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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Welcome to the Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) webpage. This page is designed to provide information, answer questions, and provide a point of contact for UCNI inquiries. UCNI is certain unclassified information about nuclear facilities and nuclear weapons that must be controlled because its unauthorized release could have a significant adverse effect on the national security or public health and safety. The Director, Office of Classification (OC), decides what specific information is UCNI. For information under the cognizance of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the decisions are made in coordination with the Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear

2

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Document Markings: A Brief Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Document Markings: A Brief Summary U.S. Department of Energy Classification Training Institute Office of Quality Management Office of Classification Office of Health, Safety and Security November 2011 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Document Markings: A Brief Summary Prepared by: Office of Quality Management Office of Classification U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 U C N I This document contains UCNI. How do I mark it? Do I need additional markings if it contains OUO? Table of Contents Marking UCNI Documents and Material .................................................... 1

3

DOE O 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order provides requirements and responsibilities for identifying and protecting the unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear ...

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chapter_13_Controlled_Unclassified_Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Controlled Unclassified Information This chapter describes the security procedures adopted by DOE HQ to implement the requirements of the following DOE regulations and directives: 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE Order 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE Order 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information DOE Manual 471.3-1, Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information Within DOE, Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) refers to unclassified information identified and marked as sensitive. CUI also describes information identified and safeguarded under Executive Order 13556, CUI.

5

10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified 0 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Establishes the Government-wide policies and procedures for implementing the requirements of section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 concerning identifying and protecting certain unclassified but sensitive Government information that concerns atomic energy defense programs. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information More Documents & Publications Summary, UCNI Document Markings - November 2011 Briefing, For Persons With Access to UCNI - April 2012

6

Controlled Unclassified STI | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Controlled Unclassified STI Controlled Unclassified STI Print page Print page Email page Email page Certain types of information have restricted access whose publication or distribution is restricted by various laws, federal codes, executive orders, international agreements, etc. This information is known as controlled unclassified information and can be broadly categorized as Official Use Only*, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and unclassified Naval Nuclear Propulsion Information. Other types of information have restrictions on their handling such as certain copyrighted material. However, regardless of the control marking, all STI is to be submitted to OSTI through appropriate applications. The Energy Link (E-Link) has built in encryption that will protect the submission of

7

Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 When you hear the term Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI), it could...

8

Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 When you hear the term Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI), it could mean one of two things. Currently, within DOE "Controlled Unclassified Information " or CUI is an overarching term used to refer to unclassified information that is identified and marked as sensitive (e.g., OUO and Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI)). Controlled Unclassified Information is also used to describe information that will be identified and safeguarded under Executive Order (E.O.) 13556, Controlled Unclassified Information. E.O. 13556 mandates a Government-wide uniform program to identify and protect sensitive but unclassified information. At this time, policies for CUI under the E.O. are still being

9

Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at the Idaho National Laboratory, IG-0755 Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at...

10

UNCLASSIFIED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 2 1 2 : 0 - - UNClASSl FIE0 CF-548 PHYSICS UNITED S T A T E S A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N CRITICAL AMOUNTS OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS BY E. Konopinski N. Metropolis E. Teller L. woods I Microfilm Price $q?rdo Available from the Office of Technical Services Department of Commerce Washington 25, D . C. March 19, 1943 I Photostat Price $ 330 Chicago. University. Metallurgical Laboratory Technical Information Service Extension, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 9 7 9 - 001. rrc DISCLAIMER T h i s report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thmof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy. compkteness, or use-

11

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Via Fax To Via E-Mail To U.S. Department Of Energy 301-903-1998 NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov ATTN: NMMSS Staff NA-73, GTN 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1290 UNCLASSIFIED...

12

Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

recognized the importance of protecting unclassified controlled information stored on computers and other electronic memory devices, particularly when this equipment is no longer...

13

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCLASSIFIED 1 UNCLASSIFIED HQ USACE 441 G. Street N.W. Washington, DC 261500RSEPT2013 OPERATION. In the absence of appropriations, the USACE Organization must shut down all non-excepted activities until Congress passes a new CRA or enacts an appropriation bill to fund the USACE Organization. Those USACE

US Army Corps of Engineers

14

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: Project Title: Associated Materials: Programmatic RIS Previous Project Number(s) Status Code Allotment Code (S=Supplier, U=User) I authorize that the information listed above is for the NMMSS Program to use as part of the project number conversion process for this facility.

15

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GG-5, is a record of decisions made by the Director, OC, as to what general subject areas are UCNI. Note: GG-5 may only be used by the Director, OC, to make determinations as to whether information...

16

MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Manchester...

17

Unclassified Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 1 Unclassified Distribution UNIVERSITY :OF CALIFORNU Radiation Lab oratory Contract No, W-7405-eng-48 THE DETECTION OF U T I F I C I B L L Y PRODUCED WOTOMESONS WITH COUNTERS *...

18

A Statistical Model for Generating a Population of Unclassified Objects and Radiation Signatures Spanning Nuclear Threats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an approach for generating a simulated population of plausible nuclear threat radiation signatures spanning a range of variability that could be encountered by radiation detection systems. In this approach, we develop a statistical model for generating random instances of smuggled nuclear material. The model is based on physics principles and bounding cases rather than on intelligence information or actual threat device designs. For this initial stage of work, we focus on random models using fissile material and do not address scenarios using non-fissile materials. The model has several uses. It may be used as a component in a radiation detection system performance simulation to generate threat samples for injection studies. It may also be used to generate a threat population to be used for training classification algorithms. In addition, we intend to use this model to generate an unclassified 'benchmark' threat population that can be openly shared with other organizations, including vendors, for use in radiation detection systems performance studies and algorithm development and evaluation activities. We assume that a quantity of fissile material is being smuggled into the country for final assembly and that shielding may have been placed around the fissile material. In terms of radiation signature, a nuclear weapon is basically a quantity of fissile material surrounded by various layers of shielding. Thus, our model of smuggled material is expected to span the space of potential nuclear weapon signatures as well. For computational efficiency, we use a generic 1-dimensional spherical model consisting of a fissile material core surrounded by various layers of shielding. The shielding layers and their configuration are defined such that the model can represent the potential range of attenuation and scattering that might occur. The materials in each layer and the associated parameters are selected from probability distributions that span the range of possibilities. Once an object is generated, its radiation signature is calculated using a 1-dimensional deterministic transport code. Objects that do not make sense based on physics principles or other constraints are rejected. Thus, the model can be used to generate a population of spectral signatures that spans a large space, including smuggled nuclear material and nuclear weapons.

Nelson, K; Sokkappa, P

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To: U.S Department Of Energy ATTN: NMMSS Staff NA-73, GTN 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1290 Return Via Fax To: 301-903-1998 Return Via E-Mail To:...

20

THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM 2002, IG-0569 THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM 2002,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE DEPARTMENT'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM, IG-0519...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE DEPARTMENT'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM, IG-0519 THE DEPARTMENT'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM, IG-0519 Protecting unclassified information systems continues to...

22

The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, IG...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, IG-0567 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, IG-0567 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002,...

23

PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support...

24

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Visitors who are foreign nationals must complete and submit the Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire 30 days before accessing facilities. Unclassified Foreign National Visits.doc Description Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire More Documents & Publications NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security Calibration Facilities Ecosystem Management Team Environmental Justice Environmental Management System Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance

25

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

UNCLASSIFIED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . 1 ^ ' ; > * «*- f _ 2 I * E -^ o %^ iJi i °I1 S- 8- 8. -5 . - S rf f- O H ) 8. c S 1 2 *£ ^ 11 0) o i l » V > o O D O C C ^ 3 X < 8 O o - I o v> o TJ . 2 8. I £ (J a " «. *£ ? fe ^ c a. V £ 5 M t o I- 0) * * = , ' *= .£ " "° -o ^ . i 8 'fe § - ^ o G -TO ( n e w * £ o S Q. Z O X O O » I s. Il ° 0) * £ o I o 3 i o o E Ic o ^ 4) U T£ e E o * * - * * - ^ C 3 in ja **' J! S-.E I 8 I 5 » U 3 *I 0) _ E S * 5 111 O) - Q. -o .5 c' o o g ->- S o a i 's e .8 c E o E e o S

27

UNCLASSIFIED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, , i m - 5 - ' ., Physics - General ? c t 1 EFFECT O F TF3SOR BANGE I N 1 NUCLEBR TWO BODY PFtOBLEBBS * , ' 1 I bs Herman Feshbach, Massachusetts I I n s t i t u t e o f Technology I Julian Schwinger, Harvard. Unfversity John A. B~PP, Harvard University Computation Laboratory of HwvaP61 University Cambrfdge, Massaehuse tts Contract No, ~~(30-l),-497 Issued: Decernb~, 1949 I UNCLASSIFIEB j ! I* ' -. ...; I ; L 2 : , \' p ;? 2 i -1- UNCLASSIFIEB DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

28

UNCLASSIFIED  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for this statistical modeling and were excluded. Three countries accounted for 74 percent, or 37, of the 50 transactions: United Arab Emirates (UAE) (18), China (11) and...

29

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SPECIAL REREVIEW SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED , ?4~0180N SctuAnr P. 0. 00x *a STATION F New YORK, N. Y. IN RLPLY RCFSRTO EID?f A- 43 MS ~-7405 eng-8 ". Subject: Contract No.H-7405 eng-8 with Metal Hydrides Incorporated. MEMORAhDUM to the Files. 1. Reference is made to basi.c communication dated 27 September 1945, Symbol No. EIDM 1%-30-b, requesting certain information with respect to the subject contract. 2. Reference pars,?-raph a. The Government committed to restore Contractor's plant 70 its original conditfon because of the fact that In furtherance of the Government work great expansion of facility ?.natallation in the Con- tractor's plant was required and the Contractor was un- W illing, in the event of termination or early cessation of

31

Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOEIG-0567 Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOEIG-0567 As...

32

Nuclear reactor control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

Cawley, William E. (Phoenix, AZ); Warnick, Robert F. (Pasco, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |Welcome to U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management! We are looking forward to your visit or assignment with us. In order to comply with our security requirements and ensure that your time with the Department of Energy goes smoothly we need to obtain some information from you prior to your arrival. Please take a few minutes to provide the information requested below for each member of your party that is not a U.S. citizen and then return the form(s) to your host. Please be sure to comply with the deadlines your host has communicated to you for returning this form.| |Part 1: Completed by Visitor Please complete all questions below, as applicable. | |1.|Given (first) name (exactly as it appears on passport)| |

35

Availability Statements for Unclassified Unlimited STI Products |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Availability Statements for Unclassified Unlimited STI Products Availability Statements for Unclassified Unlimited STI Products Print page Print page Email page Email page DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Online Access: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reports produced after 1991 and a growing number of pre-1991 documents are available free via DOE's SciTech Connect (http://www.osti.gov/scitech) Reports not in digital format may be purchased by the public from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS): U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Rd Alexandra, VA 22312 www.ntis.gov Phone: (800) 553-NTIS (6847) or (703) 605-6000 Fax: (703) 605-6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Reports not in digital format are available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI):

36

Audit Report on "Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to prevent misuse of the information for inappropriate purposes. Industry experts have reported that more than 203 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past three years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and Federal agencies. The loss of personal and other sensitive information can result in substantial financial harm, embarrassment, and inconvenience to individuals and organizations. Therefore, strong protective measures, including data encryption, help protect against the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive information. Prior reports involving the loss of sensitive information have highlighted weaknesses in the Department's ability to protect sensitive data. Our report on Security Over Personally Identifiable Information (DOE/IG-0771, July 2007) disclosed that the Department had not fully implemented all measures recommended by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and required by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to protect PII, including failures to identify and encrypt PII maintained on information systems. Similarly, the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the Department had not yet installed encryption technology to protect sensitive data on the vast majority of laptop computers and handheld devices. Because of the potential for harm, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors adequately safeguarded sensitive electronic information. The Department had taken a number of steps to improve protection of PII. Our review, however, identified opportunities to strengthen the protection of all types of sensitive unclassified electronic information and reduce the risk that such data could fall into the hands of individuals with malicious intent. In particular, for the seven sites we reviewed: (1) Four sites had either not ensured that sensitive information maintained on mobile devices was encrypted. Or, they had improperly permitted sensitive unclassified information to be transmitted unencrypted through email or to offsite backup storage facilities; (2) One site had not ensured that laptops taken on foreign travel, including travel to sensitive countries, were protected against security threats; and, (3) Although required by the OMB since 2003, we learned that programs and sites were still working to complete Privacy Impact Assessments - analyses designed to examine the risks and ramifications of using information systems to collect, maintain, and disseminate personal information. Our testing revealed that the weaknesses identified were attributable, at least in part, to Headquarters programs and field sites that had not implemented existing policies and procedures requiring protection of sensitive electronic information. In addition, a lack of performance monitoring contributed to the inability of the Department and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ensure that measures were in place to fully protect sensitive information. As demonstrated by previous computer intrusion-related data losses throughout the Department, without improvements, the risk or vulnerability for future losses remains unacceptably high. In conducting this audit, we recognized that data encryption and related techniques do not provide absolute assurance that sensitive data is fully protected. For example, encryption will not necessarily protect data in circumstances where organizational access controls are weak or are circumvented through phishing or other malicious techniques. However, as noted by NIST, when used appropriately, encryption is an effective tool that can, as part of an overall risk-management strat

None

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

38

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Director of National Intelligence and is staffed by senior counterintelligence (CI) and other specialists Counterintelligence Executive National Strategy Forum #12;No More Secrets: National Security Strategies Counterintelligence Executive The Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive (ONCIX) is part of the Office

Salama, Khaled

39

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, IG-0567  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT'S UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM 2002 SEPTEMBER 2002 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 9, 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002" As agencies strive to meet the President's goal of significantly increasing electronic government, the potential for disruption or damage to critical systems by malicious users continues to increase. In response to increasing threats to the Government's computer networks and systems, Congress enacted the Government hformation Security Reform Act (GISRA) in October 2000. GISRA focuses on program management, implementation, and evaluation of the security of unclassified and national security

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Climate Control Using Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine implications of anthropogenic low pressure regions, - created by injecting heat from nuclear reactors, into atmosphere. We suggest the possibility that such artificially generated low pressure regions, near hurricanes could disrupt their growth, path, and intensity. This method can also create controlled tropical stroms, which lead to substantial rainfall in arid areas, such as - (1)Sahara desert, (2) Australian interior desert, and (3) Indian Thar desert. A simple vortex suction model is developed to study, effect on atmospheric dynamics, by such a nuclear heat injection system.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program"  

SciTech Connect

Industry experts report that security challenges and threats are continually evolving as malicious activity has become more web-based and attackers are able to rapidly adapt their attack methods. In addition, the number of data breaches continues to rise. In an effort to mitigate and address threats and protect valuable information, the Department of Energy anticipated spending about $275 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 to implement cyber security measures necessary to protect its information technology resources. These systems and data are designed to support the Department's mission and business lines of energy security, nuclear security, scientific discovery and innovation, and environmental responsibility. The Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA) provides direction to agencies on the management and oversight of information security risks, including design and implementation of controls to protect Federal information and systems. As required by FISMA, the Office of Inspector General conducts an annual independent evaluation to determine whether the Department's unclassified cyber security program adequately protects its information systems and data. This memorandum and the attached report present the results of our evaluation for FY 2009. The Department continued to make incremental improvements in its unclassified cyber security program. Our evaluation disclosed that most sites had taken action to address weaknesses previously identified in our FY 2008 evaluation report. They improved certification and accreditation of systems; strengthened configuration management of networks and systems; performed independent assessments; and, developed and/or refined certain policies and procedures. In addition, the Department instituted a centralized incident response organization designed to eliminate duplicative efforts throughout the Department. As we have noted in previous reports, the Department continued to maintain strong network perimeter defenses against malicious intruders and other externals threats. These are positive accomplishments. However, in our judgment, additional action is required to further enhance the Department's unclassified cyber security program and help reduce risks to its systems and data. For example, our current review identified opportunities for improvements in areas such as security planning and testing, systems inventory, access controls, and configuration management. In particular, we issued a number of findings at sites managed by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We also identified weaknesses across various Department program elements. Issues that warrant further attention include: (1) Weaknesses such as outdated security plans and not completing annual security control self-assessments were identified at several sites; (2) The Department had not yet resolved systems inventory issues and had yet to deploy a complex-wide automated asset management tool to help track information technology resources and identify interfaces between systems or networks; (3) Although certain improvements had been made to enhance access controls, we noted deficiencies such as a lack of periodic account reviews and inadequate password management at a number of sites; and (4) Previously identified weaknesses in configuration management had been corrected, however, we found problems related to weak administrator account settings and failure to install software patches, as well as incomplete implementation of the Federal Desktop Core Configuration. These internal control weaknesses existed, at least in part, because certain cyber security roles and responsibilities were not clearly delineated. Program officials also had not effectively performed monitoring and review activities essential for evaluating the adequacy of cyber security performance. In some cases, officials had not ensured that weaknesses discovered during audits and other evaluations were recorded and tracked to resolution in the organizations' Plans of Action and Milestones. Our testing discl

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOE/IG-0567 Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOE/IG-0567 As agencies strive to meet the President's goal of significantly increasing electronic government, the potential for disruption or damage to critical systems by malicious users continues to increase. In response to increasing threats to the Government's computer networks and systems, Congress enacted the Government hformation Security Reform Act (GISRA) in October 2000. GISRA focuses on program management, implementation, and evaluation of the security of unclassified and national security information. It requires agencies to conduct annual reviews and evaluations of unclassified and

46

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JUNE 2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 AUGUST 2011 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 1 DOE -STD-1194-2011 August 2011 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Title Page Formatting and font size adjusted. Page 2/Section 4.h. Reference to document was updated from DOE M 470.4-1 Chg 2, Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management, dated 10-2-10 to DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 7-21-11. Page 2/Section 4.i. Reference to document was updated from DOE M

47

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1194-2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.2 DECEMBER 2012 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.3 OCTOBER 2013 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 3 DOE -STD-1194-2011 October 2013 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Page 57/Section 6.4.4.1. Change from, - Accounting records and source documents shall include item identification, material type, form, quantity, location, gross

48

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2011 June 2011 DOE STANDARD Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1194-2011 i This page is intentionally left blank. DOE-STD-1194-2011 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ..................................................................................................................................................................................... iii 1 . S C O P E ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 2

49

The Office of Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Controls Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Controls The Office of Nuclear Controls Certain terrorist groups and states are attempting to acquire WMD dual-use

50

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

51

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

52

Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

54

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

data and reports on accountable nuclear material to NMMSS and Nuclear Materials Inventory Assessments.", to "The accounting system provides data for reporting on accountable...

55

Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the cosine correction term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or knot-point spline definition, that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

Trent, Bruce C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

57

The nuclear materials control technology briefing book  

SciTech Connect

As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AEC and control of nuclear weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

control of nuclear weapons The Atomic Energy Commission took control of the atomic energy project known originally as the Manhattan Project on January 1, 1947. This shift from the...

59

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012, IG-0877  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation Report Evaluation Report The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012 DOE/IG-0877 November 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 8, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As the use of information technology resources continues to expand, the number of cyber security threats against Federal agencies has also increased. In fact, Federal cyber security officials have warned that the number of cyber attackers has increased and that the Nation's

62

Switched Control of Electron Nuclear Spin Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we study control of electron-nuclear spin dynamics at magnetic field strengths where the Larmor frequency of the nucleus is comparable to the hyperfine coupling strength. The quantization axis for the nuclear spin differs from the static B_0 field direction and depends on the state of the electron spin. The quantization axis can be switched by flipping the state of electron spin, allowing for universal control on nuclear spin states. We show that by performing a sequence of flips (each followed by a suitable delay), we can perform any desired rotation on the nuclear spins, which can also be conditioned on the state of the electron spin. These operations, combined with electron spin rotations can be used to synthesize any unitary transformation on the coupled electron-nuclear spin system. We discuss how these methods can be used for design of experiments for transfer of polarization from the electron to the nuclear spins.

Navin Khaneja

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

Carleton, Richard D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bhattacharyya, Ajay (Vasteras, SE)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

DOE Orders, Directives, Guides and Memos DOE O 142.3A, Unclassified...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Orders, Directives, Guides and Memos DOE O 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program The Order defines a program for unclassified foreign national access to...

65

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

JOINING OF BERYLLIUM-A SURVEY OF THE UNCLASSIFIED LITERATURE  

SciTech Connect

The unclassified literature on the joining of beryllium was surveyed and is summarized. The fields covered are fusion welding, self-welding (diffusion- or pressure-welding), and brazing. The most successful attempts in each field are outlined and other work is referenced. (aauth)

Brown, N.A.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

UNCLASSIFIED TPBAR RELEASES, INCLUDING TRITIUM TTQP-1-091 Rev 14  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a listing of unclassified tritium release values that should be assumed for unclassified analysis. Much of the information is brought forth from the related documents listed in Section 5.0 to provide a single-source listing of unclassified release values. This information has been updated based on current design analysis and available experimental data.

Gruel, Robert L.; Love, Edward F.; Thornhill, Cheryl K.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Property Accountability and Protection of Federal Sensitive Unclassified Information Under the Cooperative Agreement with the Incorporated County of Los Alamos, IG-0859  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Property Accountability and Protection of Federal Sensitive Unclassified Information Under the Cooperative Agreement with the Incorporated County of Los Alamos DOE/IG-0859 February 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 17, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Property Accountability and Protection of Federal Sensitive Unclassified Information Under the Cooperative Agreement with the Incorporated County of Los Alamos" BACKGROUND On September 30, 2008, the National Nuclear Security Administration entered into a 5-year

69

Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

Taft, William Elwood (Los Gatos, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear reactor control apparatus. [FBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

Sridhar, B.N.

1981-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nuclear Power - Control, Reliability and Human Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in reactor designs, materials and human-machine interfaces guarantee safety and reliability of emerging reactor technologies, eliminating possibilities for high-consequence human errors as those which have occurred in the past. New instrumentation and control technologies based in digital systems, novel sensors and measurement approaches facilitate safety, reliability and economic competitiveness of nuclear power options. Autonomous operation scenarios are becoming increasingly popular to consider for small modular systems. This book belongs to a series of books on nuclear power published by InTech. It consists of four major sections and contains twenty-one chapters on topics from key subject areas pertinent to instrumentation and control, operation reliability, system aging and human-machine interfaces. The book targets a broad potential readership group - students, researchers and specialists in the field - who are interested in learning about nuclear power.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Alarm system for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Console for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Resource Letter PSNAC-1: Physics and society: Nuclear arms control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on nuclear arms control for the nonspecialist. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: nuclear weapons

Alexander Glaser; Zia Mian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a safety control rod to desired elevations within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump motor, an electric gear motor, and a solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch, allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear engine flow reactivity shim control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear engine control system is provided which automatically compensates for reactor reactivity uncertainties at the start of life and reactivity losses due to core corrosion during the reactor life in gas-cooled reactors. The coolant gas flow is varied automatically by means of specially provided control apparatus so that the reactor control drums maintain a predetermined steady state position throughout the reactor life. This permits the reactor to be designed for a constant drum position and results in a desirable, relatively flat temperature profile across the core. (Official Gazette)

Walsh, J.M.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety ...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Measurement control administration for nuclear materials accountability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1986 a measurement control program was instituted at Mound to ensure that measurement performance used for nuclear material accountability was properly monitored and documented. The organization and management of various aspects of the program are discussed. Accurate measurements are the basis of nuclear material accountability. The validity of the accountability values depends on the measurement results that are used to determine inventories, receipts, and shipments. With this measurement information, material balances are calculated to determine losses and gains of materials during a specific time period. Calculation of Inventory Differences (ID) are based on chemical or physical measurements of many items. The validity of each term is dependent on the component measurements. Thus, in Figure 1, the measured element weight of 17 g is dependent on the performance of the particular measurement system that was used. In this case, the measurement is performed using a passive gamma ray method with a calibration curve determined by measuring representative standards containing a range of special nuclear materials (Figure 2). One objective of a measurement control program is to monitor and verify the validity of the calibration curve (Figure 3). In 1986 Mound's Nuclear Materials Accountability (NMA) group instituted a formal measurement control program to ensure the validity of the numbers that comprise this equation and provide a measure of how well bulk materials can be controlled. Most measurements used for accountability are production measurements with their own quality assurance programs. In many cases a measurement control system is planned and maintained by the developers and operators of the particular measurement system with oversight by the management responsible for the results. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Rudy, C.R.

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(03-98) (Exception to SF 14, Approved by NARS, June 1978) 1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY 4. PRECEDENCE DESIGNATION ("X" appropriate box): 6. FROM 9. TO COMMUNICATION CENTER ROUTING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TELECOMMUNICATION MESSAGE (See reverse side for Instructions) 5. TYPE OF MESSAGE FOR COMMUNICATION CENTER USE MESSAGE IDENTIFICATION NR: DTG: Z YES 2. MESSAGE CONTAINS WEAPON DATA? ("X" appropriate box. Message Center will not transmit message unless one box is marked.) 3. THIS DOCUMENT CONSIST OF PAGES NO ("X" appropriate box) Single Address Multiple Address Title Address Book Message 7. OFFICIAL BUSINESS (TIME) A.M. P.M. (Signature of authorizing official)

83

FINAL (PNNL-20432) Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., North Korea, Pakistan). Fissile materials, nuclear reactors, reprocessing and enrichment technologyFINAL (PNNL-20432) 1 Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Although the list of U.S. nuclear nonproliferation and arms control

84

DOE O 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order defines a program for unclassified foreign national access to DOE sites, information, technologies, and equipment. Cancels DOE O 142.3.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Internal Controls for Excessing and Surplusing Unclassified Computers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Los Alamos National AND OBJECTIVE Laboratory (LANL) is one of the largest multidisciplinary science institutions in the world. The primary...

86

Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy's (DOE's) Lawrence Livermore AND OBJECTIVES National Laboratory (LLNL) is a research and development institution that supports the core mission of national...

87

Control rod for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

Roman, Walter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Technologies > Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Bookmark and Share Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control. Click on image to view larger image. The goal of the Nuclear Engineering Division's research on advanced

89

International Export Control Cooperation | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

90

Material Protection, Control, & Accounting | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs...

91

Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

Cooper, Martin H. (Monroeville, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

Bilibin, Konstantin (North Hollywood, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

Jones, Robert D. (Irwin, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pre-validation of nuclear power plant control room design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the design of complex automation and control room systems is an essential phase in the design process in the nuclear field. For example, in order to meet the nuclear regulatory requirements, the new control room systems have to be evaluated ... Keywords: concept of operations, control room, pre-validation, verification & validation

Jari Laarni; Paula Savioja; Hannu Karvonen; Leena Norros

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory INS-O-13-05 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 16, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory" BACKGROUND In support of its research and development mission, the Department of Energy's national laboratories host thousands of foreign national visitors and assignees (foreign nationals) every year for research collaborations and access to scientific user facilities. During calendar year

96

DOE O 452.8, Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted ...

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Louisiana Nuclear Energy and Radiation Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation of nuclear energy safety, permitting and radiation safety and control in Louisiana. The Department operates...

98

MANAGING MODERNIZATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing modernization of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems February 2004The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nuclear membranes control symbiotic calcium signaling of legumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear membranes control symbiotic calcium signaling of legumes Ward Capoena , Jongho Suna , Derin 13, 2011 (received for review May 18, 2011) Nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium act as a secondary messenger in the symbiotic signaling pathway of legumes. These are decoded by a nuclear

Sun, Jongho

100

Universal Control of Nuclear Spins Via Anisotropic Hyperfine Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that nuclear spin subsystems can be completely controlled via microwave irradiation of resolved anisotropic hyperfine interactions with a nearby electron spin. Such indirect addressing of the nuclear spins via coupling to an electron allows us to create nuclear spin gates whose operational time is significantly faster than conventional direct addressing methods. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of this method on a solid-state ensemble system consisting of one electron and one nuclear spin.

Jonathan S. Hodges; Jamie C. Yang; Chandrasekhar Ramanathan; David G. Cory

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

Rosemary Knight

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

Vuckovich, Michael (McKeesport, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program … 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation Report Evaluation Report The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2013 OAS-M-14-01 October 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 23, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2013" BACKGROUND The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) is an independent agency within the Department of Energy (Department) responsible for, among other things, regulating the interstate

104

Nuclear fusion control-oriented plasma physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of control techniques for the efficient and reliable operation of a fusion reactor is one of the most challenging issues nowadays and it would provide great advantages over existing energy sources: Unlimited fuel availability, no greenhouse ... Keywords: fusion control, plasma physics, tokamak modeling and simulation

Aitor J. Garrido; Izaskun Garrido; M. Goretti Sevillano-Berasategui; Mikel Alberdi; Modesto Amundarain; Oscar Barambones; Itziar Martija

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CONTROL MEANS FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control means is described for a reactor which employs a liquid fuel consisting of a fissile isotope in a liquid bismuth solvent. The liquid fuel is contained in a plurality of tubular vessels. Control is effected by inserting plungers in the vessels to displace the liquid fuel and provide a critical or non- critical fuel configuration as desired.

Teitel, R.J.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of {sup 3}He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the {sup 3}He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the {sup 3}He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the {sup 3}He for spin-polarizing the {sup 3}He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the {sup 3}He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with {sup 3}He to spin-polarize the {sup 3}He atoms. 5 figs.

Bowman, C.D.

1989-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

Hausner, H.H.

1958-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

Church, J.P.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This document describes method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

Church, J.P.

1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

SPRING DRIVEN ACTUATING MECHANISM FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

l962. rod in a nuclear reactor to shut it down. The control rod or an extension thereof is wound on a drum as it is withdrawn from the reactor. When an emergency occurs requiring the reactor to be shut down, the drum is released so as to be free to rotate, and the tendency of the control rod or its extension coiled on the drum to straighten itself is used for quickly returning the control rod to the reactor. (AEC)

Bevilacqua, F.; Uecker, D.F.; Groh, E.F.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the facility's MC&A (software widely used in the aerospace, chemical, and nuclear power industries) MSET was peer reviewed in 2007 and validated in 2008 by benchmark testing at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States. The MSET documents were translated into Russian and provided to Rosatom in July of 2008, and MSET is currently being evaluated for potential application in Russian Nuclear Facilities.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL; Campbell, Billy J [ORNL; Hammond, Glenn A [ORNL; Meppen, Bruce W [ORNL; Brown, Richard F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

UNCLASSIFIED FOREIGN VISITS AND ASSIGNMENTS PROGRAM U.S. DEPARTMENT...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

subject matter expert (SME) review, host, and escort requirements to ensure: (1) that national security assets are protected; (2) that appropriate export control and technology...

118

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Introduction to Nuclear Plant Steam Turbine Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Nuclear Power Plants produce their power through the use of Steam Turbine Generators, any problems associated with the Turbine Control System has a direct effect on power generation. Although considerable effort has been expended in improving control system reliability, failures resulting in lost generation and high maintenance cost still plague the industry. On an individual basis, improvements have been made through maintenance techniques, modifications and upgrades. Unfortunately, this informati...

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

Hutter, E.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Adaptive nuclear reactor control for integral quadratic cost functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of optimally controlling the power level changes of a nuclear reactor is considered. The model of an existing power plant is used, which is a ninth-order nonlinear system, having time-varying parameters. A closed form solution of the optimal ...

George T. Bereznai; Naresh K. Sinha

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Security of Nuclear Reactors and Special Nuclear Materials This revisiono  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provides requirements for the recovery of lost, seized, or stolen special nuclear material (para 2-1b). o Prescribes that unclassified information pertaining to plans, procedures, and equipment for the physical protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material will be safeguarded as DoD Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (para 2-1f). o Requires the conduct of a vulnerability assessment at each facility where special nuclear material is used or stored (para 2-2a). o Provides that Headquarters, U. S. Army Materiel Command will develop the postulated threat as the basis for the vulnerability assessment (para 2-2b), as well as the standardized format for documenting the results of the assessment and for the after action reports (para 2-2h). o Designates special nuclear material as inherently dangerous to others for use of force purposes (para 2-4a). o Prescribes minimum storage standards for special nuclear material (para 3-1). o Provides for the protection of vital equipment (para 3-3). o Explains the concept of the required security system for nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-2). o Establishes specific physical security standards for the protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-4), to include required access controls (para 4-5). o Prohibits the locksmith from being designated as the key control officer or lock custodian (para 4-5g(25)). o Provides guidance on meeting requirement to continuously man two alarm monitoring facilities (para 4-6b). o Allows continued use of monitoring console systems installed prior to publication of this regulation that do not meet the map or video display requirement (para 4-6g(1)). o Provides guidance for testing the perimeter intrusion detection system (para 4-6n(2)). o Requires appropriate security personnel be trained to manually start the standby generator if the automatic starter fails to function properly (para 4-9b(4)). o Provides that the size, composition, and response time of the response force will be set by the major subordinate commander and approved by the Commanding

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives...

127

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Digital control of power transients in a nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated, closed-loop, control system for on-line operations in nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated with an LSI-11/23 micro-processor on the 5 MWt fission reactor (MITR-II) that is operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This control system has inherent capabilities to perform on-line fault diagnosis, information display, sensor calibration, and measurement estimation. Recently, its scope has been extended to include the direct digital control of power changes ranging from 20-80% of the reactor's licensed limit. This controller differs from most of those discussed in theoretical and simulation studies by recognizing the non-linearity of reactor dynamics, calculating reactivity on-line, and controlling the rate of change of power by restricting both period and reactivity. The controller functions accurately using rods of non-linear worth in the presence of nonlinear feedback effects.

Bernard, J.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Ray, A.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reactivity Control Schemes for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different reactivity control schemes are considered for future space nuclear reactor power systems. Each of these control schemes uses a combination of boron carbide absorbers and/or beryllium oxide reflectors to achieve sufficient reactivity swing to keep the reactor subcritical during launch and to provide sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor over its expected 715 year lifetime. The size and shape of the control system directly impacts the size and mass of the space reactor's reflector and shadow shield

Aaron E. Craft; Jeffrey C. King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

INFORMATION INTEGRATION IN CONTROL ROOMS AND TECHNICAL OFFICES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants Report prepared within the framework of the

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and ...

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

An Approach to Autonomous Control for Space Nuclear Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Under Project Prometheus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated deep space missions that would utilize space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. The initial study involved the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), which was proposed to conduct in-depth studies of three Jovian moons. Current radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and solar power systems cannot meet expected mission power demands, which include propulsion, scientific instrument packages, and communications. Historically, RTGs have provided long-lived, highly reliable, low-power-level systems. Solar power systems can provide much greater levels of power, but power density levels decrease dramatically at {approx} 1.5 astronomical units (AU) and beyond. Alternatively, an SNPS can supply high-sustained power for space applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of an SNPS must be able to provide continuous operatio for the mission duration with limited immediate human interaction and no opportunity for hardware maintenance or sensor calibration. In effect, the SNPS control system must be able to independently operate the power plant while maintaining power production even when subject to off-normal events and component failure. This capability is critical because it will not be possible to rely upon continuous, immediate human interaction for control due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion. In addition, uncertainties, rare events, and component degradation combine with the aforementioned inaccessibility and unattended operation to pose unique challenges that an SNPS control system must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design.

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Brief paper: An optimal control algorithm for nuclear reactor load cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimal control algorithm for reactor reactivity controls during CANDU& nuclear station load cycling is presented. The minimized performance index is reactor operating cost during a load cycling interval. The algorithm is developed using Pontryagin's ... Keywords: Nuclear reactors, boundary value problems, control nonlinearities, load regulation, maximum principle, optimal control, power station control

Dale B. Cherchas; Ron. T. Lake

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Controlling WMD Materials and Expertise | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

135

A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting: Instrumentation and Control Briefing Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document combines the material previously included in the Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Briefing Book for the Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting with the annual I&C research plan, replacing the latter document. It contains key information on the program and its projects including: 1. Program executive summary a high level document on the key activities of the I&C base program as well as its three supplemental groups 2. A consolidated list of EPRI I&C program deliverables for the next three years 3. ...

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2011, OAS-M-12-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 OAS-M-12-01 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 15, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2011" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) is an independent agency within the Department of Energy responsible for regulating the Nation's oil pipeline, natural gas, hydroelectric and wholesale electric industries. The Commission relies on a wide range of information technology (IT) resources in achieving its mission of assisting consumers in

138

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012, OAS-L-13-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 OAS-L-13-01 November 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 7, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012" BACKGROUND The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) is an independent agency within the Department of Energy responsible for, among other things, regulating interstate transmission of the Nation's electricity, natural gas and oil. In addition, the Commission licenses and inspects private, municipal and state hydroelectric projects. To achieve its mission, the Commission relies

139

Keyword index to unclassified ORGDP formal reports, July 1947--September 1973  

SciTech Connect

KWIC (Keywords in Context) permuted-title index is presented for all of the formal unclassified K-reports (July 1947 through September 1973) that have contributed significantly to gaseous diffusion technology. An author index and a document number index are also included. These latter two indexes contain complete citations to the original documents. (auth) ion efficiency of neon isotopes by gaseous diffusion as a function of pressure with three significantiy different types of geometrical flow channels was made. The experimental apparatus for performing the study and some results are described. A large body of data was collected. A complete description of the work is presently in publication. (TFD)

Ferguson, J.B.; Fraser, R.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frenchman Flat is one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) used for underground nuclear testing (Figure 1-1). These nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the underground test areas. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is currently conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) of the Frenchman Flat underground test areas. Since 1996, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has regulated NNSA/NSO corrective actions through the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' ([FFACO], 1996). Appendix VI of the FFACO agreement, ''Corrective Action Strategy'', was revised on December 7, 2000, and describes the processes that will be used to complete corrective actions, including those in the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. The individual locations covered by the agreement are known as corrective action sites (CASs), which are grouped into corrective action units (CAUs). The UGTA CASs are grouped geographically into five CAUs: Frenchman Flat, Central Pahute Mesa, Western Pahute Mesa, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, and Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (Figure 1-1). These CAUs have distinctly different contaminant source, geologic, and hydrogeologic characteristics related to their location (FFACO, 1996). The Frenchman Flat CAU consists of 10 CASs located in the northern part of Area 5 and the southern part of Area 11 (Figure 1-1). This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Frenchman Flat, CAU 98. The methodology used to estimate hydrologic source terms (HSTs) for the Frenchman Flat CAU is also documented. The HST of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total inventory of radionuclides that is released over time into the groundwater following the test. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. This evaluation was conducted in support of the development of a CAU contaminant transport model for the Frenchman Flat CAU.

Farnham, Irene

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms  

SciTech Connect

nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

R.L. Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 474.2, NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chg 1: 8-3-2011 NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE O 474.2 DOE O 474.2 1 6-27-2011 NUCLEAR...

143

Coherent control of hyperfine-coupled electron and nuclear spins for quantum information processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupled electron-nuclear spins are promising physical systems for quantum information processing: By combining the long coherence times of the nuclear spins with the ability to initialize, control, and measure the electron ...

Yang, Jamie Chiaming

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

146

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED #12;Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA of Energy's NNSA The Next 20 years ENERGY HEALTH ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES #12;Operated by Los

148

Program on Technology Innovation: Controlled Recycling of Contaminated Materials for Nuclear Industry Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses opportunities to recycle materials in radioactive waste by decontamination and fabrication into new components for use in the nuclear industry. In particular, a novel approach called "controlled recycling" involves a procedure that controls the material during decontamination, metal processing and remanufacture into components for reuse in the nuclear industry.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Some noise control problems peculiar to nuclear generating facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to confidently predict the noise environment in a nuclear generating facility presently under construction is complicated by the design constraints of physical layout

Robert A. Putnam

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Corrosion Control for Safe Interim Storage of Nuclear Reprocessing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization Development of ... Radiation Damage in Zircon by High-Energy Electron Beams.

151

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

Williams, Laura S.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone.

Peter Martian

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An English/Chinese and Chinese/English glossary for nuclear material control and accounting  

SciTech Connect

This document is a glossary of English/Chinese and Chinese/English expressions which are technical terms likely to occur in literature related to nuclear materials control and accounting.

Agnew, C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coherent control of two nuclear spins using the anisotropic hyperfine interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate coherent control of two nuclear spins mediated by the magnetic resonance of a hyperfine-coupled electron spin. This control is used to create a double nuclear coherence in one of the two electron spin manifolds, starting from an initial thermal state, in direct analogy to the creation of an entangled (Bell) state from an initially pure unentangled state. We identify challenges and potential solutions to obtaining experimental gate fidelities useful for quantum information processing in this type of system.

Yingjie Zhang; Colm A. Ryan; Raymond Laflamme; Jonathan Baugh

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Detection and Control of Individual Nuclear Spins Using a Weakly Coupled Electron Spin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We experimentally isolate, characterize, and coherently control up to six individual nuclear spins that are weakly coupled to an electron spin in diamond. Our method employs multipulse sequences on the electron spin that resonantly amplify the interaction with a selected nuclear spin and at the same time dynamically suppress decoherence caused by the rest of the spin bath. We are able to address nuclear spins with interaction strengths that are an order of magnitude smaller than the electron spin dephasing rate. Our results provide a route towards tomography with single-nuclear-spin sensitivity and greatly extend the number of available quantum bits for quantum information processing in diamond.

Taminiau, T.H.; Wagenaar, J.J.T.; van der Sar, T.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V.; Hanson, R.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Superradiant control of gamma-ray propagation by vibrating nuclear arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collective nature of light interactions with atomic and nuclear ensembles yields the fascinating phenomena of superradiance and radiation trapping. We study the interaction of gamma rays with a coherently vibrating periodic array of two-level nuclei. Such nuclear motion can be generated, e.g., in ionic crystals illuminated by a strong driving optical laser field. We find that deflection of the incident gamma beam into the Bragg angle can be switched on and off by nuclear vibrations on a superradiant time scale determined by the collective nuclear frequency, which is of the order of terahertz. Namely, if the incident gamma wave is detuned from the nuclear transition by much larger frequency it passes through the static nuclear array. However, if the nuclei vibrate with the frequency of the gamma ray detuning then parametric resonance can yield energy transfer into the Bragg deflected beam on the superradiant time scale, which can be used for fast control of gamma rays.

Xiwen Zhang; Anatoly A. Svidzinsky

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Emergency Diesel Generator Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency diesel generators (EDGs) have been a subject of industry attention since the 1980s because of their importance to plant safety, and a key point of focus has been their control systems. To support long-term reliability and availability of EDG control systems, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has developed this report, which highlights maintenance tasks and strategies that can reduce failures of control system components. The report draws from the knowledge of industry EDG experts and...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear materials control technology in the post-cold war world: Radiation-based methods and information management systems  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war is providing both opportunities and requirements for improving the control of nuclear materials around the world. The dismantlement of nuclear weapons and the growth of nuclear power, including the use of plutonium in light water reactors and breeder reactor programs, coupled with enhanced proliferation concerns, drive the need for improved nuclear materials control. We describe nuclear materials control and the role of technology in making controls more effective and efficient. The current use and anticipated development in selected radiation-based methods and related information management systems am described briefly.

Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Ensslin, N.; Markin, J.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a ``Deliberate Operating`` mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a ``Use Every Time`` (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a Deliberate Operating'' mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a Use Every Time'' (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Attn: Document Control Desk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blade Interference Customer Guidance. In that letter GEH stated that: This determination does not apply to BWR/6 or ABWR plants or the ABWR/ESBWR Design Control Documents (DCD). Subsequent to the issuance of the reference letter, the NRC requested additional information as to the basis of this statement with regard to the applicability of this issue to the ABWR/ESBWR Design Control Documents (DCD). The following provides supporting information to address the basis for this statement: Both the ABWR and ESBWR reactivity control systems incorporate a Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD) that is different than the Control Rod Drives supplied to the BWR/2-6. The scram pressure source is independent of RPV pressure thus the issues presented in the September 26, 2011 communication are not applicable to the ABWR or ESBWR design. The FMCRD provides hydraulicpowered rapid insertion (scram) of control rods during normal and abnormal operating conditions. The hydraulic power required for scram is provided by high pressure water stored in the individual Hydraulic Control Units (HCUs). Each HCU contains a scram accumulator charged to high pressure and the necessary valves and components to scram two FMCRDs. Upon scram valve actuation, high

Dale E. Porter; Castle Hayne Rd

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Beyond integrated safeguards: performance-based assessments for future nuclear controls.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, iE the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control agendas are to advance, they will likely become increasingly seen as parallel undertakings with the objective of comprehensive cradle-to-grave controls over nuclear materials and possibly even warheads removed from defense programs along with materials in civilian use. This 'back to the future' prospect was envisioned in the Acheson-Lillienthal Report and the Baruch Plan, and more modestly in the Atoms-for-Peace Proposal. Unlike the grand plans of the early nuclear years, today's and tomorrow's undertakings will more likely consist of a series of incremental steps with the goal of expanding nuclear controls. These steps will be undertaken at a time of fundamental change in the IAEA safeguards system, and they will be influenced by those changes in profound ways. This prospective influence needs to be taken into account as the IAEA develops and implements integrated safeguards, including its efforts to establish new safeguards criteria, undertake technological and administrative improvements in safeguards, implement credible capabilities for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities and activities and, perhaps, provide for a more intensive involvement in applying safeguards in new roles such as the verification of a fissile materials cutoff treaty. Performance-based criteria offer one promising way to address the effectiveness of integrated safeguards and to provide a common means of assessing the other key areas of a comprehensive approach to nuclear controls as these develop independently and to the extent that they are coordinated in the future.

Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Control of Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass frits with a high B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration have been designed which, when combined with high-alumina concentration nuclear waste streams, will form glasses with durabilities that are acceptable for repository disposal and predictable using a free energy of hydration model. Two glasses with nepheline discriminator values closest to 0.62 showed significant differences in normalized boron release between the quenched and heat treated versions of each glass. X-ray diffraction confirmed that nepheline crystallized in the glass with the lowest nepheline discriminator value, and nepheline may also exist in the second glass as small nanocrystals. The high-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} frit was successful in producing simulated waste glasses with no detectable nepheline crystallization at waste loadings of up to 45 wt%. The melt rate of this frit was also considerably better than other frits with increased concentrations of Na{sub 2}O.

Fox, Kevin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Voltage controlled nuclear polarization switching in a single InGaAs quantum dot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharp threshold-like transitions between two stable nuclear spin polarizations are observed in optically pumped individual InGaAs self-assembled quantum dots embedded in a Schottky diode when the bias applied to the diode is tuned. The abrupt transitions lead to the switching of the Overhauser field in the dot by up to 3 Tesla. The bias-dependent photoluminescence measurements reveal the importance of the electron-tunneling-assisted nuclear spin pumping. We also find evidence for the resonant LO-phonon-mediated electron co-tunneling, the effect controlled by the applied bias and leading to the reduction of the nuclear spin pumping rate.

M. N. Makhonin; J. Skiba-Szymanska; M. S. Skolnick; H. -Y. Liu; M. Hopkinson; A. I. Tartakovskii

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect

Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

168

WTEC panel report on European nuclear instrumentation and controls. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A study of instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology used in nuclear power plants in Europe was conducted by a panel of US specialists. This study plants in Europe was conducted by a panel of US specialists. This study included a review of the literature on the subject, followed by a visit to some of the leading organizations in Europe in the field nuclear I and C. Areas covered are: (1) role of the operator and control room design; (2) transition from analog to digital technology; (3) computerized operator support systems for fault management; (4) control strategies and techniques; (5) Nuclear power plant I and C architecture; (6) instrumentation and (7) computer standards and tools. The finding relate to poor reactions.

White, J.D.; Lanning, D.D.; Johnson, P.M.H. [eds.] [World Technology Evaluation Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shelton, R.D. [World Technology Evaluation Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same technology, and (3) different architectures within the same technology. Using this convention, the first diversity usage family, designated Strategy A, is characterized by fundamentally diverse technologies. Strategy A at the system or platform level is illustrated by the example of analog and digital implementations. The second diversity usage family, designated Strategy B, is achieved through the use of distinctly different technologies. Strategy B can be described in terms of different digital technologies, such as the distinct approaches represented by general-purpose microprocessors and field-programmable gate arrays. The third diversity usage family, designated Strategy C, involves the use of variations within a technology. An example of Strategy C involves different digital architectures within the same technology, such as that provided by different microprocessors (e.g., Pentium and Power PC). The grouping of diversity criteria combinations according to Strategies A, B, and C establishes baseline diversity usage and facilitates a systematic organization of strategic approaches for coping with CCF vulnerabilities. Effectively, these baseline sets of diversity criteria constitute appropriate CCF mitigating strategies for digital safety systems. The strategies represent guidance on acceptable diversity usage and can be applied directly to ensure that CCF vulnerabilities identified through a D3 assessment have been adequately resolved. Additionally, a framework has been generated for capturing practices regarding diversity usage and a tool has been developed for the systematic assessment of the comparative effect of proposed diversity strategies (see Appendix A).

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Waterman, Michael E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydraulic balancing of a control component within a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control component includes an inner conduit, for instance containing neutron absorber elements, adapted for longitudinal movement within an outer guide duct. A transverse partition partially encloses one end of the conduit and meets a transverse wall within the guide duct when the conduit is fully inserted into the reactor core. A tube piece extends from the transverse partition and is coaxially aligned to be received within a tubular receptacle which extends from the transverse wall. The tube piece and receptacle cooperate in engagement to restrict the flow and pressure of coolant beneath the transverse partition and thereby minimize upward forces tending to expel the inner conduit.

Marinos, D.; Ripfel, H.C.F.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method for operating a steam turbine of the nuclear type with electronic reheat control of a cycle steam reheater  

SciTech Connect

An electronic system is provided for operating a nuclear electric power plant with electronic steam reheating control applied to the nuclear turbine system in response to low pressure turbine temperatures, and the control is adapted to operate in a plurality of different automatic control modes to control reheating steam flow and other steam conditions. Each of the modes of control permit turbine temperature variations within predetermined constraints and according to predetermined functions of time. (Official Gazette)

Luongo, M.C.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Underground Nuclear Explosions and the Control of Earthquakes Author(s): Cesare Emiliani, Christopher G. A. Harrison, Mary Swanson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underground Nuclear Explosions and the Control of Earthquakes Author(s): Cesare Emiliani- ground nuclear explosions has been ex- plored in some detail during the past 2 years. In an examination with under- ground nuclear explosions has been ex- plored in some detail during the past 2 years

Miami, University of

174

Ultrafast control of nuclear spins using only microwave pulses: towards switchable solid-state quantum gates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the control of the alpha-proton nuclear spin, I=1/2, coupled to the stable radical CH(COOH)2, S=1/2, in a gamma-irradiated malonic acid single crystal using only microwave pulses. We show that, depending on the state of the electron spin mS=+/-1/2, the nuclear spin can be locked in a desired state or oscillate between mI=+1/2 and mI=-1/2 on the nanosecond time scale. This approach provides a fast and efficient way of controlling nuclear spin qubits and also enables the design of switchable spin-based quantum gates by addressing only the electron spin.

George Mitrikas; Yiannis Sanakis; Georgios Papavassiliou

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Coherence and control of quantum registers based on electronic spin in a nuclear spin bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a protocol for the control of few-qubit registers comprising one electronic spin embedded in a nuclear spin bath. We show how to isolate a few proximal nuclear spins from the rest of the environment and use them as building blocks for a potentially scalable quantum information processor. We describe how coherent control techniques based on magnetic resonance methods can be adapted to these electronic-nuclear solid state spin systems, to provide not only efficient, high fidelity manipulation of the registers, but also decoupling from the spin bath. As an example, we analyze feasible performances and practical limitations in a realistic setting associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond.

P. Cappellaro; L. Jiang; J. S. Hodges; M. D. Lukin

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

A pattern-based method for safe control systems exemplified within nuclear power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article exemplifies the application of a pattern-based method, called SaCS (Safe Control Systems), on a case taken from the nuclear domain. The method is supported by a pattern language and provides guidance on the development of design concepts ... Keywords: conceptual design, development process, pattern language, safety

Andr Alexandersen Hauge; Ketil Stlen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Export control guide: Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and preparation of plutonium metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, also referred to as the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), states in Article III, paragraph 2(b) that {open_quotes}Each State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to provide . . . equipment or material especially designed or prepared for the processing, use or production of special fissionable material to any non-nuclear-weapon State for peaceful purposes, unless the source or special fissionable material shall be subject to the safeguards required by this Article.{close_quotes} This guide was prepared to assist export control officials in the interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws and controls relating to the international Trigger List for irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, components, and materials. The guide also contains information related to the production of plutonium metal. Reprocessing and its place in the nuclear fuel cycle are described briefly; the standard procedure to prepare metallic plutonium is discussed; steps used to prepare Trigger List controls are cited; descriptions of controlled items are given; and special materials of construction are noted. This is followed by a comprehensive description of especially designed or prepared equipment, materials, and components of reprocessing and plutonium metal processes and includes photographs and/or pictorial representations. The nomenclature of the Trigger List has been retained in the numbered sections of this document for clarity.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities identified by experts to improve upon the design of the DCS. A set of nine design recommendations was developed to address these potential issues. The design principles addressed the following areas: (1) color, (2) pop-up window structure, (3) navigation, (4) alarms, (5) process control diagram, (6) gestalt grouping, (7) typography, (8) terminology, and (9) data entry. Visuals illustrating the improved DCS displays accompany the design recommendations. These nine design principles serve as the starting point to a planned general DCS style guide that can be used across the U.S. nuclear industry to aid in the future design of effective DCS interfaces.

Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Microsoft Word - NEGTN02-#188646-v22B-INVENTORY_PLAN_UNCLASSIFIED.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan December 16, 2008 Office of Nuclear Energy 2008 Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................ES-1 Excess Uranium Inventories..........................................................................................1 Unallocated U.S. HEU.........................................................................................1 U.S.-Origin NU as UF 6 ........................................................................................1 Russian-Origin NU as UF 6 ...................................................................................1 Off-Spec Non-UF 6 ..............................................................................................2

182

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

YAEC's view of the cause and control of escalating nuclear plant O and M costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides insights on this issue in terms of both the genesis and effective long-term control of O and M costs. Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC's) insights stem not only from an analysis of certain industry data, but also from its unique position within the nuclear industry in terms of its age, plant size, and organization. First, at 30 yr of age, the YAEC plant has endured the full swing of the regulatory/institutional pendulum and the associated impact on O and M costs. Second, with a size of only 185 MW(electric), YAEC's imperative since start-up has been the strict control of O and M costs while still achieving operational excellence. Finally, YAEC is an organization strictly focused on nuclear power operations and has not been distracted by fossil plant operations or other utility requirements like distribution, retail sales, etc., that may have plagued other plant operators.

Haseltine, J.D.; Lessard, L.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Production of an English/Russian glossary of terminology for nuclear materials control and accounting  

SciTech Connect

The program plans for Former Soviet Union National Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting (MC and A) Systems Enhancements call for the development of an English/Russian Glossary of MC and A terminology. This glossary was envisioned as an outgrowth of the many interactions, training sessions, and other talking and writing exercises that would transpire in the course of carrying out these programs. This report summarizes the status of the production of this glossary, the most recent copy of which is attached to this report. The glossary contains over 950 terms and acronyms associated with nuclear material control and accounting for safeguards and nonproliferation. This document is organized as follows: English/Russian glossary of terms and acronyms; Russian/English glossary of terms and acronyms; English/Russian glossary of acronyms; and Russian/English glossary of acronyms.

Schachowskoj, S.; Smith, H.A. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Guideline to good practices for control of maintenance activities at DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Control of Maintenance Activities at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a rigorously controlled maintenance program directed at achieving high quality work performance, personnel safety, radiological protection, operating equipment/system protection, and overall site safety and reliability at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 7. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing maintenance programs that are applicable to their facility.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

FIRST SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT (SRE) TEST OF HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF) CONTROL MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted in the SRE to measure temperatures and neutron flux levels in and near a boron-containing simulated control rod. The data are being used to check analytical methods developed for prediction of control rod heat generation rates and maximum temperatures in this type of control rod in the Hallam Nuclear Power Facility. The maximum observed temperatures with a reactor power level of 20 Mw were 1363 deg F for a boron-- nickel alloy ring having a 0.105-in. radial clearance with the thimble and 1100 deg F for a boron -nickel alloy ring having a 0.020-in. radial clearance. The maximum temperature difference between the coolant and the control rod was 473 deg F. It is concluded that the expected greater heat generation rates in the Hallam reactor would prohibit the use of boron-containing absorber materials in a combined a him-safety rod. (auth)

Arneson, S.O.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Universal quantum control of two-electron spin quantum bits using dynamic nuclear polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One fundamental requirement for quantum computation is to perform universal manipulations of quantum bits at rates much faster than the qubit's rate of decoherence. Recently, fast gate operations have been demonstrated in logical spin qubits composed of two electron spins where the rapid exchange of the two electrons permits electrically controllable rotations around one axis of the qubit. However, universal control of the qubit requires arbitrary rotations around at least two axes. Here we show that by subjecting each electron spin to a magnetic field of different magnitude we achieve full quantum control of the two-electron logical spin qubit with nanosecond operation times. Using a single device, a magnetic field gradient of several hundred milliTesla is generated and sustained using dynamic nuclear polarization of the underlying Ga and As nuclei. Universal control of the two-electron qubit is then demonstrated using quantum state tomography. The presented technique provides the basis for single and potent...

Foletti, Sandra; Mahalu, Diana; Umansky, Vladimir; Yacoby, Amir; 10.1038/nphys1424

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assembly fixture for cross-shaped control rods of boiling water nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assembly fixture is disclosed for cross-shaped control rods of boiling-water nuclear reactors with an upper core grid mesh for holding a core cell formed of four fuel assemblies having a gap therebetween and means disposed beneath the reactor core for driving the control rods in the gap, including a frame having corners formed therein, the frame being substantially the size of a core cell and being disposable on the core grid, templates diagonally oppositely disposed on the frame and extending into the core cell for lateral guidance of the control rods, stops for the control rods disposed on the templates, and a carrying handle having a first portion thereof being pivotable at one of the corners of the frame and a second portion thereof being locked to an opposite corner of the frame in a disassembled condition and swung out of the locked condition in an assembled condition.

Lippert, H.J.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Unclassified Sources Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone. The purpose of this report is to develop and document conceptual models of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine HST for use in implementing source terms for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine models. This document presents future plans to incorporate the radionuclide attenuation mechanisms due to unsaturated/multiphase flow and transport within the Yucca Flat CAU scale modeling. The important processes that influence radionuclide migration for the unsaturated and saturated tests in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate settings are identified. Many different flow and transport models developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including original modeling of multiphase flow and transport by the Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), are integrated to form a general understanding of how the RST relates to the HST. This report is unlike the Frenchman Flat source term analysis because it does not calculate the HST for each test. Instead, this work only identifies the important processes that must be considered when the CAU-transport modeling is performed.

Peter Martian

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microsoft Word - Management Control Cover1.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2006 OAS-M-06-10 September 2006 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 25, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATO Y COMMISSION , -x, FROM: Rickey k. ~ a k Assistant Inspector General for Financial, Technology and Corporate Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2006" BACKGROUND The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) has developed and implemented a number of information systems to support its mission of regulating the

193

Counterintelligence and operations security-support program for the Defense Nuclear Agency. Directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Directive establishes the counterintelligence (CI) and operations security (OPSEC) support program for the Defense Nuclear Agency which includes activities designed to protect classified and operationally sensitive unclassified information and material. Included are CI investigations, counterespionage and countersabotage operations, OPSEC analyses, technical surveillance countermeasures services, CI security education, and CI security assistance.

Nelson, L.

1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Emerging Technologioes in Instrumentation and Controls and Their Potential Regulatory Implications for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a summary of eight instrumentation and control (&C) technology areas, with applications in nuclear power plants (NPPs), that were the focus of a recent study performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC.) The state of the technology s application in NPPs, along with potential regulatory impact(s), are discussed. The technology focus areas are: (1) sensors and measurement systems, (2) communications media and networking, (3) microprocessors and other integrated circuits, (4) computational platforms, (5) surveillance, diagnostics, and prognostics, (6) human-system interactions, (7) high-integrity software, and (8) I&C architectures in new plants. The regulatory implications of these focus areas with regard to their application in NPPs are also discussed.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Shourbaji, Ayman A [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Single parameter controls for nuclear criticality safety at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, there are numerous situations in which nuclear criticality safety must be assured and subcriticality demonstrated by some method other than the straightforward use of the double contingency principle. Some cases are cited, and the criticality safety evaluation of contaminated combustible waste collectors is considered in detail. The criticality safety evaluation for combustible collectors is based on applying one very good control to the one controllable parameter. Safety can only be defended when the contingency of excess density is limited to a credible value based on process knowledge. No reasonable single failure is found that will result in a criticality accident. The historically accepted viewpoint is that this meets double contingency, even though there are not two independent controls on the single parameter of interest.

Baker, J.S.; Peek, W.M.

1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Upgrade of the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System at the VNIIEF Industrial Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industrial Zone at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center/All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC/VNEEF) consists of ten guarded areas with twenty two material balance areas (A and As). The type of facilities in the Industrial Zone include storage sites, machine shops, research facilities, and training facilities. Modernization of the Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) System at the Industrial Zone started in 1997. This paper provides a description of, the methodology/strategy used in the upgrade of the MFC and A system.

Lewis, J.C.; Maltsev, V.; Singh, S.P.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

Galyean, W.J.

1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

Gregory Weatherby

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet Union operates a vast and growing radioactive waste management system. Detailed information on this system is rare and a general overall picture only emerges after a review of a great deal of literature. Poor waste management practices and slow implementation of environmental restoration activities have caused a great deal of national concern. The release of information on the cause and extent of an accident involving high-level waste at the Kyshtym production reactor site in 1957, as well as other contamination at the site, serve to highlight past Soviet waste management practices. As a result, the area of waste management is now receiving greater emphasis, and more public disclosures. Little is known about Soviet waste management practices related to uranium mining, conversion, and fuel fabrication processes. However, releases of radioactive material to the environment from uranium mining and milling operations, such as from mill tailings piles, are causing public concern. Official Soviet policy calls for a closed fuel cycle, with reprocessing of power reactor fuel that has been cooled for five years. For power reactors, only VVER-440 reactor fuel has been reprocessed in any significant amount, and a decision on the disposition of RBMK reactor fuel has been postponed indefinitely. Soviet reprocessing efforts are falling behind schedule; thus longer storage times for spent fuel will be required, primarily at multiple reactor stations. Information on reprocessing in the Soviet Union has been severely limited until 1989, when two reprocessing sites were acknowledged by the Soviets. A 400-metric ton (MT) per year reprocessing facility, located at Kyshtym, has been operational since 1949 for reprocessing production reactor fuel. This facility is reported to have been reprocessing VVER-440 and naval reactor fuel since 1978, with about 2000 MT of VVER-440 fuel being reprocessed by July 1989. A second facility, located near Krasnoyarsk and having a 1500 MT per year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass volume of 100-150 liters/MT of fuel reprocessed); 3) set it aside in air-cooled storage

Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soviet Union operates a vast and growing radioactive waste management system. Detailed information on this system is rare and a general overall picture only emerges after a review of a great deal of literature. Poor waste management practices and slow implementation of environmental restoration activities have caused a great deal of national concern. The release of information on the cause and extent of an accident involving high-level waste at the Kyshtym production reactor site in 1957, as well as other contamination at the site, serve to highlight past Soviet waste management practices. As a result, the area of waste management is now receiving greater emphasis, and more public disclosures. Little is known about Soviet waste management practices related to uranium mining, conversion, and fuel fabrication processes. However, releases of radioactive material to the environment from uranium mining and milling operations, such as from mill tailings piles, are causing public concern. Official Soviet policy calls for a closed fuel cycle, with reprocessing of power reactor fuel that has been cooled for five years. For power reactors, only VVER-440 reactor fuel has been reprocessed in any significant amount, and a decision on the disposition of RBMK reactor fuel has been postponed indefinitely. Soviet reprocessing efforts are falling behind schedule; thus longer storage times for spent fuel will be required, primarily at multiple reactor stations. Information on reprocessing in the Soviet Union has been severely limited until 1989, when two reprocessing sites were acknowledged by the Soviets. A 400-metric ton (MT) per year reprocessing facility, located at Kyshtym, has been operational since 1949 for reprocessing production reactor fuel. This facility is reported to have been reprocessing VVER-440 and naval reactor fuel since 1978, with about 2000 MT of VVER-440 fuel being reprocessed by July 1989. A second facility, located near Krasnoyarsk and having a 1500 MT per year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass volume of 100-150 liters/MT of fuel reprocessed); 3) set it aside in air-cooled storage

Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Accelerated Testing of Neutron-Absorbing Alloys for Nuclear Criticality Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special Issue Technical Paper / Second Seminar on Accelerated Testing of Materials in Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Storage Systems / Materials for Nuclear Systems

R. E. Mizia; T. E. Lister

205

Universal quantum control of two-electron spin quantum bits using dynamic nuclear polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One fundamental requirement for quantum computation is to perform universal manipulations of quantum bits at rates much faster than the qubit's rate of decoherence. Recently, fast gate operations have been demonstrated in logical spin qubits composed of two electron spins where the rapid exchange of the two electrons permits electrically controllable rotations around one axis of the qubit. However, universal control of the qubit requires arbitrary rotations around at least two axes. Here we show that by subjecting each electron spin to a magnetic field of different magnitude we achieve full quantum control of the two-electron logical spin qubit with nanosecond operation times. Using a single device, a magnetic field gradient of several hundred milliTesla is generated and sustained using dynamic nuclear polarization of the underlying Ga and As nuclei. Universal control of the two-electron qubit is then demonstrated using quantum state tomography. The presented technique provides the basis for single and potentially multiple qubit operations with gate times that approach the threshold required for quantum error correction.

Sandra Foletti; Hendrik Bluhm; Diana Mahalu; Vladimir Umansky; Amir Yacoby

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS  

SciTech Connect

Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

OUO Review Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

has already made the OUO decision for you. These decisions are found in classification guides, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) guidelines, or in program-issued...

210

Microsoft Word - Document19  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

809 Pantex Laser Perimeter Awareness System (U) This inspection report is not publicly releasable because it contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. For further...

211

The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Sustainability Program of Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UEIP has been working on a comprehensive sustainability program that includes establishing a site sustainability working group, information gathering, planning, organizing, developing schedule and estimated costs, trhough joint UEIP-US DOE/NNSA National Laboratory sustainability contracts. Considerable efforts have been necessary in the sustainability planning, monitoring, and control of the scope of work using tools such as Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project and SAP R/3. While information interchanges within the sustainability program provides adequate US assurances that US funds are well spent through its quarterly reporting methodology, proper information security and protection measures are taken throughout the process. Decommissioning of outdated equipment has also become part of determining sustainability requirements and processes. The sites sustainability program has facilitated the development of a transition plan toward eventual full Russian funding of sustaining nuclear security upgrades.

Vakhonin, Alexander; Yuldashev, Rashid; Dabbs, Richard D.; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Patrick, Scott W.; Ku, Eshter M.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; O`Hearn, E. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Inc., Blue Bell, PA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Audit of Selected Aspects of the Unclassified Computer Security Program at a DOE Headquarters Computing Facility, AP-B-95-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE UNCLASSIFIED COMPUTER SECURITY PROGRAM AT A DOE HEADQUARTERS COMPUTING FACILITY The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vm1.hqadmin.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy Human Resources and Administration Home Page

214

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

Not Available

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section 5, Shield; Section 6, Turbomachinery; Section 7. Control System  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Standard guide for application of radiation monitors to the control and physical security of special nuclear material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide briefly describes the state-of-the-art of radiation monitors for detecting special nuclear material (SNM) (see 3.1.11) in order to establish the context in which to write performance standards for the monitors. This guide extracts information from technical documentation to provide information for selecting, calibrating, testing, and operating such radiation monitors when they are used for the control and protection of SNM. This guide offers an unobtrusive means of searching pedestrians, packages, and motor vehicles for concealed SNM as one part of a nuclear material control or security plan for nuclear materials. The radiation monitors can provide an efficient, sensitive, and reliable means of detecting the theft of small quantities of SNM while maintaining a low likelihood of nuisance alarms. 1.2 Dependable operation of SNM radiation monitors rests on selecting appropriate monitors for the task, operating them in a hospitable environment, and conducting an effective program to test, calibrat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Control of multiscale systems with constraints. 2. Fractal nuclear isomers and clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the influence of the Fermi statistics of nucleons on the binding energy of a new type of nuclear structures such as fractal nuclear clusters (fractal isomers of nuclei). It is shown that the fractal nuclear isomers possess a wide spectrum of binding energies that exceed, in many cases, the values known at the present time. The transition of the nuclear matter in the form of ordinary nuclei (drops of the nuclear fluid) in the state with the fractal structure or in the form of bubble nuclei opens new sources of energy and has huge perspectives. This transition is based on a new state of matter - collective coherently correlated state. It manifests itself, first of all, in the property of nonlocality of nuclear multiparticle processes. We develop a phenomenological theory of the binding energy of nuclear fractal structures and modify the Bethe - Weizs\\"acker formula for nuclear clusters with the mass number A, charge Z, and fractal dimension D_f. The consideration of fractal nuclear isomers allows one to interpret the experimental results on a new level of the comprehension of processes of the nuclear dynamics. The possibility to determine the fractal dimension of nuclear systems with the help of the method of nuclear dipole resonance for fractal isomers is discussed. The basic relations for fractal electroneutral structures such as the electron-nucleus plasma of fractal isomers are presented.

S. Adamenko; V. Bolotov; V. Novikov

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Analyses of Nuclear ldhA Gene and mtDNA Control Region Sequences of Atlantic Northern Bluen Tuna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses of Nuclear ldhA Gene and mtDNA Control Region Sequences of Atlantic Northern Blue®n Tuna: There has been considerable debate about whether the Atlantic northern blue®n tuna exist as a single®n tuna from the Mediterranean Sea and the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Pairwise comparisons of multiple

Ely, Bert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Development Guidance for Instrument and Control Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for developing and implementing a cable aging management program for low-voltage instrument and control cable circuits in nuclear power plants. Guidance is provided for identifying cables located in adverse localized environments and determining if those environments have caused significant cable circuit degradation.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nuclear criticality safety controls for uranium deposits during D and D at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management has issued a challenge to complete DOE environmental cleanup within a decade. The response for Oak Ridge facilities is in accordance with the DOE ten-year plan which calls for completion of > 95% of environmental management work by the year 2006. This will result in a 99% risk reduction and in a significant savings in base line costs in waste management (legacy waste); remedial action (groundwater, soil, etc.); and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). It is assumed that there will be long-term institutional control of cascade equipment, i.e., there will be no walk away from sites, and that there will be firm radioactivity release limits by 1999 for recycle metals. An integral part of these plants is the removal of uranium deposits which pose nuclear criticality safety concerns in the shut down of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. DOE has initiated the Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program to improve nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger uranium deposits from unfavorable geometry equipment. Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements have identified the location of these deposits. The objective of the K-25 Site Nuclear Criticality Stabilization Program is to remove and place uranium deposits into safe geometry storage containers to meet the double contingency principle. Each step of the removal process results in safer conditions where multiple controls are present. Upon completion of the Program, nuclear criticality risks will be greatly reduced.

Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jollay, L.J. III; Dahl, T.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Marking Requirements | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Submittal Basics Submittal Basics Marking Requirements Print page Print page Email page Email page Categories of Controlled Unclassified STI DOE and Major Site/Facility Management Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample Cover and Title Page for Controlled Unclassified STI Financial Assistance Recipients and Non-major Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample Cover and Title Page for Controlled Unclassified STI Resources for classified and controlled unclassified marking requirements: DOE CMPC Marking Resource DOE O 475.2A, Identifying Classified Information 10 CFR 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE M 471.3-1, Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use

225

Guideline to good practices for control and calibration of measuring and test equipment (M TE) at DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Control and Calibration of Measuring and Test Equipment (M TE) at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a rigorously controlled maintenance program directed at controlling and calibrating M TE used for maintenance tasks at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 11. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing an M TE program applicable to their facility.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Single-Photon Entanglement in the keV Regime via Coherent Control of Nuclear Forward Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation of single-photon entanglement is discussed in nuclear forward scattering. Using successive switchings of the direction of the nuclear hyperfine magnetic field, the coherent scattering of photons on nuclei is controlled such that two signal pulses are generated out of one initial pump pulse. The two time-resolved correlated signal pulses have different polarizations and energy in the keV regime. Spatial separation of the entangled field modes and extraction of the signal from the background can be achieved with the help of state-of-the-art x-ray polarizers and piezoelectric fast steering mirrors.

Adriana Plffy; Christoph H. Keitel; Jrg Evers

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

228

Control of multiscale systems with constraints. 2. Fractal nuclear isomers and clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the influence of the Fermi statistics of nucleons on the binding energy of a new type of nuclear structures such as fractal nuclear clusters (fractal isomers of nuclei). It is shown that the fractal nuclear isomers possess a wide spectrum of binding energies that exceed, in many cases, the values known at the present time. The transition of the nuclear matter in the form of ordinary nuclei (drops of the nuclear fluid) in the state with the fractal structure or in the form of bubble nuclei opens new sources of energy and has huge perspectives. This transition is based on a new state of matter - collective coherently correlated state. It manifests itself, first of all, in the property of nonlocality of nuclear multiparticle processes. We develop a phenomenological theory of the binding energy of nuclear fractal structures and modify the Bethe - Weizs\\"acker formula for nuclear clusters with the mass number A, charge Z, and fractal dimension D_f. The consideration of fractal nuclear isomers allows on...

Adamenko, S; Novikov, V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE-STD-1069-94; Guideline to Good Practices for Maintenance Tools and Equipment Control at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-94 9-94 June 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR MAINTENANCE TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT CONTROL AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA MNTY DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE94014951 DOE-STD-1069-94 FOREWORD The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Maintenance Tools and Equipment Control at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance

230

Generic Qualification of the Triconex Corporation TRICON Triple Modular Redundant Programmable Logic Controller System for Safety-Re lated Applications in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As its nuclear power plants age, the electric power industry is focusing on the development of cost-effective replacement systems for obsolete instrumentation, control, and safety systems. This report describes the generic qualification of a platform for safety-related applications that incorporates triple modular redundant (TMR) programmable logic controllers (PLCs), a technology with an excellent track record in non-nuclear applications for critical control and safety functions.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Recommended Approaches and Design Criteria for Application of Field Programmable Gate Arrays in Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are gaining increased attention worldwide for application in nuclear power plant (NPP) instrumentation and control (IC) systems, particularly for safety applications. The use of FPGAs might reduce complexity and the associated burden of gaining regulatory approval and provide better protection against obsolescence compared to conventional microprocessor-based systems. This report provides guidelines and design criteria for application of FPGAs in NPP IC systems, add...

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

energy released during the neutron-induced fission of nuclear fuels is used for energy production in power reactors. The process of beta-n emission from fission products...

233

Long term control of 3D engineering data for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The engineering of the next generation of nuclear power plants requires to take into account the whole plant lifecycle: engineering, building, operating, maintaining and decommissioning. Satisfying stronger and stronger safety regulations requires the ...

Thomas Paviot; Christophe Mouton; Samir Lamouri

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Design and control of a spheroidal underwater robot for the inspection of nuclear piping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While it is critical that nuclear plants frequently inspect their facilities for cracking, corrosion or other failure modes, humans cannot safely perform these tasks due to the hazardous conditions within the tanks and ...

Lozano, Martin, Jr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

Hampel, V.E.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

Controlling the atom. The beginnings of nuclear regulation 1946--1962  

SciTech Connect

This book traces the early history of nuclear power regulation in the US. It focuses on the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the federal agency that until 1975 was primarily responsible for planning and carrying out programs to protect public health and safety from the hazards of the civilian use of nuclear energy. It also describes the role of other groups that figured significantly in the development of regulatory policies, including the congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, federal agencies other than the AEC, state governments, the nuclear industry, and scientific organizations. And it considers changes in public perceptions of and attitudes toward atomic energy and the dangers of radiation exposure. The context in which regulatory programs evolved is a rich and complex mixture of political, legislative, legal, technological, scientific, and administrative history. The basic purpose of this book is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which inherited responsibility for nuclear safety after Congress disbanded the AEC, and the general public with information on the historical antecedents and background of regulatory issues.

Mazuzan, G.T.; Walker, J.S.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadronic reactor} (patented and international patents pending), consisting of actual equipment specifically intended for the possible industrial production of the clean energy released by representative cases of controlled intermediate fusions for independent scrutiny by interested colleagues.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

Where do the Nuclear Materials Management functions fit in the Materials Control and Accountability (MC and A) plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safeguards had its beginning in the early 1940s and has continued to grow through the stormy years in dealing with nuclear materials. MC and A Plans have been developed for each facility which includes requirements for containment, surveillance, internal controls, measurements, statistics, records and report systems, and inventory certification of its nuclear materials, in the context of how precisely the inventory is known at stated risk or confidence levels. The I and E Regulations, the newest document affecting the control system, are used for testing the current MC and A plan in place at each facility. Nuclear Materials Management activities also have reporting requirements that include: (1) Annual Forecast, (2) Materials Management Plan, (3) Quarterly Status Report, (4) Assessment Report, and (5) Scrap and Excess Material Management. Data used to generate reports for both functions come from the same data base and source documents at most facilities. The separation of sponsoring groups at the DOE for NM Accountability and NM Management can and does pose problems for contractors. In this paper, we will try to separate and identify these overlaps at the Facility and DOE level.

DeVer, E.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - o471.1B3-1-10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved: 3-1-2010 Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE O 471.1B DOE O 471.1B 1 3-1-2010 IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION 1. PURPOSE. To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify and protect Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). 2. CANCELLATION. DOE O 471.1A, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, dated 6-30-00, and DOE M 471.1-1, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Manual, dated 10-23-01. Cancellation of a directive does not, by itself, modify or otherwise affect any contractual

242

American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.15-1983: Nuclear criticality control of special actinide elements  

SciTech Connect

The American National Standard, `Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors` ANSI/ANS-8.1- 1983 provides guidance for the nuclides [sup 233]U, [sup 235]U, and [sup 239]Pu These three nuclides are of primary interest in out-of-reactor criticality safety since they are the most commonly encountered in the vast majority of operations. However, some operations can involve nuclides other than `U, `U, and `Pu in sufficient quantities that their effect on criticality safety could be of concern. The American National Standard, `Nuclear Criticality Control of Special Actinide Elements` ANSI/ANS-8.`15-1983 (Ref 2), provides guidance for fifteen such nuclides.

Brewer, R.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pruvost, N.L. [Galaxy Computer Services, Inc. (United States); Rombough, C.T. [CTR Technical Services (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

The University and the Nuclear Predicament  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34. Living with Nuclear Weapons, Harvard Nuclear Studythe proliferation of nuclear weapons states (from one to atMIT Summer Program on Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control.

Kohn, Walter; Badash, Lawrence

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

High Speed Eigenvalue Solver on the Cell Cluster System for Controlling Nuclear Fusion Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we developed a high speed eigenvalue solver that is the necessity of plasma stability analysis system for International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on Cell cluster system. Our stability analysis system is developed in order ... Keywords: Cell cluster, Eigensolver, Parallel Computing, Plasma stability analysis, Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Method

Noriyuki Kushida; Hiroshi Takemiya; Shinji Tokuda

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Robust control of entanglement in a Nitrogen-vacancy centre coupled to a Carbon-13 nuclear spin in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address a problem of generating a robust entangling gate between electronic and nuclear spins in the system of a single nitrogen-vacany centre coupled to a nearest Carbon-13 atom in diamond against certain types of systematic errors such as pulse-length and off-resonance errors. We analyse the robustness of various control schemes: sequential pulses, composite pulses and numerically-optimised pulses. We find that numerically-optimised pulses, produced by the gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm (GRAPE), are more robust than the composite pulses and the sequential pulses. The optimised pulses can also be implemented in a faster time than the composite pulses.

R. S. Said; J. Twamley

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EPRI Alpha Monitoring and Control Guidelines for Operating Nuclear Power Stations, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) first published the EPRI Alpha Monitoring Guidelines for Operating Nuclear Stations (EPRI report 1013509), to provide standardized guidance for monitoring alpha contamination. Minor revisions were made to the guidelines, which were re-issued in 2009 (1019500). Most US and some international utilities have implemented the guidelines, and several areas of improvement were identified to enhance information to support the monitoring and ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Quality Control of Concrete During Construction - Voids Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main type of degradation of concrete structures during the construction of nuclear power plants has been the existence of honeycombs and voids due to inadequate concrete design and placement. The detection of these honeycombs and voids in concrete structures has been attempted with nondestructive evaluation technologies with limited success. The addition of steel-concrete construction techniques further complicates the ability of these technologies to ...

2012-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly describes the practical efforts applied to the provision of physical protection specialists advanced training in Ukraine and real results on the way to implement such efforts in 2011-2012.

Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fuzzy control for nuclear reactor operation -- strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be analyzed through an analysis of strengths, ... Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Br1 Reactor, Fuzzy Control, Reactor Operation, Triga Mark Iii Reactor

Da Ruan; Jorge S. Bentez-Read

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Human-factors engineering-control-room design review: Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. Draft audit report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Shoreham control room was performed at the site on March 30 through April 3, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The presented sections are numbered to conform to the guidelines of the draft version of NUREG-0700. They summarize the teams's observations of the control room design and layout, and of the control room operators' interface with the control room environment.

Peterson, L.R.; Preston-Smith, J.; Savage, J.W.; Rousseau, W.F.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Support Staff, "Assessment Report: Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons-Related Security Oversight Process," March 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 5, 1977 DOE, "Plutonium: The First 50 Years. United States Plutonium Production, Acquisition, and Utilization from 1944 Through 1994 GAO/RCED-92-39, "Nuclear Security: Safeguards and Security Weaknesses at DOE's Weapons Facilities," December 13, 1991 GAO/RCED/AIMD-95-5, "Nuclear Nonproliferation: U.S. International Nuclear Materials Tracking Capabilities are Limited," December 27, 1994 GAO/AIMD-95-165, "Department of Energy: Poor Management of Nuclear Materials Tracking Capabilities Are Limited," August 3, 1995 Classified DOE report.

Gao Rced- Major

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Control of the direction and rate of nuclear spin flips in InAs quantum dots using detuned optical pulse trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find that detuning an optical pulse train from electronic transitions in quantum dots controls the direction of nuclear spin flips. The optical pulse train generates electron spins that precess about an applied magnetic field, with a spin component parallel to the field only for detuned pulses. This component leads to asymmetry in the nuclear spin flips, providing a way to produce a stable and precise value of the nuclear spin polarization. This effect is observed using two-color, time-resolved Faraday rotation and ellipticity.

S. G. Carter; A. Shabaev; Sophia E. Economou; T. A. Kennedy; A. S. Bracker; T. L. Reinecke

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Breather-less Electronic Control Unit (ECU) Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Unit (ECU) Housing Overview Mando's current ECU housing design has a breather-hole to balance the variation in temperature found inside and outside of the housing unit. Mando's customers are concerned that debris and contaminates are entering the housing unit and damaging the ECU, so they would like to remove

Demirel, Melik C.

257

Joint System Prognostics For Increased Efficiency And Risk Mitigation In Advanced Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation and Control  

SciTech Connect

The science of prognostics is analogous to a doctor who, based on a set of symptoms and patient tests, assesses a probable cause, the risk to the patient, and a course of action for recovery. While traditional prognostics research has focused on the aspect of hydraulic and mechanical systems and associated failures, this project will take a joint view in focusing not only on the digital I&C aspect of reliability and risk, but also on the risks associated with the human element. Model development will not only include an approximation of the control system physical degradation but also on human performance degradation. Thus the goal of the prognostic system is to evaluate control room operation; to identify and potentially take action when performance degradation reduces plant efficiency, reliability or safety.

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Tuan Q. Tran; Ronald L. Boring; Bruce P. Hallbert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Westinghouse Full-Length Rod Control System - Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides the technical information necessary to develop a comprehensive plant-specific life cycle management plan for the Westinghouse solid-state full-length rod control system. The technical information includes operating experience, industry bench-marking performance survey results, recommended preventive and predictive maintenance, industry "good practices," obsolescence issues, and OEM component upgrades and design enhancements. The component upgrades/enhancements will improve the sy...

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear-Renewables Energy System for Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Geoffrey Haratyk; Charles W. Forsberg

260

Date centerdTimes New Roman  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of the Department of Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information DOE/IG-0818 August 2009 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 4, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Regulatory Guide 5.29, Revision 2, "Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants".  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 Revision 2 REGULATORY GUIDE OFFICE OF NUCLEAR REGULATORY RESEARCH Written suggestions regarding this guide or development of new guides may be submitted through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/reg-guides/contactus.html. Electronic copies of this regulatory guide, previous versions of this guide, and other recently issued guides are available through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/. The regulatory guide is also available through the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) at

262

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A REPRINT of a July 1991 Report to Congress, Executive Summary of Verification of Nuclear Warhead Dismantlement and Special Nuclear Material Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the renewed thinking and debate about deep reductions in nuclear weapons, including recent proposals about eliminating nuclear warheads altogether, republishing the general conclusions of the Robinson Committee Report of 1992 appears useful. The report is sometimes referred to as the 3151 Report, from Section 3151 of the National Defnse Authorization Act for FY1991, from where its requirement originated. This report contains the Executive Summary only and the forwarding letters from the Committee, the President of the United States, the Secretary of Energy, and C Paul Robinson, the head of the Advisory Committee.

Fuller, James L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

A review of the environmental survivability of telerobotic control sensor systems for use in nuclear waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). During the next few years field deployment of remotely operated systems in nuclear waste cleanup operations will increase dramatically as DOE strives to efficiently and safely remediate the many waste storage sites. Typically, the most fragile components in remote systems are the sensors that provide feedback to the operators or to computer control algorithms. The purpose of this review is to determine the availability of environmentally hardened sensors to support control of a manipulator or vehicle system in a waste tank environment. The emphasis of the report is on the environmental ruggedness of currently available sensors. For the purpose of this review a set of nominal requirements for survivability were adopted conditions in the single-shell tanks at Hanford. This report is designed to be a practical guide to the state of the art in commercially available environmentally tolerant sensors for use with robotic systems. It is neither intended to be an exhaustive review of the technical literature on potential measurement techniques nor a complete physical review of the functioning of particular sensor systems. This report is intended to be a living document. As additional, corrected, or updated information is received from sensor manufacturers, it will be incorporated into the report database. The physical report will then be periodically revised and released in updated format. The authors wish to apologize to any sources of environmentally hardened sensors that were omitted during this review and encourage submission of new or updated data.

Holcomb, D.E.; Burks, B.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

U  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION (UCNI) GENERAL GUIDELINE GG-5 February 2004 Information Classification and Control Policy Security Policy Staff Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA) Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Department of Energy UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION General Guideline GG-5 February 2004 Change Date _____________New Pages____________ Approved and Issued by: Joan G. Hawthorne Director Information Classification and Control Policy Security Policy Staff Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA) Washington, DC 20585 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................... 1

266

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

267

CONTROLLED NUCLEAR FUSION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating and heating device is described which comprises a ceramic torus with exterior layers of a thick metal membrane and a metallic coil. In operation, the coil generates a B/sub z/ field prior to the formation of an enclosing plasma sheath. Diffusion of the trapped magnetic field outward through the plasma sheath causes enhanced heating, particularly after the sheath has been pinched. (D.L.C.)

Tuck, J.L.; Kruskal, M.; Colgate, S.A.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regula- tion.Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for Light Water Reactor

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DOE-STD-1053-93; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Control of Maintenance Activities at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-93 3-93 March 1993 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MNTY Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. Order No. DE93014268 DOE-STD-1053-93 FOREWORD The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Control of M aintenance A ctivities at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information

270

Instrumentation and Control, Human System Interface, and Information Technology Requirements Project Plan for Nuclear Power Plant Lo ng-Term Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant owners are looking to extend the operating life of their plants to 80 years and potentially longer. Instrumentation and control, human system interface, and information technologies have changed drastically since the plants were built and will change even more drastically before the plants reach the end of their operating life. A project plan to develop requirements for these technologies is defined here. These requirements will enable plants to better identify future solutions that w...

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

safeguards, radiation interaction with materials including human tissue, nuclear fuels performance at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is seeking qualified individuals for a Tenure Track faculty position instrumentation & controls, monitoring and diagnostics, reactor dynamics, nuclear security, nuclear materials

Tennessee, University of

272

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

Simpson, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF sub 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2-1/2-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a safetime,'' for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Newvahner, R.L. (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, OH (United States)); Pryor, W.A. (PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Containers: UseCoatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance2006 ABSTRACT Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Microsoft Word - o471.1B3-1-10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Approved: 3-1-2010 Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE O 471.1B DOE O...

276

9/15/1999 1 #f Polygraphs and Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION DOE M 471.2-3B SPECIAL ACCESS PROGRAM POLICIES 471.3-1** MANUAL FOR IDENTIFYING AND PROTECTING OFFICIAL USE ONLY INFORMATION CRD 0475.1 iCOUNTERINTELLIGENCE

Pearson, John E.

277

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE PUBLIC'S RIGHT TO KNOW Resources > Openness Given ongoing concerns with terrorism and nuclear proliferation, a word about secrecy, the information presented on this web site, and the public's right to know is in order. The information on this web site is currently available, and has long been available, in any major university library. The basic story of the Manhattan Project was first released to the public in August 1945 in the "Smyth Report" (right), a book-length study of the Manhattan Project. It was personally reviewed by Leslie Groves, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest O. Lawrence, and others, to ensure that it contained no information that would be of assistance to anyone who might try to build a nuclear weapon. The information from the Smyth Report and other contemporary MED press releases has been supplemented in subsequent years by numerous other histories of the Manhattan Project, including a comprehensive official history produced by the Atomic Energy Henry D. Smyth confers with Ernest O. Lawrence about the Smyth Report, Berkeley, fall 1944. Commission (AEC) historians Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr. As for the most potentially-sensitive category of entries on this web site, "Science," most of the text for these entries was taken directly from an unclassified 1963 AEC publication, The Atomic Energy Deskbook. Created under the personal supervision of AEC Chairman Glenn T. Seaborg, the Deskbook was intended from the start to be a reference work for the public. The intent of all of these publications was to reveal what could be revealed and to keep secret what needed to be kept secret. Accordingly, this web site has been reviewed by the Department of Energy's Office of Classification and confirmed to be unclassified. (For more information on Manhattan Project-related publications, see the list of "Suggested Readings.")

278

ACCESS CONTROL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMSDEFINITIONS FROM DOE M 470.4-7 ACCESS CONTROL. The process of permitting access or denying access to information, facilities, nuclear materials, resources, or designated...

279

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

U.S. Department of Energy Roadmap on Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies in Current and Future Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) recently sponsored the creation of a roadmap for instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) technology development. The roadmap represents the collective efforts of a group of subject matter experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and utilities. It is intended to provide the underpinnings to the government sponsored ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) performed in the United States for the next several years. A distinguishing feature of this roadmapping effort is that it is not limited to a technology progression plan but includes a detailed rationale, aimed at the nonspecialist, for the existence of a focused ICHMI RD&D program. Eight specific technology areas were identified for focused RD&D as follows: (1) sensors and electronics for harsh environments,(2) uncertainty characterization for diagnostics/prognostics applications, (3) quantification of software quality for high-integrity digital applications, (4) intelligent controls for nearly autonomous operation of advanced nuclear plants, (5) plant network architecture, (6) intelligent aiding technology for operational support, (7) human system interaction models and analysis tools, and (8) licensing and regulatory challenges and solutions.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Review of the Potential of Nuclear Hydrogen for Addressing Energy Security and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

James E. O'Brien

282

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

Recommendations for Controlling Cavitation, Flashing, Liquid Droplet Impingement, and Solid Particle Erosion in Nuclear Power Plant Piping Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the most common forms of erosion encountered in nuclear power plant piping systemscavitation, flashing, liquid droplet impingement, and solid particle erosionand provides utility engineers with information on how to deal with these forms of damage.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Inspection Report: IG-0759 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59 59 Inspection Report: IG-0759 March 5, 2007 Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory National Laboratory (LLNL) is a research and development institution that supports the core mission of national security. The University of California manages and operates LLNL for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). DOE spends over $2 billion each year on information technology and has a current inventory of approximately 800 information systems, including up to 115,000 personal computers, many powerful supercomputers, numerous servers, and a broad array of related peripheral equipment. The unclassified computers and electronic memory devices in these information technology systems may contain "unclassified controlled

290

Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

Struble, G. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Review of ASME code criteria for control of primary loads on nuclear piping system branch connections and recommendations for additional development work  

SciTech Connect

This report collects and uses available data to reexamine the criteria for controlling primary loads in nuclear piping branch connections as expressed in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In particular, the primary load stress indices given in NB-3650 and NB-3683 are reexamined. The report concludes that the present usage of the stress indices in the criteria equations should be continued. However, the complex treatment of combined branch and run moments is not supported by available information. Therefore, it is recommended that this combined loading evaluation procedure be replaced for primary loads by the separate leg evaluation procedure specified in NC/ND-3653.3(c) and NC/ND-3653.3(d). No recommendation is made for fatigue or secondary load evaluations for Class 1 piping. Further work should be done on the development of better criteria for treatment of combined branch and run moment effects.

Rodabaugh, E.C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Moore, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effects of Digital Instrumentation and Control Defense-in-Depth and Diversity on Risk in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preventing or mitigating the effects of software common-cause failure (CCF) remains an open technical and regulatory issue for both new plants and for digital upgrades at operating plants. The concern is the potential for CCFs to disable multiple equipment trains or systems that use identical software-based components. Instrumentation and control (I&C) designers and implementers need to ensure that the plants have adequate protection against digital CCF, in some cases adding diverse backups or operator a...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Collected Field Data on Electronic Part Failures and Aging in Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failures of instrumentation and control (I&C) systems due to aging of electronic boards and components may have an immediate negative impact on plant reliability and availability and also affect long-term plant performance and safety. Aging management technologies based on the prediction of failures and aging mechanisms should allow the optimization of preventative maintenance activities and scheduling by helping define cost-effective condition-based maintenance programs. This report represents ...

2002-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Draft audit report, human factors engineering control room design review: Saint Lucie Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 2  

SciTech Connect

A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Saint Lucie Unit 2 control room was performed at the site on August 3 through August 7, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The review team included human factors consultants from BioTechnology, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia, and from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (University of California), Livermore, California.

Peterson, L.R.; Lappa, D.A.; Moore, J.W.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

296

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sensing remote nuclear spins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensing single nuclear spins is a central challenge in magnetic resonance based imaging techniques. Although different methods and especially diamond defect based sensing and imaging techniques in principle have shown sufficient sensitivity, signals from single nuclear spins are usually too weak to be distinguished from background noise. Here, we present the detection and identification of remote single C-13 nuclear spins embedded in nuclear spin baths surrounding a single electron spins of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. With dynamical decoupling control of the centre electron spin, the weak magnetic field ~10 nT from a single nuclear spin located ~3 nm from the centre with hyperfine coupling as weak as ~500 Hz is amplified and detected. The quantum nature of the coupling is confirmed and precise position and the vector components of the nuclear field are determined. Given the distance over which nuclear magnetic fields can be detected the technique marks a firm step towards imaging, detecting and cont...

Zhao, Nan; Schmid, Berhard; Isoya, Junichi; Markham, Mathew; Twitchen, Daniel; Jelezko, Fedor; Liu, Ren-Bao; Fedder, Helmut; Wrachtrup, Jrg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided by social controls. In other calculations taking these longer term doses into account and determining the sum of the maximum individual committed dosages (SMICD), we found for each of the surrounding countries to be less than 1 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv. For releases from the Petropavlovsk sites the (SMICD) for each of the surrounding countries is less than 0.3 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv.

Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Audit Report: IG-0818 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: IG-0818 August 4, 2009 Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to prevent misuse of the information for inappropriate purposes. Industry experts have reported that more than 203 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past three years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and

302

Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment, INS-L-12-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control and Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment INS-L-12-01 December 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 21, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR EMERGENCY OPERATIONS FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Emergency Communications Network (ECN) mission is to enable the exchange of classified and unclassified voice, data and video capabilities during national or Department emergencies. ECN connects approximately 80 remote Department sites

303

Subsystem of Data Acquisition Using the ModBus Protocol in Real Time of the Digital Electro-Hydraulic Control and Its Integration with the Integral System of Process Information of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the achieved development is presented of a software module of data acquisition in real time using the ModBus protocol named Subsystem of Data Acquisition of the Digital Electro-Hydraulic Control and its integration with the New Data ... Keywords: Real time, Data acquisition System, Nuclear power plant, Modbus protocol, Linux, C++, TCP/IP

Efren Ruben Coronel Flores, Carlos Chairez Campos

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Pioneering the nuclear age  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the historical aspects of nuclear physics. The scientific aspects of the early transuranium elements are discussed and arms control measures are reviewed. 11 refs., 14 figs. (LSP)

Seaborg, G.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Some thoughts on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses factors controlling the dissemination of nuclear technologies and especially fissile materials.

Krikorian N.H.; Hawkins, H.T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

307

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

308

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

309

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

310

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

311

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

312

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

313

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

314

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

315

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

316

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

317

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

318

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION DEPARTMENT NUCLEAR SAFETY GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

The limitations and operating techniques which were in effect at ANPD for the prevention of criticality accidents are summarized. The standards followed by the atomic industry were followed; however, the safe mass of U/sup 235/ moderated with beryllium oxide and hydrogeneous materials was based upon criticality experiments conducted at ANPD. Although the guide was primarily for the use of the ANPD nuclear safety control organization, it may also be of assistance to designers and operating management in maintaining nuclear safety. (auth)

Pryor, W.A.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation > Material Protection, Control and Accounting

322

Nuclear Forensics | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect

323

Classification Training Institute Catalog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Classification » Classification Training Institute » Services » Classification » Classification Training Institute » Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute (CTI) Catalog Training & Reference Materials Online Classified or Controlled Information Mini-Lessons Classified Information Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Official Use Only Training OpenNet Training Training For Other Agency Personnel Classification Training Institute Catalog Enforcement Guidance Oversight Reporting Security Classification Classification Training Institute Official Use Only Information Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Statutes, Regulations, & Directives Nuclear Safety Assistance Training Outreach & Collaboration

324

Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies NPIC&HMIT 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 5-9, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009) FUELASSEMBLY SELF SHIELDING Polytechnic Institute Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Romanc2@rpi.edu; Danony

Danon, Yaron

325

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-and RelatedStandards for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

327

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

328

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and...

329

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CONTROL ROD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

1963-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Technology of controlled nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 38 of the included papers. Abstracts have appeared earlier in ERA for the remaining 32 papers. (MOW)

Powell, J.R.; Eterno, C.T. (eds.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Technology of controlled nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 28 included papers. Abstracts for the remaining 43 papers appeared earlier in ERA. (MOW)

Powell, J.R.; Eterno, C.T. (eds.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NATO UNCLASSIFIED NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Les systemes militaires doivent repondre a des normes tres severes. La norme militaire «Mil-Hdbk-217C Equipment", MIL-HDBK-217C, 1980. 2. Department of Defense of USA, "Military Standard: Definitions of terms

Kieras, David E.

335

UNCLASSIFIED Notice for Federal Business Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!.".,. Iso. ""M.. hIocI. 1acIIdr3ft t1IIlL bo. ~Mod. '.-rAcLMoc1 l3e'ltdm ~ "'*"Act. Mod oIo1Dr Act. Mod. I3 Engineers Geologists Sanitary Engineers Construction Inspectors Interior Designers Specification Writers Appendix "C" and attach to this Questionnaire) Also attach a list of permanent offices and any brochures

336

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

339

Hydraulic control rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for shifting a control rod into and out of a nuclear reactor utilizing as pressure fluid the fluid employed as coolant moderator in the reactor.

Treshow, Michael (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

342

SAFEGUARD AND SECURE CONTROL VERIFY POLICY  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AND SECURE CONTROL VERIFY POLICY Spring 2013 National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF NNSA, Thailand, CTBTO Hold ASEAN Nuclear Explosion Monitoring...

343

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear Forensics | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Initiatives Cyber Security Nuclear Forensics Bioinformatics National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Initiatives | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect airborne particulates and instantly send an alert if radiation is detected. For more information, please contact: nuclearforensicsinitiative

345

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

347

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

348

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

349

Computer system reliability and nuclear war  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the devastating consequences of nuclear war, it is appropriate to look at current and planned uses of computers in nuclear weapons command and control systems, and to examine whether these systems can fulfill their intended roles.

Alan Borning

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.9 5.9 (06-97) All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No. 1910-1800 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Reverse U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RECORD OF DESTRUCTION See DOE Manual 471.2-1 Manual for Classified Matter Protection and Control for Instructions UNCLASSIFIED DESCRIPTION OF MATTER (Subject or title and originator) UNIQUE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (If none, omit) DATE OF MATTER CLASSIFICATION LEVEL AND CATEGORY (Include any caveats) NUMBER of PAGES Signature, Organization, and Title of person witnessing destruction (if required) Date of Destruction Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Signature, Organization, and Title of person destroying matter Date of Destruction I CERTIFY THAT THE MATTER LISTED ABOVE HAVE BEEN DESTROYED IN ACCORDANCE WITH CURRENT SECURITY REGULATIONS.

351

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

352

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nations verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

Klingensmith, A. L.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor Shane D. Ross Control and Dynamical combustion are those powered by nuclear fission. Comparison of Chemical and Nuclear Rockets. Most existent.g., hydrogen and oxygen). In a nuclear rocket, or more precisely, a nuclear thermal rocket, the propellant

Ross, Shane

356

CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

1962-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

358

Nuclear Material Management Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical and critical role of weapons testing to another critical role for the nation. This new role focuses on being a integral element in solving the multiple challenges facing the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with nuclear material management. NTS is positioned to be a solution for other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to consolidate and modernize the production complex . With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through disposition and consolidation. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State of the art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that assigned activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS activities and challenges will be addressed.

Jesse C. Schreiber

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Learn More NNSA DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Learn More DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Tiffany A. Blanchard-Case receives 2013 Linton Brooks Medal

360

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

How do operators monitor a complex, dynamic work domain? The impact of control room technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: cognitive engineering, control rooms, human-machine interface, monitoring, nuclear power plants, process control, supervisory control

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad Field Offce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services...

363

eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

364

PIA - DOE Savannah River Operations Office PRISM System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

365

DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions More Documents & Publications MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

366

Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

367

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office File and Print Services...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

368

ACCESS CONTROL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMS/DEFINITIONS FROM DOE M 470.4-7 TERMS/DEFINITIONS FROM DOE M 470.4-7 ACCESS CONTROL. The process of permitting access or denying access to information, facilities, nuclear materials, resources, or designated security areas. ACCESS CONTROL MEASURES. Hardware and software features, physical controls, operating procedures, administrative procedures, and various combinations of these designed to detect or prevent unauthorized access to classified information; special nuclear materials; Government property; automated information systems, facilities, or materials; or areas containing the above and to enforce use of these measures to protect Departmental security and property interests. CRITICAL PATH SCENARIO. An adversary-based scenario that is generated during the conduct of a vulnerability assessment and accounts for adversary tactics that

369

Nuclear Energy  

Nuclear Energy Environmental Mgmt. Study Objectives: Respond to the pressing need to refine existing corrosion models: Predict performance in wide range of environments

370

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

371

Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos

W. C. Haxton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2012

373

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

374

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

375

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Operations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations Operations NNSA's Emergency Response Operations program acts as the headquarters command and control, functioning as the coordinating focal point for all

376

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Operations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations Operations NNSA's Emergency Response Operations program acts as the headquarters command and control, functioning as the coordinating focal point for all

377

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

378

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

379

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

380

Nuclear hadrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variable for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon?nucleon and delta?nucleon interactions are reviewed

D. F. Geesaman

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

383

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

384

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

387

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

388

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the thickness of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Reviewing Official Training April 2012 For DOE Headquarters personnel: Prior to completing this training a Request for Authority form should have been submitted to the Office of Quality Management, HS-61. This training is the next step to becoming an Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Reviewing Official (RO). Once you have completed this training, contact Charlie Jones, Senior Trainer, at 301-903-4421 or charlie.jones@hq.doe.gov to request the marking exercises and policy exam . The policy and marking exam must be returned for evaluation. If the exam is completed with a score of 80% or higher, you will be sent a Letter of Authority which will identify the jurisdiction of your authority and authorize you to

394

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

395

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

396

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

397

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

398

Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

399

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

400

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

402

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nuclear Chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear chirality is a novel manifestation of spontaneous symmetry breaking resulting from an orthogonal coupling of angular momentum vectors in triaxial nuclei. Three perpendicular angular momenta can form two systems of opposite handedness; the time reversal operator

Krzysztof Starosta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

405

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

406

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Atkins-Duffin, C E

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

PLANNING AND COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE RUSSIAN SYSTEM OF CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT ROSATOM FACILITIES IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION.  

SciTech Connect

The MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support Strategic Plan (MEMS SP) for implementing modern MC&A equipment and methodologies at Rosatom facilities has been developed within the framework of the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program. This plan developed by the Rosatom's Russian MC&A Equipment and Methodologies (MEM) Working Group and is coordinated by that group with support and coordination provided by the MC&A Measurements Project, Office of National Infrastructure and Sustainability, US DOE. Implementation of different tasks of the MEMS Strategic Plan is coordinated by Rosatom and US-DOE in cooperation with different U.S.-Russian MC&A-related working groups and joint site project teams. This cooperation allows to obtain and analyze information about problems, current needs and successes at Rosatom facilities and facilitates solution of the problems, satisfying the facilities' needs and effective exchange of expertise and lessons learned. The objective of the MEMS Strategic Plan is to enhance effectiveness of activities implementing modern equipment and methodologies in the Russian State MC&A system. These activities are conducted within the joint Russian-US MPC&A program aiming at reduction of possibility for theft or diversion of nuclear materials and enhancement of control of nuclear materials.

SVIRIDOVA, V.V.; ERASTOV, V.V.; ISAEV, N.V.; ROMANOV, V.A.; RUDENKO, V.S.; SVIRIDOV, A.S.; TITOV, G.V.; JENSEN, B.; NEYMOTIN, L.; SANDERS, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

410

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

411

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

412

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

413

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

414

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

415

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

416

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

Hutter, E.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear Models  

SciTech Connect

The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications  

SciTech Connect

Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

423

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

424

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

425

Case Study: Darlington Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Darlington is a four-reactor nuclear plant east of Toronto. It is operated by Ontario Hydro. Each reactor has two independent shutdown systems: SDS1 drops neutron-absorbing rods into the core, while SDS2 injects liquid poison into the moderator. Both ... Keywords: Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada, Canada, Darlington nuclear generating station, Ontario Hydro, case study, certification, code quality, decision-making logic, documentation, fission reactor core control and monitoring, fission reactor safety, formal methods, formal model-based inspection, formal specification, licensing, liquid poison injection, neutron-absorbing rods, nuclear engineering computing, nuclear plant, safety, safety-critical systems, software driven shutdown systems, software reliability, specifications

Dan Craigen; Susan Gerhart; Ted Ralston

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Nuclear Data Center and Nuclear Energy Pavel Oblozinsky National Nuclear Data Center;National Nuclear Data Center Probably the oldest active organization at BNL History · Founded in 1952 as Sigma Center, neutron cross sections · Changed to National Nuclear Data Center in 1977 · 40 staff

427

University of South Carolina Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Material Types and Enrichments ............ 83 Table 13. Average Isotopic Content of Uranium Material Types Uranium UC University of California UCNI Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information WIPP Waste Isolation of these codes. Prevalent radionuclides by mass are uranium (U)-235 and U-238, as described in Section 5

Morgan, Stephen L.

428

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

429

Midwest Nuclear Compact (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Nuclear Compact establishes a Midwest Nuclear Board to cooperatively evaluate and make recommendations regarding the development of nuclear technology, distribute information about...

430

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space...

431

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics Historically, nuclear physicists have studied the structure, characteristics, and behavior of the atomic nucleus and the nature of the nuclear force....

432

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has...

434

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

Pawloski, G A

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the physics of a nuclear bomb explosion and its effects on human beings is presented at the level of a sophomore general physics course without calculus. It is designed to supplement a standard text for such a course and problems are included.

A. A. Broyles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nuclear ferromagnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of producing ordered states of nuclear spins by DNP followed by ADRF was first demonstrated in 1969. The spins of 19F in a crystal of CaF2 were cooled below one microdegree (with the applied field along the [100] axis) and their antiferromagnetic ordering was exhibited through the characteristic behaviour of their transverse and (later) longitudinal susceptibilities.

A. Abragam

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear Terrorism.  

SciTech Connect

As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

Hecker, Siegfried S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculation...

Ejiri, H; Boswell, M; Young, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

1963-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States. Since East Africa forms part of the natural distribution of hydrilla, a search for potential;Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION C' [HIS PAGE(Wh., D.t.£nle,ed) 20. ABSTRACT (Continued). distribution, despite an intensive search, only a single population, probably of exotic origin, was found. The range

US Army Corps of Engineers

445

W W H H A A T T I I S S U U C C N N I I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W H H A A T T I I S S U U C C N N I I ? ? Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information is certain unclassified Government information whose unauthorized dissemination is prohibited under section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act. Such information may concern details about the design of nuclear production or utilization facilities; security measures for protecting such facilities, nuclear materials contained in such facilities, or nuclear material in transit; or the design, manufacture, or utilization of nuclear weapons or components that were once classified as Restricted Data. Examples of information that could be UCNI:  Design of facilities that produce or use special nuclear material - e.g., nuclear material manufacturing process details or critical processing

446

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

447

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research and Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to...

448

Why Nuclear Energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Why nuclear energy? energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world world' 's energy needs s...

449

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

450

ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NCNR declared a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society. The NIST Center for Neutron Research ...

451

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

453

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

454

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

NUCLEAR AND CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and establishes requirements and procedures for the implementation of the PRP to select and maintain only the most reliable people to perform duties associated with nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons require special consideration because of their policy implications and military importance, their destructive power, and the political consequences of an accident, loss of a weapon, or an unauthorized act. The safety, security, control, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons are of paramount importance to the security of the United States.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Acrobat PDFMaker 5.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE O 475.1 Approved: 12-10-04 SUBJECT: COUNTERINTELLIGENCE PROGRAM 1. OBJECTIVES. To establish Counterintelligence (CI) Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 12333 and DOE Procedures for Intelligence Activities (October 1992), the Department will- a. conduct CI activities to protect DOE information (e.g. classified, unclassified controlled information, proprietary, unclassified, and economic information affecting national security), personnel, and assets from international terrorist activities and from intelligence collection by or on behalf of foreign powers or entities; b. detect and deter insiders who engage in activities on behalf of a foreign

459

Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty in the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithology and hydraulic conductivity from the 1999 model as well as the uncertainty in the other flow and transport parameters from the 2000 DDA model. Additionally, the new model focuses on a much smaller region than was included in the earlier models, that is, the subsurface within the UC-1 land withdrawal area where the 1999 model predicted radionuclide transport will occur over the next 1,000 years. The purpose of this unclassified document is to present the modifications to the CNTA groundwater flow and transport model, to present the methodology used to calculate contaminant boundaries, and to present the Safe Drinking Water Act and risk-derived contaminant boundaries for the Faultless underground nuclear test CAU.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Jeff Daniels; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unclassified controlled nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

463

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

464

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

465

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

466

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

467

Evaluation of HotSpot, Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nasstrom accepting the revised Hotspot More Documents & Publications Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at Lawrence Livermore National...

468

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

King, L.D.P.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document combines the material previously included in the Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Briefing Book for the Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting (Electric Power Research Institute report 1023444) with the annual I&C Research Plan, replacing the latter document. This document contains key information on the I&C program and its projects, including: 1. A program executive summarya high-level document on the key activities of the I&C base program as well as its three supplemental groups 2. A consolidate...

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

Microprocessor applications in the nuclear industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microprocessors in the nuclear industry, particularly at the los Al amos Scientific Laboratory, have been and are being utilized in a wide variety of applications ranging from data acquistion and control for basic physics research to monitoring special ...

C. Dwayne Ethiridge

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Structural mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores A fast reactor core is composed of a closely packed hexagonal arrangement of fuel, control, blanket , and shielding assemblies....

472

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of other TSROSR requirement (3) Violation of DSA hazard control B. Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) Inadequacies (1) Positive unreviewed safety question C. Nuclear Criticality...