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1

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Steady-state model for estimating gas production from underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudo-one-dimensional channel model has been developed to estimate gas production from underground coal gasification. The model incorporates a zero-dimensional steady-state cavity growth submodel and models mass transfer from the bulk gas to the coal wall using a correlation for natural convection. Simulations with the model reveal that the gas calorific value is sensitive to coal reactivity and the exposed reactive surface area per unit volume in the channel. A comparison of model results with several small-scale field trials conducted at Centralia in the U.S.A. show that the model can make good predictions of the gas production and composition under a range of different operating conditions, including operation with air and steam/oxygen mixtures. Further work is required to determine whether the model formulation is also suitable for simulating large-scale underground coal gasification field trials.

Greg Perkins; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?˘ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?˘ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?˘ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?˘ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Method for Detecting Miners in Underground Coal Mine Videos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting miners in underground coal mine videos is significant for the production safety. But, the miners are very similar to the background in underground coal mine videos, it is difficult to detect. In this paper, we proposed a method to detect miners ... Keywords: moving detection, miner detection, underground coal mine video

Limei Cai; Jiansheng Qian

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Underground gasification of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a method for the gasification of coal in situ which comprises drilling at least one well or borehole from the earth's surface so that the well or borehole enters the coalbed or seam horizontally and intersects the coalbed in a direction normal to its major natural fracture system, initiating burning of the coal with the introduction of a combustion-supporting gas such as air to convert the coal in situ to a heating gas of relatively high calorific value and recovering the gas. In a further embodiment the recovered gas may be used to drive one or more generators for the production of electricity.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV); Komar, Charles A. (Uniontown, PA)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

CFD Simulation of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a process in which coal is converted to syngas in-situ. UCG has gained popularity recently as it could be used… (more)

Sarraf Shirazi, Ahad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County,...

9

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

10

Coal properties and system operating parameters for underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the model experiment for underground coal gasification, the influence of the properties for gasification agent and gasification methods on underground coal gasifier performance were studied. The results showed that pulsating gasification, to some extent, could improve gas quality, whereas steam gasification led to the production of high heating value gas. Oxygen-enriched air and backflow gasification failed to improve the quality of the outlet gas remarkably, but they could heighten the temperature of the gasifier quickly. According to the experiment data, the longitudinal average gasification rate along the direction of the channel in the gasifying seams was 1.212 m/d, with transverse average gasification rate 0.069 m/d. Experiment indicated that, for the oxygen-enriched steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio was 2:1, gas compositions remained stable, with H{sub 2} + CO content virtually standing between 60% and 70% and O{sub 2} content below 0.5%. The general regularities of the development of the temperature field within the underground gasifier and the reasons for the changes of gas quality were also analyzed. The 'autopneumatolysis' and methanization reaction existing in the underground gasification process were first proposed.

Yang, L. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

Maxwell, Bruce D.

14

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Hoe Creek Underground Gasification site occupies 80 acres of land located in Campbell County, Wyoming. The site was used to investigate the process and environmental parameters of underground coal gasification technologies in the 1970s. The Department of EnergyÂżs (DOE) current mission is limited to completing environmental remediation activities at the site. This property is owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM),

15

The estimation of the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an estimation method for the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China. It shows that there are about 6 million underground miners at present and the proportion is about 1, 1 and 4 million for national key coal mines, state-owned local coal mines, and township and private-ownership coal mines, respectively. The collective dose is about 1.65 X 10{sup 4} person-Sv y{sup -1}, of which township and private-ownership coal mines contribute about 91%. This paper also points out that the 2000 UNSCEAR report gives the number of miners of coal production and their collective dose, which are underestimated greatly because the report only includes the number of underground miners in national key coal mines, which only accounts for 1/6 of the workers all working under the best ventilation conditions in China.

Liu, F.D.; Pan, Z.Q.; Liu, S.L.; Chen, L.; Ma, J.Z.; Yang, M.L.; Wang, N.P. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Science and Technology Gaps in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is an appropriate technology to economically access the energy resources in deep and/or unmineable coal seams and potentially to extract these reserves through production of synthetic gas (syngas) for power generation, production of synthetic liquid fuels, natural gas, or chemicals. India is a potentially good area for underground coal gasification. India has an estimated amount of about 467 billion British tons (bt) of possible reserves, nearly 66% of which is potential candidate for UCG, located at deep to intermediate depths and are low grade. Furthermore, the coal available in India is of poor quality, with very high ash content and low calorific value. Use of coal gasification has the potential to eliminate the environmental hazards associated with ash, with open pit mining and with greenhouse gas emissions if UCG is combined with re-injection of the CO{sub 2} fraction of the produced gas. With respect to carbon emissions, India's dependence on coal and its projected rapid rise in electricity demand will make it one of the world's largest CO{sub 2} producers in the near future. Underground coal gasification, with separation and reinjection of the CO{sub 2} produced by the process, is one strategy that can decouple rising electricity demand from rising greenhouse gas contributions. UCG is well suited to India's current and emerging energy demands. The syngas produced by UCG can be used to generate electricity through combined cycle. It can also be shifted chemically to produce synthetic natural gas (e.g., Great Plains Gasification Plant in North Dakota). It may also serve as a feedstock for methanol, gasoline, or diesel fuel production and even as a hydrogen supply. Currently, this technology could be deployed in both eastern and western India in highly populated areas, thus reducing overall energy demand. Most importantly, the reduced capital costs and need for better surface facilities provide a platform for rapid acceleration of coal-gas-fired electric power and other high value products. In summary, UCG has several important economic and environmental benefits relevant to India's energy goals: (1) It requires no purchase of surface gasifiers, reducing capital expense substantially. (2) It requires no ash management, since ash remains in the subsurface. (3) It reduces the cost of pollution management and emits few black-carbon particulates. (4) It greatly reduces the cost of CO2 separation for greenhouse gas management, creating the potential for carbon crediting through the Kyoto Clean Development Mechanism. (5) It greatly reduces the need to mine and transport coal, since coal is used in-situ.

Upadhye, R; Burton, E; Friedmann, J

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

17

Underground Thin-Seam Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-78. 3. Motor Vehicle Facts and Figures. American Automobile Manufacturers Association, 1998. 4. F. R Gopalan Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Boston University 15 St. Mary's Street, Boston, MA-02215 commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does

18

LLNL Capabilities in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) has received renewed interest as a potential technology for producing hydrogen at a competitive price particularly in Europe and China. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) played a leading role in this field and continues to do so. It conducted UCG field tests in the nineteen-seventies and -eighties resulting in a number of publications culminating in a UCG model published in 1989. LLNL successfully employed the ''Controlled Retraction Injection Point'' (CRIP) method in some of the Rocky Mountain field tests near Hanna, Wyoming. This method, shown schematically in Fig.1, uses a horizontally-drilled lined injection well where the lining can be penetrated at different locations for injection of the O{sub 2}/steam mixture. The cavity in the coal seam therefore gets longer as the injection point is retracted as well as wider due to reaction of the coal wall with the hot gases. Rubble generated from the collapsing wall is an important mechanism studied by Britten and Thorsness.

Friedmann, S J; Burton, E; Upadhye, R

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Underground Coal Mine Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 Underground Coal Mine Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks MO LI and YUNHAO LIU Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Environment monitoring in coal mines is an important application queries under instable circumstances. A prototype is deployed with 27 mica2 motes in a real coal mine. We

Liu, Yunhao

20

Operations modeling and analysis of an underground coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, it is quite difficult to describe and model operations and conveyance systems precisely in underground coal mines because of geological components, poor visibility, unreliable installed facilities, and difficult work conditions. In this study, ...

Kanna Miwa; Soemon Takakuwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Underground coal gasification field experiment in the high-dipping coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article the experimental conditions and process of the underground gasification in the Woniushan Mine, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province are introduced, and the experimental results are analyzed. By adopting the new method of long-channel, big-section, and two-stage underground coal gasification, the daily gas production reaches about 36,000 m{sup 3}, with the maximum output of 103,700 m{sup 3}. The daily average heating value of air gas is 5.04 MJ/m{sup 3}, with 13.57 MJ/m{sup 3} for water gas. In combustible compositions of water gas, H{sub 2} contents stand at over 50%, with both CO and CH{sub 4} contents over 6%. Experimental results show that the counter gasification can form new temperature conditions and increase the gasification efficiency of coal seams.

Yang, L.H.; Liu, S.Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, W. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources & Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cyclic flow underground coal gasification process  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of in situ coal gasification for providing the product gas with an enriched concentration of carbon monoxide. The method is practiced by establishing a pair of combustion zones in spaced-apart boreholes within a subterranean coal bed and then cyclically terminating the combustion in the first of the two zones to establish a forward burn in the coal bed so that while an exothermic reaction is occurring in the second combustion zone to provide CO.sub.2 -laden product gas, an endothermic CO-forming reaction is occurring in the first combustion zone between the CO.sub.2 -laden gas percolating thereinto and the hot carbon in the wall defining the first combustion zone to increase the concentration of CO in the product gas. When the endothermic reaction slows to a selected activity the roles of the combustion zones are reversed by re-establishing an exothermic combustion reaction in the first zone and terminating the combustion in the second zone.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Underground coal mining technology: An overview and a look ahead  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining systems have kept pace with developments that have occurred in other types of mining. A diversified group of machines are now available with high horsepower motors, built-in microprocessor technology, and numerous options to satisfy miners' needs in various geological environments. The results will be a greater degree of mechanization and recovery of coal from inclined seams, thins seams, and seams mined in lifts from shallow as well as deeper deposits. This article is based on a general survey carried out by the authors to determine the current status of mechanization and systems development in underground coal mining. It indicates that the next two decades will see increasing use of longwall mining, which has already reached a high degree of sophistication.

Singhal, R.K. (Canmet Coal Research Lab., Devon, Alberta (CA)); Fytas, K. (Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)); Lama, R.D. (Kembla Coal and Coke Proprietary Ltd., Wollongong, NSW (AU))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of fluorescent lighting systems in various underground coal mines. Final report, May 1975-June 1978  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a variety of coal mining lighting projects that were funded by the Bureau of Mines to obtain underground lighting experience in support of new lighting requirements for underground coal mines. Some of the variables covered were low and high coal, narrow and wide entries, conventional and continuous mining, ac and dc power, bituminous and anthracite coal, machine mounting, and area lighting.

Ketler, A.E.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

29

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

30

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coal Combustion Products: Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products: Challenges and Opportunities American Coal Ash Association Conference St. Petersburg, FL January 27-30, 2003 Carl O. Bauer National Energy Technology Laboratory...

32

Evaluation of electricity generation from underground coal fires and waste banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temperature response factors model of vertical thermal energy extraction boreholes is presented to evaluate electricity generation from underground coal fires and waste banks. Sensitivity and life-cycle cost analyses are conducted to assess the impact of system parameters on the production of 1 MW of electrical power using a theoretical binary-cycle power plant. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the average underground temperature has the greatest impact on the exiting fluid temperatures from the ground followed by fluid flow rate and ground thermal conductivity. System simulations show that a binary-cycle power plant may be economically feasible at ground temperatures as low as 190 {sup o}C.

Chiasson, A.D.; Yavuzturk, C.; Walrath, D.E. [Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mass Balance Results for Pricetown I Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect

A mass balance model was applied to the Pricetown I test data. This model gave the values of various parameters such as water influx, percent devolatilization, percent gasification, amount of coal affected, thermal efficiency, etc., for the various phases of the test. Both hourly and daily values of the test data were used. At certain times, there was air loss to the coal seam or air gain from the coal seam as related to the underground reactor. Mass balances are modified accordingly. Realistic pyrolysis temperatures have been chosen for the different phases of the test based on the thermocouple responses. The nitrogen and argon balances gave similar results. The mass balance results showed that approximately 702 tons of coal was affected during the test. Approximately 232 tons of coal was completely gasified. The reverse combustion linkage through the virgin coal seam was dominated by the devolatilization and accounted for approximately 80% devoltilization whereas the same accounted for only 26% devolatilization during the gasification phase. During the enhanced linkage phase, the percent devolatilization ranged between that observed for the RCL and gasification phase. There was net influx of water and amounted to 0.59 barrels per ton of coal affected. The percent energy recovery for the gasification phase was 72% based on gas chromatographic data, and accounting the sensible heat of the gas and the latent heat of the water vapor in the gas.

Agarwal, A. K.; Seabaugh, P. W.; Zielinski, R. E.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Underground coal gasification: Its potential for long-term supply of sng. Occasional pub  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the viability of underground coal gasification (UCU) as a future source of substitute natural gas (SNG). The economics of commercial scale UCG technology at a western site is estimated and compared with aboveground gasification and also with an extrapolation of GRI's Baseline Projection for natural gas prices. Although much technical and economic uncertainty exists regarding UCG, the potential reserve base for unmineable coals is very large, about four times that of currently mineable coals. Assuming that only 10 percent of the 1.8 trillion tons of marginal U.S. coal resources may be amendable to UCG, this represents 1000 trillion cubic feet of potential SNG production. The UCG economics of the paper are based on a techno-economic study conducted by Williams Brothers Engineering Company; the cosponsors included GRI, Amoco Production Company, Hunt Oil Company, and Williams Brothers Engineering Company.

Hill, V.L.; Burnham, K.B.; Barone, S.P.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Ashby, A.B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A review of the factors influencing the physicochemical characteristics of underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the physicochemical characteristics of the oxidation zone, the reduction zone, and the destructive distillation and dry zone in the process of underground coal gasification (UCG) were explained. The effect of such major factors as temperature, coal type, water-inrush or -intake rate, the quantity and quality of wind blasting, the thickness of coal seams, operational pressure, the length, and the section of gasification gallery on the quality of the underground gas and their interrelationship were discussed. Research showed that the temperature conditions determined the underground gas compositions; the appropriate water-inrush or -intake rate was conducive to the improvement in gas heat value; the properties of the gasification agent had an obvious effect on the compositions and heat value of the product gas. Under the cyclically changing pressure, heat losses decreased by 60%, with the heat efficiency and gasification efficiency being 1.4 times and 2 times those of constant pressure, respectively. The test research further proved that the underground gasifier with a long channel and a big cross-section, to a large extent, improved the combustion-gasification conditions.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet technology which was acquired under a license agreement in 1975, is a continuation of the field testing program to examine the feasibility of in situ lignite gasification in Texas which began with a 27-day test burn at a site near Fairfield in August of 1976. The objectives of the Tennessee Colony Project are to examine the economic, technological and environmental aspects of a commercial project. The Project which began in August of 1978 utilizes air as the oxidizing agent and is comprised of two channels of gasification operating simultaneously. The test is presently still in progress and producing gas with a heat content in the range of 8-100 Btu.

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mathematical modelling of underground coal gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mathematical models were developed to understand cavity growth mechanisms, heat and mass transfer in combination with chemical reaction, and the factors which affect gas production… (more)

Perkins, Gregory Martin Parry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

39

Modeling of contaminant transport in underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study and discuss the impact of contaminants produced from underground coal gasification on groundwater, a coupled seepage-thermodynamics-transport model for underground gasification was developed on the basis of mass and energy conservation and pollutant-transport mechanisms, the mathematical model was solved by the upstream weighted multisell balance method, and the model was calibrated and verified against the experimental site data. The experiment showed that because of the effects of temperature on the surrounding rock of the gasification panel the measured pore-water-pressure was higher than the simulated one; except for in the high temperature zone where the simulation errors of temperature, pore water pressure, and contaminant concentration were relatively high, the simulation values of the overall gasification panel were well fitted with the measured values. As the gasification experiment progressed, the influence range of temperature field expanded, the gradient of groundwater pressure decreased, and the migration velocity of pollutant increased. Eleven months and twenty months after the test, the differences between maximum and minimum water pressure were 2.4 and 1.8 MPa, respectively, and the migration velocities of contaminants were 0.24-0.38 m/d and 0.27-0.46 m/d, respectively. It was concluded that the numerical simulation of the transport process for pollutants from underground coal gasification was valid. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Lanhe Yang; Xing Zhang [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geosciences

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Coal combustion products (CCPs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

combustion products (CCPs) combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the largest segment of U.S. electricity generation (45 percent in 2010), finding a sustainable solution for CCPs is an important environmental challenge. When properly managed, CCPs offer society environmental and economic benefits without harm to public health and safety. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has made an important contribution in this regard. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Coal Combustion Products Fossil Energy Research Benefits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal and CoalBiomass to Liquids Alternate Hydrogen Production In the Alternate Production technology pathway, clean syngas from coal is converted to high-hydrogen-content liquid...

42

Consensus Coal Production Forecast for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consensus Coal Production Forecast for West Virginia 2009-2030 Prepared for the West Virginia Summary 1 Recent Developments 2 Consensus Coal Production Forecast for West Virginia 10 Risks References 27 #12;W.Va. Consensus Coal Forecast Update 2009 iii List of Tables 1. W.Va. Coal Production

Mohaghegh, Shahab

43

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

44

Siting of prison complex above abandoned underground coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses in detail the process undertaken to mitigate the effects of any future mine subsidence on prison structures proposed above old abandoned underground workings. The site for a proposed prison complex purchased by the state of Indiana was located in west-central Indiana and was undermined by an old abandoned room and pillar mine. Based on a study of the mine map and subsurface verification of the extent of mining it was determined that all prison buildings and important structures could be placed above solid coal to the north. However, one masonry building was located within the potential draw zone of mine works that still contained significant mine voids. Based on empirical data the subsidence potential was estimated and the building was designed accordingly to be mine subsidence resistant. It was decided that a phase 2 prison complex should be constructed adjacent to and just south of the phase 1 complex. This complex would be directly above the underground workings. Subsequently, an extensive subsurface investigation program was undertaken to (1) ascertain whether or not mine areas where buildings would be located were already collapsed and thus only nominal, if any, subsidence could occur in the future and (2) verify the presence of solid coal areas within the mine as indicated on the mine map. Based on all the site information gathered subsidence profiles were developed from an empirical database of subsidence events in the Illinois coal basin. As a result of this work many structures on the site required no or nominal subsidence considerations. However, for others that could be affected potentially by future subsidence movement preliminary subsidence resistant designs were completed using the expected level of potential subsidence movement.

Marino, G.G. [Marino Engineering Associates, Inc., Urbana, IL (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium  

SciTech Connect

The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

47

Application of discrete element method to the analysis of free-flow outlet of coal from high coals at underground coal mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical model is developed on the basis of the Discrete Elements Method for investigation of processes of gravitational flow of the granular materials. The problem about free-flow outlet of coal from high coals in sublevel caving systems is ... Keywords: discrete element modeling, granular medium, numerical simulation, powered support, rock massif, underground coal mining

Vladimir I. Klishin; Sergey V. Klishin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Using Echo State Networks for Anomaly Detection in Underground Coal Mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of identifying anomalies in monitoring critical gas concentrations using a sensor network in an underground coal mine. In this domain, one of the main problems is a provision of mine specific anomaly detection, with cyclical ... Keywords: sensor networks, anomaly detection, recurrent neural networks, echo state networks, bayesian networks, coal mines

Oliver Obst; X. Rosalind Wang; Mikhail Prokopenko

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOEIJEA-1219 DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION CAMPBELL COUNTY, WYOMING October 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process. or service by trade name, trademark, manufac-

50

Thallium in Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thallium is a naturally occurring trace element that is present in coal and coal combustion products (CCPs). Thallium is of interest because it has a relatively low maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water. This Technical Brief provides EPRI data on thallium in CCPs, along with general information on its occurrence, health effects, and treatment. Most of the information presented is summarized from the 2008 EPRI Technical Report 1016801, Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: ..

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

52

Hazards of black blasting powder in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

To help reduce explosion hazards in coal mines using dangerous black blasting powder, this circular outlines precautions designed to increase the safety factor in using this explosive.

Harrington, D.; Warncke, R.G.

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analysis of methane producing communities within underground coal beds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Powder River Basin in southeastern Montana and northeast Wyoming is the largest source of coal mined in the United States but most of the… (more)

Barnhart, Elliott Paul.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Research of Cluster-OFDM System for Underground Coal Mine PLCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power line communication (PLC) is one of the most attractive communication methods for in-home networks. However, the emissions of unwanted electric waves from PLC system, noise, inter-symbol interference (ISI) and inter-channel interference (ICI) cause ... Keywords: Cluster-OFDM, underground coal mine, power line communication

Shaoliang Wei; Haijun Wang; Fengyu Cheng; Yimin Chen; Rujun Han

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Short-delay blasting in underground coal mines. Information Circular/1986  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines has conducted research to determine whether the total elapsed delay time for blasting bituminous coal in underground mines could be safely expanded beyond the present 500-ms limitation without igniting a methane or methane-coal dust atmosphere. The results indicated that the increase of total delay from 500 to 1,000 ms had no detectable effect on safety relative to incendivity as long as permissible practices were observed in all other aspects. Research was also conducted to evaluate the safety of 18-in hole spacing for delay blasting in coal relative to misfires.

Mainiero, R.J.; Verakis, H.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators approach meets the requirements for cutting straight entries and mining the proper amount of coal per cycle. Introduction The mining of soft materials, such as coal, is a large industry. Worldwide, a total of 435 million

Guestrin, Carlos

57

"Weekly U.S. Coal Production Overview"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" "Report Released: August 15, 2013" "Next Release Date: August 22, 2013" "Weekly U.S. Coal Production Overview" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing","Week...

58

Sources of productivity decline in US coal mining, 1972-1977  

SciTech Connect

Following a discussion of coal-mining technology, estimates of production functions for surface and underground coal mines are used to estimate mine productivity, to explain productivity differentials across mines, and to assess the importance of several assumed sources of productivity decline in the industry. While coal-mining techniques and equipment vary substantially between underground and surface mining, the effects of learning-by-doing appear to dominate the resource-exhaustion effects in both. The authors project that detrimental productivity effects of surface mining due to resource extraction will continue to be offset by learning by doing and other positive productivity effects until the year 2003. However, rapid growth of either surface or underground mining will hasten the appearance of detrimental resource-exhaustion effects. 9 references, 8 tables.

Kruvant, W.J. (General Accounting Office, Washington, DC); Moody, C.E. Jr.; Valentine, P.L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

60

Rock mass response to the decline in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical problems of mining in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin were studied on the basis of longterm experience gained from seismological observations. They could serve as reasonable models of rock-mass response to temporary reduction and gradual decline in mining activities and mine closure.

Holub, K. [Academy of Science in Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Electrochemical engines for power generation and load-leveling at sites for underground coal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of fuel generation by underground processing of coal with commercial consumption of the fuel at the mine site offers highly efficient utilization of energy. Commercial versions of Li/I/sub 2/ electrochemical engines to be used in one way of integration are postulated, described and evaluated on the basis of laboratory and theoretical studies. These engines are shown to be valuable for electric power generation and storage in connection with underground coal conversion (UCC) in arid land such as Northwestern New Mexico. Such engines, combined with UCC, could convert roughly 26 percent of the energy as pyrolysis hydrocarbons. The engines also provide load leveling so that peak power generators would be unnecessary.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Underground-coal-mine lighting handbook. Part 1. Background. Information Circular/1986  

SciTech Connect

This Bureau of Mines report and its companion report (Information Circular 9074) were prepared as a complete reference on underground-coal-mine lighting. The report discusses the fundamentals of light and its interrelationship with the visual process. The purpose of the report is to insure an understanding of the numerous complex and interrelated factors that must be considered to design and implement a mine lighting system that will satisfy human needs for good vision and comfort. Topics include history, objectives, and technical considerations of coal-mine lighting; light physics; light and vision relationships; and disability and discomfort glare.

Lewis, W.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

65

Underground Backfilling Technology for Waste Dump Disposal in Coal Mining District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China is one of the few countries over the world which uses coal as the main energy, and its coal production has become more than one third of the world. To cope with the serious problems caused by the coal exploitation such as waste discharge, environment ... Keywords: Coal mining district, Waste dumps, Environment destruction, Deep vertical feeding system, Fully mechanized longwall solid material backfilling mining, Backfilling equipment

Huang Yanli; Zhang Jixiong; Liu Zhan; Zhang Qiang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Low productivity in American coal mining: causes and cures. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies the factors responsible for depressed productivity in the U.S. coal mining industry. GAO analysis revealed that the fall in underground mining productivity since 1969 is closely tied to poor labor-management relations, 1974 union contract requirements, and Federal mine safety and health regulations. State reclamation laws and the opening of new surface mines lowered productivity in surface mining. Coal mining technology has not advanced sufficiently to offset the loss due to these causes.

Not Available

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

State-of-the-art study of resource characterization and planning for underground coal mining. Final technical report as of June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

With the rapid developments taking place in coal mining technology and due to high investment costs, optimization of the structure of underground coal mines is crucial to the success of the mining project. The structure of a mine, once it is developed, cannot be readily changed and has a decisive influence on the productivity, safety, economics, and production capacity of the mine. The Department of Energy desires to ensure that the resource characterization and planning activity for underground coal mining will focus on those areas that offer the most promise of being advanced. Thus, this project was undertaken by Management Engineers Incorporated to determine the status in all aspects of the resource characterization and planning activities for underground coal mining as presently performed in the industry. The study team conducted a comprehensive computerized literature search and reviewed the results. From this a selection of the particularly relevant sources were annotated and a reference list was prepared, catalogued by resource characterization and mine planning activity. From this data, and discussions with industry representatives, academia, and research groups, private and federal, an assessment and evaluation was made of the state-of-the-art of each element in the resource characterization and mine planning process. The results of this analysis lead to the identifcation of areas requiring research and, specifically, those areas where DOE research efforts may be focused.

Walton, D.; Ingham, W.; Kauffman, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Boron in Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Brief summarizes EPRI data on boron in CCPs, along with general information on its occurrence, health effects, and treatment. Much of the information presented is summarized from the 2005 EPRI technical report 1005258, Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Boron, and is updated where appropriate.

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast For  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast For West Virginia: 2011 Update Prepared for the West December 2011 © Copyright 2011 WVU Research Corporation #12;#12;W.Va. Consensus Coal Forecast Update 2011 i Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 Recent Developments 3 Consensus Coal Production And Price Forecast

Mohaghegh, Shahab

72

Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the production of a synthetic crude oil product by direct contact of coal with an appropriate catalyst, with abundant domestic coal resources but lim- ited oil and gas resources, the conversion of coal into liquid in South Africa (for Fischer- Tropsch fuels). Also, the US Department of Energy an- nounced its financial

73

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Table 6. Coal production and number of mines by State and coal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing State and...

75

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Underground coal mine monitoring with wireless sensor networks - article no. 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment monitoring in coal mines is an important application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) that has commercial potential. We discuss the design of a Structure-Aware Self-Adaptive WSN system, SASA. By regulating the mesh sensor network deployment and formulating a collaborative mechanism based on a regular beacon strategy, SASA is able to rapidly detect structure variations caused by underground collapses. We further develop a sound and robust mechanism for efficiently handling queries under instable circumstances. A prototype is deployed in a real coal mine. We present our implementation experiences as well as the experimental results. To better evaluate the scalability and reliability of SASA, we also conduct a large-scale trace-driven simulation based on real data collected from the experiments.

Li, M.; Liu, Y.H. [Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Hong Kong (China)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.

Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low productivity in American coal mining: causes and cures  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies the factors responsible for depressed productivity in the US coal mining industry. GAO analysis revealed that the fall in underground mining productivity since 1969 is closely tied to poor labor-management relations, 1974 union contract requirements, and federal mine safety and health regulation. State reclamation laws and the opening of new surface mines lowered productivity in surface mining. Coal mining technology has not advanced sufficiently to offset the loss due to these causes. Federal and state regulations have been successful in reducing both fatalities and the environmental costs of coal mining. Thus far, lower productivity is a price the nation has paid for imposed health, safety, and environmental regulations. Industry and public officials must find ways to offset the effects of regulation on productivity without compromising safety or environmental quality. GAO recommends increased federal efforts to promote the development and greater use of safe, productivity technologies, and improved labor management relations. Because of the importance of higher productivity, GAO plans to send the report to knowledgeable individuals to solicit their views on the report's conclusions, and to request suggestions on how they might be implemented. If appropriate, GAO will submit further recommendations in a subsequent report.

Staats, E.B.

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi coal mine site, Thailand: Volume 1. Progress report, December 1--31, 1995; Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The objective of this report was to determine the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of developing, demonstrating, and commercializing underground coal gasification (UCG) at the Krabi coal mine site in Southern Thailand. This is Volume 1, the Progress Report for the period December 1, 1995, through December 31, 1995.

Young, B.C.; Schmit, C.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dust Mitigation Methods for Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate coal combustion products (CCPs) requiring management for storage and disposal. These products are often stored in facilities such as landfills or placed in temporary storage pads for short or long durations. At these facilities, there is a need to address dust mitigation concerns in order to comply with environmental permits, ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Coal Production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

03 03 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279603 Varnish cache server Coal Production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

84

A Physicochemical Evaluation of the HQ-1 Core from the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Core samples of coal and rock were obtained from the HQ-1 environmental test well at the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site. A comprehensive analytical program was performed to characterize the coal samples. The rocks associated with the coals are composed of clay size material containing low amounts of organic matter and hydrocarbon gas relative to the coal seams. The fine grained sediment above and below the coal seams appear to be an effective gas seal. The coals were encountered in two intervals of 1 foot and 6 feet thickness separated by 2 feet of shale. The coals are classified as high volatile A or B bituminous based on vitrinite reflectance, fixed carbon, and calorific value. Coal maceral analysis shows that the coal is heterogeneous in petrographic properties. The vitrinite group is the predominant maceral constituent. Fusinite, semi-fusinite, massive micrinite, and sporinite are present in varying amounts. The distribution of porous fusinite layers within the coal seams may be important in the reverse linkage stage of the gasification process. The coal in the bottom seam contains an average of 45.6 standard cubic feet of free methane per ton of coal. This methane may assist in initiating the gasification process. Thermal Conductivity and Laser Thermal Diffusivity experiments were also performed on selected coal samples as well as on samples of the grout used in the instrumentation wells. While the thermal conductivity values were influenced by the tars and oils generated during the heating of the coal, the laser thermal diffusivity values were obtained at sufficiently low temperatures to minimize the influence of the tars and oils.

Zielinski, R. E.; Larson, R. J.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Pages that link to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) Jump to:...

87

Changes related to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) Jump to:...

88

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

89

Coal Combustion Products Extension Program  

SciTech Connect

This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to 40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be expanded at OSU, with support from state and federal agencies, utilities, trade groups, and the university, to focus on the following four specific areas of promise: (a) Expanding use in proven areas (such as use of fly ash in concrete); (b) Removing or reducing regulatory and perceptual barriers to use (by working in collaboration with regulatory agencies); (c) Developing new or under-used large-volume market applications (such as structural fills); and (d) Placing greater emphasis on FGD byproducts utilization.

Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 2. The Hanna I field test  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Based on the recommendations of A.D. Little, Inc. in a 1971 report prepared for the US Bureau of Mines, the Hanna I test represented the first field test in reestablishing a field program by the US Bureau of Mines. The test was directed toward comparing results from a thick subbitiminous coal seam with those obtained during the field test series conducted at Gorgas, AL, in the 1940's and 1950's. Hanna I was conducted from March 1973 through February 1974. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

92

U.S. monthly coal production increases  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. coal production in July totaled 88.9 million short tons, the highest level since August 2012, according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information...

93

Proceedings, twenty-fourth annual international Pittsburgh coal conference  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered include: gasification technologies; coal production and preparation; combustion technologies; environmental control technologies; synthesis of liquid fuels, chemicals, materials and other non-fuel uses of coal; hydrogen from coal; advanced synthesis gas cleanup; coal chemistry, geosciences and resources; Fischer-Tropsch technology; coal and sustainability; global climate change; gasification (including underground gasification); materials, instrumentation and controls; and coal utilisation byproducts.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CO2 Storage in Shallow Underground and Surface Coal Mines: Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The looming global energy and environmental crises underscore a pressing need for the revision of current energy policies. The dominating albeit somewhat optimistic public perception is that hundreds of years worth of coal available for power generation will offset the decline of oil and gas reserves. Although use of coal accounts for half of U.S. electricity generation and for a quarter of world energy consumption, it has been perceived until recently as unwelcomed by environmentalists and legislators. For coal power generation to be properly considered, CO2 and other greenhouse gas (GHG) generation and deposition must be addressed to assuage global climate change concerns. Capturing and sequestering CO2 emissions is one of the principal modes of carbon management. Herein we will suggest a novel process that includes capturing GHG in abundant materials, which can be facilitated by controlled sequential heating and cooling of these solids. By taking advantage of the properties of waste materials generated during coal production and the exhaust heat generated by the power plants, such an approach permits the integration of the entire CO2 cycle, from generation to deposition. Coupling coal extraction/preparation with power generation facilities would improve the economics of “zero-emission” power plants due to the proximity of all the involved facilities.

Romanov, V.N.; Ackman, T.E.; Soong, Yee; Kleinmann, R.L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Separation of solids from coal liquefaction products using sonic waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. This project seeks to improve the effectiveness of coal liquefaction by novel application of sonic and ultrasonic energy to separation of solids from coal liquefaction streams.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

98

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coAl utilizAtion By-Product Processing PlAnt (withdrAwn) Project Description The University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF) of Lexington, Kentucky, in partnership...

99

Coal combustion products 2007 production and use report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Coal Ash Association's 2007 Annual Coal Combustion Products (CCP) are derived from data from more than 170 power plants. The amount of CCPs used was 40.55%, a decrease of 2.88% from 2006, attributed to reduced fuel burn and a decrease in demand in the building industry. Figures are given for the production of fly ash, flue gas desulfurization gypsum, bottom ash, FBC ash and boiler slag. The article summarises results of the survey. 1 ref., 1 tab.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China  

SciTech Connect

More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Products: Molybdenum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the environmental occurrence and behavior of molybdenum (Mo), with specific emphasis on Mo derived from coal combustion products (CCPs). Included are discussions of Mo's occurrence in water and soil, potential human health and ecological effects, geochemistry, occurrence in CCPs, leaching characteristics from CCPs, measurement techniques, and treatment/remediation options.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coal and bituminous reserves  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 of this book contains sections entitled: other coal processes; underground processing of coal; and other important energy sources.

NONE

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Coal combustion products: trash or treasure?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products can be a valuable resource to various industries. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) collects data on production and uses of coal combustion products (CCPs). 122.5 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2004. The article discusses the results of the ACCA's 2004 survey. Fly ash is predominantly used as a substitute for Portland cement; bottom ash for structural fill, embankments and paved road cases. Synthetic gypsum from the FGD process is commonly used in wallboard. Plant owners are only likely to have a buyer for a portion of their CCPs. Although sale of hot water (from Antelope Valley Station) from condensers for use in a fish farm to raise tilapia proved unviable, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant which manufactures natural gas from lignite produces a wide range of products including anhydrous ammonia, phenol, krypton, carbon dioxide (for enhanced oil recovery), tar oils and liquid nitrogen. ACCA's goal is to educate people about CCPs and how to make them into useful products, and market them, in order to reduce waste disposal and enhance revenue. The article lists members of the ACCA. 2 photos., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

107

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management facilities with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ecological Effects of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive amount of research has been conducted to evaluate the potential adverse effects of coal-combustion products (CCPs) on the health of ecosystems. The objective of this project was to evaluate the ecological effects of CCPs and to identify the primary CCP-related factors that have the potential to pose the most substantial risk to ecological receptors. To meet this objective, the investigators conducted a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed chemical and toxicological literature on the eco...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Proceedings, twenty-five annual international Pittsburgh coal conference  

SciTech Connect

The conference theme was 'coal - energy, environment and sustainable development'. The topics covered energy and environmental issues, and technologies related to coal and its byproducts. These included: gasification, hydrogen from coal, combustion technologies, coal production and preparation, synthesis of liquid fuels, gas turbines and fuel cells for synthesis gas and hydrogen applications, coal chemistry and geosciences, global climate change, underground coal gasification, environmental control technologies, and coal utilization byproducts.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

EIA - Weekly U.S. Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Production U.S. Coal Production Report No.: DOE/EIA 0218/50 Report Released: December 19, 2013 Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 Week Ended Year-To-Date1 52 Weeks Ended Coal-Producing Region and State (thousand short tons) 12/14/2013 12/7/2013 12/15/2012 12/14/2013 12/14/2012 Percent Change 12/14/2013 12/15/2012 Percent Change Alabama 355 351 338 17,644 18,754 -5.9 18,343 19,394 -5.4 Alaska 42 41 45 1,675 1,964 -14.7 1,764 2,045 -13.7 Arizona 151 149 141 7,328 7,226 1.4 7,596 7,513 1.1 Arkansas 1 1 3 37 92 -59.3 44 96 -54.6 Colorado 487 473 419 22,198 27,630 -19.7 23,090 28,655 -19.4 Illinois 997 983 890 50,272 46,828 7.4 52,170 48,271 8.1 Indiana 737 728 693 36,141 35,248 2.5 37,590 36,686 2.5

112

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER SOURCES An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM of natural gas, which is mostly CH4, occurs through natural gas production, oil production, and coal mining

Delucchi, Mark

113

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids - Alternate Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification...

114

Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products Sowmya Bulusu1 ; Ahmet H. Aydilek that occurs when pyrite that is present in abandoned coal mines comes in contact with oxygen and water, which subject headings: Remedial action; Acid mine water; Mines; Coals; Recycling; Maryland; Fly ash

Aydilek, Ahmet

115

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Rail traffic reflects more oil production, less coal-fired ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The record increase in U.S. crude oil production during 2012 and the significant decline in coal use for domestic electricity generation were reflected in the ...

119

Figure 51. World production of liquids from biomass, coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 51. World production of liquids from biomass, coal, and natural gas in three cases, 2011 and 2040 (million barrels per day) Subject

120

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

122

Flooded Underground Coal Mines: A Significant Source of Inexpensive Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many mining regions in the United States contain extensive areas of flooded underground mines. The water within these mines represents a significant and widespread opportunity for extracting low-grade, geothermal energy. Based on current energy prices, geothermal heat pump systems using mine water could reduce the annual costs for heating to over 70 percent compared to conventional heating methods (natural gas or heating oil). These same systems could reduce annual cooling costs by up to 50 percent over standard air conditioning in many areas of the country. (Formatted full-text version is released by permission of publisher)

Watzlaf, G.R.; Ackman, T.E.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

PRODUCTION AND SCREENING OF CARBON PRODUCTS PRECURSORS FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have examined effects of blending a raw coal extract (EXT) with an extracted coal-tar pitch (ECTP). Previous reports were concerned with the addition of 15 wt% EXT, or less, on the physical characteristics of the blend and on the development of optical texture following carbonization. Two additional blends of ECTP and EXT were prepared at the 30 and 50 wt% EXT content using a procedure already described. The characteristics of the blends are presented. The density for these blended materials is not much different than the density for the blends reported earlier. The softening point temperature for the 30 wt% EXT increased to over 200 C while the softening point temperature for the 50 wt% EXT blend was too high to be determined by the Mettler method. Coke yields approximately follow the law of mixtures. The optical texture of the green cokes for the 30 and 50 wt% EXT blends is shown. Though the optical texture of the green cokes was not significantly affected where the level of EXT is 15 wt% or less, larger proportions of EXT exert a marked reduction in anisotropy. The co-processing of coal with petroleum residues or other heavy hydrocarbons at elevated temperature and pressure has received considerable attention in the research community as a means to upgrade simultaneously coal and byproducts. Heavy hydrocarbons can function as sources of hydrogen, as well as performing as a medium for dissolution and dispersion of coal fragments. However, the focus of much of the prior research has been on developing fuels, distillable liquids, or synthetic crudes. Comparatively little effort has been deliberately directed toward the production of heavier, non-distillable materials which could perform as binder and extender pitches, impregnants, or feedstocks for cokes and other carbons.

Caulton L. Irwin

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the element boron as it occurs in leachate at coal combustion product management sites. Included are discussions of boron's occurrence in soils and water, concentrations in coal combustion products (CCPs), CCP leaching characteristics, effects on human health and ecology, geochemistry, and treatment options for removal from water.

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

127

Weekly Coal Production by State - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended October 12, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 6.7 percent higher than ...

128

Weekly Coal Production by State - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended November 02, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 19.3 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 0.1 percent higher than ...

129

Panel data analysis of U.S. coal productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze labor productivity in coal mining in the United States using indices of productivity change associated with the concepts of panel data modeling. This approach is valuable when there is extensive heterogeneity ...

Stoker, Thomas M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 13. Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Alabama w w - - w w 14,594 85.99 Arkansas w w - - - - w w Colorado w w - - w w w w Illinois 24,811 76.45 - - 35,506 67.22 60,317 71.02 Indiana 16,445 94.65 - - - -

131

NETL: CCPI - Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant - Project Brief PDF-78KB University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Ghent, Kentucky PROJECT FACT SHEET Advanced...

132

Asia leads growth in global coal production since 1980 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal production was up about 3.8 billion short tons (91%) from 1980 through 2010. China spearheaded overall growth in coal production, increasing 415% over the ...

133

Horizontal hydraulic conductivity estimates for intact coal barriers between closed underground mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unmined blocks of coal, called barriers, separate and restrict horizontal leakage between adjacent bituminous coal mines. Understanding the leakage rate across such barriers is important in planning mine closure and strongly affects recharge calculations for postmining flooding. This study presents upper-limit estimates for hydraulic conductivity (K) of intact barriers in two closed mines at moderate depth (75-300 m) in the Pittsburgh coal basin. The estimates are based on pumping rates from these mines for the years ranging from 1992 to 2000. The two mines do not approach the outcrop and are sufficiently deep that vertical infiltration is thought to be negligible. Similarly, there are no saturated zones on the pumped mines' side of shared barriers with other mines, and therefore pumping is the only outflow. Virtually all of the pumping is attributed to leakage across or over the top of barriers shared with upgradient flooded mines. The length of shared barriers totals 24 km for the two mines, and the barriers range in thickness from 15 to 50 m. K values calculated independently for each of the 9 years of the pumping record ranged from 0.037 m/d to 0.18 m/d using an isotropic model of barrier flow. Using an anisotropic model for differential K in the face cleat (K{sub f}) and butt cleat (K{sub b}) directions, results range from 0.074 to 0.34 m/d for K{sub f} and from 0.022 to 0.099 m/d for K{sub b}.

Mccoy, K.J.; Donovan, J.J.; Leavitt, B.R. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Thallium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the environmental behavior of thallium. Included are discussions of thallium’s occurrence in soil and water, occurrence in coal and coal combustion products (CCPs), CCP leaching characteristics, effects on human health and ecology, geochemistry, and treatment/remediation options.

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Beryllium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the environmental behavior of the element beryllium. It includes discussions of beryllium8217s occurrence in soils and water, concentrations in coal and coal combustion products (CCPs), geochemistry, mobility in groundwater, toxicology, and treatment options for removal from water.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

138

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

139

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

140

System for analyzing coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect

A system for analyzing constituents of coal-derived materials comprises three adsorption columns and a flow-control arrangement which permits separation of both aromatic and polar hydrocarbons by use of two eluent streams.

Dinsmore, Stanley R. (Norris, TN); Mrochek, John E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

System for analyzing coal-liquefaction products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for analyzing constituents of coal-derived materials comprises three adsorption columns and a flow-control arrangement which permits separation of both aromatic and polar hydrocarbons by use of two eluent streams. 4 figures.

Dinsmore, S.R.; Mrochek, J.E.

1982-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pitch Production Using Solvent Extraction of Coal: Suitability as Carbon Anode Precursor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Albertan coal has been used to produce extracts as precursor for production of anode coke. Coal extractability was studied using digestion with Tetralin in a… (more)

Mohammad Ali Pour, Mehdi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal mining technology, economics and policy 1991  

SciTech Connect

The 1991 session papers from the American Mining Congress Coal Convention covered a variety of technical, economic, regulatory, and health and safety issues. The papers were grouped into the following categories: Coal mine ventilation technology; Coal policy; Coal utilization -- problems and opportunities; Dealing with spontaneous combustion; Energy taxation; Environmental issues; Ergonomics in the underground mine environment; Ground control technology; Lessons in compromise: the need to improve our communications strategies; Management - improving operations through organizational change; Productivity forum - how to improve the bottom line; Reclamation technology; Safety and health; Subsidence; Surface mining - technology and reclamation policy; Underground haulage - from the face to the surface.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

146

Numerical study on convection diffusion for gasification agent in underground coal gasification. Part I: establishment of mathematical models and solving method  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this article is to discuss the distribution law of the gasification agent concentration in a deep-going way during underground coal gasification and the new method of solving the problem for the convection diffusion of the gas. In this paper, the basic features of convection diffusion for the gas produced in underground coal gasification are studied. On the basis of the model experiment, through the analysis of the distribution and patterns of variation for the fluid concentration field in the process of the combustion and gasification of the coal seams within the gasifier, the 3-D non-linear unstable mathematical models on the convection diffusion for oxygen are established. In order to curb such pseudo-physical effects as numerical oscillation and surfeit which frequently occurred in the solution of the complex mathematical models, the novel finite unit algorithm, the upstream weighted multi-cell balance method is advanced in this article, and its main derivation process is introduced.

Yang, L.H.; Ding, Y.M. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

148

First Large Scale Production of Low Radioactivity Argon From Underground Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first large-scale production of low radioactivity argon from underground gas wells. Low radioactivity argon is of general interest, in particular for the construction of large scale WIMP dark matter searches and detectors of reactor neutrinos for non-proliferation efforts. Atmospheric argon has an activity of about 1 Bq/kg from the decays of 39Ar; the concentration of 39Ar in the underground argon we are collecting is at least a factor of 100 lower than this value. The argon is collected from a stream of gas from a CO2 well in southwestern Colorado with a Vacuum Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant. The gas from the well contains argon at a concentration of 400-600 ppm, and the VPSA plant produces an output stream with an argon concentration at the level of 30,000-50,000 ppm (3-5%) in a single pass. This gas is sent for further processing to Fermilab where it is purified by cryogenic distillation. The argon production rate is presently 0.5 kg/day.

Back, Henning O; Condon, Christopher; de Haas, Ernst; Ford, Richard; Galbiati, Cristiano; Goretti, Augusto; Hohman, Tristan; Inanni, Andrea; Loer, Ben; Montanari, David; Nelson, Allan; Pocar, Andrea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

\\Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a common constituent in coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) and can be found in CCP leachate. The chemical profile provided here assembles and summarizes existing information on selenium’s environmental characteristics, which are focused on conditions associated with CCP management. Extensive references provide a means for obtaining more detailed information on specific subject areas. The following topics are covered: 1) occurrence and sources of selenium; 2) environmental ...

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Comparison of Coal Combustion Products to Other Common Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical characteristics of coal combustion products (CCPs) are often discussed with reference to geologic materials and other industrial by-products; however, there are no systematic comparisons of these materials in the literature. This report compares the ranges in chemical characteristics of fly ash, bottom ash, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to the ranges observed for soil and rock, as well as other common products and by-products.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal  

SciTech Connect

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge form 27 October 2010 Accepted 27 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Coal reserves Coal resources Coal production estimates IPCC Logistic model Cumulative normal model An estimate

Weinreb, Sander

154

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

155

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COAL MARKET MODULE COAL MARKET MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Production Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Distribution Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Export Component The coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. The CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply

157

CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

John M. Andresen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Production of Substitute Natural Gas from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research program was to develop and demonstrate a novel gasification technology to produce substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. The technology relies on a continuous sequential processing method that differs substantially from the historic methanation or hydro-gasification processing technologies. The thermo-chemistry relies on all the same reactions, but the processing sequences are different. The proposed concept is appropriate for western sub-bituminous coals, which tend to be composed of about half fixed carbon and about half volatile matter (dry ash-free basis). In the most general terms the process requires four steps (1) separating the fixed carbon from the volatile matter (pyrolysis); (2) converting the volatile fraction into syngas (reforming); (3) reacting the syngas with heated carbon to make methane-rich fuel gas (methanation and hydro-gasification); and (4) generating process heat by combusting residual char (combustion). A key feature of this technology is that no oxygen plant is needed for char combustion.

Andrew Lucero

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Coal Using Preliminary Assumptions 2-15 2.5.1 Approach to Cost Estimating 2-16 2.5.2 Production Costs (Operation and Maintenance) 2-16 2.5.3 Consumables 2-17 2.5.4 Byproduct...

160

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to the production of gaseous hydrogen with carbonous materials in the presence of steam by the steam-carbon reaction, and more particularly to such generation of hydrogen by rapidly comminuting coal in the presence of high-temperature steam.

Paulson, L.E.

1986-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Arsenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the environmental behavior of arsenic. Included are discussions of arsenic’s occurrence in soil and water, occurrence in coal combustion products (CCPs), CCP leaching characteristics, effects on human health and ecology, geochemistry, and treatment/remediation options.

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

163

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

164

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). Figure 19. Coal Market Module Demand Regions Figure 20. Coal Market Module Supply Regions

165

Health Effects of Inhalation of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential human health effects of inhaled coal combustion products (CCPs), which consist of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products. The focus is on as-managed CCPs, with evaluation of the potential effects of exposure through fugitive emissions from storage facilities. Because the literature pertaining to bottom ash, boiler slag, and FGD solids is scarce, this review draws almost entirely from studies of fly ash as a surrogate particulate ma...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Best practices for underground diesel emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US NIOSH and the Coal Diesel Partnership recommend practices for successfully using ceramic filters to control particulate emitted from diesel-powered equipment used in underground coal mines. 3 tabs.

Patts, L.; Brnich, M. Jr. [NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlook’s Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

169

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

170

Production of hydrogen and coproducts from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between the TGA and CPU data, a number of general conclusions have been developed, regarding both selection of catalysts and selection of the most effective and economic approaches to scaled-up process development. (Hauserman, 1992) These conclusions are in an order that is not meant to imply relative importance. (1) Impregnation of Wyodak coal with KOH, at a potassium-to-fixed carbon ratio of around 0.2 or greater, roughly doubles the gasification reaction rate in fluidized beds of limestone. Soluble potassium, in any convenient form, is recommended as a rate-enhancing catalyst, subject to supply costs and efficiency of recovery by leaching. (2) In a fluidized bed of taconite, the reaction rate enhancement by potassium impregnation appears at least as great as in a limestone bed. (3) Reactivity coefficients defined by continuous test results are a different but closely related property and are substantially lower than standard TGA-determined reactivities. (4) The most useful result from the CPU is determination of specific capacities, defined as pounds per hour of fixed carbon converted per volume of reaction vessel. (5) Potassium impregnation clearly enhances reaction rates, but in a practical process will require an efficient leaching step for potassium recovery to be economically viable. (6) Earlier TGA results suggest that a weight ratio of potassium to fixed carbon (FC) of roughly 0.4 will give maximum reactivity enhancement. (7) For these CPU tests, control over the actual degree of potassium impregnation during feed impregnation proved more difficult than expected, apparently leaving a lot of the KOH catalyst free (non-ion exchanged) and subject to segregation during handling and feeding, as well as in the gasifier itself.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Production of hydrogen and coproducts from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between the TGA and CPU data, a number of general conclusions have been developed, regarding both selection of catalysts and selection of the most effective and economic approaches to scaled-up process development. (Hauserman, 1992) These conclusions are in an order that is not meant to imply relative importance. (1) Impregnation of Wyodak coal with KOH, at a potassium-to-fixed carbon ratio of around 0.2 or greater, roughly doubles the gasification reaction rate in fluidized beds of limestone. Soluble potassium, in any convenient form, is recommended as a rate-enhancing catalyst, subject to supply costs and efficiency of recovery by leaching. (2) In a fluidized bed of taconite, the reaction rate enhancement by potassium impregnation appears at least as great as in a limestone bed. (3) Reactivity coefficients defined by continuous test results are a different but closely related property and are substantially lower than standard TGA-determined reactivities. (4) The most useful result from the CPU is determination of specific capacities, defined as pounds per hour of fixed carbon converted per volume of reaction vessel. (5) Potassium impregnation clearly enhances reaction rates, but in a practical process will require an efficient leaching step for potassium recovery to be economically viable. (6) Earlier TGA results suggest that a weight ratio of potassium to fixed carbon (FC) of roughly 0.4 will give maximum reactivity enhancement. (7) For these CPU tests, control over the actual degree of potassium impregnation during feed impregnation proved more difficult than expected, apparently leaving a lot of the KOH catalyst free (non-ion exchanged) and subject to segregation during handling and feeding, as well as in the gasifier itself.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preparation and performance of membranes for application to hydrogen separation from coal-derived gas is described. The membrane material investigated was dense amorphous silica deposited on a suitable support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two types of support materials were pursued. One type consisted of a two-layer composite, zeolite silicalite/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the form of tubes approximately 0.7 cm in diameter. The other type was porous glass tubes of diameter below 0.2 cm. The first type of support was prepared starting from {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of 1{micro}m mean pore diameter and growing by hydrothermal reaction a zeolite silicalite layer inside the pores of the alumina at the OD side. After calcination to remove the organic template used in the hydrothermal reaction, CVD was carried out to deposit the final silica layer. CVD was carried out by alternating exposure of the surface with silicon tetrachloride and water vapor. SEM and N2 adsorption measurements were employed to characterize the membranes at several stages during their preparation. Permeation measurements of several gases yielded H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ideal selectivity of 150-200 at room temperature declining to 110 at 250 C. The second type of support pursued was porous glass tubes prepared by a novel extrusion technique. A thick suspension of borosilicate glass powder in a polyethersulfone solution was extruded through a spinneret and after gelation the glass-polymer tube was heat treated to obtain a gas-tight glass tube. Leaching of the glass tube in hot water yielded connected pores with diameter on the order of 100 nm. CVD of the final silica layer was not carried out on these tubes on account of their large pore size.

George R. Gavalas

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research within its Office of Science and Technology. Research pertaining to IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB) is conducted within the By-Product Utilization Team of...

175

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High melting temperature synthetic pitches (Synpitches) were created using coal derivatives produced from a solvent extraction technique. Solvent extraction is used to separate hydrocarbons from mineral matter as well as other insolubles. Mild hydrogenation can be used to chemically modify resultant material to produce a true pitch. There are three main techniques which can be used to tailor the softening point of the Synpitch. First, the softening point can be controlled by varying the conditions of hydrogenation, chiefly the temperature, pressure and residence time in a hydrogen overpressure. Second, by selectively distilling light hydrocarbons, the softening point of the remaining pitch can be raised. Third, the Synpitch can be blended with another mutually soluble pitch or hydrocarbon liquid. Through such techniques, spinnable isotropic Synpitches have been created from coal feedstocks. Characteristics of Synpitches include high cross-linking reactivity and high molecular weight, resulting in carbon fibers with excellent mechanical properties. To date, mechanical properties have been achieved which are comparable to the state of the art achievable with conventional coal tar pitch or petroleum pitch.

Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two batch and one continuous reactor study involving Clostridium ljungdahlii were carried out. First, the effects of H{sub 2} partial pressure on growth, CO and H{sub 2} uptake and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were investigated in batch culture. Over the concentration range studied, it was observed that CO was preferentially utilized in favor of H{sub 2}. It was also seen that increasing H{sub 2} partial pressures increased the ratio of ethanol to acetate. Finally, a two-stage CSTR system was successfully operated with C. ljungdahlii in which growth occurred in the first stage and ethanol production occurred in the second stage.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

COAL PRODUCTION ISSUES TO BE STUDIED The National Commission on Energy Policy has recently commenced a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COAL PRODUCTION ISSUES TO BE STUDIED The National Commission on Energy Policy has recently commenced a study on the challenges for expanded coal production in the United States, according to Sasha Mackler, Research Director of the Commission. Given its relative abundance in the United States, coal

179

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be manufactured having cement replacement with Illinois coal ashes and their blends in the range of 0 to 60LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Investigators technology for high-volume applications of Illinois coal combustion by-products generated by using both

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

180

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

182

Blasting to stabilize abandoned underground mines in eastern and midwestern coal fields: A feasibility study. Open File Report  

SciTech Connect

The study was designed to assist individuals involved with problem of abandoned mines that are subsiding. The study analyzed the practicality and desirability of using blasting to stabilize subsiding abandoned underground mines. Application of blasting to subsidence problems could provide a valuable alternative technology to classical methods of injecting fill material into abandoned mines to fill voids and prevent subsidence. By blasting, subsidence can be induced in a controlled manner, completed, and the site returned to its desired usage.

1991-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Impact of Air Emissions Controls on Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion products (CCPs) have been extensively studied and well characterized over the last 30 years. However, new air emissions control technologies at power plants will change the characteristics of some existing CCPs. These changes may affect the selection of appropriate management methods for high-volume CCPs with respect to both disposal and use. This report examines evolving air emissions controls and their likely impact on CCPs.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characterization of Field Leachates at Coal Combustion Product Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large amount of laboratory-generated leachate data has been produced over the last two decades to estimatecoal combustion product (CCP) leachate concentrations, and a variety of leaching methods have been used. No one method, however, has been shown to accurately represent field leaching conditions. In fact, little work has been performed to systematically evaluate field-generated leachates representative of a range of coal types, combustion systems, and management methods, and only limited work has be...

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to the differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Biological production of ethanol from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio (acetate to ethanol) from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September, 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Underground Infrastructure Research and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

productivity, environmental improvement and renewal of the aging underground infrastructure. OrganizationalCenter for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education CUIRE Board Members Sam Arnaout Pipe Association Tim Kennedy, AMERON NOV Chad Kopecki, Dallas Water Utilities David Marshall, Tarrant

Texas at Arlington, University of

189

Two Wyoming mines accounted for 20% of U.S. coal production by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preliminary coal production data for 2012 show that 9 out of the top 10 producing coal mines in the United States are located in Wyoming; the top two producing mines ...

190

EIA projects little change in U.S. coal production in 2013 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook projects total U.S. coal production in 2013 to be close to its 2012 level in the November 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook as coal ...

191

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

EIA - Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Monthly U.S. Coal Production and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Report No.: DOE/EIA 0218/48 Report Released: December 05, 2013 Next Release Date: January 09, 2014 Week Ended Year-To-Date1 Month Ended January - November Coal-Producing Region and State (thousand short tons) 11/30/2013 12/1/2012 11/30/2013 11/30/2012 November 2013 November 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Alabama 314 339 16,938 18,080 1,450 1,425 16,938 18,080 -6.3 Alaska 37 45 1,592 1,875 171 188 1,592 1,875 -15.1 Arizona 133 142 7,029 6,947 614 586 7,029 6,947 1.2 Arkansas 1 3 35 86 5 12 35 86 -59.4 Colorado 529 551 21,238 26,718 1,985 2,519 21,238 26,718 -20.5 Illinois 882 894 48,292 45,053 4,089 3,729 48,292 45,053 7.2 Indiana 653 696 34,676 33,865 3,022 2,909 34,676 33,865 2.4

194

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

195

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heng Ban Heng Ban Principal Investigator University of Alabama at Birmingham 1150 10th Avenue South Birmingham, AL 35294-4461 205-934-0011 hban@uab.edu Environmental and Water Resources OxidatiOn Of Mercury in PrOducts Of cOal cOMbustiOn Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. A variety of mercury reduction technologies are under commercial development, but an improved understanding of the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the transformations and capture of mercury in boilers and pollution control devices is required to achieve necessary performance and cost reduction levels. Oxidized mercury is more easily captured by pollution control devices, such as Selective

196

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Knudson, C.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Production of mineral wool from lignite coal slag  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of research conducted at the University of North Dakota concerning the utilization of the ''molten state'' condition of lignite coal slag for the fabrication of a mineral wool insulant. The research was funded by the Mercer County Energy Development Board with monies allocated from the Department of Energy. The objective of the research was to investigate, on a preliminary basis, some critical criteria such as the chemical nature of the raw material, the ability of the slag to be fiberized, as well as the possibilities that such a insulant could indeed have a market in the immediate area. In essence it was felt that a mineral wool product could be produced at coal fired power plants which burn lignite at a minimal cost. The major cost saving would come from the fact that the raw material that would be used would not have to have a great deal of energy added at the expense of the consumer.

Manz, O.E.; Eaton, L.C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Solvent Refined Coal II. Catalysts III. Purpose andSondreal, E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect ofAnthraxylon - Kinetics of Coal Hydrogenation," Ind. and Eng.

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Hydrogen permeation data for several perovskite membranes BCN (BaCe{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (SrCe{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar in this project. However, it is known that the cerate-based perovskite materials can react with CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the stability issue of the proton conducting perovskite materials under CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S environments was examined. Tests were conducted in the Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit for powder and disk forms of BCN and SCE. Perovskite materials doped with zirconium (Zr) are known to be resistant to CO{sub 2}. The results from the evaluation of the chemical stability for the Zr doped perovskite membranes are presented. During this reporting period, flowsheet simulation was also performed to calculate material and energy balance based on several hydrogen production processes from coal using high temperature membrane reactor (1000 C), low temperature membrane reactor (250 C), or conventional technologies. The results show that the coal to hydrogen process employing both the high temperature and the low temperature membrane reactors can increase the hydrogen production efficiency (cold gas efficiency) by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Using either high temperature or low temperature membrane reactor process also results in an increase of the cold gas efficiencies as well as the thermal efficiencies of the overall process.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in...

205

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUBÂ’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

206

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying the potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the candidate membrane performance under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit will be constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the design of this unit was completed. The unit will be capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The membranes to be tested will be in disc form with a diameter of about 3 cm. By operating at higher temperatures and higher hydrogen partial pressures, we expect to demonstrate commercially relevant hydrogen flux, 10 {approx} 50 cc/min/cm{sup 2}, from the membranes made of the perovskite type of ceramic material. The construction of the unit is planned to be completed by the end of the next reporting period.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microsoft Word - 2012_EIA_Coal_Production_Estimates_Comparison.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. December 2013

210

Microsoft Word - Coal Production Estimates Evaluation.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 November 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Performance Evaluation of the Weekly Coal Production Report for 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. November 2012

211

Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the Steam-Iron Process Using Promoted Iron-Based Catalysts Sub-

212

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

dividing total production by total labor hours worked by all mine employees except office workers; beginning in ... 1978 and Coal—Pennsylvania Anthracite 1977; ...

213

EIA projects little change in U.S. coal production in 2013 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Coal production for the first three quarters (January-September) of 2012 was 46 million short tons ...

214

Influence of coal quality factors on seam permeability associated with coalbed methane production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cleats are natural fractures in coal that serve as permeability avenues for darcy flow of gas and water to the well bore during production. Theoretically,… (more)

Wang, Xingjin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Proceedings: 14th International Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs), Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International research interest in coal combustion product (CCP) use continues to grow, with promising prospects for avoiding disposal costs, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and generating revenue from CCP sales. Topics discussed at the 14th International Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products included fundamental research on CCP use, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial CCP applications.

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Proceedings: 14th International Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs): Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International research interest in coal combustion product (CCP) use continues to grow, with promising prospects for avoiding disposal costs, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and generating revenue from CCP sales. Topics discussed at the 14th International Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products included fundamental research on CCP use, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial CCP applications.

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

220

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · CoalTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL · Indiana Coal Forecasting · Under-Ground Coal Gasification · Benefits of Oxyfuel Combustion · Economic

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimate. The overall economics of hydrogen production from this new process was assessed and compared with conventional hydrogen production technologies from coal. Several proton-conducting perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) were successfully tested in a new permeation unit at temperatures between 800 and 1040 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bars. The experimental data confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing hydrogen partial pressure at the feed side. The highest hydrogen flux measured was 1.0 cc/min/cm{sup 2} (STP) for the SCTm membrane at 3 bars and 1040 C. The chemical stability of the perovskite membranes with respect to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S can be improved by doping with Zr, as demonstrated from the TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis) tests in this project. A conceptual design, using the measured hydrogen flux data and a modeling approach, for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without a substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions. Flowsheet simulations show that the coal to hydrogen process employing the proposed membrane reactor concept can increase the hydrogen production efficiency by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Preliminary economic analysis also shows a 30% cost reduction for the proposed membrane reactor process, assuming membrane materials meeting DOE's flux and cost target. Although this study shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier, placing the membrane module outside the gasifier in a closely coupled way in terms of temperature and pressure can still offer the same performance advantage. This could also avoid the complicated fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues when the membrane module is installed inside the gasifier. Future work should be focused on improving the permeability and stability for the proton-conducting membranes, testing the membranes with real syngas from a gasifier and scaling up the membrane size.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Underground Structure Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Science and Technology {limo, liu}@cse.ust.hk ABSTRACT Environment monitoring in coal mines, Underground, Coal Mine 1. INTRODUCTION A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is a self-organized wireless network and widths of several meters) has been a crucial task to ensure safe working conditions in coal mines where

Liu, Yunhao

223

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit will be constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the mechanical construction of the permeation unit was completed. Commissioning and shake down tests are being conducted. The unit is capable of operation at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The membranes to be tested will be in disc form with a diameter of about 3 cm. Operation at these high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures will demonstrate commercially relevant hydrogen flux, 10{approx}50 cc/min/cm{sup 2}, from the membranes made of the perovskite type of ceramic material. Preliminary modeling was also performed for a tubular membrane reactor within a gasifier to estimate the required membrane area for a given gasification condition. The modeling results will be used to support the conceptual design of the membrane reactor.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Mike Roberts; Francis Lau

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Center for By-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Sponsored By UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI We Energies, Milwaukee, WI Co-Sponsored By American Coal Ash Association Educational Foundation

Saldin, Dilano

226

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Product Blends as Soil Substitutes / Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a field assessment of the use of blends of coal combustion by-products with biosolids in horticultural applications such as potting mixes for ornamentals and turf production.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. (Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. (Lummus Crest, Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

2009 underground/longwall mining buyer's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to underground mining operations. An index by product category is included.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the unit has been fully commissioned and is operational. The unit is capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. A double-seal technique has been developed and tested successfully to achieve leak-tight seal for the membranes. Initial data for a commercial Palladium-Gold membrane were obtained at temperatures to 450 C and pressures to 13 atm. Tests for the perovskite membranes are being performed and the results will be reported in the next quarter. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The results from the simulation work confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen. The presence of steam in the permeate side can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%. When the steam partial pressure is greater than 1 atm, the hydrogen flux becomes independent of the steam pressure.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Petrographic, mineralogical, and chemical characterization of certain Alaskan coals and washability products. Final report, July 11, 1978-October 11, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Petrological, mineralogical and chemical characterization provides basic information needed for proper utilization of coals. Since many of these coals are likely to be beneficiated to reduce ash, the influence of coal washing on the characteristics of the washed product is important. Twenty samples of Alaskan coal seams were used for this study. The coals studied ranged in rank from lignite to high volatile A bituminous with vitrinite/ulminite reflectance ranging from 0.25 to 1.04. Fifteen raw coals were characterized for proximate and ultimate analysis reflectance rank, petrology, composition of mineral matter, major oxides and trace elements in coal ash. Washability products of three coals from Nenana, Beluga and Matanuska coal fields were used for characterization of petrology, mineral matter and ash composition. Petrological analysis of raw coals and float-sink products showed that humodetrinite was highest in top seam in a stratigraphic sequence

Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United States of America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United The growing significance of the Powder River Basin's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) to United States domestic energy approximates 6% above the coal as well as inside the coal layer. This difference can be attributed primarily

Harris, Jerry M.

234

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coal - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, mining, and prices. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Coal overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly PDF XLS Annual Coke overview PDF XLS Coal-fired power plants Existing generating units in the U.S. by state, company and plant 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 Go Prices Additional formats Weekly spot prices (Coal News and Markets) Coal futures near-month contract final settlement price (weekly NYMEX) Average sales price: PDF XLSBy state and mine type PDF XLSBy state and disposition PDF XLSBy state and underground mining method PDF XLSBy state, county, and number of mines PDF XLSBy state and coal rank PDF XLSBy mine production range and mine type Average consumer prices by end use sector, Census division, and state,

236

Effects of Air Emissions Controls on Coal Combustion Products: Interim Data Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is collecting information describing the effects of air emissions controls on coal combustion products (CCPs) as they pertain to disposal and use. Specifically, data are being collected to assess the impacts of calcium bromide (CaBr2) addition to coal, refined coal, halogen injection in the boiler, brominated activated carbon injection (BrACI) in the flue gas, dry sorbent injection (DSI) in the flue gas, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analytical determination of strain energy for the studies of coal mine bumps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal mine bumps occur in most countries where coal is mined by underground methods. Coal bumps can be characterized as unstable releases of strain energy… (more)

Xu, Qiang, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, two different types of membranes, Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) provided by the University of Florida and the University of Cincinnati, respectively were tested in the high pressure permeation unit. The SCTm membrane, with a thickness of 1.7 mm, showed the highest hydrogen permeability among the perovskite membranes tested in this project so far. The hydrogen flux measured for the SCTm membrane was close to 0.8 cc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of about 4 bar at 950 C. SEM and EDX analysis for the tested SCTm membrane showed a separate Ce-rich phase deposited along the grain boundaries in the region towards the feed side of the membrane. No such phase separation was observed towards the permeate side. Partial reduction of the SCTm perovskite material by the high pressure hydrogen, especially in the feed side of the membrane, was postulated to be the possible reason for the phase separation. Further investigation of the stability issue of the perovskite membrane is needed.

Shain Doong, Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Robers

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum...

240

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Friedman, S. ,"Conversion of Anthraxylon - Kinetics ofiv- LBL 116807 CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COALand Mechanisms of Coal Conversion to Clean Fuel,iI pre-

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Preparation of oxygen-containing organic products from bed-oxidized brown coal by ozonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of modifying the functional composition of humic acids by gas-phase ozonation of bed-oxidized brown coal was examined. About 90% of the organic matter of brown coal was converted to low-molecular weight soluble oxygen-containing products by stepwise liquid-phase ozonation (in chloroform and acetic acid).

Semenova, S.A.; Patrakov, Y.F.; Batina, M.V. [National Academy of Science Belarus, Minsk (Byelarus)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed protonic-electronic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) were successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, a thin BCN membrane supported on a porous BCN layer was fabricated. The objective was to increase the hydrogen flux with a further reduction of the thickness of the active membrane layer. The thinnest dense layer that could be achieved in our laboratory currently was about 0.2 mm. Nevertheless, the membrane was tested in the permeation unit and showed reasonable flux compared to the previous BCN samples of the same thickness. A long term durability test was conducted for a SCTm membrane with pure hydrogen in the feed side and nitrogen in the sweep side. The pressure was 1 bar and the temperature was around 1010 C. No decline of hydrogen flux was observed after continuous running of over 250 hours. This long term test indicates that the perovskite membrane has good thermal stability under the reducing conditions of the hydrogen atmosphere. A conceptual design of the membrane reactor configuration for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier was completed. The design considered a tubular membrane module located within the freeboard area of a fluidized bed gasifier. The membrane ambipolar conductivity was based on the value calculated from the measured permeation data. A membrane thickness of 25 micron was assumed in the calculation. The GTI's gasification model combined with a membrane reactor model were used to determine the dimensions of the membrane module. It appears that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. • The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. • To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. • Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

X-ray absorption near edge structure spectrometry study of nickel and lead speciation in coals and coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The fate and environmental impacts of trace elements from coal fired power stations are a significant concern because of the large quantities of coal used as an energy source. The ultimate environmental fate and health impact of some of these trace elements is dependent on their various forms and oxidation states. Nickel and lead are two of the trace elements classified as 'priority pollutants' by the National Pollutant Inventory (NPI) in Australia. This study attempts to understand speciation of nickel and lead in coal and coal combustion products from five coal fired power stations in Australia where bituminous rank coals are utilized. Non-destructive X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectrometry (XANES) was used to determine speciation of these metals. Semiquantitative speciation of nickel and lead was calculated using a linear combination fit of XANES spectra obtained for selected pure reference compounds. In all fly ash samples, 28-80% of nickel was present as nickel in NiSO{sub 4} form, which is a more toxic and more bioavailable form of nickel. Less toxic NiO was detected in fly ash samples in the range of 0-15%. Speciation of lead revealed that 65-70% is present as PbS in the feed coals. In all fly ash samples analyzed, lead comprised different proportions of PbCl{sub 2}, PbO, and PbSO{sub 4}. PbCl{sub 2} and PbSO{sub 4} contents varied between 30-70% and 30-60%, respectively. Chemical reactions resulting in nickel and lead transformation that are likely to have occurred in the post-combustion environment are discussed. 22 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Pushan Shah; Vladimir Strezov; Peter F. Nelson [Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia). CRC for Coal in Sustainable Development

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The unit was fully commissioned and is operational. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and tested in the new permeation unit. These membranes were fabricated by either uniaxial pressing or tape casting technique with thickness ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm. Hydrogen permeation data for the BCN perovskite membrane have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar. The highest hydrogen flux was measured at 1.6 STPcc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of 12 bar and 950 C with a membrane thickness of 0.22 mm. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The hydrogen flux predicted from the modeling results are in line with the data from the experimental measurement. The simulation also shows that the presence of steam in the permeate side or the feed side of the membrane can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

250

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products: Consortium Byproducts Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) The mission of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing. The overall goals of CBRC are to: Increase the overall national rate of byproduct use by to ~ 50 % by 2010 Increase the number of “allowable” byproduct uses under state regulations by ~ 25% Double of the current rate of FGD byproduct use CBRC is a unique partnership that integrates the electric power industry, State and Federal regulatory agencies, and academia to form a strong, cohesive consortium to guide the national and regional research priorities of the CBRC. CBRC is managed by the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University and is administered by regional centers at the University of Kentucky (Eastern Region), Southern Illinois University (Midwest Region) and the University of North Dakota (Western Region). Primary funding for CBRC is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL).

251

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe enough to saturate the aromatics in the tar oil to meet jet fuel specifications. Alternatives were investigated. Jet fuel specifications can be achieved when the tar oil is: hydrotreated in an expanded-bed hydrotreater to lower aromatics and heteroatom content; the effluent is then hydrotreated in a second, fixed bed hydrotreater; and, finally, the 550{degree}F boiling fraction from the two hydrotreaters is hydrocracked to extinction. The process was verified by pilot-plant production of 2 barrels of JP-8 turbine fuel, which met all but the flash point specification for JP-8. In addition, small samples of JP-4, JP-8, and high-density fuel were produced as a part of Task 2. 13 figs., 21 tabs.

Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

CO2 Injection in and CO4 Production from Coal Seams: Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INJECTION IN AND CH 4 PRODUCTION FROM COAL SEAMS: LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR SIMULATIONS. Karl-Heinz A.A.Wolf ( K.H.A.A.Wolf@TA.TUDelft.NL ; 31.15.278.6029)...

253

U.S. coal production rises slightly in 2011 amid lower ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. coal production increased slightly during 2011 for the second year in a row, rising about 0.4% from from its 2010 level, after falling sharply during 2009 ...

254

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicides, Phosphides Molten Salts WC, PtZnC; Fe N, Ni N ,priority rating to molten Molten salts have demonstratedcatalyst coal contac- ting. Molten salts have high thermal

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

U. S. monthly coal production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ. Coal. Glossary ...

256

Process for forming coal compacts and product thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming durable, mechanically strong compacts from coal particulates without use of a binder is disclosed. The process involves applying a compressive stress to a particulate feed comprising substantially water-saturated coal particles while the feed is heated to a final compaction temperature in excess of about 100.degree. C. The water present in the feed remains substantially in the liquid phase throughout the compact forming process. This is achieved by heating and compressing the particulate feed and cooling the formed compact at a pressure sufficient to prevent water present in the feed from boiling. The compacts produced by the process have a moisture content near their water saturation point. As a result, these compacts absorb little water and retain exceptional mechanical strength when immersed in high pressure water. The process can be used to form large, cylindrically-shaped compacts from coal particles (i.e., "coal logs") so that the coal can be transported in a hydraulic coal log pipeline.

Gunnink, Brett (Columbia, MO); Kanunar, Jayanth (Arlington, MA); Liang, Zhuoxiong (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Compatibility of Admix and Synthetic Liner Materials With Clean Coal Technology By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When designing effective liner systems for clean coal technology by-products, utilities need information on the liner materials most suitable for each type of waste by-product. This study has developed data on twenty admix and synthetic liner types for seven different by-product combinations.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

262

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

263

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of economically significant amounts of ethyl and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene, from coal is disclosed wherein coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500.degree. C. to 1100.degree. C. at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Fallon, Peter (East Moriches, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Solid-state NMR characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study clearly demonstrated the usefulness of liquid- and solid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR for the examination of process-derived materials from direct coal liquefaction. The techniques can provide data not directly obtainable by other methods to examine the saturation of aromatic rings and to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction. In addition, these methods can be used to infer the extent of condensation and retrograde reactions occurring in the direct coal liquefaction process. Five NMR techniques were employed. Solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR measurements were made using the Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) and Single Pulse (SP) techniques. Solid-state {sup 1}H-NMR measurements were made using the technique of Combined Rotation and Multiple-Pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS). Conventional liquid-state {sup 12}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR techniques were employed as appropriate. Interpretation of the NMR data, once obtained, is relatively straightforward. Combined with other information, such as elemental analyses and process conversion data, the NMR data prove to be a powerful tool for the examination of direct coal liquefaction process-derived material. Further development and more wide-spread application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified on the basis of these results.

Miknis, F.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 3. Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 139 20 12,410 12,570 Arkansas 96 - - 96 Colorado 757 - 22,889 23,646 Illinois 18,969 - 23,868 42,837 Indiana 15,565 - - 15,565 Kentucky Total 56,179 2,018 - 58,198 Kentucky (East) 22,090 2,010 - 24,100 Kentucky (West) 34,089 9 - 34,098 Maryland 797 - - 797 Montana - - 5,708 5,708 New Mexico - - 4,960 4,960 Ohio 3,903 7 14,214 18,125 Oklahoma 349 - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 11,367 52 33,623 45,041 Pennsylvania (Anthracite)

266

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 22. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 0.71 - 1.69 1.66 Arkansas 0.59 - - 0.59 Colorado 1.90 - 6.38 5.93 Illinois 3.65 - 6.60 4.86 Indiana 3.25 - - 3.25 Kentucky Total 2.43 1.77 - 2.39 Kentucky (East) 1.61 1.77 - 1.62 Kentucky (West) 3.61 - - 3.56 Maryland 1.80 - - 1.80 Montana - - 7.47 7.47 New Mexico - - 5.19 5.19 Ohio 2.44 - 4.96 4.02 Oklahoma 2.37 - - 2.37 Pennsylvania Total 2.25 0.92 3.79

267

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 7. Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Total Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 12,410 - 139 6,669 12,549 6,669 Alaska - 2,052 - - - 2,052 Arizona - 7,493 - - - 7,493 Arkansas - - 96 - 96 - Colorado 1,673 2,655 21,955 2,265 23,628 4,920 Illinois 2,897 - 39,939 5,649 42,837 5,649 Indiana - - 15,558 21,156 15,558 21,156 Kentucky Total 3,951 552 53,891 31,507 57,842 32,059 Kentucky (East) - 552 23,753 23,572 23,753 24,124 Kentucky (West) 3,951 - 30,138 7,935 34,089 7,935 Louisiana

268

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the ninth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2005-December 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) reformate purification, (2) heat transfer enhancement, (3) autothermal reforming coal-derived methanol degradation test; and (4) model development for fuel cell system integration. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development of Continuous Solvent Extraction Processes for Coal Derived Carbon Products  

SciTech Connect

This DOE NETL-sponsored effort seeks to develop continuous processes for producing carbon products from solvent-extracted coal. A key process step is removal of solids from liquefied coal. Three different processes were compared: gravity separation, centrifugation using a decanter-type Sharples Pennwalt centrifuge, and a Spinner-II centrifuge. The data suggest that extracts can be cleaned to as low as 0.5% ash level and probably lower using a combination of these techniques.

Elliot B. Kennel

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Coal operators prepare for a prosperous new year  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of the Coal Age 2008 annual Forecast Survey of 17 coal mining executives which reinforces that 2008 could be a very good year. Coal operators are planning to invest in new equipment, development and new coal mine start-ups, based on a number of demand- and supply-side fundamentals. 71% of those surveyed thought coal production in 2008 would increase from 2007 levels and US exports are expected to climb due to the weak dollar. If the tax credit on synfuels expires on 31 December 2007 production of coal synfuel will likely cease. Asked about expensive planned purchases, companies answers ranged from $80,000 for an underground scoop to $500 m for a new mine installation. However, most producers admit they will not be able to operate at full capacity. 7 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

274

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of clean, affordable energy is essential for the prosperity and security of the United States and the world in the 21st century. Emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into the atmosphere are an inherent part of electricity generation, transportation, and industrial processes that rely on fossil fuels. These energy-related activities are responsible for more than 80 percent of the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, and most of these emissions are CO{sub 2}. Over the last few decades, an increased concentration of CO{sub 2} in the earth's atmosphere has been observed. Carbon sequestration technology offers an approach to redirect CO{sub 2} emissions into sinks (e.g., geologic formations, oceans, soils and vegetation) and potentially stabilize future atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. Coal seams are attractive CO{sub 2} sequestration sinks, due to their abundance and proximity to electricity-generation facilities. The recovery of marketable coalbed methane (CBM) provides a value-added stream, potentially reducing the cost to sequester CO{sub 2} gas. Much research is needed to evaluate this technology in terms of CO{sub 2} storage capacity, sequestration stability, commercial feasibility and overall economics. CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the US DOE, has embarked on a seven-year program to construct and operate a coal bed sequestration site composed of a series of horizontally drilled wells that originate at the surface and extend through two overlying coal seams. Once completed, all of the wells will be used initially to drain CBM from both the upper (mineable) and lower (unmineable) coal seams. After sufficient depletion of the reservoir, centrally located wells in the lower coal seam will be converted from CBM drainage wells to CO{sub 2} injection ports. CO{sub 2} will be measured and injected into the lower unmineable coal seam while CBM continues to drain from both seams. In addition to metering all injected CO{sub 2} and recovered CBM, the program includes additional monitoring wells to further examine horizontal and vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. This is the fifth Technical Progress report for the project. Progress this period was focused on reclamation of the north access road and north well site, and development of revised drilling methods. This report provides a concise overview of project activities this period and plans for future work.

William A. Williams

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Holistic Approach to Wireless Sensor Network Routing in Underground Tunnel Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and deployed in real life operations. Especially in light of coal mine disasters in recent years, governmental in underground mining environments. Emslie et al. studied the radio communication properties in coal mines channels in coal mines for underground communication purposes [7] and Sheng et al. discussed

Bao, Lichun

276

Analysis of US underground thin seam mining potential. Volume 1. Text. Final technical report, December 1978. [In thin seams  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the potential for US underground thin seam (< 28'') coal mining is undertaken to provide basic information for use in making a decision on further thin seam mining equipment development. The characteristics of the present low seam mines and their mining methods are determined, in order to establish baseline data against which changes in mine characteristics can be monitored as a function of time. A detailed data base of thin seam coal resources is developed through a quantitative and qualitative analysis at the bed, county and state level. By establishing present and future coal demand and relating demand to production and resources, the market for thin seam coal has been identified. No thin seam coal demand of significance is forecast before the year 2000. Current uncertainty as to coal's future does not permit market forecasts beyond the year 2000 with a sufficient level of reliability.

Pimental, R. A; Barell, D.; Fine, R. J.; Douglas, W. J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, and porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, hydrotreatment of solvent was completed in preparation for pitch fabrication for graphite electrodes. Coal digestion has lagged but is expected to be complete by next quarter. Studies are reported on coal dissolution, pitch production, foam synthesis using physical blowing agents, and alternate coking techniques.

Dady B. Dadyburjor; Mark E. Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; J. Joshua Maybury; Alfred H. Stiller; Joseph M. Stoffa; John W. Zondlo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High-yield hydrogen production by catalytic gasification of coal or biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification of coal or wood, catalyzed by soluble metallic cations to maximize reaction rates and hydrogen yields, offers a potential for large-scale, economical hydrogen production with near-commercial technology. With optimum reaction conditions and catalysts, product gas rich in both hydrogen and methane can be used in fuel cells to produce electricity at efficiencies nearly double those of conventional power plant. If plantation silvaculture techniques can produce wood at a raw energy cost competitive with coal, further enhancement of product gas yields may be possible, with zero net contribution of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Technical Progress report for the subject agreement. During the first six months of the project, progress was made in arranging participation by other CONSOL departments, identifying a prospective site, developing an environmental assessment report, and securing land and coal rights. In addition, correspondences were drafted in response to NETL inquiries. These aspects of the project are discussed in detail in this report.

Gary L. Cairns

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Slurryform products of coal liquefaction are treated with caustic soda in presence of H.sub.2 O in an inline static mixer and then the treated product is separated into a solids fraction and liquid fractions, including liquid hydrocarbons, by gravity settling preferably effected in a multiplate settling separator with a plurality of settling spacings.

Malek, John M. (P.O. Box 71, Lomita, CA 90717)

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EFFECTS OF COFIRING LIGNIN AND BIOSOLIDS WITH COAL ON FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin, derived from municipal solid waste and biosolid feedstocks using Masada Resource Group's patented CES OxyNol{trademark} process, and acidified biosolids were evaluated as supplemental fuels with coal for producing steam and electricity. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale (550,000-Btu/hr [580-MJ/hr]) combustion system to evaluate the effects of coal characteristics, blend mixture (on a dry wt% basis) and furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) on boiler heat-exchange surface slagging and fouling, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} production, fly ash characteristics, and combustion efficiency. The effects of blending lignin and acidified biosolids with coal on fuel handling and pulverization characteristics were also addressed. An 80 wt% Colorado--20 wt% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal blend from the Tennessee Valley Authority Colbert Steam Plant, hereafter referred to as the Colbert coal, and a bituminous Pittsburgh No. 8 coal were tested. The lignin and acidified biosolids were characterized by possessing higher moisture content and lower carbon, hydrogen, and heating values relative to the coals. Ash contents of the fuels were similar. The lignin also possessed higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}, CaO, and SO{sub 3} and lower concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, and N relative to the coals. The sulfur content of lignin could be reduced through a more thorough washing and drying of the lignin in an efficient commercial-scale dewatering device. Acidified biosolids were distinguished by higher concentrations of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MgO and lower SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to the other fuels. Trace element concentrations, especially for Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni, were generally greater in the lignin and acidified biosolid fuels relative to the Colbert coal. Maximum trace element emission factors were calculated for 95:5 Colbert coal--lignin and 90:5:5 Colbert coal--lignin--acidified biosolid blends and compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission factors for pulverized coal-fired units that are unequipped with pollution control devices. Calculated maximum trace element emission factors for the fuel blends were generally less than or within the range of those for the uncontrolled coal-fired units, except for Cr and Pb which were greater.

Kevin C. Galbreath

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coal mining technology, economics and policy - 1986  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on coal mining. Topics considered at the conference included coal preparation, communications, environmental controls, current regulatory issues regarding ground subsidence with longwall mining, personnel management, equipment manufacturers, engineers, contractors, safety and health aspects of mine emergency planning, surface mining operations, coal transport, underground face operations, and underground service operators.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

System analysis of nuclear-assisted syngas production from coal - article no. 042901  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. The results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; O'Brien, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. Table 1 provides an overview of the major markets for carbon products. Current sources of materials for these processes generally rely on petroleum distillation products or coal tar distillates obtained as a byproduct of metcoke production facilities. In the former case, the American materials industry, just as the energy industry, is dependent upon foreign sources of petroleum. In the latter case, metcoke production is decreasing every year due to the combined difficulties associated with poor economics and a significant environmental burden. Thus, a significant need exists for an environmentally clean process which can used domestically obtained raw materials and which can still be very competitive economically.

Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

285

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Production of hydrogen from low-rank coals: (Task 6. 1)  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of this research project is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for low-cost hydrogen production. This research involves a proof-of-concept and the early stages of engineering development using a continuous process unit (CPU). In parallel with this process development work, an evaluation of the relationship between the fundamental properties of low-rank coals and their reactivity under hydrogen-producing conditions is also being conducted. A 20--40 lb/hr fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) CPU was commissioned during this time period and has logged over 400 hours of operation during shakedown and operability testing. Maximum hydrogen production rates from the operability testing were over 17 SCF/lb MAF coal for both Wyodak and Velva test coals with a limestone bed, and for Martin Lake coal using 10 wt % trona, at 800{degree}C and a 2:1 steam:carbon ratio to 2:1 and increased with bed temperature over the range of 700{degree} to 800{degree}C. Agglomeration of the bed material when using trona as the catalyst was an operation problem during the CPU operability testing. The char of the low-rank coals was four to six times more reactive than that of the bituminous coal tested in the laboratory using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Surface analysis of the chars showed that the uniform distribution of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalyst decreased with increasing coal rank. 8 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Musich, M.A.; Cisney, S.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: FT-IR methods for characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to demonstrate the use of two FTIR techniques for the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-derived materials. The two methods were quantitative FTIR analysis and themogravimetric (TG) analysis with FTIR analysis of evolved products (TG-FTIR). The quantitative FTIR analyses of both whole resids and THF-soluble resids provided quantitation of total hydrogen, aliphatic and aromatic hydrogen, total carbon, total oxygen, hydroxyl and etheric oxygen, and ash contents. The FTIR results were usually in agreement with values derived by other, more conventional methods. However, the accuracies of specific measurements, in comparisons with results from conventional methods, ranged from good to poor. The TG-FTIR method provided approximate analyses of coals and resids. The data provided included the time dependent evolution profiles of the volatile species and the elemental composition of the char. Reproducible data of gaseous species and pyrolysis tar yields for whole resid samples larger than 10 mg were obtainable. The yields and evolution profiles of certain volatiles (tar, CO, and methane) provided structural information on the samples. There were some experimental and interpretational difficulties associated with both techniques. Optimization of the curve-resolving routine for coal-liquefaction samples would improve the quantitative FTIR accuracy. Aerosol formation limited the full application of the TG-FTIR technique with the THF-soluble resid samples. At this time, further development of these analytical methods as process development tools will be required before their use for that purpose can be recommended. The use of FTIR as an on-line analytical technique for coal liquefaction process streams requires demonstration before it can be recommended; however, such a demonstration may be warranted.

Serio, M.A.; Teng, H.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Proceedings: 15th International American Coal Ash Association Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs): Bu ilding Partnerships for Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the 15th International American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) Symposium, "Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs)," included fundamental CCP use, research, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial uses. There is a continuing international research interest in CCP use because of its commercial value and its environmental benefits, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing landfill needs, and utilizing recycled ma...

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 1. Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 2012 2011 Percent Change Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 46 19,321 52 19,071 -11.5 1.3 Underground 8 12,570 9 10,879 -11.1 15.5 Surface 38 6,752 43 8,192 -11.6 -17.6 Alaska 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Surface 1 2,052 1 2,149 - -4.5 Arizona 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Surface 1 7,493 1 8,111 - -7.6 Arkansas 2 98 2 133 - -26.4 Underground 1 96 1 127 - -24.0 Surface 1 2 1 7 - -71.4 Colorado

292

NETL: News Release - Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2008 16, 2008 Innovative Coal-Based Product Bumps Petroleum Out of Equation Synthetic Binder Pitch Uses Hydrocarbons from Coal in Place of Petroleum Feedstocks WASHINGTON, DC - Through a cooperative agreement with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a team headed by West Virginia University (WVU) has developed and successfully demonstrated a synthetic binder pitch that uses hydrocarbons from coal to supplement or replace petroleum feedstocks. The new binder pitch, and similar coal-derived products, could potentially reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Binder pitch - a carbon-rich, tar-like material - is an important ingredient in making graphite rods used in electric arc furnaces for the manufacture of steel from scrap. Conventional binder pitch usually blends petroleum pitch with standard coal-tar pitch. The new synthetic pitch could replace at least 19,000 tons of conventional pitch needed each year by graphite electrode manufacturers. WVU claims that the same pitch could be used by the aluminum industry; if so, demand for the new product would be close to one million barrels per year.

293

STUDY OF CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBMICRON COAL PARTICLES DISPERSED IN AIR AND CAPTURE OF COAL PARTICLES BY WATER DROPS IN A SCRUBBING COLUMN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Present day water spray based dust removal technologies do not effectively remove respirable submicron coal and silica dust particles in the underground coal mines causing… (more)

Chakravorty, Utshab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Impact of Technological Change and Productivity on the Coal Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines the components of past gains in productivity, including regional shifts, the exit of less productive producers, and technological progress Future prospects for continuing productivity gains at sustained, but lower, rates of improvement are discussed.

Information Center

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Composition of the ozonolytic degradation products of the organic matter of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal  

SciTech Connect

The ozonization of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal in chloroform and the composition of ozonolytic degradation products were studied. Water-insoluble high-molecular-weight products were predominant among the ozonization products. A half of water-soluble substances consisted of aliphatic C{sub 5}-C{sub 12} dicarboxylic acids and benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives. Sapromyxite has been suggested as a substitute for crude petroleum in the manufacture of motor fuels.

S.A. Semenova; Y.F.Patrakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 2: Ash Use R&D and Clean Coal By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fundamental studies in production of C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following conclusions can be drawn from the result obtained in this kinetic study of single stage coal gasification to hydrocarbon (HC) gases high in C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] hydrocarbons. It was observed that the direct conversion of coal to HC gases involves two steps. The first step is thermal cleavage of the coal structure to produce liquids with small amounts of gases and coke. The second step is conversion of liquids to gases. Coal to liquids occurs very rapidly and was completed within 10 minutes. Liquids to gases is the rate-determining step of the overall process. The conversion of liquids to gases was observed to follow first order kinetics. The first order kinetics treatment of the data by isothermal approximation gave an apparent activation energy of approximately 23 kcal/mol. The first order kinetics treatment of the data by a more rigorous non-isothermal method gave an activation energy of 26 kcal/mol. The quantity of HC gases produced directly from coal reached a constant value of about l0% of the dmmf coal at a reaction time of 10 miutes. Most of the HC gases were produced from the liquids. The study of model compounds shows that conversion of liquids to HC gases.proceeds through a carbonium ion mechanism, and this accounts for the production of C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] gases. Liquid to gases occurs by a catalytic hydrocracking reaction.

Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

High Conversion of Coal to Transportation Fuels for the Future With Low HC Gas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An announced objective of the Department of Energy in funding this work, and other current research in coal liquefaction, is to produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel (Task A). A second objective, reflecting a recent change in direction in the synthetic fuels effort of DOE, is to produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline- burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number (Task B).

Alex G. Oblad; Wendell H. Wiser

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 19. Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 Above 0 to 10 Zero 2 Total Number of Employees Alabama 3,415 97 655 317 160 224 54 105 5,041 Underground 2,981 - - - 36 88 - 81 3,190 Surface 434 97 655 317 124 136 54 24 1,851 Alaska 143 - - - - - - - 143 Surface 143 - - - - - - - 143 Arizona 432 - - - - - - - 432 Surface 432 - - - - - - - 432 Arkansas

300

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

302

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Groundwater Remediation of Inorganic Constituents at Coal Combustion Product Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews constituents that potentially may trigger groundwater remediation at coal combustion product (CCP) management sites and briefly summarizes various in situ and ex situ remediation technologies and their applicability to treat these constituents. The report provides a more detailed discussion for one potentially promising in situ remediation technology, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs).

2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Environmental impact assessment for steeply dipping coal beds: North Knobs site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is funding an underground coal gasification (UCG) project in steeply dipping coal beds (SDB), at North Knobs, about 8 miles west of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming. The project is being conducted to determine the technical, economic and environmental viability of such a technology. The development of SDB is an interesting target for UCG since such beds contain coals not normally mineable economically by ordinary techniques. Although the underground gasification of SDB has not been attempted in the US, Soviet experience and theoretical work indicate that the gasification of SDB in place offers all the advantages of underground gasification of horizontal coal seams plus some unique characteristics. The steep angle of dip helps to channel the produced gases up dip to offtake holes and permits the ash and rubble to fall away from the reaction zone helping to mitigate the blocking of the reaction zone in swelling coals. The intersection of SDB with the surface makes the seam accessible for drilling and other preparation. The tests at the North Knobs site will consist of three tests, lasting 20, 80 and 80 days, respectively. A total of 9590 tons of coal is expected to be gasified, with surface facilities utilizing 15 acres of the total section of land. The environmental effects of the experiment are expected to be very small. The key environmental impact is potential groundwater contamination by reaction products from coal gasification. There is good evidence that the surrounding coal effectively blocks the migration of these contaminants.

1978-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is claimed for the production of substantial amounts of ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene from coal. Coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds, and preferably at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C, and a partial pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 2 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

"Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48" 48" "Report Released: December 05, 2013" "Next Release Date: January 09, 2014" "Weekly and Monthly U.S. Coal Production Overview" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing","Week Ended",,"Year-To-Date[1]",,"Month Ended",,"January - November" "Region and State","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","November 2013","November 2012",2013,2012,"% Change" "Alabama",314.49,339.32,16938.35,18080.05,1450.46,1425.29,16938.35,18080.05,-6.3 "Alaska",37.08,45.44,1592.19,1874.56,170.87,187.66,1592.19,1874.56,-15.1

308

Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for use in gas separation and recovery processes. The overall objective of this project is to determine whether Illinois coal is a suitable feedstock for the production of CMS and to evaluate the potential application of the products in commercial gas separation processes. The full potential of these materials in commercial gas separations has yet to be realized. In Phase II, the optimal char preparation conditions determined in Phase I are being applied to production of larger quantities of CMS in a 2 in. ID batch fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and a 4 in. ID continuous rotary tube kiln (RTK). In the previous reporting period, an invention disclosure describing a novel CMS preparation technique (oxygen deposition) was prepared and submitted to Research Corporation Technologies for evaluation. During this reporting period, work continued on the development of the oxygen deposition process. Carbon deposition as a means to narrow pore size was also investigated. Pound quantities of CMS were prepared from IBC-102 coal in the TRK. A meeting was arranged between the ISGS and Carbo Tech Industieservice GmbH, one of two companies in the world that produce CMS from coal, to discuss possible shipment of Illinois coal to Germany for CMS production. A secrecy agreement between the ISGS and Carbo Tech is in preparation. Several large scale char production runs using Industry Mine coal were conducted in an 18 in. ID batch and 8 in. ID continuous RTK at Allis Mineral Systems, Milwaukee, WI. The molecular sieve properties of the chars have yet to be determined.

Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Feizoulof, C.A.; Vyas, S.N.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: P4 Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, utilities have comanaged some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned dry landfill in the midwestern United States. The findings from this research provide technical information for use in an ongoing study of comanagement by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydraulic Conductivity of Geosynthetic Clay Liners to Coal Combustion Product Leachates: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivity tests are being conducted on geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using solutions representing leachates observed in disposal facilities for coal combustion products (CCPs). Five different GCL products that are commercially available within the United States are being tested: two containing conventional sodium bentonite (NaB), two containing polymer-modified bentonite (PMB), and one with a bentonite polymer composite (BPC). Testing to date has been conducted by direct permeation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

State-of-the-Practice Liners and Caps for Coal Combustion Product Management Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 40% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) generated in the United States are beneficially reused in applications such as concrete products, road construction, and wallboard, with the remaining volume managed in landfills and ponds. Most new management units since 1994 have been lined landfills; pending federal regulations are expected to accelerate that trend.The objective of this report is to provide environmental managers with an overview of the state of the practice for ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Chemical Fixation of CO2 in Coal Combustion Products and Recycling through Biosystems  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principal results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. Optimal production of biomass depends on a number of factors. These factors include pH management, harvesting, and impact of auxiliary operations on the algae population. A number of experiments are presented which attempt to identify and characterize the impact of these factors.

C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; David Behel

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comanagement of Coal Combustion By-Products and Low-Volume Wastes: A Midwestern Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insufficient database on the environmental effects of comanagement of power plant by-products and wastes could hamper regulatory decisions regarding this practice. This report presents an environmental assessment of comanagement of high-volume coal combustion by-products with low-volume wastes at a steam electric power plant in the midwestern United States. It complements a similar assessment at a southeastern site.

1992-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the tenth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2006. This quarter saw progress in six areas. These areas are: (1) The effect of catalyst dimension on steam reforming, (2) Transient characteristics of autothermal reforming, (3) Rich and lean autothermal reformation startup, (4) Autothermal reformation degradation with coal derived methanol, (5) Reformate purification system, and (6) Fuel cell system integration. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product  

SciTech Connect

The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Coal Industry Annual, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Coal Industry Annual, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coal Industry Annual, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1996-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Coal Industry Annual, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Coal Industry Annual, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Fred Freme

1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Coal Industry Annual, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Information Center

329

Coal Industry Annual, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves.

Information Center

330

Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chemical Fixation of CO2 in Coal Combustion Products and Recycling through Biosystems  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Progress Report presents the principle results in enhanced growth of algae using coal combustion products as a catalyst to increase bicarbonate levels in solution. A co-current reactor is present that increases the gas phase to bicarbonate transfer rate by a factor of five to nine. The bicarbonate concentration at a given pH is approximately double that obtained using a control column of similar construction. Algae growth experiments were performed under laboratory conditions to obtain baseline production rates and to perfect experimental methods. The final product of this initial phase in algae production is presented.

C. Henry Copeland; Paul Pier; Samantha Whitehead; David Behel

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minemouth Prices by Region and Minemouth Prices by Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 139, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million short tons and the US Dollar. The data is broken down into production and minemouth prices. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Minemouth Prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Production and Minemouth Prices by Region- Reference Case (xls, 41.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

336

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over several years, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the eighth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005 and includes an entire review of the progress for year 2 of the project. This year saw progress in eight areas. These areas are: (1) steam reformer transient response, (2) steam reformer catalyst degradation, (3) steam reformer degradation tests using bluff bodies, (4) optimization of bluff bodies for steam reformation, (5) heat transfer enhancement, (6) autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (7) autothermal catalyst degradation, and (8) autothermal reformation with bluff bodies. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

Steven Markovich

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 24. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Union Nonunion Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 1.69 - 0.66 1.80 Alaska - 5.98 - - Arizona - 7.38 - - Arkansas - - 0.59 - Colorado 4.90 6.09 6.02 4.45 Illinois 2.09 - 5.34 4.70 Indiana - - 3.23 5.41 Kentucky Total 3.02 2.45 2.36 3.06 Kentucky (East) - 2.45 1.64 2.65 Kentucky (West) 3.27 - 3.60 5.58 Louisiana - - - 6.86 Maryland - - 1.80 2.80 Mississippi - - - 6.73 Missouri - - - 6.73 Montana - 11.20 7.47 31.69 New Mexico

340

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Blasting for abandoned-mine land reclamation (closure of individual subsidence features and erratic, undocumented underground coal-mine workings). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study has examined the feasibility of blasting for mitigating various abandoned mine land features on AML sites. The investigation included extensive field trial blasts at sites in North Dakota and Montana. A blasting technique was used that was based on spherical cratering concepts. At the Beulah, North Dakota site thirteen individual vertical openings (sinkholes) were blasted with the intent to fill the voids. The blasts were designed to displace material laterally into the void. Good success was had in filling the sinkholes. At the White site in Montana erratic underground rooms with no available documentation were collapsed. An adit leading into the mine was also blasted. Both individual room blasting and area pattern blasting were studied. A total of eight blasts were fired on the one acre area. Exploration requirements and costs were found to be extensive.

Workman, J.L.; Thompson, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ENHANCED COAL BED METHANE PRODUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN UNMINEABLE COAL SEAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the sixth semi-annual Technical Progress report under the subject agreement. During this report period, progress was made on drilling the north, center, and south well sites. Water production commenced at the center and south well sites. New drilling plans were formulated for the last remaining well, which is in the Upper Freeport Seam at the north site. Core samples were submitted to laboratories for analytical testing. These aspects of the project are discussed in detail in this report.

William A. Williams

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical work during this past quarter has focused on enhancing equipment and instrumentation in the WVU Carbon Products Laboratory. Development work on coal-based precursors for carbon foams, pitches, cokes, and fibers continues. The effects of carbon powders and chopped fibers as additives to the foam precursor are being evaluated. Extensive coordination and technology transfer activities have been undertaken and are described in Section 5 of this report.

Irwin, C.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. A process has been developed which results in high quality binder pitch suitable for use in graphite electrodes or carbon anodes. A detailed description of the protocol is given by Clendenin. Briefly, aromatic heavy oils are hydro-treated under mild conditions in order to increase their ability to dissolve coal. An example of an aromatic heavy oil is Koppers Carbon Black Base (CBB) oil. CBB oil has been found to be an effective solvent and acceptably low cost (i.e., significantly below the market price for binder pitch, or about $280 per ton at the time of this writing). It is also possible to use solvents derived from hydrotreated coal and avoid reliance on coke oven recovery products completely if so desired.

Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground February 5, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis The Air Products and...

348

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead previously by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC). The project is now under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP) after it acquired GEC and the E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The Phase I of this project was supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while the Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research, Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The two project phases planned for execution include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Thomas Lynch

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet suppression. In addition, foam is a much more effective dust suppressant, especially on respirable dust (particle with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns). To achieve maximum benefit from foam dust control, efficient on-site production of dry, stable foam is required. This paper discusses the basics of foam production and the many variables affecting foam expansion ratios. Successful applications of foam are also described.

Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type by Region and Type Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AE2011: Coal Production by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 122.3 KiB)

353

Coal mining technology, economics and policy - 1984  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on US coal mines. Topics considered at the conference included coal preparation, fine coal and refuse dewatering, flotation, coal transport, storage, environmental controls, wetlands, farmland reclamation, acid rain, longwall mining, mine monitoring systems, occupational safety, training, surface mining, underground mining, water resources development, and the US export policy.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Groundwater Monitoring Guidance for the Industry Action Plan on Coal Combustion Product Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is scheduled to release federal guidelines for management of coal combustion products (CCPs) in 2007. The utility industry has developed a voluntary Action Plan as an alternative to the federal guidelines. In either case, groundwater monitoring will be required. The purpose of this report is to provide guidance for implementing a groundwater-monitoring program at CCP management sites consistent with the Action Plan proposed by the utility industry.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Measurements in Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to provide information to help interpret gross alpha and gross beta concentrations in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate. This objective was accomplished by chemically characterizing 15 field leachate samples that were collected at three CCP management facilities. The leachate samples were analyzed for gross alpha and gross beta concentrations and for the potential individual alpha and beta emitters in solution. Gross alpha concentrations at the three sites ranged fro...

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Business Plan for Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBP) -- Biosolids Blends in Horticultural Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a marketing plan for coal combustion by-products (CCBP)-biosolids blends which summarizes the business opportunity (potential demand for CCBP-biosolids blends) and defines conditions necessary to seize and execute the opportunity identified. The plan places a hypothetical business in a specific location (Austell, GA) to make the cost-profit analysis as realistic as possible. It should be remembered, however, that the marketing plan for a business venture is not "the business." This h...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Products Blends as Soil Substitutes/Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data from greenhouse and field experiments evaluating the utilization of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) as (i) components of potting mixes to grow ornamentals in a greenhouse, (ii) components of topsoil to grow sod in a greenhouse on plastic, and (iii) components of topsoil to produce sod in the field. The experimental mixes included bottom and fly-ash mixed with biosolids. Two greenhouse experiments involving Evolvus and Pansy test plants and a greenhouse experiment to grow sod ...

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Groundwater Quality Signatures for Assessing Potential Impacts from Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron and sulfate are recognized as potential indicators of the influence of leachate from coal-combustion products (CCPs) on groundwater quality. However, there are cases in which these two constituents do not provide sufficient data to characterize groundwater for potential impacts from CCPs. In these cases, the concentrations of other indicator constituents in solution and/or advanced analytical techniques may be used to support other information. A three-tiered analysis approach can provide a ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hanna IV, underground coal gasification site, Wyoming, and comparison to other Wyoming UCG sites  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of 21 post-burn cores taken from the Hanna IV UCG site allows 96 m (315 ft) of overburden to be subdivided into four local stratigraphic units. The 7.6 m (25 ft) thick Hanna No. 1 coal seam is overlain by a laterally discontinuous, 3.3 m (11 ft) thick shaley mudstone (Unit A') in part of the Hanna IV site. A more widespread, 30 m (90 ft) thick well-indurated sandstone (Unit A) overlies the A' unit. Unit A is the roof rock for both of the Hanna IV cavities. Overlying Unit A is a 33 m (108 ft) thick sequence of mudstone and claystone (Unit B), and the uppermost unit at the Hanna IV site (Unit C) is a coarse-grained sandstone that ranges in thickness from 40 to 67 m (131 to 220 ft). Two elliptical cavities were formed during the two phases of the Hanna IV experiment. The larger cavity, Hanna IVa, is 45 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 18 m (59 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity; the Hanna IVb cavity is 40 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 11 m (36 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity. Geotechnical tests indicated that the Hanna IV overburden rocks were moderately strong to strong, based on the empirical classification of Broch and Franklin (1972), and a positive, linear correlation exists between rock strength and volume percent calcite cement. There is an inverse linear correlation between rock strength and porosity for the Hanna IV overburden rocks. 28 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs..

Marcouiller, B.A.; Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

364

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the first such report that will be submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1--December 31, 2003. This quarter saw progress in three areas. These areas are: (1) Evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor, as well as (3) Set up and data collection of baseline performance using the steam reformer. All of the projects are proceeding on schedule. During this quarter one conference paper was written that will be presented at the ASME Power 2004 conference in March 2004, which outlines the research direction and basis for looking at the coal to hydrogen pathway.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Coal mining technology, economics and policy 1990  

SciTech Connect

The conference began with several presentations on the US coal energy policy and trends in the coal industry, including tax impacts and changes in environmental regulations. Technical topics included diesel exhaust emissions in underground mines; use of wetlands; occupational safety; land reclamation techniques; and advanced technologies for longwall mining, surface mining, and underground mining. Forty-two papers have been indexed separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Simulating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration/ECBM Production in Coal Seams: Effects of Permeability Anisotropies and Other Coal Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics for Sequestering CO Economics for Sequestering CO 2 in Coal Seams with Horizontal Wells Grant S. Bromhal, NETL/US DOE W. Neal Sams, NETL/EG&G Sinisha A. Jikich, NETL/Parsons Turgay Ertekin, Penn State Duane H. Smith, NETL/US DOE 3 rd Annual Sequestration Conference May 3-6, 2004 Alexandria, VA Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Problem: How do economics change the optimal design of coal seam sequestration in Eastern coal seams? * Eastern coal seams tend to be thin with relatively high methane content and sequestration capacity per mass of coal. * Horizontal wells have shown promise for improved methane recovery and CO 2 injectivity. * Many studies have been performed to optimize design for total volume of CO 2 sequestered, but economics have not been included. Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date

368

Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

European legislation in the United Kingdom: a threat to coal-fired power station product utilization?  

SciTech Connect

The author considers that the European Union has not taken the approach adopted in the USA where environmental regulators are keen to promote the use of coal-fired power station ash by-product and recycled materials. The United Kingdom has seen, with some dismay, the effects EU legislation is having on the ash industry. This article outlines only some of the problems being tackled. The Waste Framework Directive is difficult to interpret and fails to define critical aspects of the problem. This directive is discussed at some length in the article. A total of nine directives effect the operation of coal-fired power plant. Many are imprecise and open to interpretation and cause a deal of frustration, delays and confusion to the ash supplier and contractor. This is causing markets to suffer.

Sear, K.A. [Quality Ash Association (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NETL sponsored effort seeks to develop continuous technologies for the production of carbon products, which may be thought of as the heavier products currently produced from refining of crude petroleum and coal tars obtained from metallurgical grade coke ovens. This effort took binder grade pitch, produced from liquefaction of West Virginia bituminous grade coal, all the way to commercial demonstration in a state of the art arc furnace. Other products, such as crude oil, anode grade coke and metallurgical grade coke were demonstrated successfully at the bench scale. The technology developed herein diverged from the previous state of the art in direct liquefaction (also referred to as the Bergius process), in two major respects. First, direct liquefaction was accomplished with less than a percent of hydrogen per unit mass of product, or about 3 pound per barrel or less. By contrast, other variants of the Bergius process require the use of 15 pounds or more of hydrogen per barrel, resulting in an inherent materials cost. Second, the conventional Bergius process requires high pressure, in the range of 1500 psig to 3000 psig. The WVU process variant has been carried out at pressures below 400 psig, a significant difference. Thanks mainly to DOE sponsorship, the WVU process has been licensed to a Canadian Company, Quantex Energy Inc, with a commercial demonstration unit plant scheduled to be erected in 2011.

Elliot Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Mark Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; James Mayberry; Alfred Stiller; Joseph Stoffa; Christopher Yurchick; John Zondlo

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

Conocophillips

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLGIES (IMPPCCT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The project has completed Phase I, and is currently in Phase II of development. The two project phases include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; and (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The Phase I of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The WREL integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The early entrance coproduction plant study conducted in Phase I of the IMPPCCT project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there are minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the synthesis gas (syngas). However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase II is to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies will address the technical concerns that will make the IMPPCCT concept competitive with natural

Albert C. Tsang

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The project has completed Phase I, and is currently in Phase II of development. The two project phases include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; and (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The Phase I of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The WREL integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The early entrance coproduction plant study conducted in Phase I of the IMPPCCT project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there are minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the synthesis gas (syngas). However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase II is to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies will address the technical concerns that will make the IMPPCCT concept competitive with natural

Albert C. Tsang

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Proceedings: 15th International American Coal Ash Association Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs): Bu ilding Partnerships for Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theme of the symposium is "building partnerships for sustainability." Topics discussed at the 15th International Symposium on Management and Use of CCPs included fundamental coal combustion product (CCP) use research, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial uses. There is a continuing international research interest in CCP use because of the prospects of avoiding disposal costs, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and generating revenue from CCP sales.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume III. Coal resource depletion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While US coal resources are known to be vast, their rate of depletion in a future based predominantly on coal has not been examined analytically heretofore. The Coal Depletion Model inventories the coal resource on a regional basis and calculates the cost of coal extraction by three technologies - strip and underground mining and in-situ combustion. A plausible coal demand scenario extending from 1975 to the year 2050 is used as a basis in applying the model. In the year 2050, plants in operation include 285 syncrude plants, each producing 100,000 B/D; 312 SNG plants, each producing 250 million SCF/D and 722 coal-fired electric power plants, each of 1000 MW capacity. In addition, there is 890 million tons per year of industrial coal consumption. Such a high level of coal use would deplete US coal resources much more rapidly than most people appreciate. Of course, the actual amount of US coal is unknown, and if the coal in the hypothetical reliability category is included, depletion is delayed. Coal in this category, however, has not been mapped; it is only presumed to exist on the basis of geological theory. The coal resource depletion model shows that unilateral imposition of a severance tax by a state tends to shift production to other coal producing regions. Boom and bust cycles are both delayed and reduced in their magnitude. When several states simultaneously impose severance taxes, the effect of each is weakened.Key policy issues that emerge from this analysis concern the need to reduce the uncertainty of the magnitude and geographic distribution of the US coal resource and the need to stimulate interaction among the parties at interest to work out equitable and acceptable coal conversion plant location strategies capable of coping with the challenges of a high-coal future.

Dickson, E.M.; Yabroff, I.W.; Kroll, C.A.; White, R.K.; Walton, B.L.; Ivory, M.E.; Fullen, R.E.; Weisbecker, L.W.; Hays, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. During the reporting period, various methods to remove low-level contaminants for the synthesis gas were reviewed. In addition, there was a transition of the project personnel for GEC which has slowed the production of the outstanding project reports.

Gary Harmond; Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method for control of subsurface coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

The burn front in an in situ underground coal gasification operation is controlled by utilizing at least two parallel groups of vertical bore holes disposed in the coalbed at spaced-apart locations in planes orthogonal to the plane of maximum permeability in the coalbed. The combustion of the coal is initiated in the coalbed adjacent to one group of the bore holes to establish a combustion zone extending across the group while the pressure of the combustion supporting gas mixture and/or the combustion products is regulated at each well head by valving to control the burn rate and maintain a uniform propagation of the burn front between the spaced-apart hole groups to gasify virtually all the coal lying therebetween.

Komar, Charles A. (Uniontown, PA)

1976-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

Underground Layout Configuration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

A. Linden

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

Southern cone energy network coal gasification for SNG production and pipeline system feasibility study (Brazil). Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of the volume reports on the coal gasification plant study performed by the Advanced Technology Division of Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Inc., together with information on coal resources and markets, gas demand, and by-product markets provided by Jaakko Poyry. Jaakko Poyry also supported the study with site, cost, economic, and other required local Brazilian data. Part II of the volume presents the results of Fluor's study of an SNG gas transport and gas distribution system. Also included are the results of an alternate study into barging coal north to a gasification plant located in the Santos area.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. (Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. (Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. [Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Resource Assessment & Production Testing for Coal Bed Methane in the Illinois Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess the economic coal bed methane potential of the Illinois Basin, the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky performed a geological assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. A considerable effort went into generating cumulative coal thickness and bed structure maps to identify target areas for exploratory drilling. Following this, the first project well was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. Eight additional wells were subsequently drilled in Indiana (3) and Kentucky (5) during 2004 and 2005. In addition, a five spot pilot completion program was started with three wells being completed. Gas contents were found to be variable, but generally higher than indicated by historical data. Gas contents of more than 300 scf/ton were recovered from one of the bore holes in Kentucky. Collectively, our findings indicate that the Illinois Basin represents a potentially large source of economic coal bed methane. Additional exploration will be required to refine gas contents and the economics of potential production.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Utilization of high sulfur coal in carbon fiber production. Final report, April 1993--August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PYROGRAF-III{trademark} is a highly graphitic vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) produced by the chemical vapor deposition of carbon on metallic catalysts in the temperature range of 1000{degrees}C. This is entirely different from commercial carbon fiber, which is made by first forming a filament and then graphitizing it in a high temperature oven. For PYROGRAF-III{trademark} small amounts of sulfur in the form of hydrogen sulfide are added to the process to enhance the yield. This method of supplying the necessary sulfur is both expensive and hazardous since hydrogen sulfide is flammable, toxic, and corrosive. To supply the sulfur more economically and safely, high sulfur coal was proposed as a replacement for the hydrogen sulfide gas. Applied Sciences, Inc. is the sole producer of this material in pound quantities. The primary objective of research grant OCDO-922-8 was to demonstrate that Ohio`s high sulfur coal can replace the expensive, toxic hydrogen sulfide in the production of vapor grown carbon fiber as well as become a partial or complete source of carbon. The secondary objective was to analyze the exhaust for the release of harmful sulfur compounds and to project the economic potential of the use of coal.

Burton, D.J.; Guth, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 32. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Underground Surface Total Over 1,000 58.86 19.50 31.70 Over 500 to 1,000 84.65 66.80 74.74 Over 200 to 500 95.31 73.29 84.14 Over 100 to 200 98.00 68.97 82.69 Over 50 to 100 81.53 75.99 78.61 50 or Under 92.87 63.12 73.78 U.S. Total 66.56 26.43 39.95 Note: An average sales price is calculated by dividing the total free on board (f.o.b) rail/barge value of the coal sold by the total coal sold. Excludes mines producing less than 25,000 short tons, which are not

389

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial plants operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues; and (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. This report describes management planning, work breakdown structure development, and feasibility study activities by the IMPPCCT consortium in support of the first project phase. Project planning activities have been completed, and a project timeline and task list has been generated. Requirements for an economic model to evaluate the West Terre Haute implementation and for other commercial implementations are being defined. Specifications for methanol product and availability of local feedstocks for potential commercial embodiment plant sites have been defined. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the fifth phase solicitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the GEC and an Industrial Consortia are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Doug Strickland; Albert Tsang

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Abstracts of publications and reports from Coal Mining Technology Tesearch. Open file report  

SciTech Connect

The report contains abstracts describing articles, papers, and reports dealing with the contract research results of the Coal Mining Technology Research Program. The report is divided into four major areas: (1) general, (2) underground mining, (3) surface mining, and (4) mine systems. The underground mining section is subdivided into mine planning, mine development, production systems, and logistics. The surface mining section is subdivided into mine planning, production systems, logistics, and reclamation. Within each category, projects are listed chronologically from the earliest to the latest publication.

Fowkes, R.S.; Mytrysak, C.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Vitrified underground structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

Murphy, Mark T. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Stottlemyre, James A. (Richland, WA); Tixier, Jr., John S. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

393

Automated apparatus for solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated apparatus for the solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In use of the apparatus, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control means. The mixture in the filter is agitated by means of ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products  

SciTech Connect

This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, coking and composite fabrication continued using coal-derived samples. These samples were tested in direct carbon fuel cells. Methodology was refined for determining the aromatic character of hydro treated liquid, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Tests at GrafTech International showed that binder pitches produced using the WVU solvent extraction protocol can result in acceptable graphite electrodes for use in arc furnaces. These tests were made at the pilot scale.

Elliot B. Kennel; R. Michael Bergen; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; W. Morgan Summers; John W. Zondlo

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Two project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, DOE approved the RD&T Plan submitted in the previous quarter. The RD&T Plan forms the basis for the Continuation Application to initiate the transition of the project from Phase I to Phase II. Potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis will be tested in slipstream units at the WREL facility during Phase II. A supplemental information package consisting of a revised Work Breakdown Structure and Budget Plan for Phase II and other necessary forms was also submitted. Agreement is being reached with DOE's patent attorney on the scope of the limited rights data to be provided under the Cooperative Agreement. Preparation of a comprehensive Final Report for Phase I of the project, which will consolidate the remaining deliverables including the Initial Feasibility Report, Concept Report, Site Analysis Report, Economic Analysis, and Preliminary Project Financing Plan, continued during the reporting period. Significant progress was made in the Subsystem Design Specification section of the report.

Albert Tsang

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "underground coal production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for use in gas separation and recovery processes. The overall objective of this project is to determine whether Illinois Basin coals are suitable feedstocks for the production of CMS and to evaluate the potential application of these products in commercial gas separation processes. In Phase 1 of this project, gram quantities of char were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. Chars having surface areas of 1500--2100 M{sup 2}/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as the activant. These high surface area chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO and H{sub 2}, on these chars at 25{degrees}C was determined. Several chars showed good potential for efficient O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} separation; both a high adsorption capacity and selectivity were achieved. The full potential of these materials in commercial gas separations has yet to be realized. In Phase 2 of this project, currently in progress, larger quantities of char are being prepared from Illinois coal in a batch fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and in a continuous rotary tube kiln (RTK). The pore structure of the prepared chars will be tailored for a specific gas separation process by activation in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and/or carbon deposition with CH{sub 4}.

Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M. [Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States). Geological Survey; Banerjee, D.D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention comprises the steps of first reacting particulate coal with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C and at a partial pressure of methane of less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. More preferably, the method of the subject invention is carried out at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C to 1000/sup 0/C and a pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 1.5 seconds. Surprisingly, it has been found that in the practice of the subject invention not only are commercially significant quantities of ethylene produced, namely yields in excess of 10% (percent carbon converted to product), along with economically significant quantities of-benzene and light oils, namely toluene and xylene, but also that there is little, if any, net consumption of methane in the reaction and possibly even a small net production. Since it is apparent that the carbonaceous solids or char remaining after the reaction is carried out may be burned to provide the necessary energy to carry out the process of the subject invention, it is apparent that the subject invention advantageously provides a method for the conversion of coal to economically significant quantities of ethylene, benzene and light oils while requiring only coal and, possibly, small amounts of make-up methane. Other objects and advantages of the subject invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from a consideration of the attached drawings, the detailed description of the invention, and the experimental examples set forth below.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Holistic Routing Protocol Design in Underground Wireless Sensor Networks Di Wu, Renfa Li Lichun Bao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and deployed in real life operations. Especially in light of coal mine disasters in recent years, governmental. Emslie et al. studied the radio communication properties in coal mines, and discovered the radio of underground communication in tunnels. Li et al. explored the applicability of UWB channels in coal mines

Bao, Lichun

406

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) presents U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, coal quality, and stocks data.

407

Coal resource estimation in the Bayir field, Yatagan-Mugla, SW Turkey  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on some coal properties and calculation of coal resources with two classical (isopach and polygon) methods in the Bayir field, Yatagan-Mugla, which is located in southwestern Anatolia. This field has not been mined because it is still in the exploration stage. A productive coal seam of Early (?)-Middle Miocene age has a mineable coal thickness of 1.25 m to 18.01 m. Proximate analysis results indicated that this coal seam contains high moisture, ash, volatile matter, total sulphur content, and net calorific values. The weighted average mineable coal thickness calculated from the isopachs is 7.52 m and 7.82 m from polygonal methods. The in situ tonnages with isopach and polygonal methods were calculated to be 122.8 Mt and 130 Mt, respectively. The average value of the two methods shows 126.4 Mt in situ coal tonnages. Total amount of the in situ mineable coal resources is 77.7 Mt, which indicates an important coal potential in the Bayir field. The overburden thickness ranges from 72 m to 493 m in the Bayir field, averaging 257 m, indicating a deep coal mine. The overburden ratio averages 37 m{sup 3}/ton, indicating an underground coal mine to feed a power plant in near future.

Inaner, H.; Nakoman, E.; Karayigit, A.I. [Dokuz Eylul University, Buca Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Geological Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/this operational mode, the gasifiers and other parts of the

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters  

SciTech Connect

Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

412

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 21. Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Number of Mining Operations 2 Number of Employees 3 Average Production per Employee Hour (short tons) 4 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change 2012 2011 Percent Change Alabama 54 62 -12.9 5,041 4,756 6.0 1.68 1.66 0.7 Underground 11 12 -8.3 3,190 3,138 1.7 1.64 1.45 13.2 Surface 43 50 -14.0 1,851 1,618 14.4 1.75 2.08 -15.8 Alaska 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Surface 1 1 - 143 136 5.1 5.98 6.48 -7.7 Arizona 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Surface 1 1 - 432 419 3.1 7.38 8.44 -12.6 Arkansas 2 2 - 73 70 4.3 0.58 0.70

413

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

414

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

415

Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The ADESORB Process for Economical Production of Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Coal Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) currently manages the largest research program in the country for controlling coal-based mercury emissions. NETL has shown through various field test programs that the determination of cost-effective mercury control strategies is complex and highly coal- and plant-specific. However, one particular technology has the potential for widespread application: the injection of activated carbon upstream of either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter baghouse. This technology has potential application to the control of mercury emissions on all coal-fired power plants, even those with wet and dry scrubbers. This is a low capital cost technology in which the largest cost element is the cost of sorbents. Therefore, the obvious solutions for reducing the costs of mercury control must focus on either reducing the amount of sorbent needed or decreasing the cost of sorbent production. NETL has researched the economics and performance of novel sorbents and determined that there are alternatives to the commercial standard (NORIT DARCO{reg_sign} Hg) and that this is an area where significant technical improvements can still be made. In addition, a key barrier to the application of sorbent injection technology to the power industry is the availability of activated carbon production. Currently, about 450 million pounds ($250 million per year) of activated carbon is produced and used in the U.S. each year - primarily for purification of drinking water, food, and beverages. If activated carbon technology were to be applied to all 1,100 power plants, EPA and DOE estimate that it would require an additional $1-$2 billion per year, which would require increasing current capacity by a factor of two to eight. A new facility to produce activated carbon would cost approximately $250 million, would increase current U.S. production by nearly 25%, and could take four to five years to build. This means that there could be significant shortages in supply if response to new demand is not well-timed.

Robin Stewart

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

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Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

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Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

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