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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

2

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

Manilla, R.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative. Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP) and technically recoverable resource (TRR) in highly uncertain unconventional gas reservoirs, worldwide. We evaluated global unconventional OGIP by (1) developing theoretical statistic relationships between conventional hydrocarbon and unconventional gas; (2) fitting these relationships to North America publically available data; and (3) applying North American theoretical statistical relationships to evaluate the volume of unconventional gas resource of the world. Estimated global unconventional OGIP ranges from 83,300 (P10) to 184,200 (P90) Tcf. To assess global TRR from unconventional gas reservoirs, we developed a computer program that we call Unconventional Gas Resource Assessment System (UGRAS). In the program, we integrated a Monte Carlo technique with an analytical reservoir simulator to estimate the original volume of gas in place and to predict production performance. We used UGRAS to evaluate the probabilistic distribution of OGIP, TRR and recovery factor (RF) for the most productive unconventional gas formations in the North America. The P50 of recovery factor for shale gas, tight sands gas and coalbed methane is 25%, 79% and 41%, respectively. Finally, we applied our global OGIP assessment and these distributions of recovery factor gained from our analyses of plays/formations in the United States to estimate global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource. Global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource is estimated from 43,000 (P10) to 112,000 (P90) Tcf.

Dong, Zhenzhen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The...

11

Unconventional gas: truly a game changer?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If prices of natural gas justify and/or if concerns about climate change push conventional coal off the table, vast quantities of unconventional gas can be brought to market at reasonable prices. According to a report issued by PFC Energy, global unconventional natural gas resources that may be ultimately exploited with new technologies could be as much as 3,250,000 billion cubic feet. Current conventional natural gas resources are estimated around 620,000 billion cubic feet.

NONE

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

2010 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2010 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional...

13

2009 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2009 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional...

14

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

AN ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNCONVENTIONAL GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the rapidly increasing demand for energy and the increasing prices for oil and gas, the role of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) as energy sources… (more)

Wei, Yunan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Predicting the performance of horizontal wells in unconventional gas reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional gas has become an increasingly important component of total U.S. domestic production for the past decade. Currently, only numerical models (simulators) can be used… (more)

Drinkard, Dylan Todd.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Translating Lessons Learned from Unconventional Natural Gas R...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOEFE) that established the essential exploration and production technology for these resources; and, (2) the unconventional gas...

19

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and technology (35% of funds). Unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production technology (32.5%). The technology challenges of small...

20

Impact of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Impact of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 by Ted McCallister U.S. natural gas demand is projected to exceed 30 trillion cubic feet per ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Unconventional gas resources in the U.S.A.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional gas accounts for more than 40% of U.S. domestic gas production and more than 10% of world output. The amount of resources available is still uncertain and estimates vary to a large degree. In this paper

Jon Schumann; Shapour Vossoughi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources September 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next

23

NETL: News Release - Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2010 7, 2010 Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Simulation and Visualization Tools, CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Targeted for Advancement Washington, D.C. - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next generation CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) to the point where it is ready for pilot (small) scale testing.

24

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, launched by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), is a public/private partnership valued at $400 million over eight years that is designed to benefit consumers by developing technologies to increase America's domestic oil and gas production and reduce the Nation's dependency on foreign imports. Key aspects of the program include utilizing a non-profit consortium to manage the research, establishing two federal advisory committees, and funding of $50 million per year derived from royalties, rents, and bonuses from federal onshore

25

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever increasing energy demand brings about widespread interest to rapidly, profitably and efficiently develop unconventional resources, among which tight gas sands hold a significant portion. However, optimization of development strategies in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information, and time and budget constraints. Unfortunately, classical full-scale reservoir evaluation cannot be routinely employed by small- to medium-sized operators, given its timeconsuming and expensive nature. In addition, the full-scale evaluation is generally built on deterministic principles and produces a single realization of the reservoir, despite the significant uncertainty faced by operators. This work addresses the need for rapid and cost-efficient technologies to help operators determine optimal well spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast, approximate reservoir simulation model to match and predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs. Simulation results were then fit with decline curves to enable direct integration of the reservoir model into a Bayesian decision model. These integrated tools were applied to the tight gas assets of Unconventional Gas Resources Inc. in the Berland River area, Alberta, Canada.

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Will lecture on: Unconventional Oil and Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not yet resolved. Ten years ago this category comprised heavy oil, oil shale, coal bed methane, tight gas, and economic aspects of gas shale and tight oil development. The role of oil shale in the emerging energy applied research on heavy oil, gas hydrate, gas shale, tight oil, and oil shale reservoirs. He advises

Schuster, Assaf

27

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

28

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

29

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas Annual report on ultra-deepwater natural gas, etc, required by Energy Policy Act of 2005, Subtitle J, Section 999 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program More Documents & Publications 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan

31

Preparation of environmental analyses for synfuel and unconventional gas technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Government agencies that offer financial incentives to stimulate the commercialization of synfuel and unconventional gas technologies usually require an analysis of environmental impacts resulting from proposed projects. This report reviews potentially significant environmental issues associated with a selection of these technologies and presents guidance for developing information and preparing analyses to address these issues. The technologies considered are western oil shale, tar sand, coal liquefaction and gasification, peat, unconventional gas (western tight gas sands, eastern Devonian gas shales, methane from coal seams, and methane from geopressured aquifers), and fuel ethanol. Potentially significant issues are discussed under the general categories of land use, air quality, water use, water quality, biota, solid waste disposal, socioeconomics, and health and safety. The guidance provided in this report can be applied to preparation and/or review of proposals, environmental reports, environmental assessments, environmental impact statements, and other types of environmental analyses. The amount of detail required for any issue discussed must, by necessity, be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Reed, R.M. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Producing Gas-Oil Ratio Performance of Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study presents a detailed analysis of producing gas-oil ratio performance characteristics from conventional reservoir to unconventional reservoir. Numerical simulations of various reservoir fluid… (more)

Lei, Guowen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery and Salt Production - Jim Silva, GE Oil & Gas 9:30 a.m. Appalachian Shale and Barnett Area Water Shale Coalition 8:30 a.m. Meeting Overview & Agenda - Kent Perry, Vice President, Onshore Programs Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production - Yongchun Tang, PEER Institute Shale Gas

Yener, Aylin

34

2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural 7 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Annual report on ultra-deepwater, etc. natural gas research program required by Energy Policy Act of 2005, Subtitle J, Section 999 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program More Documents & Publications 2007 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan 2008 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program

35

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reserves estimation in unconventional (low/ultra-low permeability) reservoirs has become a topic of increased interest as more of these resources are being developed, especially in North America. The estimation of reserves in unconventional reservoirs is challenging due to the long transient flow period exhibited by the production data. The use of conventional methods (i.e., Arps' decline curves) to estimate reserves is often times inaccurate and leads to the overestimation of reserves because these models are only (theoretically) applicable for the boundary-dominated flow regime. The premise of this work is to present and demonstrate a methodology which continuously estimates the ultimate recovery during the producing life of a well in order to generate a time-dependent profile of the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR). The "objective" is to estimate the final EUR value(s) from several complimentary analyses. In this work we present the "Continuous EUR Method" to estimate reserves for unconventional gas reservoirs using a rate-time analysis approach. This work offers a coherent process to reduce the uncertainty in reserves estimation for unconventional gas reservoirs by quantifying "upper" and "lower" limits of EUR prior to the onset of boundary-dominated flow. We propose the use of traditional and new rate-time relations to establish the "upper" limit for EUR. We clearly demonstrate that rate-time relations which better represent the transient and transitional flow regimes (in particular the power law exponential rate decline relation) often lead to a more accurate "upper" limit for reserves estimates — earlier in the producing life of a well (as compared to conventional ("Arps") relations). Furthermore, we propose a straight line extrapolation technique to offer a conservative estimate of maximum produced gas which we use as the "lower" limit for EUR. The EUR values estimated using this technique continually increase with time, eventually reaching a maximum value. We successfully demonstrate the methodology by applying the approach to 43 field examples producing from 7 different tight sandstone and shale gas reservoirs. We show that the difference between the "upper" and "lower" limit of reserves decreases with time and converges to the "true" value of reserves during the latter producing life of a well.

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As gas production from conventional gas reservoirs in the United States decreases, industry is turning more attention to the exploration and development of unconventional gas resources (UGR). This trend is expanding quickly worldwide. Unlike North America where development of UGRs and technology is now mature and routine, many countries are just beginning to develop unconventional gas resources. Rogner (1996) estimated that the unconventional gas in place, including coalbed methane, shale gas and tight-sand gas, exceeds 30,000 Tcf worldwide. As part of a research team, I helped to develop a software package called Unconventional Gas Resource Advisory (UGRA) System which includes the Formation Analog Selection Tool (FAST) and Basin Analog Investigations (BASIN) to objectively and rapidly identify and rank mature North American formations and basins that may be analogous to nascent international target basins. Based on BASIN and FAST results, the relationship between mature and underexplored basins is easily accessed. To quantify the unconventional resource potential in typical gas basins, I revised and used a computer model called the Petroleum Resources Investigation Summary and Evaluation (PRISE) (Old, 2008). This research is based on the resource triangle concept, which implies that all natural resources, including oil and gas, are distributed log-normally. In this work, I describe a methodology to estimate values of technically recoverable resources (TRR) for unconventional gas reservoirs by combining estimates of production, reserves, reserves growth, and undiscovered resources from a variety of sources into a logical distribution. I have also investigated mature North American unconventional gas resources, and predict unconventional resources in underexplored basins worldwide for case study. Based on the results of testing BASIN and PRISE, we conclude that our evaluation of 24 North American basins supports the premise that basins analysis can be used to estimate UGRs.

Cheng, Kun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impacts of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to represent unconventional gas technologies and their impacts on projections in the Annual EnergyOutlook 2000 (AEO2000).

Information Center

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Public Heath Implications of Unconventional Gas Drilling For presentation to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oil/gas) has caused a largeApplications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition material. The closed and unpropped fracture is then non-conductive to the flow of oil or gas

Sibille, Etienne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources  

SciTech Connect

Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins, will play an important role in fulfilling future world energy needs. We must identify and quantify potential unconventional gas resources in basins around the world to plan for their development. Basin analog assessment is one technique that can be used to identify and quantify unconventional gas resources that is less expensive and less time consuming. We have developed a basin analog methodology that is useful for rapidly and consistently evaluating the unconventional hydrocarbon resource potential in exploratory basins. We developed software, Basin Analog System (BAS), to perform and accelerate the process of identifying analog basins. Also, we built a database that includes geologic and petroleum systems information of intensely studied North America basins that contain well characterized conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. We have selected 25 basins in North America that have a history of producing unconventional gas resources. These are �reference� basins that are used to predict resources in frontier or exploratory basins. The software assists us in ranking reference basins that are most analogous to the target basin for the primary purpose of evaluating the potential unconventional resources in the target basin. The methodology allows us to numerically rank all the reference basins relative to the target basin. The accuracy of the results depends on the descriptions of geologic and petroleum systems. We validated the software to make sure it is functioning correctly and to test the validity of the process and the database. Finding a reference basin that is analogous to a frontier basin can provide insights into potential unconventional gas resources of the frontier basin. Our method will help industry predict the unconventional hydrocarbon resource potential of frontier basins, guide exploration strategy, infer reservoir characteristics, and make preliminary decisions concerning the best engineering practices as wells are drilled, completed, stimulated and produced.

Singh, Kalwant

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of an Improved Methodology to Assess Potential Unconventional Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the important role played today by unconventional gas resources in North America and their enormous potential for the future around the world, it is vital to both policy makers and industry that the volumes of these resources and the impact of technology on these resources be assessed. To provide for optimal decision making regarding energy policy, research funding, and resource development, it is necessary to reliably quantify the uncertainty in these resource assessments. Since the 1970s, studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources have been conducted by various private and governmental agencies, the most rigorous of which was by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS employed a cell-based, probabilistic methodology which used analytical equations to calculate distributions of the resources assessed. USGS assessments have generally produced distributions for potential unconventional gas resources that, in our judgment, are unrealistically narrow for what are essentially undiscovered, untested resources. In this article, we present an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. Our methodology is a stochastic approach that includes Monte Carlo simulation and correlation between input variables. Application of the improved methodology to the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado with USGS data validates the means and standard deviations of resource distributions produced by the USGS methodology, but reveals that these distributions are not right skewed, as expected for a natural resource. Our investigation indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the gas resource distributions are caused by the use of narrow triangular input parameter distributions. The stochastic methodology proposed here is more versatile and robust than the USGS analytic methodology. Adoption of the methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input distributions, should allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar, Jesus; McVay, Duane A., E-mail: mcvay@pe.tamu.edu; Lee, W. John [Texas A and M University, Department of Petroleum Engineering, 3116 TAMU (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional resources will play an important role in filling the gap between supply and demand for future world energy. In North America, the impact of unconventional resources on energy supplies is growing continuously. However, around the world they have yet to serve as a major contributor to the energy supply, partly due to the scarcity of information about the exploration and development technologies required to produce them. Basin analogy can be used to estimate the undiscovered petroleum potential in a target basin by finding a geological analog that has been explored enough that its resource potential is fully understood. In 2006, Singh developed a basin analog system BASIN (Basin Analog Systems INvestigation) in detail that could rapidly and consistently identify analogous reference basins for a target basin. My research focused on continuing that work, comprehensively improving the basin analog system in four areas: the basin analog method; the database; the software functionality; and the validation methods. The updated system compares basins in terms of probability distributions of geological parameters. It compensates for data that are sparse or that do not represent basin-level geological parameters, and it expands the system's ability to compare widely varying quantitative parameters. Because the updated BASIN database contains more geologic and petroleum systems information on reference (existing) basins, it identifies analog basins more accurately and efficiently. The updated BASIN software was developed by using component-based design and data visualization techniques that help users better manage large volumes of information to understand various data objects and their complicated relationships among various data objects. Validation of the improved BASIN software confirms its accuracy: if a basin selected as the target basin appears in the reference basin list with other basins, the target basin is 100% analogous only to itself. Furthermore, when a target basin is analyzed by both BASIN and PRISE (Petroleum Resources Investigation and Summary Evaluation) software, results of the improved BASIN closely matched the PRISE results, which provides important support for using BASIN and PRISE together to quantitatively estimate the resource potential in frontier basins.

Wu, Wenyan 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, various private and governmental agencies have conducted studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources, particularly those resources contained in tight sands, fractured shales, and coal beds. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has assessed the amount of unconventional gas resources in North America, and its estimates are used by other government agencies as the basis for their resource estimates. While the USGS employs a probabilistic methodology, it is apparent from the resulting narrow ranges that the methodology underestimates the uncertainty of these undiscovered, untested, potential resources, which in turn limits the reliability and usefulness of the assessments. The objective of this research is to develop an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources that better accounts for the uncertainty in these resources. This study investigates the causes of the narrow ranges generated by the USGS analyticprobabilistic methodology used to prepare the 1995 national oil and gas assessment and the 2000 NOGA series, and presents an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. The new model improves upon the USGS method by using a stochastic approach, which includes correlation between the input variables and Monte Carlo simulation, representing a more versatile and robust methodology than the USGS analytic-probabilistic methodology. The improved methodology is applied to the assessment of potential unconventional gas resources in the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado, and compared to results of the evaluation performed by the USGS in 2002. Comparison of the results validates the means and standard deviations produced by the USGS methodology, but shows that the probability distributions generated are rather different and, that the USGS distributions are not skewed to right, as expected for a natural resource. This study indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the resulting USGS probability distributions are not caused by the analytic equations or lack of correlation between input parameters, but rather the use of narrow triangular probability distributions as input variables. Adoption of the improved methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input probability distributions, will allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decade, the worldwide demand for energy has continued to increase at a rapid rate. Natural gas has emerged as a primary source of US energy. The technically recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have increased from approximately 1,400 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) to approximately 2,100 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2010. The recent declines in gas prices have created short-term uncertainties and increased the risk of developing natural gas fields, rendering a substantial portion of this resource uneconomical at current gas prices. This research quantifies the impact of changes in finding and development costs (FandDC), lease operating expenses (LOE), and gas prices, in the estimation of the economically recoverable gas for unconventional plays. To develop our methodology, we have performed an extensive economic analysis using data from the Barnett Shale, as a representative case study. We have used the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the values of the Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically recoverable resource (TRR) for the play, and determine the economically recoverable resource (ERR) as a function of FandDC, LOE, and gas price. Our selected investment hurdle for a development project is a 20 percent rate of return and a payout of 5 years or less. Using our methodology, we have developed software to solve the problem. For the Barnett Shale data, at a FandDC of 3 Million dollars, we have found that 90 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 46 dollars/Mcf, 50 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 9.2 dollars/Mcf, and 10 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 5.2 dollars/Mcf. The developed methodology and software can be used to analyze other unconventional gas plays to reduce short-term uncertainties and determine the values of FandDC and gas prices that are required to recover economically a certain percentage of TRR.

Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(R&D) programs aimed at protecting the environment while enhancing domestic oil and gas exploration and production. Natural gas and crude oil provide two-thirds of our Nation's...

48

Gas-recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

Heckman, R.A.

1971-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

SeTES: A self-teaching expert system for the analysis, design, and prediction of gas production from unconventional gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SeTES is a self-teaching expert system that (a) can incorporate evolving databases involving any type and amount of relevant data (geological, geophysical, geomechanical, stimulation, petrophysical, reservoir, production, etc.) originating from unconventional ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, Expert system, Machine learning, Optimization, Simulation, Unconventional gas

George J. Moridis, Matthew T. Reagan, Heidi Anderson Kuzma, Thomas A. Blasingame, Y. Wayne Huang, Ralph Santos, Katie L. Boyle, Craig M. Freeman, Dilhan Ilk, Manuel Cossio, Srimoyee Bhattacharya, Michael Nikolaou

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. Mission The Secretary of Energy, in response to provisions of Subtitle J, Sec. 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, must carry out a program of research, development, demonstration, and commercial application of technologies for ultra-deepwater and onshore unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production, as well as addressing the technology

51

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

SciTech Connect

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Significant progress has been made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. RPSEA has concluded an industry-wide collaborative effort to identify focus areas for research awards under this program. This effort is summarized in the RPSEA Draft Annual Plan, which is currently under review by committees established by the Secretary of Energy.

Russell E. Fray

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Progress continues to be made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. Significant progress was made in development of the draft program solicitations. In addition, RPSEA personnel continued an aggressive program of outreach to engage the industry and ensure wide industry participation in the research award solicitation process.

Russell E. Fray

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

Olea, Ricardo A., E-mail: olea@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey (United States); Cook, Troy A. [Denver Federal Center (United States); Coleman, James L. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Golden Rules for a Golden Age of Gas World Energy Outlook Special Report on Unconventional GasGolden Rules for a Golden Age of Gas World Energy Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is poised to enter a golden age, but this future hinges critically on the successful development of the world’s vast unconventional gas resources. North American experience shows unconventional gas – notably shale gas – can be exploited economically. Many countries are lining up to emulate this success. But some governments are hesitant, or even actively opposed. They are responding to public concerns that production might involve unacceptable environmental and social damage. This report, in the World Energy Outlook series, treats these aspirations and anxieties with equal seriousness. It features two new cases: a Golden Rules Case, in which the highest practicable standards are adopted, gaining industry a “social licence to operate”; and its counterpart, in which the tide turns against unconventional gas as constraints prove too difficult to overcome. The report: ? ?Describes the unconventional gas resource and what is involved in exploiting it. ? ?Identifies the key environmental and social risks and how they can be addressed. ? ?Suggests the Golden Rules necessary to realise the economic and energy security benefits while meeting public concerns. ? ?Spells out the implications of compliance with these rules for governments and industry, including on development costs. ? ?Assesses the impact of the two cases on global gas trade patterns and pricing, energy security and climate change. For more information, and the free download of this report, please visit: www.worldenergyoutlook.org

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimization models of gas recovery and gas condensate processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a complex of mathematical models that formalize gas recovery and processing. Optimization problems for gas recovery and gas condensate processing are stated and corresponding solution algorithms are suggested. These mathematical models provide ...

M. Kh. Prilutskii; V. E. Kostyukov

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments… (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

58

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

2012 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Message from the Secretary Fueling our Nation's economy by making the most of America's natural gas and oil resources continues to be an important part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security and a clean energy economy. The Department continues its work toward safe and responsible · development of fossil fuels, while giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised. The EPACT Section 999 program (including the NETL Complementary Research program) coordinates with DOE's ongoing natural gas research and development program within Fossil Energy. The natural gas program is the locus of the Department of Energy's (DOE) natural gas R&D work and is focused on a collaborative interagency effort with the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of the Interior. A federal R&D plan is being developed for this collaboration, focusing on high priority recommendations of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee to safely and prudently develop the Nation's unconventional sale gas and tight oil resources. Each agency will focus on specific core research competencies. In the 2012 Annual Plan, and in light of the interagency collaborative work being carried out in DOE's natural gas R&D program onshore, we will focus on supporting the implementation of the priority collaborative research and development initiative. Offshore, we will deepen the collaboration and coordination with the DOl Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. A number of initiatives, analyses, and recommendations underpin the 2012 Annual Plan. These include coordination with the high priority work being carried out by DOE, EPA, and DOl related to recommendations from the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board regarding shale gas production, insights from our work with the DOl's Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee, recommendations from the DOE Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee and recommendations

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imaging techniques · Unconventional oil and gas recovery · Gas hydrates · Nano-sensors Cross recovery Unconventional resources Renewable fuels Carbon dioxide Public policy Environmental/health #12;The and commercializing OxProp a "controlled buoyancy proppant" that is expected to materially enhance oil and gas

62

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two of Shell Canada's refineries have logged about six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery facilities. The flare gas recovery systems were designed to recover the normal continuous flare gas flow for use in the refinery fuel gas system. The system consists of liquid knock-out, compression, and liquid seal facilities. Now that the debugging-stage challenges have been dealt with, Shell Canada is more than satisfied with the system performance. A well-thought-out installation can today be safe, trouble-free, and attractive from an economic and environmental viewpoint. This paper highlights general guidelines for the sizing, design and operation of a refinery flare gas recovery facility.

Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time frame. The unconventional oil and gas hydrocarbonsare currently no unconventional developments, oil or gas, in

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

Madden, M.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Landfill gas recovery: a technology status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas, which consists mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, can be recovered and used as a fuel. Processing will upgrade it to a high-Btu gas of pipeline quality. There are more than a dozen commercial landfill-gas recovery facilities in the US at present, all at relatively large sites. The amount of gas produced by a given site is a function of size, composition, and age of the landfill. Various techniques can be used to enhance gas production and yield, including controlled addition of moisture and nutrients; bacterial seeding and pH control also appear useful. Several computer models have been developed to examine the effects of various parameters on gas production and yield; these can aid in predicting optimum gas recovery and in maintaining the proper chemical balance within the producing portion of the landfill. Economically, a site's viability depends on its location and potential users, current competing energy costs, and legislation governing the site's operation. Legal problems of site operation can occur because of environmental and safety issues, as well as from questions of gas ownership, liability, and public utility commission considerations. Currently, R and D is under way to improve present recovery techniques and to develop new technologies and concepts. Cost comparisons and potential environmental impacts are being examined. Additional research is needed in the areas of gas enhancement, decompositional analysis, computer modeling, gas characterization, instrumentation, and engineering cost analysis. 77 references, 11 figures, 23 tables.

Zimmermann, R.E.; Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Wilkey, M.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing well spacing in unconventional gas reservoirs is difficult due to complex heterogeneity, large variability and uncertainty in reservoir properties, and lack of data that increase the production uncertainty. Previous methods are either suboptimal because they do not consider subsurface uncertainty (e.g., statistical moving-window methods) or they are too time-consuming and expensive for many operators (e.g., integrated reservoir characterization and simulation studies). This research has focused on developing and extending a new technology for determining optimal well spacing in tight gas reservoirs that maximize profitability. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated multi-well reservoir and decision model that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. The reservoir model is based on reservoir simulation technology coupled with geostatistical and Monte Carlo methods to predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs as a function of well spacing and different development scenarios. The variability in discounted cumulative production was used for direct integration of the reservoir model with a Bayesian decision model (developed by other members of the research team) that determines the optimal well spacing and hence the optimal development strategy. The integrated model includes two development stages with a varying Stage-1 time span. The integrated tools were applied to an illustrative example in Deep Basin (Gething D) tight gas sands in Alberta, Canada, to determine optimal development strategies. The results showed that a Stage-1 length of 1 year starting at 160-acre spacing with no further downspacing is the optimal development policy. It also showed that extending the duration of Stage 1 beyond one year does not represent an economic benefit. These results are specific to the Berland River (Gething) area and should not be generalized to other unconventional gas reservoirs. However, the proposed technology provides insight into both the value of information and the ability to incorporate learning in a dynamic development strategy. The new technology is expected to help operators determine the combination of primary and secondary development policies early in the reservoir life that profitably maximize production and minimize the number of uneconomical wells. I anticipate that this methodology will be applicable to other tight and shale gas reservoirs.

Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

Angenent, Lars T.

70

International Conference on "Developing Unconventional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate o Shale gas o Lignite Exploration and production o Peat Gas o Biodiesel o Oil sand o in 2009 to train manpower and to pursue research in the area of upstream Oil & Gas explorationInternational Conference on "Developing Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources" (DUOG 2013) st nd 1 , 2

Bhashyam, Srikrishna

71

Enhanced Gas Recovery Using Pressure and Displacement Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work contained in this thesis combines two previous enhanced gas recovery techniques; coproduction of water and gas from water-drive reservoirs and waterflooding of low… (more)

Walker, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

73

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

75

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for ultra-deepwater and onshore unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production, as well as addressing the technology challenges for small...

76

Technology and Economics Affecting Unconventional Reservoir Development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide, unconventional resources are important sources of oil and gas when most conventional resources are declining and demand for hydrocarbons is growing. The Masters? (1979)… (more)

Flores Campero, Cecilia P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power Plant Low-Quality Heat Sources Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is...

79

Geochemical constraints on microbial methanogenesis in an unconventional gas reservoir: Devonian Antrim shale, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Antrim Shale is a self-sourced, highly fractured gas reservoir. It subcrops around the margin of the Michigan Basin below Pleistocene glacial drift, which has served as a source of meteoric recharge to the unit. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich (>10% total organic carbon), hydrogen-rich (Type I kerogen) and thermally immature (R[sub o] = 0.4 to 0.6). Reserve estimates range from 4-8 Tcf, based on assumptions of a thermogenic gas play. Chemical and isotopic properties measured in the formation waters show significant regional variations and probably delineate zones of increased fluid flow controlled by the fracture network. [sup 14]C determinations on dissolved inorganic carbon indicate that freshwater recharge occurred during the period between the last glacial advance and the present. The isotopic composition of Antrim methane ([delta][sup 13]C = -49 to -59[per thousand]) has been used to suggest that the gas is of early thermogenic origin. However, the highly positive carbon of co-produced CO[sub 2] gas ([delta][sup 13]C [approximately] +22[per thousand]) and DIC in associated Antrim brines ([delta][sup 13]C = +19 to +31[per thousand]) are consistent with bacterially mediated fractionation. The correlation of deuterium in methane ([delta]D = -200 to -260[per thousand]) with that of the co-produced waters (SD = -20 to -90176) suggests that the major source of this microbial gas is via the CO[sub 2] reduction pathway within the reservoir. Chemical and isotopic results also demonstrate a significant (up to 25%) component of thermogenic gas as the production interval depth increases. The connection between the timing of groundwater recharge, hydrogeochemistry and gas production within the Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, is likely not unique and may find application to similar resources elsewhere.

Martini, A.M.; Budal, J.M.; Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Automatic flue gas heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

Whalen, D.A.

1983-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Original Research Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2):151-156.

Robert Jones Md; Brandon Wills Do; Christopher Kang Md

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

83

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

84

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

85

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

86

Unconventional Energy Resources: 2011 Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains nine unconventional energy resource commodity summaries prepared by committees of the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Unconventional energy resources, as used in this report, are those energy resources that do not occur in discrete oil or gas reservoirs held in structural or stratigraphic traps in sedimentary basins. These resources include coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, tight gas sands, gas shale and shale oil, geothermal resources, oil sands, oil shale, and uranium resources. Current U.S. and global research and development activities are summarized for each unconventional energy commodity in the topical sections of this report. Coal and uranium are expected to supply a significant portion of the world's energy mix in coming years. Coalbed methane continues to supply about 9% of the U.S. gas production and exploration is expanding in other countries. Recently, natural gas produced from shale and low-permeability (tight) sandstone has made a significant contribution to the energy supply of the United States and is an increasing target for exploration around the world. In addition, oil from shale and heavy oil from sandstone are a new exploration focus in many areas (including the Green River area of Wyoming and northern Alberta). In recent years, research in the areas of geothermal energy sources and gas hydrates has continued to advance. Reviews of the current research and the stages of development of these unconventional energy resources are described in the various sections of this report.

Collaboration: American Association of Petroleum Geologists

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Non-isothermal, compressible gas flow for the simulation of an enhanced gas recovery application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO"2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Enhanced gas recovery, Equation of state, Finite element method, Numerical simulation, Real gas behavior

N. BöTtcher; A. -K. Singh; O. Kolditz; R. Liedl

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas reservoirs are obvious targets for carbon sequestration by direct carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection by virtue of their proven record of gas production and integrity against gas escape. Carbon sequestration in depleted natural gas reservoirs can be coupled with enhanced gas production by injecting CO{sub 2} into the reservoir as it is being produced, a process called Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). In this process, supercritical CO{sub 2} is injected deep in the reservoir while methane (CH{sub 4}) is produced at wells some distance away. The active injection of CO{sub 2} causes repressurization and CH{sub 4} displacement to allow the control and enhancement of gas recovery relative to water-drive or depletion-drive reservoir operations. Carbon dioxide undergoes a large change in density as CO{sub 2} gas passes through the critical pressure at temperatures near the critical temperature. This feature makes CO{sub 2} a potentially effective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at the end of the CSEGR process when the reservoir is filled with CO{sub 2}, additional benefit of the reservoir may be obtained through its operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this paper, we present discussion and simulation results from TOUGH2/EOS7C of gas mixture property prediction, gas injection, repressurization, migration, and mixing processes that occur in gas reservoirs under active CO{sub 2} injection.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

89

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

102

Flare-gas recovery success at Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

It appears that some North American refining companies still cling to an old philosophy that flare gas recovery systems are unsafe, unreliable, uneconomic, or unnecessary. Shell Canada's recent experience with two modern systems has proven otherwise. Two of Shell Canada's refineries, at Sarnia, Ont., and Montreal East, Que., have now logged about 6 years' total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose was to recover the normal continuous flow of refinery flare gas for treatment and use in the refinery fuel gas system.

Allen, G.D.; Chan, H.H.; Wey, R.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been expensive to simulate. Performance results were sufficiently promising to justify a commercial-scale test under the CCT program. A flowsheet of the Recovery Scrubber(tm) is...

104

Long-range assessment of R and D policy for gas-related conversion technologies and unconventional natural gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the energy impacts on the US energy-economy system on a set of successful R and D programs. These programs are presumed to have led to the commercialization of innovative technologies that increase the US gaseous fuels resource base and promote the development of advanced natural gas conversion technologies for residential/commercial uses. The GRI and its principal subcontractor, TRW Incorporated, provided the detailed specifications of the energy conditions for both a Base Case and an R and D Policy Case. These conditions can be broadly categorized in terms of key energy resource price assumptions, energy resource availabilities, technology characterizations and market penetration guidelines for all energy technologies. Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (DJA) developed a set of demographic and economic projections including population, employment, and real GNP growth rates. The GRI and TRW staff provided the technology characterizations for most of the gas-related technologies and a number of other technologies. The data for the remaining technology characterizations were taken, for the most part, from Bhagat et al. This report presents the energy results from the BNL/DJA energy-economy system as executed under GRI specifications. It is intended to serve as a complement to the DJA report on the macro-economic consequences of these specifications. Certain assumption incorporated in the R and D and Base scenarios relating to market penetration were identified as particularly sensitive. In light of the uncertainty inherent in them, an additional set of sensitivity runs were requested by GRI and are presented in Appendix B.

Kydes, A.S.; Rabinowitz, J.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17...

107

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17...

108

Case study: City of Industry landfill gas recovery operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of civic, recreation, and conservation facilities throughout a 150-acre site which had been used for waste disposal from 1951 to 1970 is described. The history of the landfill site, the geology of the site, and a test well program to assess the feasibility of recoverying landfill gas economically from the site are discussed. Based on results of the test well program, the City of Industry authorized the design and installation of a full-scale landfill gas recovery system. Design, construction, and operation of the system are described. The landfill gas system provides fuel for use in boilers to meet space heating and hot water demands for site development (MCW)

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley CA 94720 Abstract Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of...

111

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

112

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Brine and gas recovery from geopressured systems. I. Parametric calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of parametric calculations was run with the S-CUBED geopressured-geothermal simulator MUSHRM to assess the effects of important formation, fluid and well parameters on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoir systems. The specific parameters considered are formation permeability, pore-fluid salinity, temperature and gas content, well radius and location with respect to reservoir boundaries, desired flow rate, and possible shale recharge. It was found that the total brine and gas recovered (as a fraction of the resource in situ) were most sensitive to formation permeability, pore-fluid gas content, and shale recharge.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description:...

115

Secondary recovery of gas from Gulf Coast reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Studies funded by the Gas Research Institute have provided insight into the investment decisions of a small operator engaged in SGR from an abandoned Frio sandstone reservoir in Galveston County, Texas. Favorable gas-brine ratios were obtained by rapid brine production using gas lift. The lowered reservoir pressure allowed imbibition-trapped gas bubbles to expand and merge, forming a mobile phase which greatly improved recovery. Brine was disposed by environmentally benign reinjection into a shallower, unconsolidated sand unit, although the disposal formation suffered permeability damage due to iron hydroxides in the brine. Brine solids were reduced by keeping oxygen out of the surface plumbing and performing gas-brine separation in several steps inside pressurized vessels. Periodic backflowing of the disposal well dislodged the damaged surface layer of the unconsolidated disposal sand, which was then removed from the hole by swabbing, exposing a fresh formation surface to the brine. This work has shown that the technical problems involved in secondary gas recovery can be overcome by using relatively simple solutions in line with the budget constraints of a small operator. Because secondary gas production occurs in known fields located near major gathering systems and transmission lines, it is expected to supply a significant portion of future domestic natural gas.

Soeder, D.J.; Randolph, P.L.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Foam and emulsion effects on gas driven oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was to investigate the gas mobility reducing effects that a gas driven surfactant slug has on enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Three chemically similar surfactants whose properties graded from foaming agent to emulsifying agent were used to study the effects that foam and emulsion formation have on enhanced oil recovery in an unconsolidated Ottawa sand model at room temperature. Both the foam lamellae and the emulsion droplets act to reduce the mobility of the injected gas in the swept zone, thus increasing the vertical sweep efficiency. Shell's Enordet series of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants were used in the study at three different concentrations of, 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.100% (wt.). The experimental procedure consisted of displacing oil from a porous medium at residual water saturation by injecting carbon dioxide, followed first by the injection of a 0.20 pore volume slug of surfactant solution, then by carbon dioxide gas at low pressure. Measurements were made of the cumulative produced gas and liquids. Performance differences between different surfactants are small but consistent. Combining the foam and emulsion mechanisms seems to lead to more efficient oil recovery than either mechanism alone. 33 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Farrell. J.; Marsden, S.S. Jr.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

James Kendell

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

120

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership on Unconventional Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future research and scientific studies undertaken by the U.S. Department of

122

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low quality natural gas processing with the integrated CFZ/CNG Claus process is feasible for low quality natural gas containing 10% or more of CO{sub 2}, and any amount of H{sub 2}S. The CNG Claus process requires a minimum CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas of about 100 psia (15% CO{sub 2} for a 700 psia feed gas) and also can handle any amount of H{sub 2}S. The process is well suited for handling a variety of trace contaminants usually associated with low quality natural gas and Claus sulfur recovery. The integrated process can produce high pressure carbon dioxide at purities required by end use markets, including food grade CO{sub 2}. The ability to economically co-produce high pressure CO{sub 2} as a commodity with significant revenue potential frees process economic viability from total reliance on pipeline gas, and extends the range of process applicability to low quality gases with relatively low methane content. Gases with high acid gas content and high CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S ratios can be economically processed by the CFZ/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes. The large energy requirements for regeneration make chemical solvent processing prohibitive. The cost of Selexol physical solvent processing of the LaBarge gas is significantly greater than the CNG/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes.

Damon, D.A. [CNG Research Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siwajek, L.A. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W. [BOVAR Inc., AB (Canada). Western Research

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sixty-sixth annual report of the state oil and gas supervisor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains tabulated oil and gas statistics compiled during 1980 in California. On-shore and off-shore oil production, gas production, reserves, drilling activity, enhanced recovery activity, unconventional heavy oil recovery, geothermal operations and financial data are reported. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Unconventional Energy Resources: 2007-2008 Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes five 2007-2008 resource commodity committee reports prepared by the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Current United States and global research and development activities related to gas hydrates, gas shales, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources are included in this review. These commodity reports were written to advise EMD leadership and membership of the current status of research and development of unconventional energy resources. Unconventional energy resources are defined as those resources other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks. Gas hydrate resources are potentially enormous; however, production technologies are still under development. Gas shale, geothermal, oil sand, and uranium resources are now increasing targets of exploration and development, and are rapidly becoming important energy resources that will continue to be developed in the future.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

131

Apparatus and method for fast recovery and charge of insulation gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An insulation gas recovery and charge apparatus is provided comprising a pump, a connect, an inflatable collection device and at least one valve.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water in well sites. This research has helped to develop a membrane process train for a mobile produced water treatment unit for treating oilfield produced brine for reuse. To design the process train, over 30 sets of combination tests at pilot laboratory scale were performed using pretreatment, microfiltration and nanofiltration processes. Membrane performance was selected based on high flux separation efficiency, high tolerance for solids and fluid treatments. Over 95 % solids rejection and greater than 80 % oil removal efficiency were obtained in all these tests. Process train (pre-treatment and membrane) performance was monitored by chemical analysis of permeate and models fitting experimental data for the process. From the results, hydrocarbon rejection was analyzed; total organic carbon rejection was 47.9 %, total carbon content averaged 37.3 % rejection and total inorganic carbon rejection was at 3.66 %. BTEX removal efficiency ranged from 0.98 % to 52.7 % with the progressive pretreatment methods of using cartridge filters. The nanofiltration membrane showed significant reduction in total dissolved solids and in both anionic and cationic species. The process train is seen to follow a sequence of treatment from cartridge and oil removal filter treatment to microfiltration treatment to ultrafiltration, followed by nanofiltration for the purpose of this research. Further research still needs to be done on to determine the kind of analytical test which will give real time feedback on effectiveness of filters. In summary, the process train developed by TAMU-GPRI possesses distinct advantages in treating oilfield produced brine using membrane technology. These advantages include high quality of permeate, reduced sludge and the possibility of total recycle water systems. The small space requirement, moderate capital costs and ease of operation associated with the use of the mobile unit membrane technology also makes it a very competitive alternative to conventional technologies.

Eboagwu, Uche

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Unconventional human computer interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course focuses on how we can use the potential of the human body in experimental or unconventional interface techniques. It explores the biological or physiological characteristics of the separate parts of the body, from head to toe, and from skin ...

Steffi Beckhaus; Ernst Kruijff

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and...

135

Decline curve analysis in unconventional resource plays using logistic growth models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current models used to forecast production in unconventional oil and gas formations are often not producing valid results. When traditional decline curve analysis models are… (more)

Clark, Aaron James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The effect of natural fracture characteristics on current analytical models for hydraulically fractured unconventional shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, the oil and gas industry has shifted its focus more towards unconventional shale reservoirs. It has become apparent that these reservoirs require… (more)

Junor, Nathaniel T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Recovery of CO/sub 2/ from flue gas  

SciTech Connect

Within the Permian Basin geographic region, there are a variety of sources for CO/sub 2/ other than naturally occurring deposits. These sources can provide sufficient quantities of CO/sub 2/ for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. The cost associated with pipelining CO/sub 2/ produced from natural sources into the Permian Basin is reported to be $1.50/MSCF or less. Therefore, flue gas sources result in higher CO/sub 2/ costs than natural deposits. However, these costs are within the pricing parameters for the normal CO/sub 2/ market place. The demand for flue gas CO/sub 2/ for EOR is seen to depend largely on the success of CO/sub 2/ floods and the relative price that can be applied to CO/sub 2/ based on the price of oil and the increases in domestic oil production and gas liquids that CO/sub 2/ can provide. Under current conditions, CO/sub 2/ has a value of ca $2.00/MSCF for EOR use.

Hyde, E.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimal absorption pressure for CO/sub 2/ recovery from flue gas calculated  

SciTech Connect

This paper calculates the cost of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). It diagrams a carbon dioxide recovery plant and presents tables with costs of carbon dioxide recovery at various absorption pressures, and cost in various EOR project. It shows that the utility cost is a dominant factor and that a gas compressor does not reduce the equipment cost effectively at low pressure and concludes that 70 psig is the optimal operating pressure.

Fang, C.S.; Fan, S.K.

1982-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Unconventional Fossil Energy Resource Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fields, and enormous amounts of hydrocarbons are locked in unconventional reservoirs (oil shale, heavy oil, tar sands). * Economic extraction of these resources will require...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

143

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

144

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery in Ghana"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery: PI. 4. "An Improved Model to Predict Gas Generation from Landfills based on Waste Composition-2015, Role: Co-PI. 3. "Field Measurement of Emissions from Natural Gas Drilling, Production, and Distribution

Texas at Arlington, University of

145

Feasibility of methane-gas recovery at the St. John's Landfill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All facets reviewed in assessing the feasibility of a commercial landfill gas recovery system at the St. Johns Landfill in Portland, Oregon are discussed. Included are: landfill operational history, step-by-step descriptions of the field testing (and all results therein), landfill gas production/recovery predictions, results of the preliminary market research, cost matrices for primary utilization modes, and conclusions and recommendations based on analysis of the data gathered. Tables and figures are used to illustrate various aspects of the report.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

147

Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Resources Program) Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Ultra-deepwater and Unconventional Resources Program) NETL-ORD Project Information Resource Assessment | Drilling Under Extreme Conditions | Environmental Impacts Enhanced and Unconventional Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery from Fractured Media Read Detailed Project Information [PDF] Read project abstract Oil recovery from unconventional media is often difficult. However, significant hydrocarbon resources can be found in fractured reservoirs. As the supply of oil from conventional reservoirs is depleted, fractured media will provide a greater proportion of the country's oil reserves. One example of such a resource is the Bakken shale, part of the Williston Basin in North and South Dakota and Montana. It is estimated that over 100-176 billion barrels of oil are present in the Bakken shale. However, due to the low permeability of the formation and the apparent oil-wet nature of the shale, production from this formation presents considerable problems.

148

Understanding natural and induced gas migration through landfill cover materials: the basis for improved landfill gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical pressure and concentration gradients in landfill cover materials are being examined at the Mallard North Landfill in Dupage County, IL. The goal of this project is to understand venting of landfill gas and intrusion of atmospheric gases into the landfill in response to changing meteorological conditions (particularly barometric pressure and precipitation) and pumping rates at recovery wells. Nests of probes for directly measuring soil gas pressures have been installed in areas of fractured and unfractured silty clay till cover materials. The probes are at three depths: shallow (0.6 m), intermediate (1.2 m), and deep (in the top of the refuse). Preliminary results from fall 1985 suggest that soil gas pressures respond quickly to changes in barometric pressure but that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen respond more slowly to changing soil moisture conditions. An important near-surface process that limits the total amount of methane available to a gas recovery system is the activity of methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria) in oxygenated cover materials. The results of this project will be used to quantify landfill mass balance relations, improve existing predictive models for landfill gas recovery systems, and improve landfill cover design for sites where gas recovery is anticipated.

Bogner, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

151

Numerical Modeling of Gas Recovery from Methane Hydrate Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTClass 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a hydrate bearing layer underlain by a two phase, free-gas and water, zone. A Class 1 hydrate reservoir… (more)

Silpngarmlert, Suntichai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation for storage and enhanced gas recovery may be organic-rich shales, which CO2 is preferentially adsorbed comprehensive simulation studies to better understand CO2 injection process in shale gas reservoir. This paper

Mohaghegh, Shahab

153

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Recovery By Direct Contact Gas-Liquid Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy from hot gas discharge streams can be recovered by transfer directly to a coolant liquid in one of several available gas-liquid contacting devices. The design of the device is central to the theme of this paper, and experimental work has verified that the analogy between heat transfer and mass transfer can be used for design purposes. This enables the large amount of available mass transfer data for spray, packed and tray columns to be used for heat transfer calculations. Additional information is provided on flow arrangements for integrating direct contact exchangers into systems for recovering the energy transferred to the liquid.

Fair, J. R.; Bravo, J. L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHARTER UNCONVENTIONAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHARTER CHARTER UNCONVENTIONAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Committee's Official Designation: Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee (URTAC) 2. Committee's Objectives and Scope of Activities and Duties: I The Advisory Committee is to (A) advise the Secretary on the development and implementation of programs under Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Publi / I No. 109-58, related to unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resources and (B) provide to the Secretary written comments regarding the draf't annual plan that is required by Section 999B(e) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Further, the Committee will not make recommendations on funding awards to particular consortia or other entities, or for specific

158

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittal’s Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

Seaman, John

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Applications: Oil and gas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Health, Safety & Environment in Oil & Gas E&P SPE/EAGE European Unconventional Resources Conference SPE International Conference PennWell Unconventional Oil and Gas Europe PennWell Underwater Intervention Marine Exploration Society Conference UGAS SPE Middle East Unconventional Gas Conference WHOC World Heavy Oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of the Implementation of Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW(TM)) Enhanced Recovery at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the implementation of an enhanced tar recovery remediation system at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site. The project included investigations, treatability and testing, cost analysis, system design, construction, and operations.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

2008 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2008 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and...

163

2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and...

164

Integrating Depositional Facies and Sequence Stratigraphy in Characterizing Unconventional Reservoirs: Eagle Ford Shale, South Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Mid-to-Late Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale of South Texas is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate, unconventional resource play with considerable oil and natural gas. Characterization of… (more)

Workman, Seth Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Expansion of the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

unconventional resources. Furthermore, infrastructure additions related to imports of natural gas, including ... Office of Oil and Gas, September 2009 11

166

Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

1974-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nanothermites: Unconventional Nanomaterials with High Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, MS&T'13 Poster Session. Presentation Title, Nanothermites: Unconventional ...

168

Analysis of pressure data from the horizontal wells with multiple hydraulic fractures in shale gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last several years, the unconventional gas reservoirs development has grown tremendously. Most of these unconventional reservoirs have very low permeability and are not… (more)

Tabar, Essa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery levels, and the flexibility of the process. These ideas led to the design of the CHP-NGL recovery system and the development of the equipment sizing and economic analysis methods. Requirements for sizing refrigeration units, heat exchangers, and pumps are discussed and demonstrated. From the data sheets it is possible to gather costs associated with the project and demonstrate the economic feasibility of the system. The amount of NGL recovered, heating value, payback period, cash flow, net present value of money, and the internal rate of return are calculated and demonstrated to be favorable to this project.

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Program Archive (Disk1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Eastern U.S. Gas Eastern U.S. Gas Shales Shales Program Program This DVD contains information related to research and development (R&D) undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) during the 1976-1995 time period. This R&D focused on improving industry understanding of ways to locate and produce natural gas from the fractured organic gas shales of the Eastern U.S. A second DVD is also available that includes similar information related to the five other R&D programs targeting unconventional natural gas during roughly the same time frame: Western U.S. Gas Sands (1977-1992), Methane Recovery from Coalbeds (1978-1982), Methane Hydrates (1982-1992), Deep Source Gas Project (1982-1992), and Secondary Gas Recovery (1987-1995). The following items are found on this DVD.

171

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

172

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

173

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

SciTech Connect

Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of methane, and carbon dioxide injection may allow enhanced production of methane by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance. Based on the favorable results of numerous simulation studies, we propose a field test of the Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR) process. The objective of the field test is to evaluate the feasibility of CSEGR in terms of reservoir processes such as injectivity, repressurization, flow and transport of carbon dioxide, and enhanced production of methane. The main criteria for the field site include small reservoir volume and high permeability so that increases in pressure and enhanced recovery will occur over a reasonably short time period. The Rio Vista Gas Field in the delta of California's Central Valley offers potential as a test site, although we are currently looking broadly for other potential sites of opportunity.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L.; O' Connor, William K.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Gas injection techniques for condensate recovery and remediation of liquid banking in gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In gas-condensate reservoirs, gas productivity declines due to the increasing accumulation of liquids in the near wellbore region as the bottom-hole pressure declines below the… (more)

Hwang, Jongsoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

4. Natural Gas Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas fields, i.e., tight sands, shales, and coalbeds. Consideringthegrowingcontributionofthisgastothe National total, the term “unconventional” is ...

178

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor  

gas, coalbed methane, and biogas. The problem, though, is that the composition of the gas from these reserves varies widely. Unconventional gas often contains

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Act) and numerous state and local environmental and public health laws apply to shale gas and other unconventional oil and gas development. Consequently, the fracturing...

182

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 ... produce unconventional gas economically. Production.

183

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09, 2013 09, 2013 Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Washington, D.C. - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil recovery methods, such as steam and hot water injection, to reduce its viscosity and enable it to flow. The largest U.S. deposits of heavy oil are in California and on Alaska's North Slope. Estimates for the U.S. heavy oil resource total about 104 billion barrels of oil in place - nearly five times the United States' proved reserves. In addition, although no commercial-scale development of U.S. oil sands or oil shale has yet occurred, both represent another potential future domestic unconventional oil resource.

185

Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Reserves Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities Oil Shale and Other Unconventional Fuels Activities The Fossil Energy program in oil shale focuses on...

186

Unconventional Fuels Conference Tribal Energy Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for oil shale development or other unconventional resources on the Reservation be improved by encouraging commercial leasing of oil shale on the considerable public lands where oil shale formations are found out: ­ 1. Learn more about oil shale and other unconventional fuels development, and ­ 2. To understand

Utah, University of

187

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Unconventional gas sources. Volume IV. Geopressured brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: study objectives, regional geology and prospect evaluation, reservoir engineering, drilling and well costs, production and water disposal facilities, pressure maintenance, geothermal and hydraulic energy assessment, operating expense, economic evaluation, environmental considerations, legal considerations, and risks analysis. The study addresses only sandstone brine reservoirs in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast onshore areas. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Feasibility study of landfill gas recovery at seven landfill sites, Adams County/Commerce City, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a major landfill gas recovery study conducted in Adams County, Colorado. The study was performed during the period from August 1979 through September 1980. The study was broad in scope, involving a technical, economic, and institutional feasibility analysis of recovering landfill-generated methane gas from seven sanitary landfills in southwestern Adams County. The study included: field extraction testing at the seven sistes; detailed legislative research and activity; a market survey, including preliminary negotiations; and preliminary design and cost estimates for gas recovery systems at all seven sites.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gas hydrates: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advisory Committee (URTAC) Meeting Crowne Plaza Hotel, Houston, Texas July 25, 2007 Welcome Sally Zinke, Chair of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee (Committee), convened the meeting at 8:30 a.m. on July 25 in Houston, Texas. She introduced Bill Hochheiser, the Committee Management Officer, who presented a "Safety Moment" focusing on the emergency procedures for exiting the conference room and reminding people of the importance of wearing seat belts. Appendix 1 contains the Committee sign-in sheet for the meeting. Jim Mosher's resignation from the Committee due to his recent appointment to the Department of Interior was announced. For the record, his resignation letter is included in these minutes as Appendix 2.

192

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Membrane technologies for hydrogen and carbon monoxide recovery from residual gas streams. Tecnologías de membranas para la recuperación de hidrógeno y monóxido de carbono de gases residuales.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This PhD thesis work is aimed to the separation and recovery of valuable gases from industrial residual gas streams by means of membrane technology. In… (more)

David, Oana Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Effects of Macroscopic Heterogeneities of Pore Structure and Wettability on Residual Oil Recovery Using the Gravity-Assisted Inert Gas Injection (GAIGI) Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To recover oil remaining in petroleum reservoirs after waterflooding, the gravitationally stable mode of gas injection is recognized as a promising tertiary oil recovery process.… (more)

Parsaei, Rafat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, CA Landfill Gas-Recovery Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology May 10, 2012 - 1:01pm Addthis Statement of Mr. Charles McConnell, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science, Space and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, I appreciate the opportunity to discuss the role that the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy continues to play in the safe and responsible development of the Nation's unconventional fossil resources. As you know, in March 2011, the President laid out a specific goal for our Nation: to reduce imports of oil by a third over the next 10 years. This is

199

Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology May 10, 2012 - 1:01pm Addthis Statement of Mr. Charles McConnell, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science, Space and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, I appreciate the opportunity to discuss the role that the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy continues to play in the safe and responsible development of the Nation's unconventional fossil resources. As you know, in March 2011, the President laid out a specific goal for our Nation: to reduce imports of oil by a third over the next 10 years. This is

200

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

OIL and GAS ENGINEERING Page 1 of 2 Pre-and/or Co-Requisites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of unconventional oil and gas development at the John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis. Peer Reviewer-water and groundwater quality in areas of unconventional oil and gas development at the John Wesley Powell Center

Calgary, University of

204

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and formulated aiming to reveal the interplay of the viscous, interfacial and gravity forces and to predict the gravity drainage performance. Scaling criteria for the scaled physical model design have been proposed based on an inspectional analysis. In Section II, equation of state (EOS) calculations were extended to study the effect of different tuning parameters on MMP for two reservoir crude oils of Rainbow Keg River and Terra Nova. This study indicates that tuning of EOS may not always be advisable for miscibility determination. Comparison of IFT measurements for benzene in water, ethanol mixtures with the solubility data from the literature showed that a strong mutual relationship between these two thermodynamic properties exists. These preliminary experiments indicate applicability of the new vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique to determine miscibility of ternary liquid systems. The VIT experimental apparatus is under construction with considerations of expanded capacity of using equilibrated fluids and a new provision for low IFT measurement in gas-oil systems. In Section III, recommendations in the previous progress reports have been investigated in this reporting period. WAG coreflood experiments suggest the use of ''Hybrid''-WAG type floods for improved CO{sub 2} utilization factors and recoveries. The effect of saturating the injection water with CO{sub 2} for core-floods has been investigated further in this quarter. Miscible WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine showed higher recoveries (89.2% ROIP) compared to miscible WAG floods using normal brine (72.5%). Higher tertiary recovery factors (TRF) were also observed for WAG floods using CO{sub 2} saturated brine due to improved mobility ratio and availability of CO{sub 2}. Continued experimentation for evaluation of both, ''Hybrid''-WAG and gravity stable type displacements, in Berea sandstone cores using synthetic as well as real reservoir fluids are planned for the next quarter.

Dandina N. Rao

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imported sources and includes conventional and unconventional extraction * Marcellus Shale has an EUR (estimated ultimate recovery) of 489 Tcf (Engelder, 2009) Source: EIA,...

207

Tracer Applications of Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Geosciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry (Education Paper) Seyyed Ghaderi......................................................................................................................................14 5. Water and Unconventional Energy Resources in Alberta? ................................................................................17 What is Unconventional about CBM Production

Kemner, Ken

208

Pore-scale characterization and modeling of two-phase flow in tight gas sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas resources, particularly tight gas sands, constitute a significant percentage of the natural gas resource base and offer abundant potential for future reserves… (more)

Mousavi, Maryam Alsadat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project July 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. This 2009 photo shows a trenching machine, which is capable of cutting a continuous trench up to 30 feet deep and 3 feet wide. The machine was used in a pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of zeolite placement as the trench was dug. This ensured a consistent depth and width for the zeolite placement along the entire length of the permeable treatment wall.

210

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1987 Ribbeck, H. , Natural Gas Storage Project at Peckensen,besides underground natural gas storage [Sedlacek, 2002],natural gas reservoirs are an obvious target for CO 2 storage

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Shale Gas Hydraulic Fracturing in the Dutch Posidonia Shale:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently the oil and gas industry is looking at the Posidonia shale in the Dutch subsurface for production of the unconventional shale gas. This is… (more)

Janzen, M.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Microsoft Word - Shale Gas Primer Update v2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and develop this unconventional gas resource. A combination of rising natural gas prices, tax enhancements and technology advancements have enabled increased production of...

213

Natural Gas - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Unconventional Dry Natural Gas Production Release Date: August 1, 2013. Coalbed Methane; Shale Gas :

214

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production history of the natural gas ?elds in the3: The production history of the natural gas ?elds of the

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1987 Ribbeck, H. , Natural Gas Storage Project at Peckensen,besides underground natural gas storage [Sedlacek, 2002],

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and gas reservoirs, or even to the large (and rapidly increasing) data-base of information on unconventional

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P. [Bovar, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee Unconventional Gas Research Group, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University, Australia Shale gas is becoming an important source feet (Tcf) of technically recoverable shale gas resources. Western Australia (WA) alone

219

A coupled flow and geomechanics model for enhanced oil and gas recovery in shale formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic production from shale formations has been achieved because of advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon recovery from these reservoirs is… (more)

Fakcharoenphol, Perapon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (flowback procedures, production strategy, and reservoir conditions. Residual polymer in the fracture can reduce the effective fracture permeability and porosity, reduce the effective fracture half-length, and limit the well productivity. Our ability to mathematically model the fundamental physical processes governing fluid recovery in hydraulic fractures in the past has been limited. In this research, fracture fluid damage mechanisms have been investigated, and mathematical models and computer codes have been developed to better characterize the cleanup process. The codes have been linked to a 3D, 3-phase simulator to model and quantify the fracture fluid cleanup process and its effect on long-term gas production performances. Then, a comprehensive systematic simulation study has been carried out by varying formation permeability, reservoir pressure, fracture length, fracture conductivity, yield stress, and pressure drawdown. On the basis of simulation results and analyses, new ways to improve fracture fluid cleanup have been provided. This new progress help engineers better understand fracture fluid cleanup, improve fracture treatment design, and increase gas recovery from tight sand reservoirs, which can be extremely important as more tight gas reservoirs are developed around the world.

Wang, Yilin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Adsorption studies of natural gas storage in Devonian shales  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of natural gas exist as an adsorbed, or condensed, phase in Devonian shale formations and other unconventional gas resources. The amount of the adsorbed phase depends on the pressure and temperature. The Langmuir isotherm has been used to describe the pressure dependence. However, temperature dependence has not been explored. This is important to evaluate thermal simulation as a recovery method and to extrapolate laboratory measurements to reservoir conditions. The authors investigate adsorption as a function of both pressure and temperature. They found that the effects of temperature are significant and that the Langmuir model does not describe adsorption adequately. They reconciled the data with bi-Langmuir models.

Lu, X.C.; Li, F.C.; Watson, A.T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

227

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

USE OF POLYMERS TO RECOVER VISCOUS OIL FROM UNCONVENTIONAL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical progress report summarizes work performed the project, 'Use of Polymers to Recover Viscous Oil from Unconventional Reservoirs.' The objective of this three-year research project was to develop methods using water soluble polymers to recover viscous oil from unconventional reservoirs (i.e., on Alaska's North Slope). The project had three technical tasks. First, limits were re-examined and redefined for where polymer flooding technology can be applied with respect to unfavorable displacements. Second, we tested existing and new polymers for effective polymer flooding of viscous oil, and we tested newly proposed mechanisms for oil displacement by polymer solutions. Third, we examined novel methods of using polymer gels to improve sweep efficiency during recovery of unconventional viscous oil. This report details work performed during the project. First, using fractional flow calculations, we examined the potential of polymer flooding for recovering viscous oils when the polymer is able to reduce the residual oil saturation to a value less than that of a waterflood. Second, we extensively investigated the rheology in porous media for a new hydrophobic associative polymer. Third, using simulation and analytical studies, we compared oil recovery efficiency for polymer flooding versus in-depth profile modification (i.e., 'Bright Water') as a function of (1) permeability contrast, (2) relative zone thickness, (3) oil viscosity, (4) polymer solution viscosity, (5) polymer or blocking-agent bank size, and (6) relative costs for polymer versus blocking agent. Fourth, we experimentally established how much polymer flooding can reduce the residual oil saturation in an oil-wet core that is saturated with viscous North Slope crude. Finally, an experimental study compared mechanical degradation of an associative polymer with that of a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide. Detailed results from the first two years of the project may be found in our first and second annual reports. Our latest research results, along with detailed documentation of our past work, can be found on our web site at http://baervan.nmt.edu/randy/. As an overall summary of important findings for the project, polymer flooding has tremendous potential for enhanced recovery of viscous oil. Fear of substantial injectivity reduction was a primary hurdle that limited application of polymer flooding. However, that concern is largely mitigated by (1) use of horizontal wells and (2) judicious injection above the formation parting pressure. Field cases now exist where 200-300-cp polymer solutions are injected without significant reductions in injectivity. Concern about costs associated with injection of viscous polymer solutions was a second major hurdle. However, that concern is reduced substantially by realization that polymer viscosity increases approximately with the square of polymer concentration. Viscosity can be doubled with only a 40% increase in polymer concentration. Up to a readily definable point, increases in viscosity of the injected polymer solution are directly related to increases in sweep efficiency and oil recovery. Previously published simulation results - suggesting that shear-thinning polymer solutions were detrimental to sweep efficiency - were shown to be unfounded (both theoretically and experimentally).

Randall Seright

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

X-ray analysis can improve recovery of oil and natural gas |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gas industries are undergoing a revolution that has opened up previously inaccessible resources trapped in shale and tight play formations. Oil and GasFact SheetJanuary 2013...

230

Multiphase Mechanisms and Fluid Dynamics in Gas Injection Enhanced Oil Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, the Water-Alternating-Gas (WAG) process is the most widely practiced horizontal mode gas injection process in the industry. Although this process is conceptually sound, it… (more)

Kulkarni, Madhav M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Novel selective surface flow (SSF{sup TM}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogren from waste gas streams. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste streams are off-gas streams from various chemical/refinery operations. In Phase I, the architecture of the membrane and the separation device were defined and demonstrated. The system consists of a shell-and-tube separator in which the gas to be separated is fed to the tube side, the product is collected as high pressure effluent and the permeate constitutes the waste/fuel stream. Each tube, which has the membrane coated on the interior, does the separation. A multi- tube separator device containing 1 ft{sup 2} membrane area was built and tested. The engineering data were used for designing a process for hydrogen recovery from a fluid catalytic cracker off-gas stream. First-pass economics showed that overall cost for hydrogen production is reduced by 35% vs on-purpose production of hydrogen by steam- methane reforming. The hydrogen recovery process using the SSF membrane results in at least 15% energy reduction and significant decrease in CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions.

Anand, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydraulic fracture productivity performance in tight gas sands, a numerical simulation approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulically fractured tight gas reservoirs are one of the most common unconventional sources being produced today, and look to be a regular source of gas… (more)

Ostojic, Jakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The use of cuttings in shale gas play assessment; The Sbaa basin (Algeria) as case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing energy demand, the need for unconventional gas resources has risen. Shale gas is one of these new hydrocarbon resources. Hence, an enhanced workflow… (more)

Koolschijn, M.A.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

From virology to cell biology, understanding unconventional ubiquitination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From virology to cell biology, understanding unconventionalin Molecular and Cell Biology in the Graduate Division ofFrom virology to cell biology, understanding unconventional

Anania, Veronica Gina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconvention...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Resources Washington, D.C. -Development of potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources in Alaska - including viscous oil and methane hydrates -...

238

EIA projects rapid growth in unconventional vehicle sales - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Unconventional vehicles - vehicles using diesel, ... Manufacturers receive credits towards meeting CAFE standards by selling FFVs for all model years through 2016.

239

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasand S. T. Kandji, Review — Carbon sequestration in tropicalfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Deep Sea Hybrid Power Systems for Deep Sea Oil & Gas Recovery ...  

... thereby eliminating the need for pipeline construction and transport altogether. Such tankers could rely on natural-gas powered fuel cells, ...

242

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of...

243

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

priority challenges associated with safely and prudently developing unconventional shale gas and tight oil resources. Implementation Plan The Program Consortium will...

244

Gas flow behavior in extremely low permeability rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical model and modeling study of gas flow through extremely low permeability unconventional reservoirs. In contrast to conventional reservoirs

Yu-Shu Wu; Cong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

possibility. This view began to change in recent years with the realization that this unconventional resource could possibly be developed with existing conventional oil and gas...

246

Landfill methane recovery. Part II: gas characterization. Final report, December 1981-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses field sampling, analytical testing, and data generation for the characterization of both raw and processed landfill gas. Standardized protocols were developed for the sampling and analysis of the landfill gas for trace constituents and are presented as Appendices A-C. A nationwide survey was conducted in which gas samples were collected at nine landfill sites and tested for trace volatile organic compounds (VOC), trace volatile mercury, and human pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Surface-gas flux measurements at the landfill surface were also made. Repetitive sampling and analysis for each of the nice sites porvided the opportunity to evaluate agreement (or variations) within a laboratory and between two analytical laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols used by both laboratories were identical, however, the analytical hardware and interpretive computer hardware and software were different.

Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Flynn, N.W.; Wingender, R.; Olivieri, V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

OIL and GAS ENGINEERING Page 1 of 3 2009/2010 Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of unconventional resources (blue) Figure 1 helps make clear why the tar sands and other unconventional fossil fuels are important. The purple bars show the total emissions to date from the conventional fossil fuels (oil, gas of the CO2 increase from 280 to 391 ppm. The blue bar is 50% of known unconventional fossil fuel (UFF

Calgary, University of

248

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different types of fracture fluids, propping agents and treatment sizes have been tried in the Cotton Valley formation. The treatment design engineer has to choose the optimum fluid, optimum proppant, optimum treatment size and make sure the optimum treatment is mixed and pumped in the field. These optimum values also depend on drilling costs, fracturing costs and other economic parameters; such as gas prices, operating costs and taxes. Using information from the petroleum literature, numerical and analytical simulators, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides a detailed economic evaluation of the Cotton Valley wells drilled in the Elm Grove field operated by Matador Resources to determine not only the optimum treatment type, but also the optimum treatment volume as a function of drilling costs, completion costs, operating costs and gas prices. This work also provides an evaluation of well performance as a function of the fracture treatment type by reviewing production data from the Carthage and Oak Hill Cotton Valley fields in Texas and the Elm Grove field in Louisiana.

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmental assessment of the use of radionuclides as tracers in the enhanced recovery of oil and gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in field flooding for the enhanced recovery of oil and natural gas was performed. A typical operation using radioisotopes for interwell tracing was analyzed from the standpoint of three stages of operation: aboveground, subsurface, and recovery and disposal. Doses to workers who handle radioactive tracers and to members of the public were estimated for normal and accidental exposure scenarios. On the basis of estimates of the total quantity of tracer radionuclides injected in a year, the annual number of projects, the average number of injections per project, and assumed values of accident frequency, the collective dose equivalent is estimated to be 1.1 man-rem/y to workers and 15 man-rem/y to members of the public. The national radiological impact of the use of radioisotopes as interwell tracers in EOR projects is estimated to be a total collective dose equivalent of <16 man-rem/y. Accidential exposures are estimated to contribute relatively little to the total. 47 references, 8 figures, 43 tables.

Ng, Y.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

252

Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

254

Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil - Past Program Archives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These programs focused on improving industry understanding of ways to locate and produce natural gas from unconventional natural gas resources: Western U.S. Gas Sands (1977-1992),...

255

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology.

256

Microsoft Word - Unconventional Resources Tech Adv Committee - signed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCONVENTIONAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY UNCONVENTIONAL RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Advisory Committee Charter 1. Committee's Official Designation. Unconventional Resources Technical Advisory Committee (URTAC). 2. Authority. This charter establishes the Unconventional Resources Technical Advisory Committee (URTAC) pursuant to Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. The URTAC is being renewed in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended, 5 U.S.C., App. 2. This charter establishes the Committee under the authority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). 3. Objectives and Scope of Activities. The activities of the Committee include: * Advice on the development and implementation of programs under Section 999 of the Energy

257

National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model This is the second revision to the National Strategic Unconventional Resources Model that was developed in 2005-2006 to support the Task Force mandated by Congress in subsection 369(h) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The primary function of the first Model was to evaluate varying economic scenarios for four technologies: Surface Mining, Underground Mining, Modified In-Situ, and True In-Situ. In 2009 the Model was revised to update the cost data in the first Model. This second revision of the Model adds a fifth Hybrid technology that can be evaluated economically; and it also adds the capability of determining water requirements, CO2 production, and energy efficiency for the first four technologies. Subject to the

258

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources April 9, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil

259

National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model National Strategic Unconventional Resource Model This is the second revision to the National Strategic Unconventional Resources Model that was developed in 2005-2006 to support the Task Force mandated by Congress in subsection 369(h) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The primary function of the first Model was to evaluate varying economic scenarios for four technologies: Surface Mining, Underground Mining, Modified In-Situ, and True In-Situ. In 2009 the Model was revised to update the cost data in the first Model. This second revision of the Model adds a fifth Hybrid technology that can be evaluated economically; and it also adds the capability of determining water requirements, CO2 production, and energy efficiency for the first four technologies. Subject to the

260

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a… (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional Petroleum Resources in California, 1982, California Division of Oil,unconventional natural gas recovery in the U.S. Patzek [2008]. Unlike oil

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 1% to a higher level. The success of...

265

Performance Analysis & Optimization of Well Production in Unconventional Resource Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Unconventional Resource Plays consisting of the lowest tier of resources (large volumes and most difficult to develop) have been the main focus of US domestic activity during recent times. Horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing completion technology have been primarily responsible for this paradigm shift. The concept of drainage volume is being examined using pressure diffusion along streamlines. We use diffusive time of flight to optimize the number of hydraulic fracture stages in horizontal well application for Tight Gas reservoirs. Numerous field case histories are available in literature for optimizing number of hydraulic fracture stages, although the conclusions are case specific. In contrast, a general method is being presented that can be used to augment field experiments necessary to optimize the number of hydraulic fracture stages. The optimization results for the tight gas example are in line with the results from economic analysis. The fluid flow simulation for Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFR) is performed by Dual-Permeability or Dual-Porosity formulations. Microseismic data from Barnett Shale well is used to characterize the hydraulic fracture geometry. Sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, manual & computer assisted history matching are integrated to develop a comprehensive workflow for building reliable reservoir simulation models. We demonstrate that incorporating proper physics of flow is the first step in building reliable reservoir simulation models. Lack of proper physics often leads to unreasonable reservoir parameter estimates. The workflow demonstrates reduced non-uniqueness for the inverse history matching problem. The behavior of near-critical fluids in Liquid Rich Shale plays defies the production behavior observed in conventional reservoir systems. In conventional reservoirs an increased gas-oil ratio is observed as flowing bottom-hole pressure is less than the saturation pressure. The production behavior is examined by building a compositional simulation model on an Eagle Ford well. Extremely high pressure drop along the multiple transverse hydraulic fractures and high critical gas saturation are responsible for this production behavior. Integrating pore-scale flow modeling (such as Lattice Boltzmann) to the field-scale reservoir simulation may enable quantifying the effects of high capillary pressure and phase behavior alteration due to confinement in the nano-pore system.

Sehbi, Baljit Singh

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegas Dodged a Bullet: Chlorine-hauling Tanker Rolls Free. ”March 19, 11. Parsons C. “Chlorine Truck Blast Kills Five inA. “Iraq Insurgents Employ Chlorine in Bomb Attacks. ” New

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

269

Probabilistic Performance Forecasting for Unconventional Reservoirs With Stretched-Exponential Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reserves estimation in an unconventional-reservoir setting is a daunting task because of geologic uncertainty and complex flow patterns evolving in a long-stimulated horizontal well, among other variables. To tackle this complex problem, we present a reserves-evaluation workflow that couples the traditional decline-curve analysis with a probabilistic forecasting frame. The stretched-exponential production decline model (SEPD) underpins the production behavior. Our recovery appraisal workflow has two different applications: forecasting probabilistic future performance of wells that have production history; and forecasting production from new wells without production data. For the new field case, numerical model runs are made in accord with the statistical design of experiments for a range of design variables pertinent to the field of interest. In contrast, for the producing wells the early-time data often need adjustments owing to restimulation, installation of artificial-lift, etc. to focus on the decline trend. Thereafter, production data of either new or existing wells are grouped in accord with initial rates to obtain common SEPD parameters for similar wells. After determining the distribution of model parameters using well grouping, the methodology establishes a probabilistic forecast for individual wells. We present a probabilistic performance forecasting methodology in unconventional reservoirs for wells with and without production history. Unlike other probabilistic forecasting tools, grouping wells with similar production character allows estimation of self-consistent SEPD parameters and alleviates the burden of having to define uncertainties associated with reservoir and well-completion parameters.

Can, Bunyamin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

271

INJECTING CARBON DIOXIDE INTO UNCONVENTIONAL STORAGE RESERVOIRS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CBM wells over a one-year period Perform a small Huff and Puff test in a Devonian shale gas well Duration: 4 years (October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2015) Research...

272

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high temperature membrane reactor (MR) has been developed to enhance the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction efficiency with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This improved WGS-MR with CO{sub 2} recovery capability is ideally suitable for integration into the Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation system. Two different CO{sub 2}-affinity materials were selected in this study. The Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated as an adsorbent or a membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. The adsorption isotherm and intraparticle diffusivity for the LDH-based adsorbent were experimentally determined, and suitable for low temperature shift (LTS) of WGS. The LDH-based membranes were synthesized using our commercial ceramic membranes as substrate. These experimental membranes were characterized comprehensively in terms of their morphology, and CO{sub 2} permeance and selectivity to demonstrate the technical feasibility. In parallel, an alternative material-base membrane, carbonaceous membrane developed by us, was characterized, which also demonstrated enhanced CO{sub 2} selectivity at the LTS-WGS condition. With optimization on membrane defect reduction, these two types of membrane could be used commercially as CO{sub 2}-affinity membranes for the proposed application. Based upon the unique CO{sub 2} affinity of the LDHs at the LTS/WGS environment, we developed an innovative membrane reactor, Hybrid Adsorption and Membrane Reactor (HAMR), to achieve {approx}100% CO conversion, produce a high purity hydrogen product and deliver a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream for disposal. A mathematical model was developed to simulate this unique one -step process. Finally a benchtop reactor was employed to generate experimental data, which were consistent with the prediction from the HAMR mathematical model. In summary, the project objective, enhancing WGS efficiency for hydrogen production with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration, has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated via the developed one-step reactor, HAMR. Future development on reactor scale up and field testing is recommended.

Paul K.T. Liu

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this quarter, we have made progress in the three approaches selected for preparing CO{sub 2}-affinity membrane. A defect free nanoporous membrane was prepared via slip casting. This membrane will then be used for post treatment to seal the micropores to become a non-porous membrane with CO{sub 2} affinity. This post treatment study will be our focus in the next several quarters. Polymeric gel as a precursor was successfully prepared, which will be used for subsequent thin film deposition. Preparation of a defect-free thin film from this precursor will be our future focus using the sol-gel approach. Finally, the third approach, in-situ impregnation approach, was modified. Although we were able to deposit the precursor within the porous of the membrane, we have not been able to enhance the pH in-situ. Designing an unconventional approach to alternate the pH in-situ will be our focus of the next quarter.

Paul K. T. Liu

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

275

Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional gas has become an important resource to help meet our future energy demands. Although plentiful, it is difficult to produce this resource, when locked in a massive sedimentary formation. Among all unconventional gas resources, tight gas sands represent a big fraction and are often characterized by very low porosity and permeability associated with their producing formations, resulting in extremely low production rate. The low flow properties and the recovery factors of these sands make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a hydraulic fracture is to create a long, highly conductive fracture to facilitate the gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore to obtain commercial production rates. Fracture conductivity depends on several factors, such as like the damage created by the gel during the treatment and the gel clean-up after the treatment. This research is focused on predicting more accurately the fracture conductivity, the gel damage created in fractures, and the fracture cleanup after a hydraulic fracture treatment under certain pressure and temperature conditions. Parameters that alter fracture conductivity, such as polymer concentration, breaker concentration and gas flow rate, are also examined in this study. A series of experiments, using a procedure of “dynamical fracture conductivity test”, were carried out. This procedure simulates the proppant/frac fluid slurries flow into the fractures in a low-permeability rock, as it occurs in the field, using different combinations of polymer and breaker concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving this process will help to decrease capital expenditures and increase the production in unconventional tight gas reservoirs.

Correa Castro, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biomass and Other Unconventional Energy Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of the unstable costs of fuels, it is prudent of industries to seek alternative sources of energy whose costs are more predictable than the prices of oil and gas. This paper will examine the use of biomass as fuel, focusing on the potential benefits to industries. Industries have used the waste generated within their own plants as fuel, or have cooperated with municipal governments in seeking energy sources based on municipal solid waste. A discussion of the activities of local governments is included, but it should be noted that the priorities of industry and government, although compatible, do not always coincide.

Gershman, H. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional Energy Resources DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional Energy Resources April 16, 2013 - 9:30am Addthis Acting ASFE, Christopher Smith, and Alaska Department of Natural Resources Commissioner, Dan Sullivan, sign an MOU at the LNG 17 Global Conference in Houston, Texas, pledging to work together in the effort to get more of Alaska's fossil fuels into the energy stream. Photo courtesy of LNG 17. Acting ASFE, Christopher Smith, and Alaska Department of Natural Resources Commissioner, Dan Sullivan, sign an MOU at the LNG 17 Global Conference in Houston, Texas, pledging to work together in the effort to get more of Alaska's fossil fuels into the energy stream. Photo courtesy of LNG 17.

278

UNCONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCES NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Alexandra Hakala  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNCONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCES NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Alexandra Hakala UNCONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCES NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Alexandra Hakala Name Title Affiliation Hakala, Alexandra Physical Scientist NETL Sames, Gary Physical Scientist NETL Dilmore, Robert General Eng NETL Peckney, Natalie General Eng NETL Veloski, Garret Research Chemist NETL Diehl, Rod Physical Scientist NETL Hammack, Richard Physical Scientist NETL Wells, Art Research Chemist NETL Stanko, Denny Phy Sci Tech NETL Hedges, Sheila Research Chemist NETL Lopano, Christina Physical Scientist NETL Edenborn, Harry Microbiologist NETL Goodman, Angela Physical Scientist NETL McIntyre, Dustin Mechanical Eng NETL Soeder, Daniel Physical Scientist NETL Mroz, Thomas Geologist NETL Strazisar, Brian Physical Scientist NETL Kutchko, Barbara Physical Scientist NETL Rose, Kelly Geologist NETL Brohmal, Grant

279

DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional Energy Resources DOE Accord Seeks Accelerated Development of Alaska's Vast Unconventional Energy Resources April 16, 2013 - 9:30am Addthis Acting ASFE, Christopher Smith, and Alaska Department of Natural Resources Commissioner, Dan Sullivan, sign an MOU at the LNG 17 Global Conference in Houston, Texas, pledging to work together in the effort to get more of Alaska's fossil fuels into the energy stream. Photo courtesy of LNG 17. Acting ASFE, Christopher Smith, and Alaska Department of Natural Resources Commissioner, Dan Sullivan, sign an MOU at the LNG 17 Global Conference in Houston, Texas, pledging to work together in the effort to get more of Alaska's fossil fuels into the energy stream. Photo courtesy of LNG 17.

280

Integration of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Technology with Oil Sands Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation of siting an HTGR plant in a remote area supplying steam, electricity and high temperature gas for recovery and upgrading of unconventional crude oil from oil sands. The area selected for this evaluation is the Alberta Canada oil sands. This is a very fertile and active area for bitumen recovery and upgrading with significant quantities piped to refineries in Canada and the U.S Additionally data on the energy consumption and other factors that are required to complete the evaluation of HTGR application is readily available in the public domain. There is also interest by the Alberta oil sands producers (OSP) in identifying alternative energy sources for their operations. It should be noted, however, that the results of this evaluation could be applied to any similar oil sands area.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

284

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor’s logic, which mimics human expert’s decision-making process. TGS Advisor’s recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Marcellus Shale Amirmasoud Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, West Virginia University, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, SPE Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible of how much carbon dioxide or methane can be stored in shale at a given pressure. In this paper, a shale

Mohaghegh, Shahab

287

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Rate-decline Relations for Unconventional Reservoirs and Development of Parametric Correlations for Estimation of Reservoir Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-rate analysis and time-rate-pressure analysis methods are available to estimate reserves and study flow performance of wells in unconventional gas reservoirs. However, these tools are often incorrectly used or the analysis can become difficult because of the complex nature of the reservoir system. Conventional methods (e.g., Arps' time-rate relations) are often used incorrectly to estimate reserves from such reservoirs. It was only recently that a serious study was conducted to outline the limitations of these relations and to set guidelines for their correct application. New time-rate relations, particularly the Duong and logistic growth model, were introduced to estimate reserves and forecast production from unconventional reservoirs. These new models are being used with limited understanding of their characteristics and limitations. Moreover, well performance analyses using analytical/semi-analytical solutions (time-rate-pressure) are often complicated from non-uniqueness that arises when estimating well/formation properties. In this work, we present a detailed study of the Duong model and logistic growth model to investigate the behaviors and limitations of these models when analyzing production data from unconventional reservoirs. We consider production data generated from numerical simulation cases and data obtained from unconventional gas reservoirs to study the quality of match to specific flow regimes and compare accuracy of the reserve estimates. We use the power-law exponential model (PLE), which has been shown to model transient, transition and boundary-dominated flow regimes reliably, as a benchmark to study performance of Duong and logistic growth models. Moreover, we use the "continuous EUR" approach to compare these models during reserve estimation. Finally, we develop four new time-rate relations, based on characteristics of the time-rate data on diagnostic plots. Using diagnostic plots we show that the new time-rate relations provide a quality match to the production data across all flow regimes, leading to a reliable reserve estimate. In a preliminary study, we integrated time-rate model parameters with fundamental reservoir properties (i.e., fracture conductivity (Fc) and 30 year EUR (EUR30yr)), by studying 15 numerical simulation cases to yield parametric correlations. We have demonstrated a methodology to integrate time-rate model parameters and reservoir properties. This method avoids the non-uniqueness issues often associated with model-based production data analysis. This study provides theoretical basis for further demonstration of the methodology using field cases.

Askabe, Yohanes 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

290

AAPPSS SSCCIIEENNCCEE RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING HIGHLIGHTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 p.m. CAB 365 "Unconventional Oil and Gas Reservoir Modeling and Simulation" Professor Zhangxing John to unconventional oil and gas modeling. As conventional oil and gas reserves dwindle and oil prices rise, the recovery of unconventional oil and gas (such as heavy oil, oil sands, tight gas, and shale gas) is now

Kemner, Ken

291

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: NSTAR Automated Mater Reading Based Dynamic Pricing - Douglas Horton, NSTAR Electric & Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting AMR Based Dynamic Pricing y g Doug Horton NSTAR Electric & Gas Co. 6/8/2012 AMR Based Dynamic Pricing Objective Provide two-way communication of electricity cost & consumption data utilizing the customers existing meter & Internet. Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and Goal to achieve 5% reduction in peak and average load. Life-cycle Funding ($K) Total Budget Total DOE Funding to Technical Scope Use customer's existing AMR meter and broadband Internet to achieve two way Total Budget Total DOE Funding Funding to Date $4,900k $2,362k $1,623k broadband Internet to achieve two way communication and "AMI" functionality Cutting-edge solution to integrate: * Existing meters E i ti I t t December 2008 * Existing Internet * Existing billing & CIS

292

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two process schemes have been investigated by us for the use of hydrotalcites we prepared as CO{sub 2} adsorbents to enhance water gas shift (WGS) reaction: Case I involves the adsorption enhanced WGS packed bed reactor and Case II involves the adsorption enhanced WGS membrane reactor. Both cases will achieve the same objective as the hydrotalcite membrane reactor: i.e., improving the WGS reactor efficiency via the concomitant removal of CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this report a detailed investigation of the design characteristics and performance of Case II, termed the Hybrid Adsorbent-Membrane Reactor (HAMR), is presented. The HAMR system includes a packed-bed catalytic membrane reactor (hydrogen selective) coupling the WGS reaction (in a porous hydrogen selective membrane) with CO{sub 2} removal with an adsorbent in the permeate side. The reactor characteristics have been investigated for a range of permeance and selectivity relevant to the aforementioned application. The HAMR system shows enhanced CO conversion, hydrogen yield, and product purity, and provides good promise for reducing the hostile operating conditions of conventional WGS reactors, and for meeting the CO{sub 2} sequestration objective. In the next quarterly report we will present the simulation result for Case I as well as the progress on hydrotalcite membrane synthesis.

Paul K. T. Liu

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

DOE Solar Decathlon: Cornell University: Making an Unconventional Choice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silo House at Solar Decathlon 2009. Enlarge image Silo House at Solar Decathlon 2009. Enlarge image Silo House is now a private residence on Martha's Vineyard. Forty solar panels rise above three cylinders and a courtyard to provide Silo House with 8 kW of power. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: Cornell University What: Silo House Where: Martha's Vineyard Vineyard Haven, MA 02568 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2009 Cornell University: Making an Unconventional Choice Like the two U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon houses before it, Cornell University's Silo House now serves as a residence and is located within 30 miles of campus. Having competed in Solar Decathlon 2005 and 2007, the Cornell team knew it wanted to try something different in 2009. The team decided to create a

296

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Bubble point suppression in unconventional liquids rich reservoirs and its impact on oil production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The average pore size in producing unconventional, liquids-rich reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this nano-pore scale, capillary and surface disjoining… (more)

Firincioglu, Tuba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Unconventional Staging Package Selection Leads to Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

In late 2010, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Secretary of Energy, Daniel Poneman, directed that an analysis be conducted on the U-233 steel-clad, Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) fuel plates that were stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), focusing on cost savings and any potential DOE programmatic needs for the special nuclear material (SNM). The NA-162 Nuclear Criticality Safety Program requested retention of these fuel plates for use in experiments at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). A Secretarial Initiative challenged ORNL to make the first shipment to the NNSS by the end of the 2011 calendar year, and this effort became known as the U-233 Project Accelerated Shipping Campaign. To meet the Secretarial Initiative, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), the NNSS Management and Operations contractor, was asked to facilitate the receipt and staging of the U-233 fuel plates in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). Because there were insufficient staging containers available for the fuel plates, NSTec conducted an analysis of alternatives. The project required a staging method that would reduce the staging footprint while addressing nuclear criticality safety and radiation exposure concerns. To accommodate an intermediate staging method of approximately five years, the NSTec project team determined that a unique and unconventional staging package, the AT-400R, was available to meet the project requirements. By using the AT-400R containers, NSTec was able to realize a cost savings of approximately $10K per container, a total cost savings of nearly $450K.

,

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Dioxide as Cushion Gas for Natural Gas Storage  

Carbon dioxide injection during carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery can be carried out to produce the methane while

302

Use expander cycles for LPG recovery  

SciTech Connect

Expander-type cycles are competitive with other gas recovery processes even when applied to relatively rich gas feeds for a high recovery of only propane plus. These cycles are the most economical to use when (1) ''free pressure drop'' is available between feed and residue gas pressure; (2) product requires demethanization only; (3) feed is very lean and propane plus heavier components are required; (4) a small, unattended, prefabricated unit for LPG recovery is needed; (5) an offshore LPG facility is required to be built on a platform where space and weight allowance is at a premium; (6) a facility is initially built for propane recovery, but is planned for future conversion to ethane recovery; and (7) relatively low-pressure gas feeds (which are usually quite rich) must be processed for a high recovery of ethane. A flow chart for an oil absorption plant is presented.

Valdes, A.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Comprehensive Evaluation Model of the Development Prospect of Shale Gas Based on Fuzzy Mathematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an unconventional gas resource, shale gas is an practically alternative energy. Through the analysis of the current situation of shale gas development at home and abroad, this paper ascertains the influencing factors of the development prospect of ... Keywords: shale gas, fuzzy mathematics, development prospect, influence factors

Yanping Wang; Fanqi Meng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

305

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

306

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

307

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

308

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

309

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Oil & Gas Research Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the ultra-deepwater and unconventional fuels program. Read more DOE Signs MOU with Alaska New accord to help develop Alaska's potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D DOE is conducting groundbreaking research to unlock the energy potential of gas hydrates. Read more LNG Safety Research Report This Report to Congress summarizes the progress of DOE's LNG safety research Read more FE's Office of Oil & Natural Gas supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas. Resource/Safety R&D Hydraulic Fracturing & Shale Gas Research. Natural gas from shales has the

310

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Enhanced oil recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Research programs on enhanced recovery are briefly described. Major areas include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery processes, resource assessment technology, geoscience technology, microbial technology, and environmental technology.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Recovery Act Buy American Requirements for Information Needed from Financial Assistance Applicants/Recipients for Waiver Requests Based on Unreasonable Cost or Nonavailability Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance funded by the Recovery Act must comply with the requirement that all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work be produced in the United States, unless the head of the agency makes a waiver, or determination of inapplicability of the Buy American Recovery Act provisions, based on one of the authorized exceptions. The authorized exceptions are unreasonable cost, nonavailability, and in furtherance of the public interest. This

315

FreezeFrac Improves the Productivity of Gas Shales S. Enayatpour, E. Van Oort, T. Patzek, University of Texas At Austin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 166482 FreezeFrac Improves the Productivity of Gas Shales S. Enayatpour, E. Van Oort, T. Patzek to unconventional hydrocarbon reservers such as oil shales, gas shales, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and gas; Keaney et al., 2004). Successful production of oil and gas from shales with nano-Darcy range permeability

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

316

Petroleum recovery materials and process  

SciTech Connect

A petroleum recovery process uses micellar solutions made from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). During the process, microemulsions utilizing LPG in the external phase are injected through at least one injection well into the oil-bearing formations. The microemulsions are driven toward at least one recovery well and crude petroleum is recovered through the recovery well. The LPG in the micellar system may be propane or butane. Corrosion inhibitors can be used in sour fields, and bactericides can be used where necessary. The microemulsions used contain up to about 10-20% water and about 8% surfactant. (4 claims)

Gogarty, W.B.; Olson, R.W.

1967-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Unconventional fermions: The Price of Quark-Lepton Unification at TeV Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early petite unification (PUT) of quarks and leptons at TeV scales with sin^2 theta_W(M^2_Z) used as a constraint, necessitates the introduction of extra quarks and leptons with unconventional electric charges (up to 4/3 for the quarks and 2 for the leptons). This talk, in honor of Paul Frampton's 60th birthday, will be devoted to the motivation and construction of models of early unification and to their implications, including the issues of rare decays and unconventional fermions.

P. Q. Hung

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

319

What questions should we be asking about shale gas? Bob Howarth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What questions should we be asking about shale gas? Bob Howarth Department of Ecology://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/pdf/0383er(2011).pdf #12;Unconventional extraction of gas from shale formations is new, and is being/ndx_marcil.pdf Shales hold a lot of natural gas (methane), but very dispersed, not economical using traditional

Barthelat, Francois

320

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

322

Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery Untapped Domestic Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

targeting unconventional oil resources such as extra heavy oil, oil and tar sands, oil shale, and oil in unconventional reservoirs (like the fractured Bakken Shale of North...

323

Unconventional Energy Resources and Geospatial Information: 2006 Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article contains a brief summary of some of the 2006 annual committee reports presented to the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The purpose of the reports is to advise EMD leadership and members of the current status of research and developments of energy resources (other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks), energy economics, and geospatial information. This summary presented here by the EMD is a service to the general geologic community. Included in this summary are reviews of the current research and activities related to coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, gas shales, geospatial information technology related to energy resources, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NETL: Hydrogen & Clean Fuels - Abstract : Gas Adsorption on Single...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources...

326

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas...

327

New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play  

SciTech Connect

While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Low-frequency RF Coupling To Unconventional (Fat Unbalanced) Dipoles  

SciTech Connect

The report explains radio frequency (RF) coupling to unconventional dipole antennas. Normal dipoles have thin equal length arms that operate at maximum efficiency around resonance frequencies. In some applications like high-explosive (HE) safety analysis, structures similar to dipoles with ''fat'' unequal length arms must be evaluated for indirect-lightning effects. An example is shown where a metal drum-shaped container with HE forms one arm and the detonator cable acts as the other. Even if the HE is in a facility converted into a ''Faraday cage'', a lightning strike to the facility could still produce electric fields inside. The detonator cable concentrates the electric field and carries the energy into the detonator, potentially creating a hazard. This electromagnetic (EM) field coupling of lightning energy is the indirect effect of a lightning strike. In practice, ''Faraday cages'' are formed by the rebar of the concrete facilities. The individual rebar rods in the roof, walls and floor are normally electrically connected because of the construction technique of using metal wire to tie the pieces together. There are two additional requirements for a good cage. (1) The roof-wall joint and the wall-floor joint must be electrically attached. (2) All metallic penetrations into the facility must also be electrically connected to the rebar. In this report, it is assumed that these conditions have been met, and there is no arcing in the facility structure. Many types of detonators have metal ''cups'' that contain the explosives and thin electrical initiating wires, called bridge wires mounted between two pins. The pins are connected to the detonator cable. The area of concern is between the pins supporting the bridge wire and the metal cup forming the outside of the detonator. Detonator cables usually have two wires, and in this example, both wires generated the same voltage at the detonator bridge wire. This is called the common-mode voltage. The explosive component inside a detonator is relatively sensitive, and any electrical arc is a concern. In a safety analysis, the pin-to-cup voltage, i.e., detonator voltage, must be calculated to decide if an arc will form. If the electric field is known, the voltage between any two points is simply the integral of the field along a line between the points. Eq. 1.1. For simplicity, it is assumed that the electric field and dipole elements are aligned. Calculating the induced detonator voltage is more complex because of the field concentration caused by metal components. If the detonator cup is not electrically connected to the metal HE container, the portion of the voltage generated by the dipole at the detonator will divide between the container-to-cup and cup-to-pin gaps. The gap voltages are determined by their capacitances. As a simplification, it will be assumed the cup is electrically attached, short circuited, to the HE container. The electrical field in the pin-to-cup area is determined by the field near the dipole, the length of the dipole, the shape of the arms, and the orientation of the arms. Given the characteristics of a lightning strike and the inductance of the facility, the electric fields in the ''Faraday cage'' can be calculated. The important parameters for determining the voltage in an empty facility are the inductance of the rebars and the rate of change of the current, Eq. 1.3. The internal electric fields are directly related to the facility voltages, however, the electric fields in the pin-to-cup space is much higher than the facility fields because the antenna will concentrate the fields covered by the arms. Because the lightning current rise-time is different for every strike, the maximum electric field and the induced detonator voltage should be described by probability distributions. For pedantic purposes, the peak field in the simulations will be simply set to 1 V/m. Lightning induced detonator voltages can be calculated by scaling up with the facility fields. Any metal object around the explosives, such as a work stand, will also distort the electric

Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Perkins, M P; Speer, R D; Javedani, J B

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Convert CargoMAX Vehicles to Run on Compressed Natural Gas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08092010 Location(s): Okarche, Oklahoma Office(s):...

330

Illinois Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Memo Illinois has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

331

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

332

Natural gas market under the Natural Gas Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This first of a series of analyses presents data on the exploration, development, production, and pricing of US natural gas since the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act in 1978. Designed to give pricing incentives for new-well activity, the NGPA has apparently eliminated many of the pricing differences that existed between interstate and intrastate markets. Estimates of the annual production volumes in trillion CF/yr of gas for the categories defined by the NGPA include new gas 4.5, new onshore wells 4.1, high-cost unconventional gas 0.7, and stripper wells 0.4. Preliminary statistics on the end-use pricing of natural gas suggest that significant changes in the average wellhead prices have not caused correspondingly large increases in the price of delivered gas.

Carlson, M.; Ody, N.; O'Neill, R.; Rodekohr, M.; Shambaugh, P.; Thrasher, R.; Trapmann, W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Recovery Newsletters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

newsletters Office of Environmental newsletters Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en 2011 ARRA Newsletters http://energy.gov/em/downloads/2011-arra-newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

334

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the...

335

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

336

Market model finds tight gas sands R and D offers most promise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional natural gas (UNG) - primarily tight gas sands - offers by far the largest opportunity for reducing gas costs between now and 2000, a team of researchers reported at the Sept. 1984 International Gas Research conference in Washington, DC. The promises of UNG R and D far outweigh those of synthetic natural gas (SNG), the researchers concluded, but stressed that SNG R and D should nonetheless continue - but with a different focus and changed performance goals.

Not Available

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unconventional sources, such as oil sands and oil shale. It is important to note that overall reserve figures. Although Utah contains large deposits of oil shale and oil sands, both of which can be processed to yield from oil shale and oil sands is exempt from the state oil and gas severance tax. Utah also levies

Provancher, William

338

Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat recovery boilers are widely used in process plants for recovering energy from various waste gas streams, either from the consideration of process or of economy. Sulfuric, as well as nitric, acid plant heat recovery boilers are examples of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800°F to 1800°F. This gas, when recovered, can result in a large energy savings and steam production. This paper attempts to outline some of the engineering considerations in the design of heat recovery boilers for turbine exhaust applications (combined cycle, cogeneration mode), incineration plants (solid waste, fume) and chemical plants (reformer, sulfuric acid, nitric acid).

Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

ARM - Recovery Act Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActRecovery Act Instruments ActRecovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Recovery Act Instruments These pages provide a breakdown of the new instruments planned for installation among the permanent and mobile ARM sites. In addition, several instruments will be purchased for use throughout the facility and deployed as needed. These are considered "facility spares" and are included in the table below. View All | Hide All ARM Aerial Facility Instrument Title Instrument Mentor Measurement Group Measurements

340

Recovery Act Open House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Open House North Wind Environmental was one of three local small businesses that received Recovery Funding for projects at DOE's Idaho Site. Members of the community...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utahâ??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utahâ??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water â?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquiferâ??s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utahâ??s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utahâ??s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Annual Report: EPAct Complementary Program's Ultra-Deepwater R&D Portfolio and Unconventional Resources R&D Portfolio (30 September 2012)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes FY13 research activities performed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Office of Research and Development (ORD), along with its partners in the Regional University Alliance (RUA) to fulfill research needs under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) Section 999?s Complementary Program. Title IX, Subtitle J, Section 999A(d) of EPAct 2005 authorizes $50 million per year of federal oil and gas royalties, rents and bonus payments for an oil and natural gas research and development effort, the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program. Section 999 further prescribes four program elements for the effort, one of which is the Complementary Research Program that is to be performed by NETL. This document lays out the plan for the research portfolio for the Complementary Research Program, with an emphasis on the 2013 funding. The Complementary Program consists of two research portfolios focused on domestic resources: (1) the Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Portfolio (UDW) (focused on hydrocarbons in reservoirs in extreme environments) and (2) the Unconventional Resources Portfolio (UCR) (focused on hydrocarbons in shale reservoirs). These two portfolios address the science base that enables these domestic resources to be produced responsibly, informing both regulators and operators. NETL is relying on a core Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) competency in engineered-natural systems to develop this science base, allowing leveraging of decades of investment. NETL?s Complementary Research Program research portfolios support the development of unbiased research and information for policymakers and the public, performing rapid predictions of possible outcomes associated with unexpected events, and carrying out quantitative assessments for energy policy stakeholders that accurately integrate the risks of safety and environmental impacts. The objective of this body of work is to build the scientific understanding and assessment tools necessary to develop the confidence that key domestic oil and gas resources can be produced safely and in an environmentally sustainable way. For the Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Portfolio, the general objective is to develop a scientific base for predicting and quantifying potential risks associated with exploration and production in extreme offshore environments. This includes: (1) using experimental studies to improve understanding of key parameters (e.g., properties and behavior of materials) tied to loss-of-control events in deepwater settings, (2) compiling data on spatial variability for key properties used to characterize and simulate the natural and engineered components involved in extreme offshore settings, and (3) utilizing findings from (1) and (2) in conjunction with integrated assessment models to model worst-case scenarios, as well as assessments of most likely scenarios relative to potential risks associated with flow assurance and loss of control. This portfolio and approach is responsive to key Federal-scale initiatives including the Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee (OESC). In particular, the findings and recommendations of the OESC?s Spill Prevention Subcommittee are addressed by aspects of the Complementary Program research. The Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Portfolio is also aligned with some of the goals of the United States- Department of the Interior (US-DOI) led Alaska Interagency Working Group (AIWG) which brings together state, federal, and tribal government personnel in relation to energy-related issues and needs in the Alaskan Arctic. For the Unconventional Fossil Resources Portfolio, the general objective is to develop a sufficient scientific base for predicting and quantifying potential risks associated with the oil/gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing and/or other engineering measures to produce. The major areas of focus include: (1) improving predictions of fugitive methane and greenhouse gas emissions, (2) pr

none,; Rose, Kelly [NETL] [NETL; Hakala, Alexandra [NETL] [NETL; Guthrie, George [NETL] [NETL

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Real natural gas reservoir data Vs. natural gas reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas reservoir per se model is an exceedingly simple model of a natural gas reservoir designed to develop the physical relationship between ultimate recovery and rate(s) of withdrawal for production regulation policy assessment. To be responsive, ...

Ellis A. Monash; John Lohrenz

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 4, 2012 January 4, 2012 DOE-Sponsored Online Mapping Portal Helps Oil and Gas Producers Comply with New Mexico Compliance Rules An online mapping portal to help oil and natural gas operators comply with a revised New Mexico waste pit rule has been developed by a team of New Mexico Tech researchers. December 21, 2011 DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies Research projects to study ways for improving the environmental performance of unconventional gas development are being sought by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. November 22, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has selected six

346

Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is directed at more traditional enhanced recovery projects such as waterflood or gas cycling projects and does

Voordouw, Gerrit

347

Safety research plan for gas-supply technologies. Final report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a multiyear research plan addressing the safety issues of the following gas supply technologies: conventional natural gas, including deep and sour gas wells; unconventional natural gas (Devonian shale, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and geopressured methane); SNG from coal (surface and in situ), and SNG from biomass. A total of 51 safety issues were identified in the initial review. These safety issues were screened to eliminate those hazards which appeared to be relatively insignificant in terms of accident severity or frequency, or because the potential for resolving the problem through research was considered very low. Twenty-six remaining safety issues were prioritized, and of these, 9 were selected as priority research projects: two under conventional gas; one under unconventional natural gas; and six under SNG from coal. No safety research issues in the biomass area appear to warrant priority consideration.

Tipton, L.M.; Junkin, P.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Oil Shale Development from the Perspective of NETL's Unconventional Oil Resource Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of oil shale development was examined by gathering relevant research literature for an Unconventional Oil Resource Repository. This repository contains over 17,000 entries from over 1,000 different sources. The development of oil shale has been hindered by a number of factors. These technical, political, and economic factors have brought about R&D boom-bust cycles. It is not surprising that these cycles are strongly correlated to market crude oil prices. However, it may be possible to influence some of the other factors through a sustained, yet measured, approach to R&D in both the public and private sectors.

Smith, M.W. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV); Shadle, L.J.; Hill, D. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

351

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

352

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide lean injection gas for reservoir energy, to provide fuel for potential viscous oil thermal recovery, or to supplement future export gas. The associated fresh water...

353

Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL AND NATURAL GAS PROGRAM National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Enhanced Oil Recovery NETL has advanced the science of enhanced...

354

Simplify heat recovery steam generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in process and power plants, refineries and in several cogeneration/combined cycle systems. They are usually designed for a set of gas and steam conditions but often operate under different parameters due to plant constraints, steam demand, different ambient conditions (which affect the gas flow and exhaust gas temperature in a gas turbine plant), etc. As a result, the gas and steam temperature profiles in the HRSG, steam production and the steam temperature differ from the design conditions, affecting the entire plant performance and economics. Also, consultants and process engineers who are involved in evaluating the performance of the steam system as a whole, often would like to simulate the performance of an HRSG under different gas flows, inlet gas temperature and analysis, steam pressure and feed water temperature to optimize the entire steam system and select proper auxiliaries such as steam turbines, condensers, deaerators, etc.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chapter 8 Appendices 1 Appendix 8A: Natural Gas RD&D Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today to about 40 percent; unconventional oil production is estimated to account for less -0.5 0.0 0.5 1cfr National Security Consequences of U.S. Oil Dependency Report of an Independent Task Force and Introduction 3 Findings: The U.S. Energy System and the Role of Imported Oil and Gas 12 Findings: How

Reuter, Martin

356

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the core recovery, gas and water are produced.Gas produced will displace some water, reducing the density

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

359

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

Jury, S.H.

1964-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

Brown, William R. (Zionsville, PA); Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA); Dunbobbin, Brian R. (Allentown, PA); Rao, Pradip (Allentown, PA); Erickson, Donald C. (Annapolis, MD)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Polar Kerr Effect as Probe for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking in Unconventional Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The search for broken time reversal symmetry (TRSB) in unconventional superconductors intensified in the past year as more systems have been predicted to possess such a state. Following our pioneering study of TRSB states in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} using magneto-optic probes, we embarked on a systematic study of several other of these candidate systems. The primary instrument for our studies is the Sagnac magneto-optic interferometer, which we recently developed. This instrument can measure magneto-optic Faraday or Kerr effects with an unprecedented sensitivity of 10 nanoradians at temperatures as low as 100 mK. In this paper we review our recent studies of TRSB in several systems, emphasizing the study of the pseudogap state of high temperature superconductors and the inverse proximity effect in superconductor/ferromagnet proximity structures.

Kapitulnik, A.

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ď?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 19, 2011 CX-005047: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 19, 2011 CX-005039: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/19/2011

365

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Recovery Act Funds at Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Funds at Work Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Funds at Work Recovery Act Funds at Work Funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) are being put to work to improve safety, reliability, and service in systems across the country. Idaho Power Company is accelerating development of renewable energy integration, improving access to clean power resources, and overhauling their customer information and communications systems. Oklahoma Gas and Electric has completed the 2-year pilot of a time-based rate program to reduce peak demand, which resulted in an average bill reduction of $150/customer over the summer periods. Powder River Energy Corporation is meeting the challenges of terrain and weather by building a microwave communications network to ensure higher

367

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kansas are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to geothermal and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Kansas' businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications Slide 1 District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

368

A Study of the Composition of Carryover Particles in Kraft Recovery Boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carryover particles are partially/completely burned black liquor particles entrained in the flue gas in kraft recovery boilers. Understanding how carryover particles form and deposit on… (more)

Khalaj-Zadeh, Asghar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Natural Gas Production Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, ... for elemental sulfur and carbon dioxide can be used for enhanced oil recovery. Inert gases such as

370

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but unconventional oil sources are utilized to a greaterand unconventional oil sources are utilized more) 5 . FigureConventional Crude Oil Unconventional Sources 90 to 90 to 92

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remain dominant but unconventional oil sources are utilizedremain dominant, and unconventional oil sources are utilizedTransport - Overall Unconventional oil resources (coal, NG,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 2011 Annual Plan | Page i Message from the Secretary As we take steps to create the clean energy economy of the future, prudent development of domestic oil and natural gas resources will continue to be part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security for decades to come. These operations have to be conducted responsibly, ensuring that communities are safe and that the environment is protected. As industry tackles the challenge of developing an increasingly difficult reserve base - in ultra-deepwater offshore and unconventional plays onshore - we must ensure through scientific

374

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cyanidation Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

376

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Dr. Bjorn P. Wygrala Dr Bjorn P. Wygrala was born in 1952 in Melbourne, Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Well Construction · Well Construction · Well Stimulation Halliburton Center for Unconventional Resources · Coalbed-Methane Reservoirs · Heavy Oil Recovery · Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs · Resource

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

378

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Status of enhanced oil recovery technology  

SciTech Connect

The various enhanced oil recovery processes are discussed and classified into the following categories: (1) polymer waterflooding; (2) steam processes; (3) miscible gas (CO/sub 2/) processes; (4) surfactant flooding; and (5) in-situ combustion. Polymer flooding alone is of limited applicability and production from polymer projects is unlikely to become highly significant. Steam processes are now economic for favorable prospects, and recovery levels range from 5 to 35%. Miscible gas processes are particularly applicable to those reservoirs with favorable geology located near sources of CO/sub 2/, and production could become significant in the next five years, but not sooner due to the time necessary to develop CO/sub 2/ sources and construct distribution systems. Recovery levels for the miscible gas processes are in the 5 to 15% range. Most surfactant processes are still in the research stage, and will not yield significant production for at least ten years. Ten to fifteen % of the original oil-in-place can be recovered through these processes. In Situ combustion processes are currently economic in some cases, but the ultimate potential is presently very limited unless significant technical breakthroughs are made in the future. It is estimated that the ultimate potential for present enhanced oil recovery processes in the conterminous United States is up to 20 billion barrels of petroleum.

Mattax, C.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo Colorado Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Delaware Recovery Act State Memo District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo Florida Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Guam Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Idaho Recovery Act State Memo Illinois Recovery Act State Memo Indiana Recovery Act State Memo Iowa Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

382

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Outlines Recipient Reporting Requirements "Recipient reports required by Section 1512 of the Recovery Act will answer important questions, such as: â–Ş Who is receiving Recovery Act dollars and in what amounts? â–Ş What projects or activities are being funded with Recovery Act dollars? â–Ş What is the completion status of such projects or activities and what impact have they had on job creation and retention?" "When published on www.Recovery.gov, these reports will provide the public with an unprecedented level of transparency into how Federal dollars are being spent and will help drive accountability for the timely,

383

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 52 quarter ending September 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience Technology; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 39, quarter ending June 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 41, quarter ending December 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 42, quarter ending March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 51 quarter ending June 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Field Projects; Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Virginia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to alternative fuel vehicles and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News. Through these investments, Virginia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Virginia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Virginia Recovery Act State Memo

389

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana has substantial natural resources, including abundant oil, gas, coal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Louisiana are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and smart grid to solar and geothermal, advanced battery manufacturing and biofuels. Through these investments, Louisiana's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Louisiana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo

390

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Wyoming are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Wyoming's businesses, the University of Wyoming, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Wyoming to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Recovery_Act_Memo_Wyoming.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1

391

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kentucky are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Kentucky's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kentucky to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

392

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Oklahoma are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and geothermal. Through these investments, Oklahoma's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

393

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

394

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Kentucky are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Kentucky's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Kentucky to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

395

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

396

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

397

Utah Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah Recovery Act State Memo Utah has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, natural gas, wind, geothermal, and solar power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Utah are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal, alternative fuel vehicles, and the clean-up of legacy uranium processing sites. Through these investments, Utah's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Utah to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Utah Recovery Act State Memo

398

Texas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas Recovery Act State Memo Texas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, biomass, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Texas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from carbon capture and storage to energy efficiency, the smart grid, solar, geothermal, and biomass projects. Through these investments, Texas's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Texas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Texas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

399

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

400

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Oklahoma are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and geothermal. Through these investments, Oklahoma's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

402

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alabama are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the electric grid to renewable energy and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Alabama's businesses, universities, nonprofits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alabama to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

403

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage. Keywords: geologicalactivities such as natural gas storage, EOR, and deepstorage, such as natural gas storage and CO 2 -enhanced oil

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Gulf of Mexico is a hub of oil and gas exploration activities that historically have impacted and impede recovery of the system. There are over 3,000 active oil & gas production platforms in U.S. OuterDisturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil

Pennings, Steven C.

405

Feed Resource Recovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Resource Recovery Feed Resource Recovery Jump to: navigation, search Name Feed Resource Recovery Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Product Start-up planning to convert waste to fertilizer and biomethane gas. Coordinates 42.29776°, -71.289744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.29776,"lon":-71.289744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Property:RecoveryFunding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RecoveryFunding RecoveryFunding Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RecoveryFunding" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 5,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 1,544,004 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 4,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 11,444,180 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 1,330,825 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 18,700,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 20,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 200,000,000 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 88,821,251 +

407

Enhanced recovery update  

SciTech Connect

Three key projects featuring enhanced operations in California are described. In the Kern River oil field, steaming at a pilot project is testing the hot plate heavy oil recovery method. In Buena Vista oil field, steam will be injected in a test project to determine the commercial feasibility of using steam for the enhanced recovery of light crude oil. Also, in the McKittrick oil field, 2 processes are being considered for a commercial heavy oil mining venture. Steam continues to be the most important element in the recovery of hard-to-produce oil. Other steam-using projects are highlighted.

Rintoul, B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here is one compliance agreement for EM’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program on accelerated milestones for the Recovery Act program.

410

Recovery News Flashes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news-flashes Office of Environmental news-flashes Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http://energy.gov/em/downloads/tru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear" class="title-link">"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP

411

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

412

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 23, 2012 August 23, 2012 New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector Taking a moment to break-down key findings from the latest Clean Energy Jobs Roundup. August 13, 2012 INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 3, 2012 A worker suppresses dust during the final demolition stages of the historic DP West site, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area 21. The demolition was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and is part of $212 million in ARRA funds the Lab received for environmental remediation. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Photo of the Week: August 3, 2012 Check out our favorite energy-related photos! August 2, 2012 With new pipes and controls, the natural gas kilns Highland Craftsmen uses to produce poplar bark shingles will operate about 40 percent more efficiently, saving the company $5,000 a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of Highland Craftsmen.

414

Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant and convection waste heat boilers. Medium level waste heat leaving fixed bed type gasifiers can be recovered more economically by convection type boilers or shell and tube heat exchangers. An economic analysis for the steam generation and process heat exchanger is presented. Steam generated from the waste heat boiler is used to drive steam turbines for power generation or air compressors for the oxygen plant. Low level heat recovered by process heat exchangers is used to heat product gas or support the energy requirement of the gasification plant. The mechanical design for pressure vessel shell and boiler tubes is discussed. The design considers metallurgical requirements associated with hydrogen rich, high temperature, and high pressure atmosphere.

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with advanced gas turbines that are subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures resulting from excessive thermal mechanical fatigue damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in the lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs. The procurement of engineer, procure, and construct ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers designed to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 150°F or lower are now being commercially operated on gas, oil and coal fired boilers. These heat exchangers, when applied to boiler flue gas, are commonly called condensing economizers. It has traditionally been common practice in the boiler industry to not reduce flue gas temperatures below the 300°F to 400°F range. This barrier has now been broken by the development and application of corrosion proof heat exchanger technology. This opens up a vast reservior of untapped recoverable energy that can be recovered and reused as an energy source. The successful recovery of this heat and the optimum use of it are the fundemental goals of the technology presented in this paper. This Recovered Low Level Heat Is Normally Used To Heat Cold Make-up Water Or Combustion Air.

Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping cogeneration systems, over two-thirds of the energy is in the exhaust gases leaving the gas turbine. In bottoming cycles, where steam and/or electrical power are generated from heating process exhaust streams, the heat recovery design is of primary concern. John Zink Company, since 1929, has specialized in the development, design, and fabrication of energy efficient equipment for the industrial and commercial markets. The paper outlines the design, installation and performance of recently supplied gas turbine cogeneration heat recovery systems. It also describes; several bottoming cycle thermal system designs applied to incinerators, process heaters, refinery secondary reformers and FCC units. Overall parameters and general trends in the design and application of cogeneration thermal systems are presented. New equipment and system designs to reduce pollution and increase overall system efficiency are also reviewed.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 47, Quarter ending June 1986  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; environmental technology; and microbial technology. (AT)

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unconventional gas recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mass Transfer Mechanisms during the Solvent Recovery of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Canada has the second largest proven oil reserves next to Saudi Arabia which is mostly located in Alberta and Saskatchewan but is unconventional heavy oil… (more)

James, Lesley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Guidelines on Optimizing Heat Recovery Steam Generator Drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe thermal-mechanical fatigue damage to the superheaters (SHs), reheaters (RHs), and steam piping of horizontal-gas-path heat recovery steam generators due primarily to ineffective drainage of the condensate that is generated in superheaters and reheaters at every startup continues to be a significant industry problem that results in avoidable deterioration of unit reliability and significant unnecessary maintenance costs. This report will assist operators in guiding heat recovery steam generator (HR...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Mexico are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and solar, geothermal and hydro, biofuels and nuclear, as well as a major commitment to cleaning up the Cold War- legacy nuclear sites in the state. Through these investments, New Mexico's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New

424

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota has substantial natural resources, including coal, natural gas, oil, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in North Dakota are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to clean coal, wind, and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, North Dakota's businesses, the University of North Dakota, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning North Dakota to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future.

425

New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mexico Recovery Act State Memo Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New Mexico are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and solar, geothermal and hydro, biofuels and nuclear, as well as a major commitment to cleaning up the Cold War- legacy nuclear sites in the state. Through these investments, New Mexico's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning New

426

California Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

427

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota Recovery Act State Memo North Dakota has substantial natural resources, including coal, natural gas, oil, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in North Dakota are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to clean coal, wind, and carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, North Dakota's businesses, the University of North Dakota, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning North Dakota to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future.

428

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two years ago I summarized 20 years of experience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the end of that paper I concluded with brief advice on 'How to specify heat recovery equipment.' The two years which have elapsed since then have convinced me that proper specification assures the most reliable equipment at the lowest price. The most economical specification describes the operating and site data but leaves the design details for the supplier. A true specialist will be able to provide you with the latest technology at the best possible price. This paper explores the impact of specifications on heat recovery equipment and its associated cost.

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency.

Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. 1983 update  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to serve owners and operators of enhanced oil recovery operations as a guidebook to the environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). EOR, as used in this handbook, refers to what is also called tertiary recovery. There are three major categories of EOR processes - thermal (including both steam injection and in-situ combustion), miscible gas, and chemical. These processes are used only after a well or reservoir has ceased to produce oil economically through primary or secondary methods. The primary emphasis in the handbook is on laws and regulations for the control or prevention of pollution. 3 figures, 14 tables.

Wilson, T.D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Annual Plan 3 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress June 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy |June 2013 Department of Energy |June 2013 Message from the Secretary The Nation needs to deploy American assets, innovation, and technology so that it can safely and responsibly develop more energy here at home and be a leader in the global energy economy. To this end, the Department of Energy (DOE) continues its work toward safe and responsible development of fossil fuels. This means giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised.

433

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress June 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy |June 2013 Department of Energy |June 2013 Message from the Secretary The Nation needs to deploy American assets, innovation, and technology so that it can safely and responsibly develop more energy here at home and be a leader in the global energy economy. To this end, the Department of Energy (DOE) continues its work toward safe and responsible development of fossil fuels. This means giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised.

434

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 12, 2011 August 12, 2011 Statement from National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary August 1, 2011 DOE Selects Projects Totaling $12.4 Million Aimed at Increasing Dom