle introduced the first air pump to ventilate coal mines (1803), followed shortly by the miner’s safety lamps that were developed independently by Sir Humphry Davy, William Clanny, and George Stephenson (1813-1816). Coal mining underwent a rapid transition in the 1880s to mechanical coal cutting in mines in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Russia. The St. Joseph Lead Company of Missouri (1900) invented the first underground mine roof bolts that became a key safety feature in underground coal mines. The first commercially successful bucket wheel excavator was used at the Luise Mine in Braunkohlemwerke, Germany (1925), followed by the first successful continuous miners in U.S. underground coal mining (1948). The first mechanized U.S. longwall mining system appeared in 1951, and was followed by the self-advancing hydraulic longwall support system that provided greater support for the roof of the mine. LeTourneau Technologies, Inc. of Texas manufactured the largest rubber tired front-end wheel loader in the world, the L-2350, which would play an important role in loading coal in Wyoming’s large surface mines (2005). Coal mining has always been a very hazardous occupation, and has produced some of history’s worst industrial disasters. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France (1906). An explosion in a coal mine in Liaoning province in northeastern China killed more than 1,500 Chinese miners (1942), as did other major accidents in Ky?sh?, Japan (1914), Wankie, Rhodesia (1972), Wales (1913), Bihar, India (1965), and West Virginia, U.S. (1907), to name just a few. Legislation such as the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act in the U.S. (1969) improved working conditions in many nations. The Great Smog of London (1952) occurred after an exceptionally cold winter forced homes and factories to burn large quantities of coal. A temperature inversion formed, trapping pollutants above the ground. More than 4,000 people died from respiratory ailments within the following week. The use of coal has been impacted by legislation to control the environmental impacts associated with its mining and combustion. The first known environmental regulation of coal dates to 1306 when King Edward II of England prohibited burning sea coal while Parliament was in session because of its offensive smoke. Sulfur dioxide from coal combustion was tied to acid rain in the 1960s, and carbon dioxide emissions became a concern beginning in the 1980s when climate change emerged as a critical environmental issue.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Madhavi Nallani-Chakravartula; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

Reuse of coal combustion by-products: A new profit center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are generated from the combustion of coal for energy production. Approximately 82 million tons of CCBs are produced each year by electric utilities. There are several common types of CCBs produced by coal combustion--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, flue gas desulfurization material (FGD) and fluidized bed combustion byproducts (FBC). Some CCBs such as fly ash, have pozzolanic properties and may have cementitious properties, both of which are advantageous for engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) in ASTM C-618 has created two classifications of useful and quality coal ash, Class F ash and Class C ash. Each class of coal ash has different pozzolanic and cementitious characteristics. Coal ash can be utilized in many manufacturing, mining, agricultural, engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. These potential applications may provide a new revenue source for utilities. The profitability of these applications can, however, be limited by applicable state regulations. Prior to initiating any reuse application, a utility should ensure regulatory approval of the proposed use. Approval may be apparent from a review of state law and regulations. Often times, further regulatory analysis and consultations may be necessary.

Jagiella, D. [Howard and Howard Attorneys, Peoria, IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

System analysis of nuclear-assisted syngas production from coal - article no. 042901  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. The results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; O'Brien, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Investigation of benefit of using coal wastes in cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste disposal in coal preparation plants leads to serious environmental problems. These wastes usually contain about 20% carbon, and the composition of the remaining ash is similar to clay. Addition of these wastes to cement clinker raw material utilises carbon as a source of energy. In this investigation, the effect of addition of these waste materials to the raw materials used in cement manufacture is studied. Ordinary type II cement and sulphoaluminate cement may be produced from the wastes. Mechanical strength, chemical and phase analysis, setting time and particle size distribution of the cement were studied. The results of the experiments show that an addition of about 3% of the coal wastes to the raw materials used in cement manufacture produces cements with good quality. Further, energy consumption may be reduced by up to 15%.

A. Sarrafi; M.R. Izadpanah; A. Ebrahimi; A.I. Mansouri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. Table 1 provides an overview of the major markets for carbon products. Current sources of materials for these processes generally rely on petroleum distillation products or coal tar distillates obtained as a byproduct of metcoke production facilities. In the former case, the American materials industry, just as the energy industry, is dependent upon foreign sources of petroleum. In the latter case, metcoke production is decreasing every year due to the combined difficulties associated with poor economics and a significant environmental burden. Thus, a significant need exists for an environmentally clean process which can used domestically obtained raw materials and which can still be very competitive economically.

Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

237

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

NETL: News Release - Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16, 2008 16, 2008 Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of Equation Synthetic Binder Pitch Uses Hydrocarbons from Coal in Place of Petroleum Feedstocks WASHINGTON, DC - Through a cooperative agreement with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a team headed by West Virginia University (WVU) has developed and successfully demonstrated a synthetic binder pitch that uses hydrocarbons from coal to supplement or replace petroleum feedstocks. The new binder pitch, and similar coal-derived products, could potentially reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Binder pitch - a carbon-rich, tar-like material - is an important ingredient in making graphite rods used in electric arc furnaces for the manufacture of steel from scrap. Conventional binder pitch usually blends petroleum pitch with standard coal-tar pitch. The new synthetic pitch could replace at least 19,000 tons of conventional pitch needed each year by graphite electrode manufacturers. WVU claims that the same pitch could be used by the aluminum industry; if so, demand for the new product would be close to one million barrels per year.

239

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 1. Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Percent Change Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 46 19,321 52 19,071 -11.5 1.3 Underground 8 12,570 9 10,879 -11.1 15.5 Surface 38 6,752 43 8,192 -11.6 -17.6 Alaska 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Surface 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Arizona 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Surface 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Arkansas 2 98 2 133 - -26.4 Underground 1 96 1 127 - -24.0 Surface 1 2 1 7 - -71.4 Colorado

240

Composition of the ozonolytic degradation products of the organic matter of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ozonization of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal in chloroform and the composition of ozonolytic degradation products were studied. Water-insoluble high-molecular-weight products were predominant among the ozonization products. A half of water-soluble substances consisted of aliphatic C{sub 5}-C{sub 12} dicarboxylic acids and benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives. Sapromyxite has been suggested as a substitute for crude petroleum in the manufacture of motor fuels.

S.A. Semenova; Y.F.Patrakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the facility modifications for continuous hydrotreating, as well as developing improved protocols for producing synthetic pitches.

Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Petrochemicals from oil, natural gas, coal and biomass: Production costs in 2030–2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane, coal and biomass are being considered as alternatives to crude oil for the production of basic petrochemicals, such as light olefins. This paper is a study on the production costs of 24 process routes utilizing these primary energy sources. A wide range of projected energy prices in 2030–2050 found in the open literature is used. The basis for comparison is the production cost per t of high value chemicals (HVCs or light olefin-value equivalent). A Monte Carlo method was used to estimate the ranking of production costs of all 24 routes with 10,000 trials of varying energy prices and CO2 emissions costs (assumed to be within $0–100/t CO2; the total CO2 emissions, or cradle-to-grave CO2 emissions, were considered). High energy prices in the first three quarter of 2008 were tested separately. The main findings are:• Production costs: while the production costs of crude oil- and natural gas-based routes are within $500–900/t HVCs, those of coal- and biomass-based routes are mostly within $400–800/t HVCs. Production costs of coal- and biomass-based routes are in general quite similar while in some cases the difference is significant. Among the top seven most expensive routes, six are oil- and gas-based routes. Among the top seven least expensive routes, six are coal and biomass routes. • CO2 emissions costs: the effect of CO2 emissions costs was found to be strong on the coal-based routes and also quite significant on the biomass-based routes. However, the effect on oil- and gas-based routes is found to be small or relatively moderate. • Energy prices in 2008: most of the coal-based routes and biomass-based routes (particularly sugar cane) still have much lower production costs than the oil- and gas-based routes (even if international freight costs are included). To ensure the reduction of CO2 emissions in the long-term, we suggest that policies for the petrochemicals industry focus on stimulating the use of biomass as well as carbon capture and storage features for coal-based routes.

Tao Ren; Bert Daniëls; Martin K. Patel; Kornelis Blok

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Synthesis Gas Production with an Adjustable H2/CO Ratio through the Coal Gasification Process: Effects of Coal Ranks And Methane Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the decline of oil reserves and production, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) part of Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) synthesis technology has become increasing important. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that over 50% of the coal reserve base in the United States (U.S.) is bituminous coal, about 30% is sub-bituminous, and 9% is lignite. ...

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Analysis of the Coal-based Power Production with Amine-based Carbon Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Analysis of the Coal-based Power Production with Amine-based Carbon Capture J. To capture carbon dioxide from fossil fuel power plants and to store it in geological formations (CCS at the beginning. From an electricity generator's perspective the amine based carbon capture offers some advantages

245

Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels · H2 (and CO2) distribution · H2 utilization (e.g. fuel cells, combustion) · Princeton energy carriers are needed: electricity and hydrogen. · If CO2 sequestration is viable, fossil fuel1 Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture Princeton University: Tom

246

Productivity change of coal-fired thermal power plants in India: a Malmquist index approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......coal are taken into consideration and power plants which use lignite as primary fuel are excluded from the study. Power plants...REDDY, Y. V. (2006) Importance of productivity in India. Reserve Bank India Bulletin, 6572. REVIEW OF PERFORMANCE OF THERMAL......

S. K. Behera; J. A. Farooquie; A. P. Dash

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

Kruse, C.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Techno-economic analysis of coal gasification based co-production systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal gasification based co-production systems are increasing popular in the world because they are assumed to be advantageous in energy efficiency and economic cost. However, there has been seldom researches on quantifying these advantages. In this paper, the co-prouction systems are analyzed from the technical and ecnomic point of views. During the study, the co-production system, of which the products are electricity and methanol, is modeled and simulated. For analysis, the energy analysis model and the economy analysis model are established. Results show that the co-production system has higher energy efficiency and less capital expenditure than tranditional single production systems.

Siyu Yang; Hengchong Li; Yu Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

"Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48" 48" "Report Released: December 05, 2013" "Next Release Date: January 09, 2014" "Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing","Week Ended",,"Year-To-Date[1]",,"Month Ended",,"January - November" "Region and State","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","November 2013","November 2012",2013,2012,"% Change" "Alabama",314.49,339.32,16938.35,18080.05,1450.46,1425.29,16938.35,18080.05,-6.3 "Alaska",37.08,45.44,1592.19,1874.56,170.87,187.66,1592.19,1874.56,-15.1

252

Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is claimed for the production of substantial amounts of ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene from coal. Coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds, and preferably at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C, and a partial pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 2 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

Underground Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underground Exploration and Testing A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board October 1993 Yucca Mountain at #12;Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Dr. John E and Testing #12;Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Introduction

255

Modernization of Ohio's coal reserves, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to determine state-level totals of the estimated economic resource, minable reserve base, and recoverable coal in Ohio, allocated to specified ranges of sulfur and heat content. In addition, resources and reserves were to be categorized by mining methods (surface and underground). Land use and environmental restrictions, needed to determine remaining minable reserves, were to be delineated and percentages of restricted coal calculated. In context of a Phase 1, one-year project, the objectives of this project were to update Ohio's coal reserves and resources for as many counties as time allowed, and to deplete production tonnages to January 1, 1991, on the remaining coal-producing counties. For the depleted counties, only estimated economic resources were required or possible with the data available. 24 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Carlton, R.W.

1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced multi-product coal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced... Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U... 12;Presentation Outline Hydrogen Initiatives Hydrogen from Coal ......

258

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

An evaluation of Substitute natural gas production from different coal gasification processes based on modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal and lignite will play a significant role in the future energy production. However, the technical options for the reduction of CO2 emissions will define the extent of their share in the future energy mix. The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG) from solid fossil fuels seems to be a very attractive process: coal and lignite can be upgraded into a methane rich gas which can be transported and further used in high efficient power systems coupled with CO2 sequestration technologies. The aim of this paper is to present a modeling analysis comparison between substitute natural gas production from coal by means of allothermal steam gasification and autothermal oxygen gasification. In order to produce SNG from syngas several unit operations are required such as syngas cooling, cleaning, potential compression and, of course, methanation reactors. Finally the gas which is produced has to be conditioned i.e. removal of unwanted species, such as CO2 etc. The heat recovered from the overall process is utilized by a steam cycle, producing power. These processes were modeled with the computer software IPSEpro™. An energetic and exergetic analysis of the coal to SNG processes have been realized and compared.

S. Karellas; K.D. Panopoulos; G. Panousis; A. Rigas; J. Karl; E. Kakaras

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 19. Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 Above 0 to 10 Zero 2 Total Number of Employees Alabama 3,415 97 655 317 160 224 54 105 5,041 Underground 2,981 - - - 36 88 - 81 3,190 Surface 434 97 655 317 124 136 54 24 1,851 Alaska 143 - - - - - - - 143 Surface 143 - - - - - - - 143 Arizona 432 - - - - - - - 432 Surface 432 - - - - - - - 432 Arkansas

264

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

265

AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minemouth Prices by Region and Minemouth Prices by Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 139, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons and the US Dollar. The data is broken down into production and minemouth prices. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Minemouth Prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region- Reference Case (xls, 41.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

266

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over several years, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Production of low ash coal by thermal extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Present study was conducted for the purpose of producing low ash coal from LRC (low rank coals) such as lignite and sub-bituminous coal through thermal extraction using polar solvent. Extraction from bituminous coal

Sang Do Kim; Kwang Jae Woo; Soon Kwan Jeong…

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stable isotope geochemistry of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal bed and shale gas can be of thermogenic, microbial or of mixed origin with the distinction made primarily on the basis of the molecular and stable isotope compositions of the gases and production waters. Methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen are the main constituents of coal bed and shale gases, with a general lack of C2+ hydrocarbon species in gases produced from shallow levels and more mature coals and shales. Evidence for the presence of microbial gas include ?13C–CH4 values less than ? 50‰, covariation of the isotope compositions of gases and production water, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations consistent with microbial processes, and positive ?13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in production waters. The CO2-reduction pathway is distinguished from acetate/methyl-type fermentation by somewhat lower ?13C–CH4 and higher ?D–CH4, but can also have overlapping values depending on the openness of the microbial system and the extent of substrate depletion. Crossplots of ?13C–CH4 versus ?13C–CO2 and ?D–CH4 versus ?13C–H2O may provide a better indication of the origin of the gases and the dominant metabolic pathway than the absolute carbon and hydrogen isotope compositions of methane. In the majority of cases, microbial coal bed and shale gases have carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations close to those expected for CO2 reduction. Primary thermogenic gases have ?13C–CH4 values greater than ? 50‰, and ?13C values that systematically increase from C1 to C4 and define a relatively straight line when plotted against reciprocal carbon number. Although coals and disseminated organic matter in shales represent a continuum as hydrocarbon source rocks, current data suggest a divergence between these two rock types at the high maturity end. In deep basin shale gas, reversals or rollovers in molecular and isotopic compositions are increasingly reported in what is effectively a closed shale system as opposed to the relative openness in coal measure environments. Detailed geochemical studies of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters are essential to determine not only gas origins but also the dominant methanogenic pathway in the case of microbial gases.

Suzanne D. Golding; Chris J. Boreham; Joan S. Esterle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth semi-annual Technical Progress report under the subject agreement. During this report period, progress was made on drilling the north, center, and south well sites. Water production commenced at the center and south well sites. New drilling plans were formulated for the last remaining well, which is in the Upper Freeport Seam at the north site. Core samples were submitted to laboratories for analytical testing. These aspects of the project are discussed in detail in this report.

William A. Williams

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Coal industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

Steven Markovich

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Wind versus coal: Comparing the local economic impacts of energy resource development in Appalachia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two energy development scenarios were compared for the Coal River Mountain in Raleigh County, West Virginia: (1) mountaintop mining (MTM) of coal, and (2) wind energy plus underground mining of coal. Economic impact computations over the life of each energy development scenario were made on a county basis for output of goods and services, the number of jobs created, and local earnings. Externality costs were assigned monetary values for coal mining and subtracted from earnings. Premature mortality within the general population due to additional coal mining accounted for 96% of these external cost computations. The results showed that economic output over the life of each scenario was twice as high for MTM mining as wind energy plus underground coal mining. Over the short term, employment and earnings were higher for MTM mining, but towards the end of the scenario, cumulative employment and earnings became higher under scenario (2). When local externality costs were subtracted from local earnings, MTM coal production had an overall negative net social impact on the citizens of Raleigh County. The external costs of MTM coal production provide an explanation of the existence of a “resource curse” and the conflicting results of output versus income provide insights into why coal-producing counties are underdeveloped.

Alan R. Collins; Evan Hansen; Michael Hendryx

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 24. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 1.69 - 0.66 1.80 Alaska - 5.98 - - Arizona - 7.38 - - Arkansas - - 0.59 - Colorado 4.90 6.09 6.02 4.45 Illinois 2.09 - 5.34 4.70 Indiana - - 3.23 5.41 Kentucky Total 3.02 2.45 2.36 3.06 Kentucky (East) - 2.45 1.64 2.65 Kentucky (West) 3.27 - 3.60 5.58 Louisiana - - - 6.86 Maryland - - 1.80 2.80 Mississippi - - - 6.73 Missouri - - - 6.73 Montana - 11.20 7.47 31.69 New Mexico

275

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. A process has been developed which results in high quality binder pitch suitable for use in graphite electrodes or carbon anodes. A detailed description of the protocol is given by Clendenin. Briefly, aromatic heavy oils are hydro-treated under mild conditions in order to increase their ability to dissolve coal. An example of an aromatic heavy oil is Koppers Carbon Black Base (CBB) oil. CBB oil has been found to be an effective solvent and acceptably low cost (i.e., significantly below the market price for binder pitch, or about $280 per ton at the time of this writing). It is also possible to use solvents derived from hydrotreated coal and avoid reliance on coke oven recovery products completely if so desired.

Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

277

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead previously by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC). The project is now under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP) after it acquired GEC and the E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The Phase I of this project was supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while the Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research, Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The two project phases planned for execution include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Thomas Lynch

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type by Region and Type Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AE2011: Coal Production by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 122.3 KiB)

280

From coal to wood thermoelectric energy production: a review and discussion of potential socio-economic impacts with implications for Northwestern Ontario, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The province of Ontario in Canada is the first North American jurisdiction with legislation in place to eliminate coal-fired thermoelectric production by the end of 2014. Ontario Power Generation (OPG) operates coal

Jason Ernest Elvin Dampier; Chander Shahi…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coal fly ash–carbide lime bricks: An environment friendly building product  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal fly ash and carbide lime are industrial by-products of coal combustion in thermal power plants and of manufacture of acetylene gas, respectively, available in profusion in southern Brazil. Research has been carried out to search for possible use of such materials to produce environmental friendly bricks that have high compressive strength. This study aims to evaluate strength controlling parameters of coal fly ash–carbide lime mixtures, as well as to show that porosity/carbide lime (?/Lv) ratio (corresponding to porosity divided by the volumetric carbide lime content) can be used to predict compressive strength (qu). The controlling parameters evaluated here are carbide lime content, porosity, curing temperature, curing time and porosity/carbide lime ratio. A number of unconfined compression tests were carried out. The results show that a power function adapts better the relation qu versus ?/Lv, in which Lv is adjusted by an exponent (in this case 0.11) for all coal fly ash–carbide lime mixtures studied. Equations that control the compressive strength for each curing period and curing temperature examined can be formulated using this unique ratio. Preferred strategies for varying ranges of qu are also proposed based on the energy required for heating, considering distinct curing periods and temperatures.

Nilo Cesar Consoli; Cecília Gravina da Rocha; Rodrigo Beck Saldanha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the first such report that will be submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1--December 31, 2003. This quarter saw progress in three areas. These areas are: (1) Evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor, as well as (3) Set up and data collection of baseline performance using the steam reformer. All of the projects are proceeding on schedule. During this quarter one conference paper was written that will be presented at the ASME Power 2004 conference in March 2004, which outlines the research direction and basis for looking at the coal to hydrogen pathway.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

286

The potential utilization of nuclear hydrogen for synthetic fuels production at a coal–to–liquid facility / Steven Chiuta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of synthetic fuels (synfuels) in coal–to–liquids (CTL) facilities has contributed to global warming due to the huge CO2 emissions of the process. This… (more)

Chiuta, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Simulating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration/ECBM Production in Coal Seams: Effects of Permeability Anisotropies and Other Coal Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics for Sequestering CO Economics for Sequestering CO 2 in Coal Seams with Horizontal Wells Grant S. Bromhal, NETL/US DOE W. Neal Sams, NETL/EG&G Sinisha A. Jikich, NETL/Parsons Turgay Ertekin, Penn State Duane H. Smith, NETL/US DOE 3 rd Annual Sequestration Conference May 3-6, 2004 Alexandria, VA Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Problem: How do economics change the optimal design of coal seam sequestration in Eastern coal seams? * Eastern coal seams tend to be thin with relatively high methane content and sequestration capacity per mass of coal. * Horizontal wells have shown promise for improved methane recovery and CO 2 injectivity. * Many studies have been performed to optimize design for total volume of CO 2 sequestered, but economics have not been included. Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date

288

Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Matrix Shrinkage and Swelling Effects on Economics of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production and CO2 Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increases in CO2 levels in the atmosphere and their contributions to global climate change have been a major concern. It has been shown that CO2 injection can enhance the methane recovery from coal. Accordingly, sequestration costs can be partially offset by the value added product. Indeed, coal seam sequestration may be profitable, particularly with the introduction of incentives for CO2 sequestration. Hence, carbon dioxide sequestration in unmineable coals is a very attractive option, not only for environmental reasons, but also for possible economic benefits. Darcy flow through cleats is an important transport mechanism in coal. Cleat compression and permeability changes due to gas sorption desorption, changes of effective stress, and matrix swelling and shrinkage introduce a high level of complexity into the feasibility of a coal sequestration project. The economic effects of carbon dioxide-induced swelling on permeabilities and injectivities has received little (if any) detailed attention. Carbon dioxide and methane have different swelling effects on coal. In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was re-written to also account for coal swelling caused by carbon dioxide sorption. The generalized model was added to PSU-COALCOMP, a dual porosity reservoir simulator for primary and enhanced coalbed methane production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals were used.[1] Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, the cleat porosity, and the injection pressure. The economic variables included CH4 price, CO2 cost, CO2 credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net present value analyses of the simulation results included profits due to methane production, and potential incentives for CO2 sequestered. This work shows that for some coal-property values, the compressibility and cleat porosity of coal may be more important than more purely economic criteria.

Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

You've got that Sinking Feeling: Measuring Subsidence above Abandoned Underground Mines in Ohio, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As a result of more than 200 years of underground coal mining, many urbanized areas throughout Ohio, USA, are susceptible to land subsidence. Approximately 6,000… (more)

Siemer, Kyle W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

292

Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCo) Class F fly ash is the first material to be worked on in this project. A head sample was taken and a screen analysis performed. Each size fraction was evaluated for LOI content. Table 1 shows the distribution of the as-received material by size and LOI content. From the data, 80% of the as-received material is finer than 400 mesh and the LOI content goes from high at coarse fractions and decreases to a low at the finest size fraction. SEM chemical analysis identified the as-received fly ash to mainly consist of silica (46%), aluminum oxide (21%), and iron in various forms (16%). The high iron content presents an extreme case as compared to other fly ash samples we have evaluated previously. Its effect on product testing applications could identify physical and chemical limitations as product testing progresses. Because of the high iron content, it was realized that magnetic separation would be incorporated into the early part of the pilot plant flowsheet to remove magnetic iron and, hopefully, reduce the total iron content. More analytical data will be presented in the next reporting period.

A.M. HEIN; J.Y. HWANG; M.G. MCKIMPSON; R.C. GREENLUND; X. HUANG

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Split and collectorless flotation to medium coking coal fines for multi-product zero waste concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The medium coking coal fines of ? 0.5 mm from Jharia coal field were taken for this investigation. The release analysis of the composite coal reveals that yield is very low at 10.0% ash, about 25% at 14% ash and 50% at 17% ash level. The low yield is caused by the presence of high ash finer fraction. The size-wise ash analysis of ? 0.5 mm coal indicated that ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm fraction contains less ash than ? 0.15 mm fraction. Thus, the composite feed was split into ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm and ? 0.15 mm fractions and subjected to flotation separately. The low ash bearing fraction (? 0.5 + 0.15 mm) was subjected to two stages collectorless flotation to achieve the concentrate with 10% ash. The cleaner concentrate (18.9%) with 10% ash was recovered which has an application in metallurgical industries. The concentrate of 30.2% yield with 12.5% ash could be achieved in one stage collectorless flotation which is suitable for use in coke making as sweetener. As the ? 0.15 mm fraction contains relatively high ash, collector aided flotation using sodium silicate was performed to get a concentrate of 23.6% yield with about 17% ash. The blending of this product with cleaner tail obtained from ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm produces about 35.0% yield with 17% ash and that can be utilized for coke making. The reject from the two fractions can be used for conventional thermal power plant or cement industries using a 23.5% ash after one stage collector aided flotation and the final tailings produced content ash of 61.6% can be used for fluidization combustion bed (FBC). This eventually leads to complete utilization of coal.

Shobhana Dey; K.K. Bhattacharyya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of a coal combustion product (CCP) database system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly 90 million tons of coal combustion products (CCPs) are produced annually in the United States. The value of CCPs is well established by research and commercial practice; however, only 25% of these products are utilized. The objective of this project was to develop a computer program containing a database of advanced analytical and comprehensive engineering information on CCPs, accessible through a user-friendly interface. Version 1.0 of the ACAA CCP Data Manager was specifically designed to: perform multiple-criteria queries to produce a set of sample for in-depth study; view and print standard test reports, such as C618 reports; compare and contrast analytical results in graphs and tables; graph utilization information by application and region; and save data to a file for use in other computer applications, such as spreadsheet programs. The program was designed to contain descriptive information about a given CCP sample, including sample formation data (material type, sample location, fuel type, collection device etc.), combustion system design data (steam generator type, furnace type, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control information, ash-handling configurations), test data (chemical, mineralogical, and physical characterization data), and utilization potential of the CCP. The location of the plant is identified by region. The database has been initially populated with information on over 800 CCP samples, taken from the Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC). An installation package and user`s guide was developed for unlimited distribution by the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA).

O`Leary, E.M.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

Conocophillips

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This NETL sponsored effort seeks to develop continuous technologies for the production of carbon products, which may be thought of as the heavier products currently produced from refining of crude petroleum and coal tars obtained from metallurgical grade coke ovens. This effort took binder grade pitch, produced from liquefaction of West Virginia bituminous grade coal, all the way to commercial demonstration in a state of the art arc furnace. Other products, such as crude oil, anode grade coke and metallurgical grade coke were demonstrated successfully at the bench scale. The technology developed herein diverged from the previous state of the art in direct liquefaction (also referred to as the Bergius process), in two major respects. First, direct liquefaction was accomplished with less than a percent of hydrogen per unit mass of product, or about 3 pound per barrel or less. By contrast, other variants of the Bergius process require the use of 15 pounds or more of hydrogen per barrel, resulting in an inherent materials cost. Second, the conventional Bergius process requires high pressure, in the range of 1500 psig to 3000 psig. The WVU process variant has been carried out at pressures below 400 psig, a significant difference. Thanks mainly to DOE sponsorship, the WVU process has been licensed to a Canadian Company, Quantex Energy Inc, with a commercial demonstration unit plant scheduled to be erected in 2011.

Elliot Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Mark Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; James Mayberry; Alfred Stiller; Joseph Stoffa; Christopher Yurchick; John Zondlo

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Radioactivity of coals and ashes from Çatalazi coal-fired power plant in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Notes Radioactivity of coals and ashes from catalagzi coal-fired...radioactivity contents in feed coals from lignite-fired power plants...Geological Survey of Canada, Economic Geology Report. 14 Aytekin...influence of an underground coal mine in Zonguldak basin, Turkey......

Hüseyin Aytekin; Ridvan Baldik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. During the reporting period, various methods to remove low-level contaminants for the synthesis gas were reviewed. In addition, there was a transition of the project personnel for GEC which has slowed the production of the outstanding project reports.

Gary Harmond; Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

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301

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coal combustion products in Europe - sustainable raw materials for the construction industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of coal combustion products (CCPs) in all the European member states is estimated to be about 100 million tonnes. The utilisation of CCPs is well established in some European countries, based on long term experience and technical as well as environmental benefits. The CCPs are mainly utilised in the building material and construction industry as a replacement for natural resources. By their utilisation, they help to reduce energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions to atmosphere for mining and production of products which are replaced and to save natural resources. By this, the use of CCPs contributes to the sustainability of construction materials. Furthermore, the majority of the CCPs is produced to meet certain requirements of standards or other specifications with respect to utilisation in certain areas. The standards and specifications are subject to regular revision by CEN or national authorities.

Hans-Joachim Feuerborn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/this operational mode, the gasifiers and other parts of the

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 32. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Underground Surface Total Over 1,000 58.86 19.50 31.70 Over 500 to 1,000 84.65 66.80 74.74 Over 200 to 500 95.31 73.29 84.14 Over 100 to 200 98.00 68.97 82.69 Over 50 to 100 81.53 75.99 78.61 50 or Under 92.87 63.12 73.78 U.S. Total 66.56 26.43 39.95 Note: An average sales price is calculated by dividing the total free on board (f.o.b) rail/barge value of the coal sold by the total coal sold. Excludes mines producing less than 25,000 short tons, which are not

305

Resource Assessment & Production Testing for Coal Bed Methane in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to assess the economic coal bed methane potential of the Illinois Basin, the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky performed a geological assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. A considerable effort went into generating cumulative coal thickness and bed structure maps to identify target areas for exploratory drilling. Following this, the first project well was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. Eight additional wells were subsequently drilled in Indiana (3) and Kentucky (5) during 2004 and 2005. In addition, a five spot pilot completion program was started with three wells being completed. Gas contents were found to be variable, but generally higher than indicated by historical data. Gas contents of more than 300 scf/ton were recovered from one of the bore holes in Kentucky. Collectively, our findings indicate that the Illinois Basin represents a potentially large source of economic coal bed methane. Additional exploration will be required to refine gas contents and the economics of potential production.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

307

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial plants operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues; and (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. This report describes management planning, work breakdown structure development, and feasibility study activities by the IMPPCCT consortium in support of the first project phase. Project planning activities have been completed, and a project timeline and task list has been generated. Requirements for an economic model to evaluate the West Terre Haute implementation and for other commercial implementations are being defined. Specifications for methanol product and availability of local feedstocks for potential commercial embodiment plant sites have been defined. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the fifth phase solicitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the GEC and an Industrial Consortia are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Doug Strickland; Albert Tsang

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

310

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

311

Automated apparatus for solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated apparatus for the solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In use of the apparatus, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control means. The mixture in the filter is agitated by means of ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, coking and composite fabrication continued using coal-derived samples. These samples were tested in direct carbon fuel cells. Methodology was refined for determining the aromatic character of hydro treated liquid, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Tests at GrafTech International showed that binder pitches produced using the WVU solvent extraction protocol can result in acceptable graphite electrodes for use in arc furnaces. These tests were made at the pilot scale.

Elliot B. Kennel; R. Michael Bergen; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; W. Morgan Summers; John W. Zondlo

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 6, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this program is to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. This quarterly report covers activities during the period from April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1996. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort has continued on a no-cost extension of the original contract. Samples have been supplied to CPC participants so they could conduct their portions of the project as contracted through ORNL. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: project planning and administration; consortium administration and reporting; coal extraction; technical/economic evaluation of WVU extraction process; and technology transfer. Previous work has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for producing suitable base raw materials for carbon products. Current effort, therefore, involved the screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. As part of this program, the activation of the coal extraction residues was investigated for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon. A further task, which was started towards the end of the program, was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of these studies are summarized in this report.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Study of the properties of mine waste in the midwestern coal fields. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to assist the coal industry in complying with the applicable regulations, to design safe and environmentally acceptable disposal systems, and to encourage secondary use of coal mine waste, the US Department of Energy has initiated research programs to develop coal mine waste disposal and use technology. This study of the properties of mine wastes in the Midwestern coal fields has been limited to the waste materials obtained from underground coal mines and preparation plants attached to both underground and surface mines. The program has been divided into two phases. In Phase I, the 20 most important properties relevant to safe disposal, reclamation, underground disposal, and secondary uses have been identified. An inventory of the significant waste disposal sites in the Midwestern coal fields has been prepared. The site locations have been plotted on USGS maps. Estimates of coal production and coal mine waste production during the next 2 decades have been prepared and are presented in this report. Also, all available information obtained from a search of existing literature on physical and chemical properties, including analysis results of the general runoff from the refuse disposal areas, has been collected and is presented. In order to fill the gaps in information, 20 sites have been identified for drilling and sampling to determine the various physical and chemical properties. They have been selected on the basis of the distribution and quantity of waste at the existing locations (both abandoned and active), the future trends in production and likely locations of waste disposal areas, their geographical and geological distribution, and ease of accessibility for drilling and sampling.

None

1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coal preparation: The essential clean coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter is a brief introduction to a broad topic which has many highly specialized areas. The aim is to summarize the essential elements of coal preparation and illustrate its important role in facilitating the clean use of coal. Conventional coal preparation is the essential first step in ensuring the economic and environmentally acceptable use of coal. The aim of coal preparation is to produce saleable products of consistent, specified quality which satisfy customer requirements while optimizing the utilization of the coal resource. Coal preparation covers all aspects of preparing coal for the market. It includes size reduction, blending and homogenization and, most importantly, the process of physical beneficiation or washing, which involves separation of undesirable mineral matter from the coal substance itself. Coal preparation can be performed at different levels of sophistication and cost. The degree of coal preparation required is decided by considering the quality of the raw coal, transport costs and, in particular, the coal quality specified by the consumer. However, the cost of coal beneficiation rises rapidly with the complexity of the process and some coal is lost with the waste matter because of process inefficiencies, therefore each situation requires individual study to determine the optimum coal preparation strategy. The necessary expertise is available within APEC countries such as Australia. Coals destined for iron making are almost always highly beneficiated. Physical beneficiation is mostly confined to the higher rank, hard coals, but all other aspects of coal preparation can be applied to subbituminous and lignitic coals to improve their utilization. Also, there are some interesting developments aimed specifically at reducing the water content of lower rank coals.

Cain, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 21. Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Number of Mining Operations 2 Number of Employees 3 Average Production per Employee Hour (short tons) 4 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change Alabama 54 62 -12.9 5,041 4,756 6.0 1.68 1.66 0.7 Underground 11 12 -8.3 3,190 3,138 1.7 1.64 1.45 13.2 Surface 43 50 -14.0 1,851 1,618 14.4 1.75 2.08 -15.8 Alaska 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Surface 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Arizona 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Surface 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Arkansas 2 2 - 73 70 4.3 0.58 0.70

322

Production of high-energy fuel with low volatile content from 3B and D coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments on the carbonization of coal show that high-energy fuel with satisfactory piece strength (?8 MPa in compression) may be produced in the nonoxidative heating of 3B and D coal, with gradual increase ...

M. V. Kulesh; S. R. Islamov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Syngas Production from Coal Gasification with CO2 Rich Gas Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification with CO2 rich gas mixture is one of several promising new technologies associated with CO2 reduction in the atmosphere. Coal gasification with high CO2 concentration is suitable for producing la...

M. S. Alam; A. T. Wijayanta; K. Nakaso…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Public Subsidies of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I have spent most of my life in western Pennsylvania, in the Appalachian coal belt of the U.S. I have direct experience with the economic, environmental, and social impacts of coal extraction and use. ... Although coal was important in building the economy of western Pennsylvania as well as the economies of other coal regions, its extraction and use left a legacy of damage: thousands of miles of streams severely impacted by acid drainage from abandoned mines; large piles of coal mine refuse; old strip mines that have not been refilled; damaged groundwater resources; and land subsidence from underground mining. ...

David A. Dzombak

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Removing petroleum products from coke-plant wastewater by means of coal concentrates and coking products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of raw materials and products at OAO Moskoks in absorbing petroleum products is explored. These materials are compared with mass-produced carbon absorbers. The possibility of producing carbon adsorbent...

N. P. Zubakhin; V. N. Klushin; D. A. Dmitrieva; E. V. Zen’kova

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the method for bulk separation of multi-component gases generated in a coal gasification process wherein coal is gasified in a gasifier to produce gasification products including a mixture of gases comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gas components carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. It consists of the steps of conveying a stream comprising the mixture of gases into one end of an elongated column containing a solid adsorbent for each of the gases forming the mixture of gases and pressurizing the charge of gases within the column to a pressure within a range sufficient to effect the adsorption by the adsorbent of the conveyed gases including the hydrogen defining the least absorbable gas in the mixture of gases. Then, decreasing the partial pressure of the charge of gases in the column to effect the sequential desorption of the gases hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane from the adsorbent in the column, and conveying the adsorbed gases from the column upon desorption thereof from the adsorbent.

Ghate, M.H.; Yang, R.T.

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

GIS BASED ANALYSIS OF LANDCOVER CHANGES ARISING FROM COAL PRODUCTION WASTES IN ZONGULDAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mining has been made since 1848 and, based on the records kept since 1865, 328 million tons pit run coal

H. Akç?n A; S. Karak? A; G. Büyüksalih A; M. Oruç A

330

Improving Process Performances in Coal Gasification for Power and Synfuel Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. ... Considering the world’s insatiable appetite for energy and oil, the only reasonable large-scale conventional source left in the medium term will have to be coal. ...

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional and clean coal technologies. This project was primarily directed toward developing concrete, mineralogical, and microstructural properties. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Based on these properties, two sources of both conventional and clean coal ashes were selected

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

332

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. There are a number of parameters which are important for the production of acceptable cokes, including purity, structure, density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity etc. From the standpoint of a manufacturer of graphite electrodes such as GrafTech, one of the most important parameters is coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because GrafTech material is usually fully graphitized (i.e., heat treated at 3100 C), very high purity is automatically achieved. The degree of graphitization controls properties such as CTE, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and density. Thus it is usually possible to correlate these properties using a single parameter. CTE has proven to be a useful index for the quality of coke. Pure graphite actually has a slightly negative coefficient of thermal expansion, whereas more disordered carbon has a positive coefficient.

Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Economical production of transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, and other carbonaceous feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nation`s economy and security will continue to be vitally linked to an efficient transportation system of air, rail, and highway vehicles that depend on a continuous supply of liquid fuels at a reasonable price and with characteristics that can help the vehicle manufacturers meet increasingly strict environmental regulations. However, an analysis of US oil production and demand shows that, between now and 2015, a significant increase in imported oil will be needed to meet transportation fuel requirements. One element of an overall Department of Energy`s (DOE) strategy to address this energy security issue while helping meet emissions requirements is to produce premium transportation fuels from non-petroleum feedstocks, such as coal, natural gas, and biomass, via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) and other synthesis gas conversion technologies.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Winslow, J.C.; Venkataraman, V.K.; Driscoll, D.J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. The results generated by this project will promote Illinois coals for such prospective new markets as feed materials for advanced gasification processes, for synthetic organic chemicals, and to meet new environmental requirements for their use in utility steam generation. During the first quarter, each of 34 project samples were ground to about {approximately}100 mesh size and cleaned by use of a special froth flotation technique (release analysis). The flotation products were analyzed for ash, moisture, and heating value (BTU). The data were then used to construct a series of different-washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected, or as a function of the weight of the flotation products. From the relationship between %cumulative BTU and %cumulative weight, nine composite samples each having 80% of the total BTU were prepared from the individual flotation products and submitted for trace element analysis.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States). Geological Survey

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 4. Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal Thickness (inches) Underground Surface Total Under 7 - 17 17 7 - Under 13 - 2,108 2,108 13 - Under 19 429 6,688 7,117 19 - Under 25 111 14,107 14,217 25 - Under 31 4,147 12,913 17,060 31 - Under 37 15,128 19,022 34,150 37 - Under 43 23,868 17,285 41,153 43 - Under 49 26,035 15,597 41,632 49 - Under 55 18,909 22,544 41,453 55 - Under 61 36,946 11,285 48,231 61 - Under 67 43,146 15,074 58,220 67 - Under 73 40,983 8,783 49,766 73 - Under 79 32,914 10,193 43,107 79 - Under 85 27,011 3,554 30,565 85 - Under 91 11,997

338

Characterization of the Products of the Clay Mineral Thermal Reactions during Pulverization Coal Combustion in Order to Study the Coal Slagging Propensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Slagging is well-known as one problem threatening safe, economic operation of coal-fired boilers. ... (1-4) Today, more and more power plants use new coals or coal blends because of the low availability of the original design fuels, which has increased the demand for predictions of coal slagging characteristics. ...

Sida Tian; Yuqun Zhuo; Changhe Chen

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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341

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Economic analysis of coal-based polygeneration system for methanol and power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polygeneration system for chemical and power co-production has been regarded as one of promising technologies to use fossil fuel more efficiently and cleanly. In this paper the thermodynamic and economic performances of three types of coal-based polygeneration system were investigated and the influence of energy saving of oxygenation systems on system economic performance was revealed. The primary cost saving ratio (PCS) is presented as a criterion, which represents the cost saving of polygeneration system compared with the single-product systems with the same products outputs, to evaluate economic advantages of polygeneration system. As a result, the system, adopting un-reacted syngas partly recycled to the methanol synthesis reactor and without the shift process, can get the optimal PCS of 11.8%, which results from the trade-off between the installed capital cost saving and the energy saving effects on the cost saving, and represents the optimal coupling relationship among chemical conversion, energy utilization and economic performance. And both of fuel price and the level of equipment capital cost affect on PCS faintly. This paper provides an evaluation method for polygeneration systems based on both technical and economic viewpoints.

Hu Lin; Hongguang Jin; Lin Gao; Wei Han

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Use of resin-bearing wastes from coke and coal chemicals production at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coke and coal chemicals plant at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine is making trial use of a technology that recycles waste products in 'tar ponds.' Specialists from the Ekomash company have installed a recycling unit in one area of the plant's dump, the unit including an inclined conveyor with a steam heater and a receiving hopper The coal preparation shop receives the wastes in a heated bin, where a screw mixes the wastes with pail of the charge for the coking ovens. The mixture subsequently travels along a moving conveyor belt together with the rest of the charge materials. The addition of up to 2% resin-bearing waste materials to the coal charge has not had any significant effect on the strength properties of the coke.

Kul'kova, T.N.; Yablochkin, N.V.; Gal'chenko, A.I.; Karyakina, E.A.; Litvinova, V.A.; Gorbach, D.A.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

STEO November 2012 - coal supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach record high in 2012. While U.S. coal production is down 7 percent this year due in part to utilities switching to low-priced natural gas to generate electricity, American coal is still finding plenty of buyers in overseas markets. U.S. coal exports are expected to hit a record 125 million tons in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says in its new monthly short-term energy outlook. Coal exports are expected to decline in 2013, primarily because of continuing economic weakness in Europe, lower international coal prices, and higher coal production in Asia. However, U.S. coal exports next year are still expected to top 100 million tons for the third year in a row

349

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas: Case studies, design, and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a combination of process simulation and catalyst development aimed at identifying the most economical method for converting coal to syngas to linear higher alcohols to be used as oxygenated fuel additives. There are two tasks. The goal of Task 1 is to discover, study, and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas, and to explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. The goal of Task 2 is to simulate, by computer, energy efficient and economically efficient processes for converting coal to energy (fuel alcohols and/or power). The primary focus is to convert syngas to fuel alcohols. This report contains results from Task 2. The first step for Task 2 was to develop computer simulations of alternative coal to syngas to linear higher alcohol processes, to evaluate and compare the economics and energy efficiency of these alternative processes, and to make a preliminary determination as to the most attractive process configuration. A benefit of this approach is that simulations will be debugged and available for use when Task 1 results are available. Seven cases were developed using different gasifier technologies, different methods for altering the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas to the desired 1.1/1, and with the higher alcohol fuel additives as primary products and as by-products of a power generation facility. Texaco, Shell, and Lurgi gasifier designs were used to test gasifying coal. Steam reforming of natural gas, sour gas shift conversion, or pressure swing adsorption were used to alter the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas. In addition, a case using only natural gas was prepared to compare coal and natural gas as a source of syngas.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Conditioner for flotation of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for recovering coal is described which comprises the steps of floating coal in an aqueous frothing medium containing an amount of a condensation product of an alkanolamine and naphthenic acid sufficient to increase the recovery of coal as compared to the recovery of coal in an identical process using none of the condensation product.

Nimerick, K.H.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Production of Middle Caloric Fuel Gas from Coal by Dual-Bed Gasification Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work demonstrated the dual-bed gasification technology on a pilot plant (1000 tons of coal/a) mainly consisting of a fluidized-bed gasifier and a pneumatic combustor using the coal with a particle size of less than 20 mm. ... It can be seen in Table 1 that the mass fraction of the coal with sizes less than 2.0 mm was about 45 wt %. ... Coal was continuously fed in the gasifier, and meanwhile, air or gas mixture (air and steam) as the fluidizing medium and gasifying reagent was introduced from the bottom of the gasifier. ...

Yin Wang; Wen Dong; Li Dong; Junrong Yue; Shiqiu Gao; Toshiyuki Suda; Guangwen Xu

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evaluation of factors that influence microbial communities and methane production in coal microcosms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Vast reserves of coal represent a largely untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to burning oil… (more)

Gallagher, Lisa K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Trends in U.S. Recoverable Coal Supply Estimates and Future Production Outlooks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

are naturally occurring concentrations or deposits of coal in the Earth’s crust, in such forms and amounts that economic extraction is currently or potentially feasible.

Mikael Höök; Kjell Aleklett

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Advanced coal technology by-products: Long-term results from landfill test cells and their implications for reuse or disposal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New air pollution regulations under the 1991 Clean Air Act and other legislation are motivating continued development and implementation, of cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electrical power. These clean coal processes produce solid by-products which differ in important respects from conventional pulverized coal combustion ash. Clean coal by-products` contain both residual sorbent and captured SO{sub 2} control products, as well as the mineral component of the coal. The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center has contracted Radian Corporation to construct and monitor landfill test cells with a several different advanced coal combustion by-products at three locations around the US; data from these sites provide a unique picture of the long-term field behavior of clean coal combustion by-products. The field testing sites were located in western Colorado, northern Ohio, and central Illinois. Fluidized bed combustion and lime injection residues are characterized by high lime and calcium sulfate contents` contributed by reacted and unreacted sorbent materials, and produce an leachate, when wetted. Compared with conventional coal fly ash, the clean coal technology ashes have been noted for potential difficulties when wetted, including corrosivity, heat generation, cementation, and swelling on hydration. On the other hand, the high lime content and chemical reactivity of clean coal residues offer potential benefits in reuse as a cementitious material.The results of three years of data collection suggest a fairly consistent pattern of behavior for the calcium-based dry sorbent systems involved in the project, despite differences in the initial of the by-products, differences in the methods of placement, and differences in climate at the test sites.

Weinberg, A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Harness, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 5. Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Production (thousand short tons) Thickness (inches) Coalbed ID Number 1 Coalbed Name Underground Surface Total Average 2 Low High 1699 Wyodak - 351,188 351,188 778 160 913 0036 Pittsburgh 52,476 3,871 56,348 74 18 138 0489 No. 9 42,193 12,181 54,374 61 24 74 0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6) 48,526 1,910 50,436 71 46 89 0212 Pittsburgh 27,355 76 27,431 75 27 98 1701 Smith - 23,847 23,847 822 745 912 1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2 - 18,992 18,992 932 660 960 0084 Lower Kittanning 8,196 7,268 15,464

357

Research needs and data acquisition to apply US technology to foreign coals: Annual report, July 1, 1986-June 30, 1987. [Production and consumption of each indexed country  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive data on the coal resources, characteristics, demand and supply, coal production and plans for coal utilization to meet the energy needs in the countries of the Pacific Basin and Asia have been gathered. Two databases have been prepared based on this information which are compatible with the database on domestic coals available at NCTDC, PETC on coal resources and characteristics. Coal technologies and coal preparation methods currently in use in the Pacific Basin and Asia have also been addressed. In the second phase of this project, an assessment of the information obtained will be conducted and, wherever possible, this data will be compared with domestic data on coals and coal conversion practices so as to highlight similarities or differences. High quality and useful data will be enumerated in the form of graphs, tables and matrices for quick review. Conclusions from this data will depict work areas of potential mutual interest and areas of technology transfer. US products and services which can be exported will be emphasized.

Joseph, S.; Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. Filter media candidates were evaluated for dewatering the ultrafine ash (UFA) product. Media candidates were selected based on manufacturer recommendations and evaluated using standard batch filtration techniques. A final media was selected; 901F, a multifilament polypropylene. While this media would provide adequate solids capture and cake moisture, the use of flocculants would be necessary to enable adequate filter throughput. Several flocculant chemistries were also evaluated and it was determined that polyethylene oxide (PEO) at a dosage of 5 ppm (slurry basis) would be the most suitable in terms of both settling rate and clarity. PEO was evaluated on a continuous vacuum filter using 901F media. The optimum cycle time was found to be 1.25 minutes which provided a 305% moisture cake, 85% solids capture with a throughput of 115 lbs dry solids per hour and a dry cake rate of 25 lb/ft2/hr. Increasing cycle time not did not reduce cake moisture or increase throughput. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities.

John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The demonstration unit was hauled to the test site on trailers that were place on a test pad located adjacent to the ash pond and re-assembled. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities. Representative feed ash for the operation of the filed testing unit was excavated from a location within the lower ash pond determined from coring activities. Approximately 150 tons of ash was excavated and pre-screened to remove +3/8 inch material that could cause plugging problems during operation of the demonstration unit.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Underground Layout Configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

A. Linden

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

CO2 Sequestration in Unmineable Coal with Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery DE-FC26-01NT41148  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2013 1, 2013 James E. Locke & Richard A. Winschel CONSOL Energy Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS Presentation Outline  Benefit to the program  Project overview  Technical status  Accomplishments  Summary  Appendix 2 Benefit to the Program This project will demonstrate the effectiveness and the economics of carbon sequestration in an unmineable coal seam with enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) production. 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives  Demonstrate horizontal drilling in underground coal seams,  Devise economical drilling strategies to maximize both CO 2 sequestration potential and CBM recovery,

363

Comparing solar PV (photovoltaic) with coal-fired electricity production in the centralized network of South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract South Africa has a highly centralized network, in which almost all electricity is produced in Mpumalanga and transmitted throughout South Africa. In the case of the Western Cape, electricity has to be transmitted over 800–1370 km. This generates losses and entails high transmission costs. Investments in additional production and transmission capacity are needed to cope with the growing demand. Although there is a large potential for solar energy in South Africa, investments are lacking while large investments in new coal-fired power plants are being executed. These coal power plants do not only increase the need for heavier transmission infrastructure, but also have a higher CO2 emission level and a higher pressure on water reserves. This paper performs a more comprehensive cost-analysis between solar energy production and coal production facilities, to make a more elaborate picture of which technologies are more plausible to foresee in the growing demand of electricity. The current centralized electricity infrastructure makes the investment in large production facilities more likely. However, it should be questioned if the investment in large centralized solar parks will be more beneficial than the investments by consumers in smaller solar PV facilities on site.

R.A.F. de Groot; V.G. van der Veen; A.B. Sebitosi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT & PRODUCTION TESTING FOR COAL BED METHANE IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky have completed the initial geologic assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. Cumulative thickness maps have been generated and target areas for drilling have been selected. The first well in the Illinois area of the Illinois Basin coal bed methane project was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. This well was cored in the major coal interval from the Danville to the Davis Coals and provided a broad spectrum of samples for further analyses. Sixteen coal samples and three black shale samples were taken from these cores for canister desorption tests and were the subject of analyses that were completed over the following months, including desorbed gas volume, gas chemical and isotope composition, coal proximate, calorific content and sulfur analyses. Drilling programs in Indiana and Kentucky are expected to begin shortly.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Refined methods for the evaluation of coal resources, quantum leaps in productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of coal resource evaluations have been constantly refined since the inception of the Joint Coal Availability Project between the Kentucky Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey in the mid 1980's. Originally geological, environmental, social and technical data was collected and analyzed on individual 7.5 minute quadrangles (areas of 50 to 60 square miles). Mineable coal beds were correlated using the best available data and map and mining information accuracy were closely scrutinized. Advancements in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and the development of regional databases have allowed the US GS to model the geology and mining restrictions in the same detail, but, for much larger areas coal fields and basins, than in the past. This paper will discuss the GIS programs, methodologies, and computer hardware used in the coal evaluations, and results of Illinois, Powder River, and San Juan Basins and Wasatch Plateau studies.

Devereux Carter, M; Rohrbacher, T.; Molnia, C.L.; Osmonson, L.; Treworgy, C.G.; Weisenfluh, G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

M. M. Wu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effects of matrix shrinkage and swelling on the economics of enhanced-coalbed-methane production and CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was rewritten to also account for coal swelling caused by CO{sub 2} sorption. The generalized model was added to a compositional, dual porosity coalbed-methane reservoir simulator for primary (CBM) and ECBM production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals was used. Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cleat porosity, and injection pressure. The economic variables included CH{sub 4}, price, Col Cost, CO{sub 2} credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net-present value (NPV) analyses of the simulation results included profits resulting from CH{sub 4}, production and potential incentives for sequestered CO{sub 2}, This work shows that for some coal seams, the combination of compressibility, cleat porosity, and shrinkage/swelling of the coal may have a significant impact on project economics.

Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

369

Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450ºC. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450ºC (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300ºC (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300ºC. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development of Continuous Solvent Extraction Processes For Coal Derived Carbon Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, tonnage quantities of coal extract were produced but solid separation was not accomplished in a timely manner. It became clear that the originally selected filtration process would not be effective enough for a serious commercial process. Accordingly, centrifugation was investigated as a superior means for removing solids from the extract. Results show acceptable performance. Petrographic analysis of filtered solids was carried out by R and D Carbon Petrography under the auspices of Koppers and consultant Ken Krupinski. The general conclusion is that the material appears to be amenable to centrifugation. Filtered solids shows a substantial pitch component as well as some mesophase, resulting in increased viscosity. This is likely a contributing reason for the difficulty in filtering the material. Cost estimates were made for the hydotreatment and digestion reactors that would be needed for a 20,000 ton per year demonstration plants, with the aid of ChemTech Inc. The estimates show that the costs of scaling up the existing tank reactors are acceptable. However, a strong recommendation was made to consider pipe reactors, which are thought to be more cost effective and potentially higher performance in large scale systems. The alternate feedstocks for coke and carbon products were used to fabricate carbon electrodes as described in the last quarterly report. Gregory Hackett successfully defended his MS Thesis on the use of these electrodes in Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC), which is excerpted in Section 2.4 of this quarterly report.

Elliot B. Kennel; Dady B. Dadyburjor; Gregory W. Hackett; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; Robert C. Svensson; John W. Zondlo

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Water effects of the use of western coal for electrical production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water may be a constraint on the expanded development of coal resources in the semi-arid western United States. Water allocation in the West has been determined by the appropriative rights doctrine which allows perpetual use of water sources by those who first claim it for beneficial purposes. This has had the effect of placing a dominative interest in water allocation in one economic sector: agriculture. New water sources are available to coal producers but political and economic problems must be overcome. Water is required by every phase of coal development. Mines use water for dust control and land reclamation. Coal slurry pipelines would use water as a transport medium. Steam electric power plants use water for cooling, cleaning, and in the boiler. Coal gasification plants would use water for cooling, cleaning, and as a material input. In addition to these direct uses of water by coal development, the people who build and operate the development demand water for domestic and recreational purposes. The quantity of water required for a given element of a coal development is site specific and dependent on many factors. The available literature cites a range of estimates of the amount of water required for each type of development. The width of this range seems related to the stage of development of the particular technology. Estimates of water requirements for various schemes to provide an average electrical load of 9 GWe to a load center 1000 miles from western mines are shown in Table 5.

Rogers, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Look taken at coal mining costs and trends for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author examines the trends in US bituminous coal production and consumption over the past 40 years, and then looks at the growth rates than can be expected for the rest of the 1980s. Increases are likely to be substantial in absolute terms, although nominal when expressed as a percentage. Surface minable reserves in the eastern US are rapidly being depleted, so that underground mining will gain in importance in these regions. A significant contribution to supplying increased domestic coal consumption will eventually come from new longwall mines in the Illinois Basin and northern Appalachia.

Weir, J.P.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cast-Concrete Products Made with FBC Ash and Wet-Collected Coal-Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0899-1561 2005 17:6 659 CE Database subject headings: Recycling; Ashes; Concrete et al. 1991 . Fluidized bed combustion FBC ash is the ash produced by an FBC boiler in which the coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

376

Study of methanol-to-gasoline process for production of gasoline from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process is an efficient way to produce liquid ... The academic basis of the coal-to-liquid process is described and two different synthesis processes are focused on: Fixed MTG process

Tian-cai He; Xiao-han Cheng; Ling Li…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Simulation of CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production in Multiple Appalachian Basin Coal Seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DOE-funded field injection of carbon dioxide is to be performed in an Appalachian Basin coal seam by CONSOL Energy and CNX Gas later this year. A preliminary analysis of the migration of CO2 within the Upper Freeport coal seam and the resulting ground movements has been performed on the basis of assumed material and geometric parameters. Preliminary results show that ground movements at the field site may be in a range that are measurable by tiltmeter technology.

Bromhal, G.S.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.K.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coal market momentum converts skeptics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tight supplies, soaring natural gas prices and an improving economy bode well for coal. Coal Age presents it 'Forecast 2006' a survey of 200 US coal industry executives. Questions asked included predicted production levels, attitudes, expenditure on coal mining, and rating of factors of importance. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described earlier in an e-mail, in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described billion gallons of toxic coal sludge located directly above Marsh Fork Elementary School. (No word yet on their campus a couple of years ago. Underground Appalachian coal mining is being replaced in recent years

Hansen, James E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

382

Stable isotope and water quality analysis of coal bed methane production waters and gases from the Bowen Basin, Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) is a significant growing industry in Queensland's energy sector. It is, however, a relatively new industry with little local water quality data and stable isotope compositions of production waters and gases available in the public domain. This study aims to determine whether water quality and stable isotope data can be correlated with gas and groundwater production and flow pathways, and identify zones of recharge and water mixing. Stable isotope analysis and accessory water quality tests were conducted on CBM production gas and water samples collected from two CBM producing bituminous coal seams within a single field in the Bowen Basin. In the production field, the reservoir seams are gently folded with eastwardly dipping fold axes, and compartmentalised by an ENE normal fault on the flank of a broad central anticline that contains minor faults. For one seam, splitting and a change in coal quality parallels the fault and fold axes. Although virgin reservoir conditions were similar, differing production performance north and south of the main fault suggests it acts as a barrier to water and gas flow along strike. The stable isotope analysis on the production water showed that waters with more positive ?D and ?18O compositions were associated with areas of higher water production and shallower depths, whereas more negative ?D and ?18O compositions were associated with lower water production and high gas production. The gas isotope analysis showed that production gases had both biogenic and thermogenic origins and that secondary biogenic gas generated through CO2 reduction comprises a significant portion of the CBM produced from this field. More negative CH4 ?13C values characterize the zones of meteoric recharge in shallow, up-dip areas. Gas production data and CO2 ?13C values suggest that this may result from 13CH4 stripping by the recharge waters and/or increased biogenic activity in this area. Smaller CO2–CH4 carbon isotopic fractionation values characterized zones of meteoric recharge, whereas higher isotopic fractionation values characterized the high gas production domain.

E.C.P. Kinnon; S.D. Golding; C.J. Boreham; K.A. Baublys; J.S. Esterle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 14--16, 1989. Topics discussed included the following: Expanded Horizons for US Coal Technology and Coal Trade; Future Coal-Fired Generation and Capacity Requirements of the Philippines; Taiwan Presentation; Korean Presentation; Hong Kong Future Coal Requirements; Indonesian Presentation; Electric Power System in Thailand; Coal in Malaysia -- A Position Paper; The US and Asia: Pacific Partners in Coal and Coal Technology; US Coal Production and Export; US Clean Coal Technologies; Developments in Coal Transport and Utilization; Alternative/Innovative Transport; Electricity Generation in Asia and the Pacific: Power Sector Demand for Coal, Oil and Natural Gas; Role of Clean Coal Technology in the Energy Future of the World; Global Climate Change: A Fossil Energy Perspective; Speaker: The Role of Coal in Meeting Hawaii's Power Needs; and Workshops on Critical Issues Associated with Coal Usage. Individual topics are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coal Gasification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

386

The direct production of electron pairs by high-energy muons underground (148 m w.e.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct production of electron pairs in thin iron targets by muons of mean energy 32.6 GeV was studied with a ... two or more electrons associated with each outgoing muon from the targets were selected and their energy

N. Chaudhuri; M. S. Sinha

1964-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

388

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

389

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

390

Reaction Mechanism of Coal Chemical Looping Process for Syngas Production with CaSO4 Oxygen Carrier in the CO2 Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanism of Coal Chemical Looping Process for Syngas Production with CaSO4 Oxygen Carrier in the CO2 Atmosphere ... (5) One is to carry out first coal gasification and subsequently to introduce the syngas produced in the CLC system,(6) while the other is to feed the solid fuel directly to the fuel reactor in a CLC process. ... When oxygen supported by oxygen carrier is enough for converting the coal into CO2 and H2O, a considerable amount of heat will produce for electricity generation. ...

Yongzhuo Liu; Qingjie Guo; Yu Cheng; Ho-Jung Ryu

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Coal recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the beneficiation of coal by selective agglomeration and the beneficiated coal product thereof is disclosed wherein coal, comprising impurities, is comminuted to a particle size sufficient to allow impurities contained therein to disperse in water, an aqueous slurry is formed with the comminuted coal particles, treated with a compound, such as a polysaccharide and/or disaccharide, to increase the relative hydrophilicity of hydrophilic components, and thereafter the slurry is treated with sufficient liquid agglomerant to form a coagulum comprising reduced impurity coal.

Good, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY); Badgujar, Mohan (Williamsville, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1,1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual quarterly reports of four industrial participants of this project are included in this report. The technical emphasis continues to be the supply of coal-based feedstocks to the industrial participants. There have been several iterations of samples and feedback to meet feedstock characteristics for a wide variety of carbon products. Technology transfer and marketing of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is a continual effort. Interest in the program and positive results from the research continue to grow. In several aspects, the program is ahead of schedule.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 3, July 1, 1995--Sepember 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tasks 1 and 2 involve preparation of a Project Management Plan and establishment of a Participants Agreement/Proprietary Information Agreement for members of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC). These tasks are now complete. Task 3 is to provide a series of samples of solvent extracted coal to the CPC participants and to incorporate their feedback and suggestions into subsequent samples. As of September 30, 1995, UCAR has received two rounds of samples; Koppers has received one round of samples; ALCOA and AMOCO have not yet specified the types of samples they wish to receive; FMI has received one round of samples and has requested a rather large, five kilogram, sample of coal extracts to do multiple impregnation on a large carbon fiber preform. There are extensive communications between the WVU research team and the five industrial partners. Task 4, cooperation with MITRE on their preparation of an economic analysis of the solvent extraction, is complete. Task 5, Technology Transfer, is an on going endeavor with research team meetings, general CPC meetings, presentations of conference papers, and submission of required reports. The CPC is finally functioning as it has been envisioned, i.e., with the WVU solvent extracted coal materials being evaluated by several companies as precursor for their individual product lines. The companies are comparing the WVU materials with commercially available pitches and cokes.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY FROM COAL WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification, quench cooled and shifted to (pri- marily) H2 and CO2 via sulfur-tolerant water-gas shift (WGS with sulfur-bearing waste gases, H2S and SO2. I. INTRODUCTION Carbon-free energy carriers, H2 and electricity relative abundance, high carbon intensity, and low cost. Coal-to-H2 plants based on gasification have been

395

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A parametric study on coal gasification for the production of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this parametric study, the effects of coal and oxidiser type, air-to-fuel ratio, steam-to-fuel ratio, reactor temperature, and pressure on H2 and CO amounts at the gasifier output, H2/CO, and higher heating va...

Afsin Gungor; Murat Ozbayoglu; Cosku Kasnakoglu; Atilla Biyikoglu…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Underground Power Cables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1973 research-article Underground Power Cables J. D. Endacott Up to the present, effectively...particular, in recent years, the oil-filled cable system using cellulose paper impregnated...design of supertension underground power cable systems are considered. The limitations...

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal sulfur K-T gasification process SRC I process U. S.flow sheet of a K-T coal gasification complex for producingProduction via K-T Gasification" © CEP Aug. 78. Feed

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary economic investigations have focused on cost reduction measures in the production of syngas from coal. A spread sheet model has been developed which can determine the cost of syngas production based upon the cost of equipment and raw materials and the market value of energy and by-products. In comparison to natural gas derived syngas, coal derived syngas is much more expensive, suggesting a questionable economic status of coal derived alcohol fuels. While it is possible that use of less expensive coal or significant integration of alcohol production and electricity production may reduce the cost of coal derived syngas, it is unlikely to be less costly to produce than syngas from natural gas. Fuels evaluation is being conducted in three parts. First, standard ASTM tests are being used to analyze the blend characteristics of higher alcohols. Second, the performance characteristics of higher alcohols are being evaluated in a single-cylinder research engine. Third, the emissions characteristics of higher alcohols are being investigated. The equipment is still under construction and the measurement techniques are still being developed. Of particular interest is n-butanol, since the MoS{sub 2} catalyst produces only linear higher alcohols. There is almost no information on the combustion and emission characteristics of n-butanol, hence the importance of gathering this information in this research.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

402

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

403

Status of Coal Gasification: 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-pressure technology is important to coal gasification for several reasons. When the end product ... of high pressures in all types of coal gasification reduces the pressure drop throughout the equipment,...

F. C. Schora; W. G. Bair

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

2009 Coal Age Buyers Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The buyers guide lists more than 1200 companies mainly based in the USA, that provide equipment and services to US coal mines and coal preparation plants. The guide is subdivided by product categories.

NONE

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

2008 Coal Age buyers guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The buyers guide lists more than 1200 companies mainly based in the USA, that provide equipment and services to US coal mines and coal preparation plants. The guide is subdivided by product categories.

NONE

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Cells, Turbines, and Carbon Capture & Sequestration #12;Production Goal for Hydrogen from Coal Central Separation System PSA Membrane Membrane Carbon Sequestration Yes (87%) Yes (100%) Yes (100%) Hydrogen

407

Coal liquefaction quenching process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA); Yeh, Chung-Liang (Bethlehem, PA); Donath, Ernest E. (St. Croix, VI)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

US coal market softens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operators table some near term expansion plans, meanwhile long-term fundamentals look strong. This is one of the findings of the Coal Age Forecast 2007 survey of readers predictions on production and consumption of coal and attitudes in the coal industry. 50% of respondents expected product levels in 2007 to be higher than in 2006 and 50% described the attitude in the coal industry to be more optimistic in 2007 than in 2006. Most expenditure is anticipated on going on new equipment but levels of expenditure will be less than in 2006. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

412

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

413

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2005. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The standard part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrographic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

EIA - AEO2010 - Coal projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Projections Coal Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Coal Projections Figure 88. Coal production by region, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 89. U.S. coal production in six cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 90. Average annual minemouth coal prices by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 91. Average annual delivered coal prices in four cases, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 92. Change in U.S. coal consumption by end use in two cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Coal production increases at a slower rate than in the past In the AEO2010 Reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation, along with the startup of several CTL plants, leads to growth in coal production averaging 0.2 percent per year from 2008 to 2035. This is significantly less than the 0.9-percent average growth rate for U.S. coal production from 1980 to 2008.

417

Oil shale retorted underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale retorted underground ... Low-temperature underground retorting of oil shale produces a crude oil with many attractive properties, Dr. George R. Hill of the University of Utah told a meeting of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers last week in Los Angeles. ... Typical above-ground retorting of oil shale uses temperatures of 900° to 1100° F. because of the economic need ... ...

1967-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also be affected by higher coal prices. II "Current Factors$/year Change in Clean Coal Price, $/ton (FOB Plant) Cost ofcoal production capacities and coal prices. Coal Production

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Comanagement of coal combustion by-products and low-volume wastes: A midwestern site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from a field evaluation of the environmental effects of co-management of high-volume coal combustion residues with low-volume non-combustion wastes at a utility power plant. At the C-site, located in the midwestern United States, fly ash and bottom ash from the combustion of bituminous Indiana coal are co-managed with non-combustion wastes including pyrite rejects from coal cleaning, demineralizer regenerant, runoff water from the plant grounds, and boiler cleaning wastes. These wastes are disposed of in an unlined ash pond on site. The pond discharges primarily to the surrounding shallow groundwater with a limited surface discharge to a nearby river. Hydrological monitoring took place over a nine-month period in 1989 and 1990. Groundwater and soil samples were collected on three occasions during this time. Samples were analyzed to determine the groundwater chemistry, and soil and waste chemistry and geochemistry. Downgradient wells showed an increased concentration of several ash-derived species including boron, calcium, fluoride, potassium, sodium, strontium, and sulfate. The median sulfate concentration in downgradient wells was 350 mg/L, which exceeds the secondary drinking water limit. Statistical comparison of the