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Sample records for unclassified controlled nuclear

  1. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  2. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information for persons with access to UCNI, June 2014 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Reviewing Official's Training Resources Understanding Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Brochure UCNI Marking Reference Classification's Webpage on Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Policy Documents Training & Reference

  3. Identification of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-08

    To establish policy and procedures for identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UNCI) and for reviewing and marking documents and material containing UNCI. Cancels DOE O 5650.3. Canceled by DOE O 471.1 of 9-25-95.

  4. Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-24

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy and procedures for the protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UNCI). Canceled by DOE O 471.1 of 9-25-1995.

  5. Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-02-03

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy and procedures for the protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). This directive does not cancel another directive. Chg 1 dated 4-24-92.

  6. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline GG-5, is a record of decisions made by the Director, OC, as to what general subject areas are UCNI. Note: GG-5 may only be used by the Director, OC, to make determinations as to whether information is UCNI. All other UCNI Reviewing Officials must use UCNI guidance. UCNI General Guideline (80.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Briefing, For Persons With

  7. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Welcome to the Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) webpage. This page is designed to provide information, answer questions, and provide a point of contact for UCNI inquiries. UCNI is certain unclassified information about nuclear facilities and nuclear weapons that must be controlled because its unauthorized release could have a significant adverse effect on the national security

  8. Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.1A, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Change 1, dated 10/23/01, was added to the Manual to clarify when and how encryption requirements for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information may be waived. Canceled by DOE O 471.1B.

  9. Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-03-01

    The Order provides requirements and responsibilities for identifying and protecting the unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Supersedes DOE O 471.1A and DOE M 471.1-1.

  10. Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    The Order provides requirements and responsibilities for identifying and protecting the unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05. Cancels DOE O 471.1. Canceled by DOE O 471.1B dated 3-1-10.

  11. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email: ...

  12. UNCLASSIFIED

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 10 CFR 810 January 13, 2013 UNCLASSIFIED 2 Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for part 810 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) on September 7, 2011. This regulation governs the process of export control review and approval for nuclear technology exports from the United States. After careful consideration of all public comments

  13. Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 Controlled Unclassified Information and E.O. 13556 When you hear the term Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI), it could mean one of two things. Currently, within DOE "Controlled Unclassified Information " or CUI is an overarching term used to refer to unclassified information that is identified and marked as sensitive (e.g., OUO and Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI)). Controlled Unclassified Information is also

  14. 10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Information | Department of Energy Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Establishes the Government-wide policies and procedures for implementing the requirements of section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 concerning identifying and

  15. Implementation of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information guidelines for fixed-site safeguards and security (FSSS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, P.L.

    1995-02-01

    Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) is one type of sensitive information that DOE employees, including computer users, must now identify and protect. Guidelines to identify information as UCNI are gradually being put in place. The publication of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Topical Guideline for Fixed-Site Safeguards and Security, TG-FSSS-1, is a major step in the development of UCNI guidelines. This DOE published guide cuts across and addresses many different programmatic areas including automated data processing. Our local guideline, Los Alamos National Laboratory Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Guideline for Fixed-Site Safeguards and Security, IG-LAFSSS-1, is based on TG-FSSS-1. In this paper, I plan to discuss the background of UCNI, the definition of UCNI, information that qualifies as UCNI, the consequences of information being UCNI, the development of UCNI guidelines, TG-FSSS-1 and IG-LAFSSS-1, the relationship of UCNI to classification, and the implementation of the IG-LAFSSS-1 at Los Alamos.

  16. Chapter 13 Controlled Unclassified Information 01-16-2015 YPM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-1 Chapter 13 Controlled Unclassified Information This chapter describes the security procedures adopted by DOE HQ to implement the requirements of the following DOE regulations and directives: 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE Order 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE Order 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information DOE Manual 471.3-1, Manual for

  17. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Return Via Mail To: U.S Department Of Energy ATTN: NMMSS Staff NA-73, GTN 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1290 Return Via Fax To: 301-903-1998 Return Via E-Mail To: NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov

  18. MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration | Department of Energy MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration (378.48 KB) More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant

  19. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 13, Controlled Unclassified Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 13, Controlled Unclassified Information Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for protecting Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).

  20. Extension of DOE O 471.1, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-02

    Extends DOE O 471.1 until 9-25-00. The planned revisions for the Order include abolishing the preliminary review determination by a Reviewing Official and the "May contain UCNI" stamp. Additionally, a "Controlled by Originator" caveat is being added to the UCNI marking when programmatic requirements place special dissemination or reproduction limitations on the matter containing UCNI.

  1. Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho National Laboratory, IG-0755 | Department of Energy Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at the Idaho National Laboratory, IG-0755 Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at the Idaho National Laboratory, IG-0755 I11 suppoi-t of its mission, the Department of Energy spends over $2 billioil each year on infonnation teclulology and has a current inventory of approxiinately 800 info~mations ystems, including up to 11 5,000

  2. UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: ...

  3. UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: Project Title: Associated Materials: Programmatic RIS Previous Project Number(s) Status Code Allotment Code (S=Supplier, U=User) I authorize that the information listed above is for the NMMSS Program to use as part of the project number conversion process for this facility. Signature of Authorized Official Date

  4. Security Controls for Unclassified Information Systems Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-05

    The Manual establishes minimum implementation standards for cyber security technical, management, and operational controls that will be followed in all information systems operated by DOE and the information systems. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B

  5. Security Controls for Unclassified Information Systems Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-05

    The Manual establishes minimum implementation standards for cyber security technical, management, and operational controls that will be followed in all information systems operated by DOE and the information systems. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  6. Security Controls for Unclassified Information Systems Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-05

    The Manual establishes minimum implementation standards for cyber security technical, management, and operational controls that will be followed in all information systems operated by DOE and the information systems. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  7. Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    The Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement the Order. Extended by DOE N 251.58, dated 07/06/2004, until 06/30/2005. Canceled by: DOE O 471.B. Does not cancel other directives.

  8. NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Updates Export Control Regulation February 24, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on March 25, 2015. Part 810 enables civil nuclear trade by ensuring that nuclear technology and assistance exported from the

  9. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    which "international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and...

  10. Controlled Unclassified Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 13-2 Transmission UCNI: A document containing UCNI may be transmitted by (1) U.S. First Class, Express, Certified, or Registered mail; (2) any other means approved for ...

  11. Nuclear Controls Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Controls Yes No 1) Is your Facility involved in the research on or development, design, manufacture, construction, testing or maintenance of any nuclear explosive ...

  12. Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-14

    International cooperation and collaboration is an important element in the effective planning and implementation of many Department of Energy (DOE) programs. DOE and its international partners benefit from the exchange of information that results from a managed process of unclassified visits and assignments by foreign nationals. These visits and assignments must be conducted in a manner consistent with U.S. and DOE national security policies, requirements, and objectives including export control laws and regulations. Canceled by DOE O 142.3. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Controls Challenge: Detect/deter illicit transfers of nuclear/dual-use materials, technology, and commodities. Solution: Build domestic and international capacity to implement and meet export control obligations. Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation Policy Nonproliferation and Arms Control NIS

  14. Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-18

    To define a program for unclassified foreign national access to Department of Energy sites, information, and technologies. This Order cancels DOE P 142.1, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments, dated 7-14-99; DOE N 142.1, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments, dated 7-14-99; Secretarial Memorandum Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments, dated 7-14-99; Memorandum from Francis S. Blake, Departmental Use of Foreign Access Central Tracking System, dated 11-05-01; Memorandum from Kyle E. McSlarrow, Interim Guidance for Implementation of the Department's Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program, dated 12-17-02; and Secretarial Memorandum, Policy Exclusion for Unclassified Foreign National's Access to Department of Energy Facilities in Urgent or Emergency Medical Situations, dated 4-10-01. Cancels: DOE P 142.1 and DOE N 142.1

  15. Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-14

    To provide interim Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities for unclassified visits and assignment by foreign nationals to DOE facilities for unclassified activities. This Notice supplements DOE P 142.1 dated 7-14-99, which sets overall Departmental policy on unclassified foreign visits and assignments. It is a complement to existing counterintelligence and security orders and policies. DOE N 251.53, dated 05/14/03, extends this directive until canceled. Cancels: DOE 1240.2B

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  17. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ...

  18. Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Visitors who are foreign nationals must complete and submit the Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire 30 days before accessing facilities. Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire (192.5 KB) More Documents & Publications HQ FNVA

  19. nuclear controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    controls Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  20. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  1. Onsite Non-LANL-Owned but Government-Owned Unclassified Automated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This unclassified controlled article may not be taken into a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) or an area where Top Secret or Special Access Program (SAP) ...

  2. PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General...

  3. PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support ...

  4. Nuclear reactor control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, William E.; Warnick, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  5. Nuclear Controls Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Checklist (Required only for Foreign (non-U.S.) Companies) Facility* Name: Description of activity**: *Facility means the entire organization, not just the department you work in. **Please describe the activity that the Los Alamos National Laboratory/Los Alamos National Security information/software/equipment/material/research will be used for. Nuclear Controls □Yes □No 1) Is your Facility involved in the research on or development, design, manufacture, construction, testing or

  6. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, D.F.; Motta, E.E.

    1961-06-27

    A method for controlling the excess reactivity in a nuclear reactor throughout the core life while maintaining the neutron flux distribution at the desired level is described. The control unit embodies a container having two electrodes of different surface area immersed in an electrolytic solution of a good neutron sbsorbing metal ion such as boron, gadolinium, or cadmium. Initially, the neutron absorber is plated on the larger electrode to control the greater neutron flux of a freshly refueled core. As the fuel burns up, the excess reactivity decreases and the neutron absorber is then plated onto the smaller electrode so that the number of neutrons absorbed also decreases. The excess reactivity in the core may thus be maintained without the introduction of serious perturbations in the neutron flux distributibn.

  8. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Evanston, Illinois From Condensed Matter Physics to Next Generation Quantum Devices Wednesday, December 9, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMSMPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg...

  9. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Stuart Brown Experimental Condensed Matter University of California, Los Angeles Charge Fluctuations and Superconductivity in Organic Conductors: the case of...

  10. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They are of interest in different fields such as the physics of 3He, quantum Hall physics, unconventional superconductivity and topological quantum computing. In the first part of ...

  11. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markus Garst University of Cologne Kln, Germany Exciting Skyrmions and Helices in Chiral ... Lett.) Bio: Markus received his PhD in physics from the University of Karlsruhe (Germany) ...

  12. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prof. James Avery Sauls Department of Physics & Astronomy Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois From Condensed Matter Physics to Next Generation Quantum Devices Wednesday, December 9, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Topic: In this Colloquium Professor Sauls will present his views on phases of matter under extreme conditions being explored by condensed matter physicists, materials scientists, engineers and chemists that hold promise for next generation

  13. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Open to the Public Dr. Sergej Moroz University of Colorado Condensed Matter Theory Group Effective Theory of Chiral Superfluids and Superconductors Thursday, March 24, 2016 9am to 1pm: Seminar 9 - 10 & open discussion until 1pm Hot Rocks Conference Room (TA03-4200 Room 203-A) Abstract: Two-dimensional fermionic chiral superfluidity and superconductivity is an active area of experimental and theoretical research in condensed matter physics. They are of interest in different fields such as

  14. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Stuart Brown Experimental Condensed Matter University of California, Los Angeles Charge Fluctuations and Superconductivity in Organic Conductors: the case of ''-(ET) 2 SF 5 CH 2 CF 2 SO 3 Wednesday, October 21, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: Superconductivity in most organic charge transfer salts is considered magnetically mediated, in part because of the proximity of the superconductivity to antiferromagnetic ground states as well as

  15. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen R. Guimond, Ph.D. University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center The Impacts of Numerical Schemes on Asymmetric Hurricane Intensification Thursday, June 9, 2016 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Research Park, 203A Conference Room (TA-03, Bldg. 4200) Abstract: The fundamental pathways for tropical cyclone (TC) intensification are explored by considering axisymmetric and asymmetric impulsive thermal perturbations to balanced, TC-like vortices using the dynamic cores of three different nonlinear

  16. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian Aukema University of Minnesota Tamarack in Trouble? Climate change and altered population dynamics of eastern larch beetle in North America Wednesday, July 13, 2016 11:00 AM TA-51 Conference Room (TA-51, Building 25, Room 102) Abstract. Eastern larch or tamarack Larix laricina is an important lowland conifer of northern boreal and peat ecosystems found from Alaska to the Canadian maritimes. Its primary bark beetle, the eastern larch beetle Dendroctonus simplex, has been documented by

  17. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sebastien Bourdarie ONERA,The French Aerospace Lab AP8-AP9 Engineering Model Validation Wednesday, July 20, 2016 10:00 AM Moon Room (TA-03, 40/N125) Abstract. In-flight feedback data are collected such as displacement damage doses, ionizing doses on board various space vehicles and are compared to predictions performed with (1) proton measurements performed with spectrometers data on board the same spacecraft if any and (2) protons spectrum predicted by the legacy AP8min model and the AP9 mean

  18. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven W. Clarke Director of the Heliophysics Division Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters Heliophysics Research: The NASA Headquarters Perspective Thursday, August 18, 2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Physics Auditorium TA-03, Bldg 215 Rescheduled from July Abstract. NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data,

  19. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Institute for Materials Prof. Gabriel Aeppli Head of the Synchrotron and Nanotechnology Department Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland Are all interesting oxides inhomogeneous? Wednesday, August 19, 2015 3:00 to 4:00pm IMS/MPA Conference Room (TA-03, Building. 32, Room 134) Abstract: Defects are responsible for the interesting and useful properties of conventional semiconductors, and we show here that defects and inhomogeneities play a similarly important role for transition metal oxides.

  20. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IMS Dr. Markus Garst University of Cologne Köln, Germany Exciting Skyrmions and Helices in Chiral Magnets Wednesday, August 26, 2015 3:00 - 4:00 pm IMS/MPA Conference Room (TA3-0032-134) Abstract: Chiral magnets like MnSi, Fe1-xCoxSi, or Cu2OSeO3 gain Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbit energy by twisting the magnetization on a long length scale giving rise to spatially modulated magnetic textures like helices and skyrmion crystals. The spin-wave excitations exhibit Bragg scattering of these

  1. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1.5453, 1.2851 1.0688 0.0000 0.1475 0.5423 0.9778 1.4176 1.8245 2.2026 2.5237 2.8012 3.0266 3.2107 3.3516 3.4582 3.5312 3.5775 3.5986 3.5997 3.5826 3.5511 3.5068 3.4527 3.3898 ...

  2. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven W. Clarke Director of the Heliophysics Division Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters Heliophysics Research: The NASA Headquarters Perspective Thursday, August 18, ...

  3. UNCLASSIFIED

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    represent a significant possible risk of technology transfer and eventual proliferation. ... represent a significant possible risk of technology transfer and eventual proliferation. ...

  4. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Institute for Materials Prof. Gabriel Aeppli Head of the Synchrotron and Nanotechnology Department Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland Are all interesting oxides...

  5. nuclear technology | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technology NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on

  6. SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED , ?4~0180N SctuAnr P. 0. 00x *a STATION F New YORK, N. Y. IN RLPLY RCFSRTO EID?f A- 43 MS ~-7405 eng-8 ". Subject: Contract No.H-7405 eng-8 with Metal Hydrides Incorporated. MEMORAhDUM to the Files. 1. Reference is made to basi.c communication dated 27 September 1945, Symbol No. EIDM 1%-30-b, requesting certain information with respect to the subject contract. 2. Reference pars,?-raph a. The Government committed to restore Contractor's plant

  7. Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-10-14

    The order defines a program for unclassified foreign national access to DOE sites, information, technologies, and equipment. Supersedes DOE O 142.3.

  8. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security, Safety, Weapon...

  9. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    The Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and for DOE owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Chg 4 (PgChg) supersedes AdminChg 3, dated 5-15-15.

  10. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    The Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and for DOE owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Admin Chg 3, dated 5-15-15 supersedes Admin Chg 2.

  11. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

  12. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Chg 1, dated 8-14-06. Canceled by DOE O 474.2.

  13. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Cancels: DOE M 474.1-1B DOE M 474.1-2A

  14. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Nonproliferation Nonproliferation and Arms Control The mission of the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and enable verifiable nuclear reductions. NPAC provides a comprehensive approach to strengthen nonproliferation and arms control regimes, achieving its mission through four subprograms: International Nuclear Safeguards Nuclear Controls Nuclear Verification Nonproliferation Policy Learn More

  15. Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-18

    The order defines a program for unclassified foreign national access to Department of Energy sites, information, and technologies. The page change streamlines the HQs Management Panel review process to include reviews by HSS, IN, and a representative of the cognizant under secretary for access requests involving foreign nationals. Cancels Secretarial Memorandum, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments, dated 7-14-99; Memorandum from Francis S. Blake, Departmental Use of Foreign Access Central Tracking System, dated 11-05-01; Memorandum from Kyle E. McSlarrow, Interim Guidance for Implementation of the Department's Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program, dated 12-17-02; and Secretarial Memorandum, Policy Exclusion for Unclassified Foreign National's Access to Department of Energy Facilities in Urgent or Emergency Medical Situations, dated 4-10-01. Cancels: DOE P 142.1 and DOE N 142.1

  16. CFR | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CFR NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on

  17. Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-01

    Industry experts report that security challenges and threats are continually evolving as malicious activity has become more web-based and attackers are able to rapidly adapt their attack methods. In addition, the number of data breaches continues to rise. In an effort to mitigate and address threats and protect valuable information, the Department of Energy anticipated spending about $275 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 to implement cyber security measures necessary to protect its information technology resources. These systems and data are designed to support the Department's mission and business lines of energy security, nuclear security, scientific discovery and innovation, and environmental responsibility. The Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA) provides direction to agencies on the management and oversight of information security risks, including design and implementation of controls to protect Federal information and systems. As required by FISMA, the Office of Inspector General conducts an annual independent evaluation to determine whether the Department's unclassified cyber security program adequately protects its information systems and data. This memorandum and the attached report present the results of our evaluation for FY 2009. The Department continued to make incremental improvements in its unclassified cyber security program. Our evaluation disclosed that most sites had taken action to address weaknesses previously identified in our FY 2008 evaluation report. They improved certification and accreditation of systems; strengthened configuration management of networks and systems; performed independent assessments; and, developed and/or refined certain policies and procedures. In addition, the Department instituted a centralized incident response organization designed to eliminate duplicative efforts throughout the Department. As we have noted in previous reports, the Department continued to maintain strong network perimeter

  18. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-10-25

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

  19. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computingmore » Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)« less

  20. Material Protection, Control, & Accounting | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Nuclear and Radiological Material Security Material Protection, Control, & Accounting Material Protection, Control, & Accounting NNSA implements material...

  1. Control of Nuclear Weapon Data

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Supersedes DOE O 5610.2.

  2. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  3. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, Robert C.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  4. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  5. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and ...

  6. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6, Admin Chg 1, 8-26-05. Admin Chg 2, dated 11-19-12, cancels DOE M 474.2 Admin Chg 1. Admin Chg 3, dated 5-15-15, cancels Admin Chg 2.

  7. Federal Register | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Register NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on

  8. PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System (355.91 KB) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE

  9. Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |Welcome to U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management! We are looking forward to your visit or assignment with us. In order to comply with our security requirements and ensure that your time with the Department of Energy goes smoothly we need to obtain some information from you prior to your arrival. Please take a few minutes to provide the information requested below for each member of your party that is not a U.S.

  10. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-08-11

    DOE O 474.1 prescribes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Cancels DOE 5633.3B

  11. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-02-12

    The order prescribes DOE minimum requirements and procedures for control and accountability of nuclear materials at DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Cancels DOE O 5633.3. Canceled by DOE O 5633.3B.

  12. 10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policies and procedures for implementing the requirements of section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 concerning identifying and protecting certain unclassified but sensitive...

  13. The nuclear materials control technology briefing book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

  14. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20

    To prescribe Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, including those for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DOE N 251.60, dated 11-19-04, extends this directive until 11-19-05. Cancels DOE O 474.1.

  15. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-01-22

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A. Canceled by DOE O 452.4C.

  16. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-11-19

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  17. AEC and control of nuclear weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control of nuclear weapons The Atomic Energy Commission took control of the atomic energy project known originally as the Manhattan Project on January 1, 1947. This shift from the ...

  18. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1984-01-01

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  19. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... can be established for waste accounts, material under ... decay, fission transmutation, adjustments for ... inventory. 6.4.4.4 Nuclear material activities shall ...

  20. Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... can be established for waste accounts, material under ... decay, fission transmutation, adjustments for ... inventory. 6.4.4.4 Nuclear material activities shall ...

  1. SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of

  2. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-09-07

    To prescribe the Department of Energy (DOE) minimum requirements and procedures for control and accountability of nuclear materials at DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE O 5633.2A and DOE O 5633.3A. Canceled by DOE O 474.1

  3. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  4. INSPECTION REPORT Alleged Nuclear Material Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alleged Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Weaknesses at the Department of Energy's Portsmouth Project INS-O-15-04 May 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector...

  5. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  6. Controlled Nuclear Fusion (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Controlled Nuclear Fusion The objective of controlled nuclear fusion research is to develop a major economic source of energy that should be readily available to all ...

  7. Controlled Nuclear Fusion (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Controlled Nuclear Fusion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlled Nuclear Fusion You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech ...

  8. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  9. Global nuclear material flow/control model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

  10. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-28

    The order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1E to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts, deliberate unauthorized use, and denial of authorized use. Supersedes DOE O 452.4B, dated 1-22-10.

  11. Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taft, William Elwood

    1976-01-01

    A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

  12. Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2002, DOE/IG-0567 | Department of Energy Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOE/IG-0567 Evaluation Report on The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program 2002, DOE/IG-0567 As agencies strive to meet the President's goal of significantly increasing electronic government, the potential for disruption or damage to critical systems by malicious users continues to increase. In response to increasing threats to the Government's computer networks and

  13. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  14. Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent, Bruce C.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the “cosine correction” term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or “knot-point spline definition,” that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

  15. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  16. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    unclassified information and can be broadly categorized as Official Use Only, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and unclassified Naval Nuclear Propulsion Information. ...

  17. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  18. Console for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  19. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  20. Enforcement Letter, Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC - February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    involving the unclassified waste stream and discrepancies in the inventory of accountable nuclear material at DOE's Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ...

  1. Nuclear engine flow reactivity shim control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    A nuclear engine control system is provided which automatically compensates for reactor reactivity uncertainties at the start of life and reactivity losses due to core corrosion during the reactor life in gas-cooled reactors. The coolant gas flow is varied automatically by means of specially provided control apparatus so that the reactor control drums maintain a predetermined steady state position throughout the reactor life. This permits the reactor to be designed for a constant drum position and results in a desirable, relatively flat temperature profile across the core. (Official Gazette)

  2. Fission control system for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conley, G.H.; Estes, G.P.

    Control system for nuclear reactor comprises a first set of reactivity modifying rods fixed in a reactor core with their upper ends stepped in height across the core, and a second set of reactivity modifying rods movable vertically within the reactor core and having their lower ends stepped to correspond with the stepped arrangement of the first set of rods, pairs of the rods of the first and second sets being in coaxial alignment.

  3. Manual for Control And Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-08-11

    DOE M 474.1-1 prescribes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and procedures for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). This Manual supplements DOE O 474.1, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials.

  4. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as ...

  5. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roman, Walter G.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod.

  6. MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Administration (378.48 KB) More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Manchester Software 1099 Reporting

  7. MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Administration More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA,...

  8. Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached for your information is a March 9,201 0 Memorandum from the Deputy Secretary relaxing certain check and approval requirements relating to visits and assignments of foreign nationals to DOE facilities and National Laboratories, including National Nuclear Security Administration sites. This is part of an ongoing review of DOE Order 142.3. Please furnish a copy to affected contractors pending revision of the Order and its associated Contractor Requirements Document.

  9. Quality control and statistical process control for nuclear analytical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, R.; Sergent, F.; Clark, W.H.C.; Gleason, G.

    1993-12-31

    The same driving forces that are making businesses examine quality control of manufacturing processes are making laboratories reevaluate their quality control programs. Increased regulation (accountability), global competitiveness (profitability), and potential for litigation (defensibility) are the principal driving forces behind the development and implementation of QA/QC programs in the nuclear analytical laboratory. Both manufacturing and scientific quality control can use identical statistical methods, albeit with some differences in the treatment of the measured data. Today, the approaches to QC programs are quite different for most analytical laboratories as compared with manufacturing sciences. This is unfortunate because the statistical process control methods are directly applicable to measurement processes. It is shown that statistical process control methods can provide many benefits for laboratory QC data treatment.

  10. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bilibin, Konstantin

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  11. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  12. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  13. MEANS FOR CONTROLLING A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, V.C.; Overbeck, W.P.; Slotin, L.; Froman, D.K.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type using a solid neutron absorbing material as a means for controlling the reproduction ratio of the system and thereby the power output. Elongated rods of neutron absorbing material, such as boron steel for example, are adapted to be inserted and removed from the core of tae reactor by electronic motors and suitable drive means. The motors and drive means are controlled by means responsive to the neutron density, such as ionization chambers. The control system is designed to be responsive also to the rate of change in neutron density to automatically maintain the total power output at a substantially constant predetermined value. A safety rod means responsive to neutron density is also provided for keeping the power output below a predetermined maximum value at all times.

  14. Evaluation Report The Department of Energy's Unclassified

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... to general information technology controls increased. ... authentication for remote access and use of default ... management of desktop computers and network systems. ...

  15. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  16. Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17

    This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

  17. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The consortium of 13 universities and 8 national laboratories is dedicated to the research and development (R&D) of nuclear arms ...

  18. 1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (03-98) (Exception to SF 14, Approved by NARS, June 1978) 1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY 4. PRECEDENCE DESIGNATION ("X" appropriate box): 6. FROM 9. TO COMMUNICATION CENTER ROUTING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TELECOMMUNICATION MESSAGE (See reverse side for Instructions) 5. TYPE OF MESSAGE FOR COMMUNICATION CENTER USE MESSAGE IDENTIFICATION NR: DTG: Z YES 2. MESSAGE CONTAINS WEAPON DATA? ("X" appropriate box. Message Center will not

  19. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials: Responsibilities and Authorities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-23

    The order prescribes the Department of Energy (DOE) policies, responsibilities, and authorities for control and accountability of nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5633.2.

  20. Audit of Internal Controls Over Special Nuclear Materials, IG...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0388 "Audit of Internal Controls Over Special Nuclear Materials" This report is not available electronically. However, copies may be obtained by calling the Office of Inspector...

  1. AUDIT REPORT Cybersecurity Controls Over a Major National Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report: "Cybersecurity Controls Over a Major National Nuclear Security Administration Information System"...

  2. Chapter 13 Controlled Unclassified Information 01-16-2015 YPM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... If encryption is not available and transmission by mail is not a feasible alternative, the document should be sent password protected, and the password communicated by separate ...

  3. Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of approxiinately 800 infomations ystems, including up to 11 5,000 personal computers, many powerful supercomputers, numerous servers, and a broad array of related...

  4. Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    with measurable performance; and Provides a basis for designing MC&A Programs in the context of the nuclear material inventory holdings, operations, and missions at the site. ...

  5. Manual for Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-06-13

    The manual prescribes requirements and assign responsibilities for nuclear material control and accountability. Cancels DOE M 474.1-1A. Canceled by DOE M 470.4-6.

  6. Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials Responsibilities and Authorities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-01-29

    The order prescribe the Department of Energy (DOE) policies, responsibilities, and authorities for control and accountability of nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5630.1. Canceled by DOE O 5633.2A.

  7. Manual for Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-22

    The manual prescribes requirements and procedures for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). Cancels DOE M 474.1-1. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-1B.

  8. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A ...

  9. Classified Matter Protection and Control

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-26

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.2, which establishes policy for the protection and control of classified and unclassified information. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. Materials Control and Accountability Program Manager | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Materials Control and Accountability Program Manager Amy Whitworth Amy Whitworth July 2009 Fellow by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management NNSA Materials Control and Accountability Program Manager Amy Whitworth was awarded the prestigious title of Fellow by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management during its recent annual meeting in Tucson, Ariz. Fellows must be nominated by their peers, recommended by the INMM Fellows Committee and approved by

  11. Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nonproliferation and Arms Control NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting 35 representatives from 30 countries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from April 26 to May 8, 2015 for the 20th International Training Course

  12. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  13. CONTROL MEANS FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teitel, R.J.

    1961-09-01

    A control means is described for a reactor which employs a liquid fuel consisting of a fissile isotope in a liquid bismuth solvent. The liquid fuel is contained in a plurality of tubular vessels. Control is effected by inserting plungers in the vessels to displace the liquid fuel and provide a critical or non- critical fuel configuration as desired.

  14. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1991-01-01

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  15. Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

  16. CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-12-30

    BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

  17. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.

  18. Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, J.P.

    1993-03-30

    Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

  19. Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

  20. SPRING DRIVEN ACTUATING MECHANISM FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevilacqua, F.; Uecker, D.F.; Groh, E.F.

    1962-01-23

    l962. rod in a nuclear reactor to shut it down. The control rod or an extension thereof is wound on a drum as it is withdrawn from the reactor. When an emergency occurs requiring the reactor to be shut down, the drum is released so as to be free to rotate, and the tendency of the control rod or its extension coiled on the drum to straighten itself is used for quickly returning the control rod to the reactor. (AEC)

  1. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  2. LA-UR-14-26016 LA-UR-14-26016 Unclassified Heidi Sandoval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6016 LA-UR-14-26016 Unclassified Heidi Sandoval California State University Matthew Dwyer Lynchburg College Anthony Pearson St. Cloud State University The Effects of SSD Caching on...

  3. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program … 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Report The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2013 OAS-M-14-01 October 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 23, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program -

  4. Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory INS-O-13-05 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 16, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory" BACKGROUND In support

  5. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclearmore » technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.« less

  6. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  7. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T; Campbell, Billy J; Hammond, Glenn A; Meppen, Bruce W; Brown, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the

  8. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  10. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Milton H.; Collins, Jack L.; Shell, Sam E.

    1985-01-01

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  11. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, M.H.; Collins, J.L.; Shell, S.E.

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  12. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  13. CIA sheds new light on nuclear control in CIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood, D.

    1993-03-01

    In a wide-ranging presentation to the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee February 24, 1993, newly installed CIA director James Woolsey and one of his senior aides provided a great deal of new information on nuclear weapons issues and how they are controlled in the former USSR. The main topics covered in the briefing are briefly discussed.

  14. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  15. Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  16. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    visible to x-ray (laser) fields | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Thomas Pfeifer, MPIK Heidelberg Program Description Electrons bound in atoms and small molecules represent some of the most fundamental quantum systems. These systems are so well known and reliable that they serve as optical

  17. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos April 7, 2014 Laboratory can help groom next generation of arms- control-technology experts LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 7, 2014-A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes Los Alamos National Laboratory as a partner has been awarded a $25 million grant by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The consortium of 13 universities and 8 national laboratories is dedicated to the research and development (R&D) of

  18. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 13, Controlled...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3, Controlled Unclassified Information CUI consists of information that is not classified, but it is so sensitive that it requires special handling and protection. CUI includes ...

  19. Safeguards & Security | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    in Technical Qualification Program. This includes derivative classifiers, inquiry officials, Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information reviewer certifications, ...

  20. Briefing, Reviewing Official's UCNI Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Briefing provides information on Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Reviewing Official's Training.

  1. An Approach to Autonomous Control for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Upadhyaya, Belle R.

    2011-01-01

    Under Project Prometheus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated deep space missions that would utilize space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. The initial study involved the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), which was proposed to conduct in-depth studies of three Jovian moons. Current radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and solar power systems cannot meet expected mission power demands, which include propulsion, scientific instrument packages, and communications. Historically, RTGs have provided long-lived, highly reliable, low-power-level systems. Solar power systems can provide much greater levels of power, but power density levels decrease dramatically at {approx} 1.5 astronomical units (AU) and beyond. Alternatively, an SNPS can supply high-sustained power for space applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of an SNPS must be able to provide continuous operatio for the mission duration with limited immediate human interaction and no opportunity for hardware maintenance or sensor calibration. In effect, the SNPS control system must be able to independently operate the power plant while maintaining power production even when subject to off-normal events and component failure. This capability is critical because it will not be possible to rely upon continuous, immediate human interaction for control due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion. In addition, uncertainties, rare events, and component degradation combine with the aforementioned inaccessibility and unattended operation to pose unique challenges that an SNPS control system must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design.

  2. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (NMC&A) for the Savannah...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Material Control and Accountability (NMC&A) for the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (NMC&A) for the Savannah River Site Tritium...

  3. Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  4. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. R. Soelberg; J. D. Law; T. G. Garn; M. Greenhalgh; R. T. Jubin; P. Thallapally; D. M. Strachan

    2013-08-01

    The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ) and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs), have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRC Nuclear Export Controls Implementing...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Legal Basis * Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended * Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 * Treaties, Conventions and Agreements including: - Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty - ...

  6. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Boring

    2011-09-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  7. State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting 35 representatives from 30 countries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from April 26 to May 8, 2015 for the 20th International Training Course

  8. DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  9. Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

    2013-07-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

  10. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  11. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  12. Controlling WMD Materials and Expertise | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  13. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012, OAS-L-13-01

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 OAS-L-13-01 November 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 7, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012" BACKGROUND The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) is an independent

  14. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Garn, Troy; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Law, Jack; Jubin, Robert T.; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2013-07-22

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing. These can evolve in volatile species in the reprocessing facility off-gas streams, depending on the separations and reprocessing technologies that are used. Radionuclides that have been identified as “volatile radionuclides” are noble gases (most notably isotopes of Kr and Xe); 3H; 14C; and 129I. Radionuclides that tend to form volatile species that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas systems are more challenging to efficiently control compared to radionuclides that tend to stay in solid or liquid phases. Future used fuel reprocessing facilities in the United States can require efficient capture of some volatile radionuclides in their off-gas streams to meet regulatory emission requirements. In aqueous reprocessing, these radionuclides are most commonly expected to evolve into off-gas streams in tritiated water [3H2O (T2O) and 3HHO (THO)], radioactive CO2, noble gases, and gaseous HI, I2, or volatile organic iodides. The fate and speciation of these radionuclides from a non-aqueous fuel reprocessing facility is less well known at this time, but active investigations are in progress. An Off-Gas Sigma Team was formed in late FY 2009 to integrate and coordinate the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities directed towards the capture and sequestration of the these volatile radionuclides (Jubin 2012a). The Sigma Team concept was envisioned to bring together multidisciplinary teams from across the DOE complex that would work collaboratively to solve the technical challenges and to develop the scientific basis for the capture and immobilization technologies such that the sum of the efforts was greater than the individual parts. The Laboratories currently participating in this effort are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific

  15. Arms control during the pre-nuclear era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper analyzes the first extended effort to limit arms in the history of the United States. The author adopts a broad international approach in its examination of the naval arms limitation process that culminated with treaties intended to end the naval competition between the United States, Great Britain, and Japan--the Washington treaties of 1922, the London Treaty of 1930, and the London Treaty of 1936. The author focuses on the following questions in presenting the history and analysis of these treaties: what motivated the U.S. to pursue naval limitation; what did American decisionmakers hope and expect the treaties to achieve; what was the impact of domestic politics on the negotiations and their outcomes; how did negotiators address the problem of verification; and what was the impact of the treaties on naval doctrine and deployment The author has based this study on the premise that a systematic study of prenuclear ideas and events can improve our understanding of the relationship between arms limitation and national security. The author draws comparisons and contrasts between arms limitation during the interwar years and arms control in the nuclear age, offering specific, direct, and compelling considerations of the relevance of the interwar experience to contemporary arms negotiations.

  16. Command and control in new nuclear states: Implications for stability. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Command and control systems of new nuclear states are likely to fail when placed under stress. This thesis will demonstrate that such failures can dramatically affect regional or international stability. Describing the current argument over the consequences of nuclear proliferation between proliferation pessimists and deterrence optimists, this thesis shows how C2 is in fact the crux of the debate. This thesis develops an analytical tool that may be applied to new nuclear states in order to classify their C2 systems and to predict when and how these evolving systems might fail. To show the tool's usefulness, it is applied to Ukraine, an important new nuclear state. This thesis also suggests several implications for U.S. foreign policy. Nuclear weapons, Command and control, Proliferation, Arms control, Regional stability, Russia, United States, Ukraine, Nuclear capabilities, U.S. Security policy.

  17. Unclassified Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNIVERSITY :OF CALIFORNU Radiation Lab oratory Contract No, W-7405-eng-48 THE DETECTION OF U T I F I C I B L L Y PRODUCED WOTOMESONS WITH COUNTERS * I - - J . Steinberger a...

  18. Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-08-01

    The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

  19. NETL F 142.1-1A, Request for Unclassified Foreign National Access (Short Form)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    142.1-1A Revised: 10/27/2014 Reviewed: 10/27/2014 (Previous Editions Obsolete) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR UNCLASSIFIED FOREIGN NATIONAL ACCESS (SHORT FORM) COVER SHEET FOR NETL FORM 142.1-1A Privacy Act Notice Authority: Collection of the information is authorized pursuant to Section 145 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (Public Law 83-703, 42 U.S.C. 2165); and The Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Public Law 93-579, 5 U.S.C. § 552a). Purpose: The primary purpose of the

  20. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene

    2005-09-01

    Frenchman Flat is one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) used for underground nuclear testing (Figure 1-1). These nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the underground test areas. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is currently conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) of the Frenchman Flat underground test areas. Since 1996, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has regulated NNSA/NSO corrective actions through the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' ([FFACO], 1996). Appendix VI of the FFACO agreement, ''Corrective Action Strategy'', was revised on December 7, 2000, and describes the processes that will be used to complete corrective actions, including those in the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. The individual locations covered by the agreement are known as corrective action sites (CASs), which are grouped into corrective action units (CAUs). The UGTA CASs are grouped geographically into five CAUs: Frenchman Flat, Central Pahute Mesa, Western Pahute Mesa, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, and Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (Figure 1-1). These CAUs have distinctly different contaminant source, geologic, and hydrogeologic characteristics related to their location (FFACO, 1996). The Frenchman Flat CAU consists of 10 CASs located in the northern part of Area 5 and the southern part of Area 11 (Figure 1-1). This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Frenchman Flat, CAU 98. The methodology used to estimate hydrologic source terms (HSTs) for the Frenchman Flat CAU is also documented. The HST of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total inventory of radionuclides that is released over time into the groundwater following the test. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or

  1. New - DOE O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1E to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts, deliberate unauthorized use, and denial of authorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4B, dated 1-22-10.

  2. Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Laura S.

    2011-05-25

    To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

  3. Lessons from UNSCOM/IAEA applicable to nuclear arms control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorn, D.W.

    1995-12-05

    In early 1991, the Security Council of the United Nations tasked the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, with the assistance and cooperation of the United Nations Special Commission, to oversee the destruction, removal or rendering harmless of nuclear weapons material and capabilities in Iraq. The conduct of the nuclear inspections, and the subsequent activities (identification, destruction, removal rendering harmless), have provided a wealth of experience and insight into the inspection and monitoring process as well as into the political realities of such an operation. The early inspections were conducted in an atmosphere of discovery and inexperience on both the part of the Iraqis and the IAEA and UNSCOM. As time went on, the Iraqis became more adept at hiding and obscuring relevant documents and equipment, and the inspection teams became more knowledgeable about inspection and investigative techniques, and the pre-existing Iraqi programs. A continuous monitoring presence in Iraq has now been established and an import/export monitoring regime is being developed. While steps taken to date have proven effective in inhibiting resumption of nuclear weaponization activities, it remains to be seen how effective these measures will be in the future. The external and internal conditions which led the Iraqi leadership to undertake a nuclear weaponization program have not changed, and the prognosis for the long term is uncertain. The entire process in Iraq has shown how fragile are the tools available to the international community, and how a determined proliferator can evade inspection and monitoring measures. Such measures cannot prevent nuclear proliferation, they can only hope to deter it, or, failing in that, detect it.

  4. ACCELERATED TESTING OF NEUTRON-ABSORBING ALLOYS FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald E. Mizia

    2011-10-01

    The US Department of Energy requires nuclear criticality control materials be used for storage of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel used in government programs and the storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel at the proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Geological Repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Two different metallic alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd and borated stainless steel) have been chosen for this service. An accelerated corrosion test program to validate these materials for this application is described and a performance comparison is made.

  5. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  6. NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Updates Export Control Regulation February 24, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National ... society, NNSA has made Part 810 into a regulation that both meets the requirement to ...

  7. Multi-Canister overpack pressurization monitoring and control methodology for the spent nuclear fuel project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajunen, A.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-19

    A control methodology is developed and monitoring alternatives evaluated for controlling pressurization in a Multi- Canister Overpack for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Monitoring alternative evaluations include concept description, identification of uncertainties, and identification of experimental work required for implementation. A monitoring alternative is recommended and implementation requirements, risks and start up testing associated with the recommendation are discussed.

  8. Near-term improvements for nuclear power plant control room annunciator systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.L.; Duvernoy, E.G.; Ames, K.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Eckenrode, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    This report sets forth a basic design philosophy with its associated functional criteria and design principles for present-day, hard-wired annunciator systems in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. It also presents a variety of annunciator design features that are either necessary for or useful to the implementation of the design philosophy. The information contained in this report is synthesized from an extensive literature review, from inspection and analysis of control room annunciator systems in the nuclear industry and in related industries, and from discussions with a variety of individuals who are knowledgeable about annunciator systems, nuclear plant control rooms, or both. This information should help licensees and license applicants in improving their hard-wired, control room annunciator systems as outlined by NUREG-0700.

  9. Foreign Ownership, Control or Influence (FOCI) | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Foreign Ownership, Control or Influence (FOCI) The FOCI program regulates NNSA determinations to the degree of which a company is under foreign ownership, control, or influence. In accordance with 48 CFR Chapter 9, DOE Acquisition Regulation (DEAR), NNSA must obtain information about a company's FOCI that is sufficient in making determinations regarding risk to the common defense and security of the United States. the Office of Personnel and Facility Clearances and

  10. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  11. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  12. Export Control Guide: Loose Parts Monitoring Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenberg, Donald W.

    2012-12-01

    This report describes a typical LPMS, emphasizing its application to the RCS of a modern NPP. The report also examines the versatility of AE monitoring technology by describing several nuclear applications other than loose parts monitoring, as well as some non-nuclear applications. In addition, LPMS implementation requirements are outlined, and LPMS suppliers are identified. Finally, U.S. export controls applicable to LPMSs are discussed.

  13. Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control project |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control project By John Greenwald April 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Gallery: Physicists Alexander Glaser, left, and Robert Goldston display the non-nuclear test object that will serve as a target in their research. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Physicists Alexander Glaser, left, and Robert Goldston

  14. Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control project |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control project By John Greenwald April 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicists Alexander Glaser, left, and Robert Goldston, display the non-nuclear test object that will serve as a target in their research. (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) Physicists Alexander Glaser, left, and Robert Goldston, display the non-nuclear test object that will serve as a target in

  15. Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi; Loebl, Andy; Mays, Gary T; Muhlheim, Michael David; Mullens, James Allen; Poore III, Willis P; Qualls, A L; Wilson, Thomas L; Waterman, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same

  16. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  17. Self-actuating and locking control for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Dong K. (Chatsworth, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A self-actuating, self-locking flow cutoff valve particularly suited for use in a nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes a plurality of fluid support neutron absorber elements to provide for the safe shutdown of the reactor. The valve comprises a substantially vertical elongated housing and an aperture plate located in the housing for the flow of fluid therethrough, a substantially vertical elongated nozzle member located in the housing and affixed to the housing with an opening in the bottom for receiving fluid and apertures adjacent a top end for discharging fluid. The nozzle further includes two sealing means, one located above and the other below the apertures. Also located in the housing and having walls surrounding the nozzle is a flow cutoff sleeve having a fluid opening adjacent an upper end of the sleeve, the sleeve being moveable between an upper open position wherein the nozzle apertures are substantially unobstructed and a closed position wherein the sleeve and nozzle sealing surfaces are mated such that the flow of fluid through the apertures is obstructed. It is a particular feature of the present invention that the valve further includes a means for utilizing any increase in fluid pressure to maintain the cutoff sleeve in a closed position. It is another feature of the invention that there is provided a means for automatically closing the valve whenever the flow of fluid drops below a predetermined level.

  18. nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesu.s-japan-exchange-best-practices-nuclear-emergency-respon...

  19. Briefing, For Persons With Access to UCNI- June 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Briefing provides information on Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) and for persons who have access to UCNI.

  20. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network (TRAIN) | Department of Energy Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) (3.3 MB) More Documents & Publications PIA - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business

  1. Proceedings of the second US Department of Energy environmental control symposium. Volume 2. Nuclear energy, conservation, and solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Second Environmental Control Symposium. Symposium presentations highlighted environmental control activities which span the entire DOE. Volume II contains papers relating to: environmental control aspects of nuclear energy use and development; nuclear waste management; renewable energy sources; transportation and building conservation (fuel economy, gasohol, building standards, and industry); and geothermal energy, power transmission, and energy storage. (DMC)

  2. Federal Automated Information System of Nuclear Material Control and Accounting: Uniform System of Reporting Documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitel, M V; Kasumova, L; Babcock, R A; Heinberg, C

    2003-06-12

    One of the fundamental regulations of the Russian State System for Nuclear Material Accounting and Control (SSAC), ''Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Rules,'' directed that a uniform report system be developed to support the operation of the SSAC. According to the ''Regulation on State Nuclear Material Control and Accounting,'' adopted by the Russian Federation Government, Minatom of Russia is response for the development and adoption of report forms, as well as the reporting procedure and schedule. The report forms are being developed in tandem with the creation of an automated national nuclear material control and accounting system, the Federal Information System (FIS). The forms are in different stages of development and implementation. The first report forms (the Summarized Inventory Listing (SIL), Summarized Inventory Change Report (SICR) and federal and agency registers of nuclear material) have already been created and implemented. The second set of reports (nuclear material movement reports and the special anomaly report) is currently in development. A third set of reports (reports on import/export operations, and foreign nuclear material temporarily located in the Russian Federation) is still in the conceptual stage. To facilitate the development of a unified document system, the FIS must establish a uniform philosophy for the reporting system and determine the requirements for each reporting level, adhering to the following principles: completeness--the unified report system provides the entire range of information that the FIS requires to perform SSAC tasks; requisite level of detail; hierarchical structure--each report is based on the information provided in a lower-level report and is the source of information for reports at the next highest level; consistency checking--reports can be checked against other reports. A similar philosophy should eliminate redundancy in the different reports, support a uniform approach to the contents of

  3. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  4. Hydraulic balancing of a control component within a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marinos, D.; Ripfel, H.C.F.

    1975-10-14

    A reactor control component includes an inner conduit, for instance containing neutron absorber elements, adapted for longitudinal movement within an outer guide duct. A transverse partition partially encloses one end of the conduit and meets a transverse wall within the guide duct when the conduit is fully inserted into the reactor core. A tube piece extends from the transverse partition and is coaxially aligned to be received within a tubular receptacle which extends from the transverse wall. The tube piece and receptacle cooperate in engagement to restrict the flow and pressure of coolant beneath the transverse partition and thereby minimize upward forces tending to expel the inner conduit.

  5. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  6. Nuclear export controls and the CTBT: Where we`ve been and challenges ahead -- Views of an engineer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundy, A.S.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses the following topics: the importance of export controls; the uniqueness of nuclear weapons and their export control requirements; ``dual-use`` controls; and recent developments in nonproliferation beyond export control. Also discussed are some non-obvious challenges which include computer modeling and visualization, and fissile material availability and instant nukes. The author concludes by asking the Nuclear Suppliers Group to consider whether there are ways to make its controls more effective.

  7. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  8. Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  9. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  10. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Martian

    2009-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone.

  11. A brief review of intermediate controlled nuclear syntheses (ICNS) without harmful radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanjewar, R. B.

    2015-03-10

    Hadronic mechanics gave birth to new magnecular fuels. The present day demand is of clean energy source that is cheap and abundant. Clean energy can be obtained by harnessing renewable energy sources like solar, wind etc. Nuclear energy conventionally produced by fission reactions emits hazardous radiation and radioactive waste. The requirements of clean and safe energy gets fulfilled by novel fuel that achieved by elevating the traditional quantum mechanics to hadronic mechanics and to hadronic chemistry. In the present paper, a comprehensive review on both the theoretical and experimental aspect of the Intermediate Controlled Nuclear Synthesis (ICNS) as developed by Italian American Scientist Professor R. M. Santilli.

  12. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  13. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  14. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  15. Fuzzy Logic Controller Architecture for Water Level Control in Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generator (SG) Using ANFIS Training Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vosoughi, Naser; Naseri, Zahra

    2002-07-01

    Since suitable control of water level can greatly enhance the operation of a power station, a Fuzzy logic controller architecture is applied to show desired control of the water level in a Nuclear steam generator. with regard to the physics of the system, it is shown that two inputs, a single output and the least number of rules (9 rules) are considered for a controller, and the ANFIS training method is employed to model functions in a controlled system. By using ANFIS training method, initial member functions will be trained and appropriate functions are generated to control water level inside the steam generators while using the stated rules. The proposed architecture can construct an input output mapping based on both human knowledge (in from of Fuzzy if then rules) and stipulated input output data. In this paper with a simple test it has been shown that the architecture fuzzy logic controller has a reasonable response to one step input at a constant power. Through computer simulation, it is found that Fuzzy logic controller is suitable, especially for the water level deviation and abrupt steam flow disturbances that are typical in the existing power plant. (authors)

  16. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    promoting international Safeguards by Design (SBD). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA ) has described the SBD concept as an approach in which "international...

  17. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-02-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative—intended to catalog final products—rather than formative—intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  18. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-07-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations.

  19. Production of an English/Russian glossary of terminology for nuclear materials control and accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schachowskoj, S.; Smith, H.A. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The program plans for Former Soviet Union National Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting (MC and A) Systems Enhancements call for the development of an English/Russian Glossary of MC and A terminology. This glossary was envisioned as an outgrowth of the many interactions, training sessions, and other talking and writing exercises that would transpire in the course of carrying out these programs. This report summarizes the status of the production of this glossary, the most recent copy of which is attached to this report. The glossary contains over 950 terms and acronyms associated with nuclear material control and accounting for safeguards and nonproliferation. This document is organized as follows: English/Russian glossary of terms and acronyms; Russian/English glossary of terms and acronyms; English/Russian glossary of acronyms; and Russian/English glossary of acronyms.

  20. Input visualization for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator: CYClus Input Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, R.; Schneider, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the methods used for the graphical user interface for the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator being developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Cyclus Input Control (CYCIC) is currently being designed with nuclear engineers in mind, but future updates to the program will be made to allow even non-technical users to quickly and efficiently simulate fuel cycles to answer the questions important to them. (authors)

  1. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  3. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRC Nuclear Export Controls Implementing the NSG Trigger List_Gary Langlie [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. NRC Nuclear Export Controls: Implementing the NSG Trigger List Gary R. Langlie Licensing Officer Office of International Programs May 11-14, 2015 NRC's Mission 2 License and regulate the Nation's civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, promote the common defense and security, and protect the environment. Legal Basis * Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended * Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 * Treaties,

  5. Memo for Sam Callahan- Recommendation for change to DOE O 474.2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tritium Focus Group (TFG) recommends that DOE Order 474.2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability, dated June 27, 2011, be revised to eliminate deuterium from Table B "Other Accountable Nuclear Materials" of Attachment-2 during the five year revision to the Order.

  6. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project document control and Records Management Program Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARTIN, B.M.

    2000-05-18

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project document control and records management program, as defined within this document, is based on a broad spectrum of regulatory requirements, Department of Energy (DOE) and Project Hanford and SNF Project-specific direction and guidance. The SNF Project Execution Plan, HNF-3552, requires the control of documents and management of records under the auspices of configuration control, conduct of operations, training, quality assurance, work control, records management, data management, engineering and design control, operational readiness review, and project management and turnover. Implementation of the controls, systems, and processes necessary to ensure compliance with applicable requirements is facilitated through plans, directives, and procedures within the Project Hanford Management System (PHMS) and the SNF Project internal technical and administrative procedures systems. The documents cited within this document are those which directly establish or define the SNF Project document control and records management program. There are many peripheral documents that establish requirements and provide direction pertinent to managing specific types of documents that, for the sake of brevity and clarity, are not cited within this document.

  8. EARLY-STAGE DESIGN AND EVALUATION FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Jeffrey C. Joe; Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger T. Lew

    2015-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate operator performance with these systems as part of a verification and validation process. While there is regulatory and industry guidance for some modernization activities, there are no well defined standard processes or predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages. This paper proposes a framework defining the design process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The process and metrics are generalizable to other applications and serve as a guiding template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  9. CONTROLLED DOCUMENT OFFICE OF PRIMARY INTEREST (OPI): AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: Office of Defense Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security http://nnsa.energy.gov Printed Copies are Uncontrolled SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 4-1-16 DEFENSE NUCLEAR SECURITY FEDERAL OVERSIGHT PROCESS NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Nuclear Security NNSA SD 470.4-1 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK NNSA SD 470.4-1 1 4-1-16 DEFENSE NUCLEAR SECURITY FEDERAL OVERSIGHT PROCESS 1. PURPOSE. This National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Supplemental Directive (SD) prescribes the Defense Nuclear Security

  10. Microsoft Word - NEGTN02-#188646-v22B-INVENTORY_PLAN_UNCLASSIFIED.DOC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United States Department of Energy Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan December 16, 2008 Office of Nuclear Energy 2008 Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................ES-1 Excess Uranium Inventories..........................................................................................1 Unallocated U.S. HEU.........................................................................................1 U.S.-Origin

  11. ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 474.2, NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE O 474.2 Chg 1 8-3-11 ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 474.2, NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY LOCATION OF CHANGES: Page Paragraph Changed To 11 6.b. DOE O 470.4A, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 5-25-07 DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 7-21-11 11 6.c. DOE M 470.4-1 Chg 2, Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management, dated 10-20-11 deleted 11 6.d. DOE M 470.4-2A, Physical Protection, dated 6-29-11 DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations,

  12. Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Programs The SFO Sandia Field Office's Programs office is responsible for oversight and contract administration activities in support of mission execution policy areas at Sandia National Laboratories. These programs Oversight responsibilities include: oversight in support of NNSA Nuclear Weapon Defense Programs (NA-10) at SNL; oversight and coordination of all classified and unclassified Inter-Agency Work packages; oversight and coordination of all Non-NNSA DOE programs; oversight and

  13. Cyber Securing Control Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Control Systems Integration into the DoD Networks A Briefing in Response to House Report 113-102, Accompanying the FY14 National Defense Authorization Act Unclassified - Distribution Statement A August, 2015 Cyber Securing Control Systems Acquisition, Technology and Logistics 2 DoD Scope of Platform IT & Control Systems * Acquisitions / Weapon Systems - H,M & E (ships / subs, missiles, UVs, etc.) - Training Simulators, 3D printing, etc. * EI&E - Buildings & linear

  14. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage

  15. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  16. Strategy for Migration of Traditional to Hybrid Control Boards in a Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Ulrich, Thomas Anthony

    2014-07-01

    This strategy document describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of new digital control room elements in a legacy analog main control room (MCR). Information from previous planning and analysis work serves as the foundation for creating a human-machine interface (HMI) specification for distributed control systems (DCSs) to be implemented as part of nuclear power plant (NPP) modernization. This document reviews ways to take the HMSI specification and use it when migrating legacy displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then an integrated system validation (ISV) in the full-scope control room training simulator. Following successful demonstration of operator performance using the systems during the ISV, the new DCS is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the MCR. This document concludes with a sample project plan, including a 15-month timeline from DCS design through implementation. Included is a discussion of how the U.S. Department of Energy’s Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) can be used to support design and V&V activities. This report completes a Level 4 (M4) milestone under the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program.

  17. Emergency Communications | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    communications network providing classified and unclassified voice, video, and data ... The Mobile ECN is capable of classified and unclassified data, voice, and video; wide-band ...

  18. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-09-16

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D&D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D&D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C.

  19. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  20. Investigation of criticality safety control infraction data at a nuclear facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Merhege, James F.; Costa, David A.; Art, Blair M.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2014-10-27

    Chemical and metallurgical operations involving plutonium and other nuclear materials account for most activities performed at the LANL's Plutonium Facility (PF-4). The presence of large quantities of fissile materials in numerous forms at PF-4 makes it necessary to maintain an active criticality safety program. The LANL Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Program provides guidance to enable efficient operations while ensuring prevention of criticality accidents in the handling, storing, processing and transportation of fissionable material at PF-4. In order to achieve and sustain lower criticality safety control infraction (CSCI) rates, PF-4 operations are continuously improved, through the use of Lean Manufacturing andmore » Six Sigma (LSS) business practices. Employing LSS, statistically significant variations (trends) can be identified in PF-4 CSCI reports. In this study, trends have been identified in the NCS Program using the NCS Database. An output metric has been developed that measures ADPSM Management progress toward meeting its NCS objectives and goals. Using a Pareto Chart, the primary CSCI attributes have been determined in order of those requiring the most management support. Data generated from analysis of CSCI data help identify and reduce number of corresponding attributes. In-field monitoring of CSCI's contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to improve criticality safety operation safety. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.« less

  1. Investigation of criticality safety control infraction data at a nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Merhege, James F.; Costa, David A.; Art, Blair M.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2014-10-27

    Chemical and metallurgical operations involving plutonium and other nuclear materials account for most activities performed at the LANL's Plutonium Facility (PF-4). The presence of large quantities of fissile materials in numerous forms at PF-4 makes it necessary to maintain an active criticality safety program. The LANL Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Program provides guidance to enable efficient operations while ensuring prevention of criticality accidents in the handling, storing, processing and transportation of fissionable material at PF-4. In order to achieve and sustain lower criticality safety control infraction (CSCI) rates, PF-4 operations are continuously improved, through the use of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma (LSS) business practices. Employing LSS, statistically significant variations (trends) can be identified in PF-4 CSCI reports. In this study, trends have been identified in the NCS Program using the NCS Database. An output metric has been developed that measures ADPSM Management progress toward meeting its NCS objectives and goals. Using a Pareto Chart, the primary CSCI attributes have been determined in order of those requiring the most management support. Data generated from analysis of CSCI data help identify and reduce number of corresponding attributes. In-field monitoring of CSCI's contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to improve criticality safety operation safety. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.

  2. REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

    2011-09-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

  3. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  4. The Programmable Logic Controller and its application in nuclear reactor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomar, J.; Wyman, R.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to guide reviewers in the application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCS) to the control, monitoring and protection of nuclear reactors. The first topics addressed are system-level design issues, specifically including safety. The document then discusses concerns about the PLC manufacturing organization and the protection system engineering organization. Supplementing this document are two appendices. Appendix A summarizes PLC characteristics. Specifically addressed are those characteristics that make the PLC more suitable for emergency shutdown systems than other electrical/electronic-based systems, as well as characteristics that improve reliability of a system. Also covered are PLC characteristics that may create an unsafe operating environment. Appendix B provides an overview of the use of programmable logic controllers in emergency shutdown systems. The intent is to familiarize the reader with the design, development, test, and maintenance phases of applying a PLC to an ESD system. Each phase is described in detail and information pertinent to the application of a PLC is pointed out.

  5. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; O`Hearn, E.

    1994-02-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  6. Using micro saint to predict performance in a nuclear power plant control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, M.T.; Laughery, K.R.; Persenky, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires a technical basis for regulatory actions. In the area of human factors, one possible technical basis is human performance modeling technology including task network modeling. This study assessed the feasibility and validity of task network modeling to predict the performance of control room crews. Task network models were built that matched the experimental conditions of a study on computerized procedures that was conducted at North Carolina State University. The data from the {open_quotes}paper procedures{close_quotes} conditions were used to calibrate the task network models. Then, the models were manipulated to reflect expected changes when computerized procedures were used. These models` predictions were then compared to the experimental data from the {open_quotes}computerized conditions{close_quotes} of the North Carolina State University study. Analyses indicated that the models predicted some subsets of the data well, but not all. Implications for the use of task network modeling are discussed.

  7. Model-reference adaptive control applied to load-following of a space-nuclear power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.; Parlos, A.G.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power systems are presently being investigated as an alternative for both commercial and military space power systems because of their projected longevity of 7 to 10 years, their mass advantage over other space power sources at powers above approximately 25 kW{sub e}, and their ability to operate without direct illumination from the sun. These space-nuclear power systems are being designed to supply from tens of kilowatts to multimegawatts of power for continuous operation of seven years and more. Space-nuclear power systems designs that meet these requirements will not be available for refueling or maintenance during their lifetime. To ensure that the space-nuclear power system will operate safely and will respond in a predictable and desired manner, the design of the system's controller must account for changes in the system parameters over its lifetime. This paper applies model-reference adaptive control to an increase in the power demand by the load. A model-reference adaptive controller will force the actual space-nuclear power system to follow the predictable and desired response of a reference model, despite changes in the actual system's operating parameters. Included in this paper are the model-reference adaptive control algorithm, the description of the computer simulation of a space-nuclear power system and the reference model, and results that demonstrate the application of model-reference adaptive control to a change in the load power demand. The results demonstrate that model-reference adaptive control can ensure the transient response of the system despite differences between the design of the system and the as-built system as well as for variations in the systems parameters. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Control room modernization at Finnish nuclear power plants - Two projects compared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laarni, J.; Norros, L.

    2006-07-01

    The modernization of automation systems and human-machine interfaces is a current issue at both of the two nuclear power plants (i.e., Fortum's Loviisa plant and TVO's Olkiluoto plant) in Finland. Since the plants have been launched in the 1970's or 1980's, technology is in part old-fashioned and needs to be renewed. At Olkiluoto upgrades of the turbine operator systems have already been conducted; at Loviisa the first phase of the modernization project has just started. Basically, there is a question of the complete digitalization of the information streams at the two plants, and transition from a conventional hard-wired or hybrid control room to a screen-based one. The new human-machine interfaces will comprise new technology, such as PC workstations, soft control, touch screens and large-screen overall displays. The modernization of human-system interfaces is carried out in a stepwise manner at both plants. At both plants the main driver has not been the need to renew the user interfaces of the control room, but the need to upgrade the automation systems. In part because of this, there is a lack of a systematic top-down approach in which different aspects of human factors (HF) engineering are considered in relationship to higher level goals. Our aim here is to give an overview description of the control room modernization projects at the two plants and provide a preliminary evaluation of their progress to date. The projects are also compared, for example, in terms of duration, scope and phasing, and who is responsible for the realization of the project. In addition, we also compare experiences from the Finnish projects to experiences from similar projects abroad. The main part of the data used in this study is based on designers' and project members' interviews. (authors)

  9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (unclassified publicly releasable, controlled unclassified categories, or classified). ... Review all software for classified and sensitive unclassified information. Established ...

  10. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  11. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

  12. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

  13. Unclassified Sources Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Martian

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone. The purpose of this report is to develop and document conceptual models of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine HST for use in implementing source terms for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine models. This document presents future plans to incorporate the radionuclide attenuation mechanisms due to unsaturated/multiphase flow and transport within the Yucca Flat CAU scale modeling. The important processes that influence radionuclide migration for the unsaturated and saturated tests in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate settings are identified. Many different flow and transport models developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including original

  14. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  15. A Pilot Study Investigating the Effects of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies: Methods and Qualitative Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLanc, Katya Le; Powers, David; Joe, Jeffrey; Spielman, Zachary; Rice, Brandon; Fitzgerald, Kirk

    2015-08-01

    Control room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. Nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Upgrades in the U.S. do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The goal of the control room upgrade benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes a pilot study to test upgrades to the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL.

  16. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  17. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  18. DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

  19. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  20. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, John

    2004-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102.

  1. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  2. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

    1990-03-01

    year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass

  3. Department of Energy Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex, Aktau, Republic of Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, R.; Berry, R.B.; Eras, A.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program, the US Department of Energy and Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC), Aktau, Republic of Kazakstan have cooperated to enhance existing MAEC MPC and A features at the BN-350 liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor. This paper describes the methodology of the enhancement activities and provides representative examples of the MPC and A augmentation implemented at the MAEC.

  4. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited

  5. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  6. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  7. ESTSC - Software Best Practices

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with DOE-Approved site agreements Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Software that is protected by law from disclosure to persons not having a need-to-know. ...

  8. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Software that is protected by law from disclosure to persons not having a need-to-know for the information without ...

  9. Controlling the atom. The beginnings of nuclear regulation 1946--1962

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazuzan, G.T.; Walker, J.S.

    1997-08-01

    This book traces the early history of nuclear power regulation in the US. It focuses on the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the federal agency that until 1975 was primarily responsible for planning and carrying out programs to protect public health and safety from the hazards of the civilian use of nuclear energy. It also describes the role of other groups that figured significantly in the development of regulatory policies, including the congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, federal agencies other than the AEC, state governments, the nuclear industry, and scientific organizations. And it considers changes in public perceptions of and attitudes toward atomic energy and the dangers of radiation exposure. The context in which regulatory programs evolved is a rich and complex mixture of political, legislative, legal, technological, scientific, and administrative history. The basic purpose of this book is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which inherited responsibility for nuclear safety after Congress disbanded the AEC, and the general public with information on the historical antecedents and background of regulatory issues.

  10. Guideline for Evaluating Analytical Chemistry Capabilities and Recommending Upgraded Methods and Instrumentation for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability at Russian Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ, G.P.

    1999-10-21

    Analytical chemistry plays a key role in nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). A large part of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) inventories and virtually all of the highly attractive SNM inventories are based on sampling bulk materials followed by destructive assay (DA) of these materials. These measurements support MC and A in process control, physical inventory verification, evaluation of the effects of process changes, detecting and resolving shipper-receiver differences, and the resolution of inspector-facility differences. When evaluating these important functions, US Project Teams need to carefully assess the existing Russian analytical chemistry capabilities and to specify appropriate upgrades where needed. This evaluation and the specification of upgrades have proven difficult, in part, because of the highly specialized and technical nature of DA and because of the wide variety of methods and applications. In addition, providing a DA capability to a Russian analytical laboratory requires much more than simply supplying new instrumentation. Experience has shown that DA upgrades at Russian analytical facilities require more support equipment than was originally anticipated by US Teams. The purpose of this guidance document is to: (1) recommend criteria for US Projects Teams to use in their evaluation of Russian DA capabilities; (2) provide a basis for selection of appropriate upgrades where capabilities are inadequate to support MC and A goals; and (3) to provide a list of Da methods suitable for MC and A with the following information: performance and applications information, strengths and limitations, and references and information on cost. Criteria for evaluating existing capabilities and determining appropriate upgrades are difficult to define. However, this is the basic information needed by the US project Teams. Section IV addresses these criteria.

  11. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Sergii L. Dudarev Programme Grant Modelling Co-ordinator & Visiting Professor Oxford ... was funded by the RCUK Energy Programme grant number EPI501045, carried out within the ...

  12. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to his name. Dr. Whetten is a native of Mesa, Arizona and holds degrees from Weber State University and Cornell University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Exxon...

  13. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaluation and management of technology. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the US National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society (London), and...

  14. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emeritus Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics (KIT) The Exotic World of Quantum Matter: Novel States Induced by Fluctuations Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2 - 3pm MSL...

  15. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fracture with coarser dimples. Biography: Roger Doherty received his D. Phil. from Oxford University in 1964, worked for two years in the UK steel industry and then spent 17...

  16. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. She was previously a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Integrated...

  17. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. In this talk, I will discuss our recent research in the area of nanoscale materials modeling, using various atomistic simulation techniques, aimed at uncovering the...

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sauls held visiting faculty appointments at the University of Copenhagen and Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, as well as Director of Research at the CNRS laboratories in...

  19. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PSI: the X-ray free electron laser SwissFEL and its future experimental capabilities. Biography: Prof. Dr. Jol Mesot is, since 2008, director of the Paul Scherrer Institute...

  20. UNCLASSIFIED Information Science and ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... data analysis, including machine learning, statistical learning theory and information theory. Application areas of his research include image analysis, medical imaging, acoustic ...

  1. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auditorium) Abstract: When the yield strength of metallic alloys is increased the fracture toughness almost always falls. By use of a plot of bond strength normalized fracture...

  2. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  3. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  4. Command, control, and communications command post in space: A further step for nuclear deterrence and preserving national security. Research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raduege, H.D.

    1989-05-01

    A U.S. congressman thinks U.S. forces are at the brink of being out of control from a loss of communications. This paper describes the critical need for survivable national-level command, control, and communications. (C3). Brief description of the threat the U.S. faces from the Soviet Union with particular emphasis on growing space-based capabilities. General vulnerabilities of the U.S. National Command Authorities and supporting systems are described. Attributes of space-based command, communications, and control are compared to current land, sea, and air capabilities. Developing a permanently manned C3 command post in space would benefit U.S. security strategy through significant enhancements to nuclear deterrence and the political, economic, psychological, and military instruments of national power.

  5. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  6. Fault Diagnosis with Multi-State Alarms in a Nuclear Power Control Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart A. Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-09-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effects of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized the use of three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. Sensitivity and criterion based on the Signal Detection Theory were used to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  7. FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  8. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  9. GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

    2011-10-01

    The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly

  10. Nuclear materials management storage study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs` Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites.

  11. Basis for and practical methods of controlling painting activities at the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.R.

    1997-08-01

    Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) follows the guidance presented in Regulatory Guide (R.G.) 1.52, {open_quotes}Design, Testing, and Maintenance Criteria for Atmospheric Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption System Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants{close_quotes} in protecting its charcoal filter trains from the effects of painting and other chemical releases. SQN, as well as other nuclear facilities around the country, have the problem of how to address the issue of protection of Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) filter systems from degradation due to communication with airborne hydrocarbons (i.e., primarily paints and solvents). R.G. 1.52 (and a similar statement from R.G. 1.140) states in part,{open_quotes}Testing should be performed ... following painting, fire, or chemical release in any ventilation zone communicating with the system...,{close_quotes} and requires that a test be performed upon any kind of painting or chemical release. This is considered overly restrictive if the activity is minor and in a location remote from the charcoal filters. Charcoal filters used in air cleaning systems are required to filter out radioactive iodine from an airstream before its release from the plant to the environment. Charcoal filters will age with time because of their ability to adsorb many different types of material. This aging affects the charcoal by lowering its iodine retention efficiency, and therefore the charcoal needs to be protected from the effects of chemicals such as paint fumes. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of

  13. United States-Russian laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation on protection, control, and accounting for naval nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.; Yurasov, N.; Goncharenko, Y.; Mullen, M.; McConnell, D.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1995, the Russian Navy contacted safeguards experts at the Kurchatov Institute (KI) and proposed the initiation of work to enhance nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) at Russian Navy facilities. Because of KI`s successful experience in laboratory-to-laboratory MPC and A cooperation with US Department of Energy Laboratories, the possibility of US participation in the work with the Russian Navy was explored. Several months later, approval was received from the US Government and the Russian Navy to proceed with this work on a laboratory-to-laboratory basis through Kurchatov Institute. As a first step in the cooperation, a planning meeting occurred at KI in September, 1995. Representatives from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DOD), the Russian Navy, and KI discussed several areas for near-term cooperative work, including a vulnerability assessment workshop and a planning study to identify and prioritize near-term MPC and A enhancements that might be implemented at Russian facilities which store or handle unirradiated highly enriched uranium fuel for naval propulsion applications. In subsequent meetings, these early proposals have been further refined and extended. This MPC and A cooperation will now include enhanced protection and control features for storage facilities and refueling service ships, computerized accounting systems for naval fuel, methods and equipment for rapid inventories, improved security of fresh fuel during truck transportation, and training. This paper describes the current status and future plans for MPC and A cooperation for naval nuclear materials.

  14. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  15. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  16. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Supersedes DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  17. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  18. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Engineering basis for operator control of nuclear power stations in abnormal operations - closing the loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womack, E.A.; Kelly, J.J.; Elliott, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Abnormal Transient Operating Guidelines (ATOG) Program is intended to ''close the loop'' on a continuing basis between the engineering designers/performance analysts and the operators who control the plant. It will make the technical basis for operation responsive to information from the study of actual plant transients, as well as new developments in engineering.

  20. Lanthanides in Metallic Nuclear Fuels: Their Behavior and Methods for Their Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Mariani; Douglas L. Porter; Thomas P. O'Holleran; Steven L. Hayes; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-12-01

    The thermodynamic and experimental basis is given for using dopant additives to bind lanthanides as intermetallic compounds in metallic nuclear fuels. Lanthanide fission products are a major factor in limiting the lifetime of the fuel, because they migrate to the fuel slug peripheral surface where they participate in fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) with the steel cladding. Lanthanide carryover in recycled metal fuels can accelerate FCCI, as recycled lanthanides would likely segregate from the fuel phase, putting the lanthanides in prompt contact with the cladding. In out-of-pile tests we examined the use of Pd for binding the lanthanides, with Pd selected because of its known metallurgical properties in fuel related systems and because of its known behavior in irradiated EBR-II fuels. Initial results confirmed that palladium may be expected to mitigate FCCI arising from lanthanides, and it has been recommended for in-pile tests. We also evaluated transport phenomena responsible for lanthanide migration, and identified liquid-like behaviors as being dominant. Liquid-like behaviors include transport with liquid metals, liquid metal solutions, and rapid surface transport of alloys/metals near their melting temperatures. The analysis led to establishing general criteria for selecting alternate dopant additives, and identifying Sn, Sb, and Te as alternates for further testing.

  1. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.4B, Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons, dated 1-11-2010

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-09-18

    Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter the functionality of the weapon and possible cause DAU.

  2. Creating a comprehensive, efficient, and sustainable nuclear regulatory structure. A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Gregory E.; Brownell, Lorilee; Wright, Troy L.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; O'Brien, Patricia E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the strategies and process used by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to restructure its support for MPC&A regulations in the Russian Federation. The RDP adopted a project management approach to defining, implementing, and managing an effective nuclear regulatory structure. This approach included defining and developing the regulatory documents necessary to provide the Russian Federation with a comprehensive regulatory structure that supports an effective and sustainable MPC&A Program in Russia. This effort began in February 2005, included a series of three multi-agency meetings in April, June, and July, and culminated in August 2005 in a mutually agreed-upon plan to define and populate the nuclear regulatory system in the Russian Federation for non-military, weapons-usable material. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear material at the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom), the Russian Agency for Industry (Rosprom), and the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT) facilities; nuclear material in transport and storage; and nuclear material under the oversight of the Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervisory Service of Russia (Rostechnadzor). The Russian and U.S. MPC&A management teams approved the plan, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) NA-255, Office of Infrastructure and Sustainability (ONIS), is providing funding. The Regulatory Development Project is managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) NNSA.

  3. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly.

  4. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-07-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  5. SSAC | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SSAC NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  6. ONAC | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ONAC NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  7. American press coverage of US-Soviet relations, the Soviet Union, nuclear weapons, arms control, and national security: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorman, W.A.; Manoff, R.K.; Weeks, J.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography covers work that addresses coverage of nuclear and arms control issues, defense, the Soviet Union, and Soviet-American relations by the American news media between 1965 and 1988. Material selected for inclusion either discusses press performance or addresses conditions -- such as classification of information -- that directly impact on media coverage of such issues. Bodies of literature on media coverage of conflict elsewhere in the world lie outside the Center's current mandate (which has shaped the parameters of this bibliography) except insofar as such conflicts are presented by the news media specifically in the context of US-Soviet relations. Much the same is true of such issues as the North-South flow of information and the debate over calls for a New World Information Order. However, the authors have decided to include assessments of American media coverage of the Vietnam War as a case study of a watershed conflict that raised many of the issues discussed throughout this literature in a particularly compelling way.

  8. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  9. All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5.9 (06-97) All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No. 1910-1800 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Reverse U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RECORD OF DESTRUCTION See DOE Manual 471.2-1 Manual for Classified Matter Protection and Control for Instructions UNCLASSIFIED DESCRIPTION OF MATTER (Subject or title and originator) UNIQUE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (If none, omit) DATE OF MATTER CLASSIFICATION LEVEL AND CATEGORY (Include any caveats) NUMBER of PAGES Signature, Organization, and Title of person

  10. CONTROLLED NUCLEAR FUSION REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuck, J.L.; Kruskal, M.; Colgate, S.A.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1962-01-01

    A plasma generating and heating device is described which comprises a ceramic torus with exterior layers of a thick metal membrane and a metallic coil. In operation, the coil generates a B/sub z/ field prior to the formation of an enclosing plasma sheath. Diffusion of the trapped magnetic field outward through the plasma sheath causes enhanced heating, particularly after the sheath has been pinched. (D.L.C.)

  11. International Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) International Nuclear Security The International Nuclear Security program collaborates with partners world-wide to improve the security of proliferation-sensitive materials, particularly weapons-usable nuclear material in both civilian and non-civilian use in key countries. As part of these efforts, INS works with partner countries to: Upgrade and sustain physical security and material control and accounting systems; Develop national-level nuclear security infrastructure in areas such

  12. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  14. DOE-STD-1053-93; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Control of Maintenance Activities at DOE Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-93 March 1993 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MNTY Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. Available to the public from the

  15. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  16. Audit Report: IG-0818 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Audit Report: IG-0818 August 4, 2009 Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to

  17. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT Form used to support nuclear materials accountability and control. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT (15.02 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE/NRC F 742 DOE F 749 DOE F 5635.9

  18. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  19. Technical cooperation between IAE/NNC and U.S. DOE National Laboratories on nuclear export controls in Kazakhstan -- a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picologlou, B.; Cernicek, A.; Pakhnitz, V.; Koltysheva, G.

    1997-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors technical cooperative agreements, also known as Lab to Lab agreements, between its National Laboratories and similar institutions in the Newly Independent States (NIS) for the purpose of sharing some of the experience and expertise on nuclear export controls and nonproliferation of the former with their NIS counterparts so that, in turn, they can provide technical support to their respective governments in nonproliferation matters. In Kazakhstan, two separate technical cooperative agreements involving the Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were established in 1996. The tasks carried out during the first year of these technical cooperative agreements are described and the objectives and end products of the tasks are discussed.

  20. Verified Unclassified Diana J Hollis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15:46:11 -06'00'

  1. Verified Unclassified Diana J Hollis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15:42:56 -06'00'

  2. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  4. Implications of an Improvised Nuclear Device Detonation on Command and Control for Surrounding Regions at the Local, State and Federal Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquale, David A.; Hansen, Richard G.

    2013-01-23

    This paper discusses command and control issues relating to the operation of Incident Command Posts (ICPs) and Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) in the surrounding area jurisdictions following the detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). Although many aspects of command and control will be similar to what is considered to be normal operations using the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the IND response will require many new procedures and associations in order to design and implement a successful response. The scope of this white paper is to address the following questions: Would the current command and control framework change in the face of an IND incident? What would the management of operations look like as the event unfolded? How do neighboring and/or affected jurisdictions coordinate with the state? If the target areas command and control infrastructure is destroyed or disabled, how could neighboring jurisdictions assist with command and control of the targeted jurisdiction? How would public health and medical services fit into the command and control structure? How can pre-planning and common policies improve coordination and response effectiveness? Where can public health officials get federal guidance on radiation, contamination and other health and safety issues for IND response planning and operations?

  5. Physics (selected articles). [Nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiyao, Z.; Zesheng, C.; Xiaolung, X.; Qiang, H.

    1982-09-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion as a new energy source was investigated. It will be possible in the 1980's to obtain thermal nuclear ignition, and in the early 2000's nuclear fusion may be used to supplement the energy shortage. It is predicted that in the 2000's nuclear fusion will occupy an important position as a global source of energy.

  6. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  7. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Current Issues & Trends See more › U.S. nuclear outages this summer were higher than in summer 2015

  8. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear explosion, is the application of laboratory analysis and interpretation to provide technical conclusions (provenance, design, etc.) about a nuclear device or interdicted nuclear material. Nuclear forensic analysts can build confidence in their conclusions by employing multiple signatures that collectively minimize the

  9. Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The nuclear sites list and map shows how DOE nuclear operations are mostly divided between nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance, research and environmental cleanup. The operations are performed within several different facilities supporting nuclear reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal.

  10. Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regoushevsky, V I; Tambovtsev, S D; Dvukhsherstnov, V G; Efimenko, V F; Ilyantsev, A I; Russ III, G P

    2009-05-18

    For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC&A items.

  11. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  12. Improving the reliability of Class 1E power distribution to instrumentation and control cabinets on nuclear power plants in the USA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennen, M.B.

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted to explore nontraditional electric power distribution concepts to improve the reliability of uninterruptible power to vital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) cabinets in future US nuclear power plants. The study incorporated comparative technical and economic evaluations of existing and nontraditional uninterruptible power supply (UPS) concepts. All nontraditional distribution concepts were based on available or already emerging components or semiconductor devices. Another purpose of the study was to reduce the cost and complexity of present power distribution and to lower maintenance, replacement, degradation and fault location requirements. The possible reduction of distribution losses, especially during operation under battery power, was also evaluated. The study indicates that direct current distribution at 48 or 125 Vdc levels would have more than an order of magnitude improvement over the reliability of present alternating current supplies at comparable cost. Furthermore, losses under battery power could be reduced significantly with respect to present distribution losses. An inherent advantage of DC distribution is that power transfer from the failed power bus to an operational bus occurs naturally and instantaneously via two simple and reliable semiconductor diodes. AC distribution, on the other hand, requires complex synchronization, decision making and gated semiconductor switching devices for power bus transfer all of which could be eliminated. Some of the concepts presented may also be applied to make existing vital (Class 1E) uninterruptible power supplies in US nuclear plants more reliable.

  13. Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    To establish a program within the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to identify certain unclassified controlled information as Official Use Only (OUO) and to identify, mark, and protect documents containing such information.

  14. Basis for UCNI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UCNI Basis for UCNI What documents contain the legal and policy foundations for the UCNI program? Section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), is the statutory basis for the UCNI program. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information specifies many detailed policies and requirements concerning the UCNI program. DOE O 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information,

  15. Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UCNI Basis for UCNI What documents contain the legal and policy foundations for the UCNI program? Section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), is the statutory basis for the UCNI program. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information specifies many detailed policies and requirements concerning the UCNI program. DOE O 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information,

  16. Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline GG-5, is a record of decisions made by the Director, OC, as to what general subject areas are UCNI. Note: GG-5 may only be used by the Director, OC, to make determinations as to whether information is UCNI. All other UCNI Reviewing Officials must use UCNI guidance. UCNI General Guideline (80.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Briefing, For Persons With

  17. Controlling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling chaos in low- and high-dimensional systems with periodic parametric perturbations K. A. Mirus and J. C. Sprott Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 29 June 1998͒ The effect of applying a periodic perturbation to an accessible parameter of various chaotic systems is examined. Numerical results indicate that perturbation frequencies near the natural frequencies of the unstable periodic orbits of the chaotic systems can result in limit

  18. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  19. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. Vietnam Removal Working in close...

  20. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. ... both state- and non-state-based proliferation of nuclear and radiological materials ...

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  2. nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

    Learning techniques to combat nuclear trafficking, touring the...

  3. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  4. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  5. nuclear enterprise

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise

    The...

  6. Some thoughts on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian N.H.; Hawkins, H.T.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling the dissemination of nuclear technologies and especially fissile materials.

  7. Nonproliferation Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Policy Challenge: Address evolving threats/challenges to the nonproliferation and arms control regimes. Solution: Develop programs and strategies to address emerging nonproliferation and arms control challenges and opportunities. Learn More 10 CFR Part 810 Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation and

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  9. control design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control design - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  10. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear science nuclear chemistry Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry Nuclear Physics The 10-MV tandem accelerator at CAMS provides a platform for conducting nuclear physics experiment both for basic science and lab mission-related programs. For example, we performed a new cross section measurement of the astrophysically important reaction 40Ca(a,g)44Ti in which high purity CaO targets were irradiated with helium ions at several different discrete energies. The reaction rate was measured on-line

  11. MPA Fellows and Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | Department of Energy MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration (378.48 KB) More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant

  12. NDA NNL DOE Confidentiality Agreement 21 April 2015.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Administration | Department of Energy MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration (378.48 KB) More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant

  13. Supporting Technology for Chain of Custody of Nuclear Weapons and Materials throughout the Dismantlement and Disposition Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Benz, Jacob M.; Denlinger, Laura Schmidt

    2014-05-04

    signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to rapidly confirm the presence of specific components on a yes/no basis without revealing classified information. PNNL researchers have also used ultrasonic measurements to obtain images of material microstructures which may be used as templates or unique identifiers of treaty-limited items. Such alternative technologies are suitable for application in various stages of weapons dismantlement and often include the advantage of an inherent information barrier due to the inability to extract classified weapon design information from the collected data. As a result, these types of technologies complement radiation-based verification methods for arms control. This article presents an overview of several alternative verification technologies that are suitable for supporting a future, broader and more intrusive arms control regime that spans the nuclear weapons disarmament lifecycle. The general capabilities and limitations of each verification modality are discussed and example technologies are presented. Potential applications are defined in the context of the nuclear material and weapons lifecycle. Example applications range from authentication (e.g., tracking and signatures within the chain of custody from downloading through weapons storage, unclassified templates and unique identification) to verification of absence and final material disposition.

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  15. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  16. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Network (TRAIN) (3.3 MB) More Documents & Publications PIA - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System

  17. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    America Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada Nuclear Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  18. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  19. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  20. Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power/Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-29T14:02:38+00:00 Contributing to the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Generation Our nuclear energy and fuel cycle technologies supports the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide through strengths in repository science, nonproliferation, safety and security, transportation, modeling, and system demonstrations. Areas of Expertise Defense Waste Management Sandia advises the U.S. Department

  1. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance "The United States will continue to promote the safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide through a variety of bilateral and multilateral engagements. For example, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission advises international partners on safety and regulatory best practices, and the Department of Energy works with international partners on research and development, nuclear waste and storage, training, regulations,

  2. cdns | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cdns Design Basis Threat NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or SNM) and nuclear weapons in its custody. One major challenge has been, and remains, ensuring that SNM is well protected, while at the same time,... Information Security Information security deals with requirements for the protection and control of information and matter required to be classified or controlled by statutes,

  3. Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

    2003-02-25

    An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided

  4. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-11-19

    These changes are intended to correct typographical and pagination errors, delete a canceled reference and clarify the intent of four metrics in Attachment 3.

  5. Nuclear Engineer (Director, Radiological Controls)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is being concurrently advertised to All US Citizens under vacancy announcement #16-NA30-031-MP. You must apply to the vacancy for which you wish to receive consideration. If you wish...

  6. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Supersedes DOE O 452.1D.

  7. OSTIblog Articles in the nuclear chain reaction Topic | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction. ... Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II Read more... ...

  8. SU-C-9A-02: Structured Noise Index as An Automated Quality Control for Nuclear Medicine: A Two Year Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J; Christianson, O; Samei, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Flood-field uniformity evaluation is an essential element in the assessment of nuclear medicine (NM) gamma cameras. It serves as the central element of the quality control (QC) program, acquired and analyzed on a daily basis prior to clinical imaging. Uniformity images are traditionally analyzed using pixel value-based metrics which often fail to capture subtle structure and patterns caused by changes in gamma camera performance requiring additional visual inspection which is subjective and time demanding. The goal of this project was to develop and implement a robust QC metrology for NM that is effective in identifying non-uniformity issues, reporting issues in a timely manner for efficient correction prior to clinical involvement, all incorporated into an automated effortless workflow, and to characterize the program over a two year period. Methods: A new quantitative uniformity analysis metric was developed based on 2D noise power spectrum metrology and confirmed based on expert observer visual analysis. The metric, termed Structured Noise Index (SNI) was then integrated into an automated program to analyze, archive, and report on daily NM QC uniformity images. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated over a period of 2 years. Results: The SNI metric successfully identified visually apparent non-uniformities overlooked by the pixel valuebased analysis methods. Implementation of the program has resulted in nonuniformity identification in about 12% of daily flood images. In addition, due to the vigilance of staff response, the percentage of days exceeding trigger value shows a decline over time. Conclusion: The SNI provides a robust quantification of the NM performance of gamma camera uniformity. It operates seamlessly across a fleet of multiple camera models. The automated process provides effective workflow within the NM spectra between physicist, technologist, and clinical engineer. The reliability of this process has made it the preferred

  9. American Nuclear Society Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ans awards American Nuclear Society Awards Established in 1999 by the Fusion Energy Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and named after LLNL's co-founder, the Edward Teller Medal recognizes pioneering research and leadership in the use of laser and ion-particle beams to produce unique high-temperature and high-density matter for scientific research and for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Name Year Name of Award and Citation Susana Reyes 2012 Mary Jane Oestmann Professional Women's

  10. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Deborah J.

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  11. Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Programs Nuclear Security Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials ...

  12. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Material Control and Accountability (NMC&A) for the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities I Marlene L. Moore, Tritium Facilities Material Balance Area (MBA) Custodian Thirty-fifth (35 th ) Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Princeton, New Jersey May 6, 2015 UNCLASSIFIED DOES NOT CONTAIN UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION DC/RO: M. L. Moore, SRTE ENGRG. Date: 6 May 2015 Categorization of the Tritium Facilities The Tritium Facilities is a Category IV Material Balance Area (MBA) that

  14. Notice of Intent to Develop a Page Change for Department of Energy Order 474.2 Chg 3, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2016-01-07

    The change will be limited in scope to correct language requiring the Office of Nuclear Materials Integration (ONMI) to be an approver for termination of safeguards for all sites.

  15. SU-E-T-270: Quality Control of Source Strength and Indexer Length in HDR Brachytherapy Using Sun Nuclear Mapcheck2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to evaluate Sun Nuclear MapCheck2 capability for quantitative determination of both HDR source strength and position. Predictive power of Mapcheck2 dose matrix, originated by a microSelectron-v2 source from 22mm distance, was investigated. Methods: A Mick MultiDoc phantom with the 1400mm indexer length mark aligned over MapCheck2 central detector plus two additional 5cm plastic slabs were used as a composite phantom. Dose readings were transformed by applying published source anisotropy corrections and experimentally established radial dose and relative sensitivity factors. Angular dependence was not considered. Only readings from diodes located 2cm around the central detector were evaluated. The reproducibility of a fit between transformed dose readings and the ratio of virtual source strength and the square of source-detector distance was investigated. Four parameters were considered in the model: virtual source strength, lateral, longitudinal and vertical source positions. Final source strength calibration factor was calculated from the ratio of reference measurements and results from the fit. Results: Original lateral and longitudinal source position estimations had systematic errors of 0.39mm and 0.75mm. After subtracting these errors, both source positions were predicted with a standard deviation of 0.15mm. Results for vertical positions were reproducible with a standard deviation of 0.05mm. The difference between calculated and reference source strengths from 34 independent measurement setups had a standard deviation of 0.3%. The coefficient of determination for the linear regression between known indexer lengths and results from the fit in the range 1400mm 5mm was 0.985. Conclusions: ource strength can be estimated with MapCheck2 at appropriate accuracy levels for quality control. Verification of indexer length with present implementation is more accurate than visual alternatives. Results can be improved by designing a

  16. CONTROL ROD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

    1963-04-30

    This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

  17. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nations verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  18. International Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, James E.

    2012-08-14

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration honors Y-12 employees | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atlantic Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada National Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Atlantic Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada National Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  1. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Isotopes» A roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe is put together The DOE Office of Science's Nuclear Physics (NP) program supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create this roadmap. This quest requires a broad approach to different, but related, scientific

  2. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Security Centers of Excellence: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 "We [the Participating States]... Acknowledge the need for capacity building for nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels for the promotion of nuclear security culture through technology development, human resource development, education, and training; and stress the importance of optimizing international cooperation and coordination of

  3. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

    1983-05-09

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

  4. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ROADMAP Table of Contents List of Acronyms ................................................................................................... iii Executive Summary ............................................................................................... v 1. Introduction ...................................................................................................... 1 2. Background

  5. nuclear smuggling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    13, 2015

    SHANGHAI, CHINA - Today, the Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense...

  6. nuclear material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    width"300" >WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction...

  7. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09, 2015

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful...

  8. nuclear forensics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    serves as the premier technical leader in responding to and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological threats worldwide. When the need arises, NNSA is prepared to...

  9. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  10. Hydraulic control rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treshow, Michael

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus for shifting a control rod into and out of a nuclear reactor utilizing as pressure fluid the fluid employed as coolant moderator in the reactor.

  11. Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Dickman, Debbie; Gavrilyuk, Victor; Drapey, Sergey; Kirischuk, Vladimir; Strilchuk, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

  12. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  13. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Myths Topics: Can a Nuclear Reactor Explode Like a Bomb? Will Nuclear Waste Be Around for Millions of Years? Is Nuclear Energy Dangerous? Moderator: Suzy Hobbs ...

  14. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons off ...

  15. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, ...

  16. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International ...

  17. nuclear | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  18. Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl, Ukraine A catastrophic nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl Reactor 4 in the then Soviet Republic of Ukraine

  19. Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and monitor nuclear weapons production, proliferation, and nuclear explosions worldwide. ...

  20. Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA's Emergency Response Operations program acts as the headquarters command and control, functioning as the coordinating focal point for all deployed assets during a nuclear or ...

  1. Abnormal condition and events analysis for instrumentation and control systems. Volume 1: Methodology for nuclear power plant digital upgrades. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKemy, S.; Marcelli, M.; Boehmer, N.; Crandall, D.

    1996-01-01

    The ACES project was initiated to identify a cost-effective methodology for addressing abnormal conditions and events (ACES) in digital upgrades to nuclear power plant systems, as introduced by IEEE Standard 7-4.3.2-1993. Several methodologies and techniques currently in use in the defense, aerospace, and other communities for the assurance of digital safety systems were surveyed, and although several were shown to possess desirable qualities, non sufficiently met the needs of the nuclear power industry. This report describes a tailorable methodology for performing ACES analysis that is based on the more desirable aspects of the reviewed methodologies and techniques. The methodology is applicable to both safety- and non-safety-grade systems, addresses hardware, software, and system-level concerns, and can be applied in either a lifecycle or post-design timeframe. Employing this methodology for safety systems should facilitate the digital upgrade licensing process.

  2. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Lee, Chuck; Farmer, Joseph; Day, Dan; Wall, Mark; Saw, Cheng; Boussoufi, Moe; Liu, Ben; Egbert, Harold; Branagan, Dan; D'Amato, Andy

    2007-07-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{sup TM}, Metamic{sup TM}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion- Resistant Material (HPCRM){sup [1]} can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous - an essential property for corrosion resistance - and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison. (authors)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  5. Worldwide report: Arms control, [November 7, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-11-07

    This document contains articles about arms control throughout the world. Some topics discussed include SDI and space arms, US and USSR nuclear and space arms talks, intermediate range nuclear forces, nuclear testing and free zone proposals.

  6. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  7. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marking Requirements Categories of Controlled Unclassified STI DOE and Major SiteFacility Management Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample ...

  8. Guidance | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SiteFacility Management Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample Cover and Title Page for Controlled Unclassified STI Financial Assistance ...

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  10. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  11. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  12. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  13. Nuclear option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, P.S.

    1983-03-01

    The energy demand complexion of this country is always changing and promises to change in the future. The nuclear industry is responding to changing energy demands through standards writing activities. Since the oil embargo of 1973, there has been a change in the mix of fuels contributing to energy growth in this country; virtually all of the energy growth has come from coal and nuclear power. The predicted expansion of coal use by 1985, over 1977 level, is 37%, while the use of oil is expected to decline by 17%. Use of nuclear power is expected to increase 62% from the 1977 level. The feasibility of using nuclear energy to meet the needs of the USA for electric power is discussed.

  14. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agencies related to the management and oversight of ... it adequately protected data and information systems. ... National Vulnerability Database sponsored by the ...

  15. UNCLASSIFIED CSES Planetary Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSES Planetary Science Lecture Series Nina Lanza LANL, ISR-2 Oxidation of Manganese at Kimberley, Gale Crater: More Free Oxygen in Mars' Past? Thursday, August 25, 2016 10:00 AM Quantum Conference Room (TA-03, Bldg 0040, Room N101) Abstract. Recent results from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover has discovered high concentrations of manganese in rocks in Gale crater, some of which are inferred to be Mn-oxide minerals. On Earth, manganese deposits provide unique indicators of

  16. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Igor Altfeder Air Force Research Laboratory Dayton, Ohio Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Phonon Standing Waves Tuesday, March 8, 2016 2:30 - 3:30 pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: Previous STM studies of coherent wave processes at the nanoscale have resulted in a number of breakthroughs related to electron standing waves on surfaces. The experimental discovery of atomic scale phonon standing waves opens a new page in this rapidly developing research field. Using

  17. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edwin L. Thomas Dean of Engineering Professor of Materials Science and NanoEngineering Rice University - Houston, Texas Indistinguishable from Magic? (A Perspective on Some Aspects of Materials Research in the Next Decade) Tuesday, March 22, 2016 10am - 11am MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Addressing multifunctional materials: The mighty electron, the cool photon and the lowly phonon...how waves in periodic materials lead to interesting properties. Problem Driven Research:

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lecture Series Dr Roger D Doherty M.A. D. Phil., Fellow TMS Emeritus Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Solute Enhanced Strain Hardening of Aluminum Alloys for Higher Strength / Toughness Combinations Wednesday, May 6, 2015 1:15 - 2:15 PM TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103 (MSL Auditorium) Abstract: When the yield strength of metallic alloys is increased the fracture toughness almost always falls. By use of a plot of bond strength normalized

  19. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Series Dr. Sergey Pershoguba Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (NORDITA) Postdoctoral Fellow Skyrmion-induced Bound States in a Superconductor Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:00 - Noon IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: We consider a superconductor proximity coupled to a two-dimensional ferromagnetic film with a skyrmion texture. We predict the skyrmion bound states (SBS) that are induced in the superconductor, similar to the well-known Yu- Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states.

  20. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antonia Antoniou Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia Mechanical Behavior of Hierarchical Nanoporous Metals Thursday, August 27, 2015 1:30 - 2:30pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103) Abstract: Nanoporous (NP) metal foams are a unique class of materials that are characterized by extremely high surface-to- volume ratios and possess such desirable properties of metals as high electrical conductivity, catalytic activity, and strength. This unusual combination of properties is

  1. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Garritt Tucker Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Atomistic Methods to Quantify Nanoscale Strain and Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Thursday, August 27, 2015 3:00 - 4:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03, Bldg. 1698, Room A103) Abstract: As the theoretical physicist, Sir Frederick Charles Franck, said, 'Crystals are like people: it is the defects in them that make them interesting.' Fundamental research in Materials Science and Engineering focuses on linking structure and

  2. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Sergii L. Dudarev Programme Grant Modelling Co-ordinator & Visiting Professor Oxford University Materials United Kingdom "Magnetic" Molecular Dynamics and Other Models for Fusion Reactor Materials Tuesday, September 15, 2015 2:00 - 3:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract - Multiscale models for fusion reactor materials address both the initial stages of production of radiation defects, where the recently discovered power law statistics of defect

  3. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Robert L. Whetten University of Texas, San Antonio Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award recipiant Z 60 , Phantaspheraurate Thursday, September 10, 2015 3 - 4pm IMS/MPA Conference Room (TA3-0032-134) Abstract: Discovery of new substances and their underlying principles consists not so much of "new materials analyzed by established methods" but rather of ancient ones elucidated by newly developed methods. So we had better focus on the advances - new instruments and

  4. UNCLASSIFIED Los Alamos Astrophysics Distinguished Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Astrophysics Distinguished Seminar Series Ryan Miranda Cornell University Sustained Dust Asymmetries At Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks Thursday, July 21, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM T-DO Conf Room (TA-03, Building 123, Room 121) Abstract. Protoplanetary disks, consisting of gas and dust in orbit around a newly formed star, are the birthplaces of planetary systems. Several observations of transition disks, a class of protoplanetary disks in which the first stages of planet

  5. EVALUATION REPORT The Department of Energy's Unclassified

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... business, human resources, and general ... 2 Due to the sensitive nature of the vulnerabilities ... Web applications that do not properly protect the ...

  6. EVALUATION REPORT The Department of Energy's Unclassified

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... applications, including human resources, financial, and ... Due to the sensitive nature of the vulnerabilities ... programs adequately protect information systems and data. ...

  7. The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... vulnerability management, integrity of web applications, planning for continuity of ... by the vendor; * We found at least 29 web applications, including those supporting ...

  8. EVALUATION REPORT The Department of Energy's Unclassified

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... that six locations had weaknesses related to system integrity of Web applications. In these instances, Web applications-including business, human resources, and general support ...

  9. EVALUATION REPORT The Department of Energy's Unclassified

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... system integrity of Web applications, and account management continued to persist. ... existed related to system integrity of Web applications, including human resources, ...

  10. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  11. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  12. JPRS report: Arms control, [December 11, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-11

    This document contains articles translated into English from foreign periodicals. They concern arms control throughout the world. Some topics discussed are strategic defense initiative, space arms, intermediate-range nuclear forces, conventional forces in Europe, short-range nuclear forces, nuclear testing, chemical and biological weapons, nuclear-free zones and peace zones, Asian security issues, and nuclear weapons issues.

  13. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  14. protective forces | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    protective forces Design Basis Threat NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or SNM) and nuclear weapons in its custody. One major challenge has been, and remains, ensuring that SNM is well protected, while at the same time,... Information Security Information security deals with requirements for the protection and control of information and matter required to be classified or controlled by

  15. Inspection Report: IG-0759

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  16. Inspection Report: IG-0757

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excessing of Computers Used for Unclassified Controlled Information at the Idaho National Laboratory

  17. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  18. WIPP Documents - Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Safety DOE/WIPP-07-3372, Revision 5b, WIPP Documented Safety Analysis Approved April 2016 The Documented Safety Analysis addresses all hazards (both radiological and nonradiological) and the controls necessary to provide adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. The WIPP DSA demonstrates the extent to which the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant can be operated safely with respect to workers, the public, and the environment. DOE/WIPP-07-3373, Revision 5b, WIPP Technical

  19. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  20. NNSA: Working to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA: Working to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation February 01, 2011 NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security, and arms control strategies to advance U.S. national security objectives. NIS draws on and contributes to a wide range of technical resources within the U.S. National Laboratory complex, working in concert with international organizations and

  1. Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, S.E.; Matthews, W.B. III; McKamy, E.D.; Pedigo, R.B. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) which is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The system serves national security and program management interests, and international interests in the programs for the peaceful application of nuclear energy and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Within the scope of the NMMSS are found all nuclear materials applied and controlled under United States law and related international agreements, including U.S. nuclear materials production programs and U.S. private nuclear industrial activities. In addition, its national and international scope enables it to provide services to other organizations such as the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of State, and the U.S. Congress.

  2. Defense Nuclear Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Facility NNSA's safety office accredited and recognized for leadership in safe operation of defense nuclear facilities Part of NNSA's commitment to maintaining the nation's safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent are relentlessly high standards for technically capable nuclear enterprise personnel qualifications for all aspects of Defense Nuclear Facility operations. In December 2015, the Department of Energy

  3. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, S K; Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2007-04-26

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of NSTec and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemical Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary

  4. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  5. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Impact Topics: Today's & Tomorrow's New Nuclear Energy Construction & the Workforce Outlook Current New Nuclear Energy Construction Projects Small Modular...

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Starr, C.

    1963-01-01

    This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

  7. ITC | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ITC NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting 35 representatives from 30 countries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from April 26 to May 8, 2015 for the 20th International Training Course... NNSA and IAEA Celebrate the 25th International Training Course Washington, D.C. -The

  8. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Diffraction Data for Selected Control Rod Drive Nozzles from Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-04-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined ultrasonic (UT) time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) data from ten (10) nozzles in the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant reactor closure head. The TOFD data was acquired by AREVA after a bare metal visual examination of the pressure vessel head indicated potential leakage in at least one nozzle. A detailed analysis of the UT data shows that Nozzle 4 has three indications consistent with cracking in the penetration tube. One of the indications starts at the wetted side of the weld and progresses to the annulus. In addition, examination of UT data from the annulus region of Nozzle 4 displays an irregular pattern that could be associated with boric acid deposits and leakage/wastage in the interference fit. The review of TOFD data for the other nine nozzles resulted in several indications being detected in the weld region and near the inner diameter (ID) and outer diameter (OD) surfaces of the penetration tube, but no other indications that are consistent with cracking that may have resulted in leakage were observed. A review of the back-wall reflections in the other nine nozzles also did not show strong indications of leakage, although Nozzle 67 displayed an irregularly-shaped region of high ultrasonic transmission near 180 degrees on the interference fit.

  9. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  10. CP-1 Anniversary: Nuclear Pioneers Remember the Dawn of the Nuclear Age |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Anniversary: Nuclear Pioneers Remember the Dawn of the Nuclear Age Share Topic Energy Energy sources Nuclear energy On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day

  11. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence

  12. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 18: SECURITY, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SAFETY RECORDS | Department of Energy 8: SECURITY, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND SAFETY RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 18: SECURITY, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND SAFETY RECORDS Protection program records include the various files created by the Department to control and protect safeguards and security interests (e.g., classified information, sensitive unclassified information, special nuclear materials, nuclear weapons, other Government property) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 18: SECURITY,

  13. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  14. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security Council-sponsored policy ...

  15. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Our Programs Defense Programs Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective ...

  16. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: ...

  17. Nuclear Suppliers Group & Regimes | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency ...

  18. Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu Institution: Iowa State University Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 15 ...

  19. Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This includes NNSA's work to advance physical protection standards for nuclear facilities and to strengthen nuclear safeguards, which are criteria for the physical security and the ...

  20. nuclear emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home nuclear emergency nuclear emergency Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, and ...

  1. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or ...

  2. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team NNSA houses the Nuclear Incident Team (NIT), which is responsible for deploying assets at the request of coordinating agencies in response to a nuclear or ...

  3. Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Transient Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  4. nuclear science week | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    science week Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  5. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise ... efficient 21stcentury NSE with less environmental impact. ... is referred to as Stockpile Stewardship and Management. ...

  6. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Processing System Identification Controls Embedded systems Aerospace Systems Robotics Structural Health Monitoring Thinking Telescopes Machine Learning Los Alamos Dynamics...

  7. Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    specified directives on Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) when maintaining certain nuclear materials in support of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile program. ...

  8. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and Disposal Three trucks transport nuclear waste

  9. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  12. Draft - DOE G 410.2-1, Nuclear Material Disposition

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This document provides a roadmap for implementing the requirements for disposition of nuclear material as outlined in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 410.2, Management of Nuclear Materials, and DOE Order 474.2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. This Guide provides the basic framework for the nuclear material disposition process, includes information related to the Programmatic Value Determination (PVD) process, and identifies Discard Limits (DL) for specific low-equity nuclear materials.

  13. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age

  14. The Governance of Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergino, E S; May, M

    2003-09-22

    Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech in 1953 is remembered for engaging the world, and the Soviet Union in particular, in a dialogue about arms control and the formulation of a nuclear regime in which national and international security concerns growing from this unprecedented emerging and frightening new weapons capability would be addressed while tapping the civilian promise of nuclear applications for the good of mankind. Out of it came a series of initiatives, leading fifteen years later to the NPT, intended to allow the growth and spread of the beneficial uses of nuclear know-how while constraining the incentives and capabilities for nuclear weapons. The last 50 years has seen a gradual spread in nations with nuclear weapons, other nations with nuclear knowledge and capabilities, and still others with nuclear weapon intentions. Still most nations of the world have forgone weapon development, most have signed and abided by the NPT, and some that have had programs or even weapons, have turned these capabilities off. Yet despite this experience, and despite a relatively successful record up to a few years ago, there is today a clear and generally recognized crisis in nuclear governance, a crisis that affects the future of all the cross-cutting civilian/security issues we have cited. The crux of this crisis is a lack of consensus among the major powers whose support of international efforts is necessary for effective governance of nuclear activities. The lack of consensus focuses on three challenges: what to do about non-compliance, what to do about non-adherence, and what to do about the possible leakage of nuclear materials and technologies to terrorist groups. Short of regaining consensus on the priority to be given to nuclear material and technology controls, it is unlikely that any international regime to control nuclear materials and technologies, let alone oversee a growth in the nuclear power sector, will be successful in the tough cases where it needs to

  15. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  16. Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    components, special nuclear materials and classified information. Technical Assistance. ... personnel, facilities, property, classified information, and sensitive unclassified ...

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  18. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  19. Anne Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Anne Harrington Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington Anne Harrington was sworn in as Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation for the National Nuclear Security Administration in October 2010. Previously, Ms. Harrington was the Director of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) a position she held from March 2005 to October 2010. While at CISAC, she managed several key studies on a

  20. Nuclear Photonics for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2015-03-10

    Lasers and laser-based sources are now routinely used to control and manipulate nuclear processes, e.g. fusion, fission and resonant nuclear excitation. Two such “nuclear photonics” activities with the potential for profound societal impact will be reviewed in this presentation: the pursuit of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility and the development of laser-based, mono-energetic gamma-rays for isotope-specific detection, assay and imaging of materials.