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1

Preamble: CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Part 1502 National Environmental Pollcy Act Regulations; Incomplete or Unavailable Information AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President....

2

Preamble: CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

618 618 Federal Register / Vol. 51, No. 80 / Friday, April 25, 1986 / Rules a n d Regulations - -- COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 40 CFR Part 1502 National Environmental Pollcy Act Regulations; Incomplete or Unavailable Information AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) promulgates regulations, binding on all federal agencies, to implement the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The regulations address the administration of the NEPA process, including preparation of environmental impact statements for major federal actions which significantly affect the quality of the human environment. On August 9 . 1985, CEQ published a proposed

3

Heber geothermal binary demonstration project: Unavailability distributions for principal pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study has been to review data sources relevant to the failure rate and mean time to repair for the principal pumps of the Heber geothermal project. Based upon that review the distributions of failure rates, repair times and pump unavailability were established. A total of 16 pumps are represented in this study. The method used to develop data distributions has been to first review as many sources of pump data as are currently available. This review was followed by a study of the features of the pumps specified for the Heber installation and the effects of operation and the environment on those features as they relate to anticipated failure rates and repair times. From this, determinations were made for mean failure rate and repair time values appropriate to specific Heber pumps. Range factors are then selected and used to establish the expected variability of the data. Failure rates and repair times were then combined to obtain the unavailability distribution of each type of pump.

Mulvihill, Robert J.; Cleveland, Edward B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or 80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information, Final Rule 80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information, Final Rule The final amendment requires all federal agencies to disclose the fact of incomplete or unavailable information when evaluating reasonably foreseeable significant adverse impacts on the human environment in an EIS, and to obtain that information if the overall costs of doing so are not exorbitant. If the agency is unable to obtain the information because overall costs are exorbitant or because the means to obtain it are not known, the agency must (1) affirmatively discIose the fact that such information is unavailable; (2) explain the relevance of the unavailable information; (3) summarize the existing credible scientific evidence which

5

Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time independent and a time dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor operated valves (MOVs), motor driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine driven pumps (FDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78%) from environmental factors (standby time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63%) than standby time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby time stresses (approx. 78%). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk informed and performance based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

Lofgren, E.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Fairfax Station, VA (United States); Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Methods for dependency estimation and system unavailability evaluation based on failure data statistics. Volume 1, Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report introduces a new perspective on the basic concept of dependent failures where the definition of dependency is based on clustering in failure times of similar components. This perspective has two significant implications: first, it relaxes the conventional assumption that dependent failures must be simultaneous and result from a severe shock; second, it allows the analyst to use all the failures in a time continuum to estimate the potential for multiple failures in a window of time (e.g., a test interval), therefore arriving at a more accurate value for system unavailability. In addition, the models developed here provide a method for plant-specific analysis of dependency, reflecting the plant-specific maintenance practices that reduce or increase the contribution of dependent failures to system unavailability. The proposed methodology can be used for screening analysis of failure data to estimate the fraction of dependent failures among the failures. In addition, the proposed method can evaluate the impact of the observed dependency on system unavailability and plant risk. The formulations derived in this report have undergone various levels of validations through computer simulation studies and pilot applications. The pilot applications of these methodologies showed that the contribution of dependent failures of diesel generators in one plant was negligible, while in another plant was quite significant. It also showed that in the plant with significant contribution of dependency to Emergency Power System (EPS) unavailability, the contribution changed with time. Similar findings were reported for the Containment Fan Cooler breakers. Drawing such conclusions about system performance would not have been possible with any other reported dependency methodologies.

Azarm, M.A.; Hsu, F.; Martinez-Guridi, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Dublin, OH (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The unavailable candidate model: a decision-theoretic view of social choice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fundamental problems in the theory of social choice is aggregating the rankings of a set of agents (or voters) into a consensus ranking. Rank aggregation has found application in a variety of computational contexts. However, the goal ... Keywords: preferences, rank aggregation, social choice, voting

Tyler Lu; Craig E. Boutilier

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA...

9

"Projected Real GDP Growth Trend"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69465655,0.02391459409,0.01807394932 " * These are historical annual growth rates in real GDP (2005 chained dollars). The annual changes are compounded and averaged in the table...

10

North Dakota sees increases in real GDP per capita following ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In recent years, North Dakota has seen significant gains in real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, coinciding with development of the Bakken shale play.

11

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

12

GDP Jobs Direct Structure of Australian economy, employment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% GDP Jobs Direct emissions Inclusive emissions Structure Biomass Solar PV 3020 Abatement below businss as usual Mt CO2e Industry Buildings Forestry Power Transport Employment intensity Jobs / $m valu-add 13 2 10 4 14 10 11 Gross value added ABS Australian Nat'l Accounts

Pezzey, Jack

13

U.S. Primary Energy Use and GDP, 1970-1998 (chart)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Figure 2. U.S. primary energy use and GDP [Trends in Building-Related Energy and ...

14

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 WHAM Clearfell Pen Y Pigyn 01 OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 102 103 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Cwrt The Glyn 5% windthrow 5% windthrow 01 dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 104 105 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Thinning

15

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Thinning Bryn OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 WHAM Thinning Part 2 Allt Y Gennli, Carno 01/09/12 31/03/13 to £ Per tonne) 104 WHAM Clearfell Cwm Mawr, Radnor 01/09/12 31/08/13 to £ Per tonne Estimated weight 4797 tonnes

16

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VAT) LOG DESCRIPTION 101 102 103 WHAM WHAM WHAM Dyfi, Forge, Corris Clocaenog Coed Y Rhaiadr - 66011 WHAM WHAM WHAM Crychan - 63203 Crychan - 63032 Esgair Dafydd, Halfway - 62051 And 63066 18 18 18 cm cm VAT) LOG DESCRIPTION 107 108 109 WHAM WHAM WHAM Caio - 58024 Buckland - 68798 Dyfi - Corris 22655 18

17

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Bowling Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 104 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Cc OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 105 WHAM Clearfell Cc-Margam 01/04/13 30/09/13 to £ Per tonne Estimated weight

18

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Bryn Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 104 WHAM WHAM Thinning Thinning Hafod Fawr OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 105 106 WHAM WHAM Thinning Thinning Ffridd Y Drum, Mathrafal Beddgelert 01

19

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Thinning Clearfell Cwrt) 103 104 WHAM WHAM Thinning Clearfell Beudy Hir Carrog Newydd 5% windthrow 01/05/12 01/04/12 30) 105 WHAM Thinning Abercarn 01/04/12 30/10/12 to £ Per tonne Estimated weight 2061 tonnes FOREST

20

Empirical Analysis on the Cities' GDP and the Main Economic Indicators of High-Tech Industrial Parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the national 54 high-tech industrial parks' main economic indicators and their cities' GDP are analyzed respectively with clustering analysis. It is found that there is a certain degree of correlation between them. To reveal the inner ... Keywords: Cities' GDP, High-tech industrial parks' economic, Correlation Analysis, Clustering Analysis

Yu-Chen Song; Sha Zhen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI:...

22

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

23

Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRC, 2004 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

24

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tibuleac Published: GRC, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009)...

25

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Area (Stroujkova & Malin, 2001) Long Valley Caldera...

26

TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

January 28-30, 2002, 112002 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2002-2005) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http:...

27

Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http:...

28

Monaco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

29

Flow Of Mantle Fluids Through The Ductile Lower Crust- Helium...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal energy development. Author(s): B. M. Kennedy, M. C. van Soest Published: Science, 2007 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Isotopic Analysis At Cascades...

30

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

31

Retrieval Group Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Retrieval Tools and Systems: ... currently unavailable. Other sites with extensive information retrieval (IR) links: ...

32

EIA - Daily Report 9/28/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, several Gulf Coast compressor stations are on emergency backup generators as commercial power is unavailable, ...

33

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Carbon Emission Outlook to 2050. Berkeley, CA:of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings2 Sectoral Outlook and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction  

SciTech Connect

GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

36

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

37

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

38

A Self-Calibrating Real-Time GOES Rainfall Algorithm for Short-Term Rainfall Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of precipitation from satellite data can provide timely information about rainfall in regions for which data from rain gauge networks are sparse or unavailable entirely and for which radar data are unavailable or are compromised by ...

Robert J. Kuligowski

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microsoft PowerPoint - Herb_Presentation 6-10-09 (2).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operational flexibility typically unavailable from conventional hydro due to water availability considerations and other project requirements Pumping energy provides...

40

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Full forced outage: The net capability of main generating units that are unavailable for load for emergency reasons. Futures market: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Achieving Chinas goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Savannah River National Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries ...  

The device offers features unavailable in tank cleaning technologies currently on the market, ... as the incident light energy is ... information provided includes ...

44

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are unavailable or mounting such towers would be ... eddy simulations (LES) of wind flow over ... rooftops as compared with tower-based measurements ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded Project Revives Aging California...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

steam from a nearby power plant. However, inexpensive steam became unavailable when the power plant shut down. Future expansion of thermal recovery would require improving the...

46

Reliability test of a RIFD system for tool management on construction sites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the construction industry, one of the aspects that affect the productivity of the construction crew is the availability of tools and supplies. Unavailability of (more)

Kalla, Naresh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Exhibitor: STELLAR MATERIALS INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Booth #637 Detroit, Michigan. Thermbond is a unique new refractory material with features and benefits unavailable in traditional refractories. Thermbond is...

48

Disruption Tolerant Shell (SYS 13)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure does not Software Requirements Datarequirements end-to-end connections are unavailable or fail B PUBLISH Suitable for DTN since it does

Martin Lukac; Lewis Girod; Deborah Estrin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Silicates In The Larderello Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

these two fluids occurred locally. Author(s): Eleonora Petrucci, Giovanni Gianelli, Mariano Puxeddu, Paola Iacumin Published: Geothermics, 1994 Document Number: Unavailable DOI:...

50

251.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have radio transmission and reception equipment, including antennas and all ..... aspect that plays a ma j or role in frequency planning is the (un)availability of.

51

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: Import and export data for natural gas in BTUs is currently unavailable as we improve our methodology for this calculation. We will repost the data once this ...

52

Efficiency Maine Renewable Energy Program (Maine) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Commission (PUC) developed rules to implement the program. Rebates for PV and solar-thermal installations were unavailable for 2009. However, the governor signed...

53

Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Gaining Recognition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events Events are temporarily unavailable. Newsletter Publications DOE Challenge Home...

54

Techniques to Mitigate the Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Free Space Optical Communication Links.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Free space optical communication links are an attractive technology for broadband communications when fiber optic links are unavailable or simply not feasible. Atmospheric turbulence, aerosols, (more)

Wasiczko, Linda Marie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11016: Micro CHP Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of time the system is available for operation under realistic operating conditions and load profile. Unavailable time includes time for scheduled maintenance. 2 Supporting...

56

NERSC Users Group Meeting February 22, 2001 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File: spong.doc | doc | 326 KB FES Greenbook Presentation February 23, 2001 | Author(s): Bas Braams | File unavailable for download HENP Greenbook Presentation February 23, 2001...

57

NERSC Users Group Meeting February 22, 2001 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File: spong.doc | doc | 326 KB FES Greenbook Presentation February 23, 2001 | Author(s): Bas Braams | File unavailable for download Future Technology Assessment February 22, 2001...

58

Bulk Amorphous Steels Based on Fe Alloys  

be limited or unavailable. Patent applications directed towards this invention may not have been filed with any patent ... Disclosure Number 200301265 ...

59

Identifiable mercury methylation genes and enzymes ...  

be limited or unavailable. Patent applications directed towards this invention may not have been filed with any patent ... Disclosure Number 201202869 ...

60

Dielectric Waveguide Gas-Filled Stark Shift Modulator  

be limited or unavailable. Patent applications directed towards this invention may not have been filed with any patent ... Disclosure Number 200100951 ...

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61

Private Video Display System  

be limited or unavailable. Patent applications directed towards this invention may not have been filed with any patent ... Disclosure Number 201303003 ...

62

Colorado DWR GWS-32 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado DWR GWS-32 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s):...

63

Colorado DWR GWS-31 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado DWR GWS-31 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s):...

64

Because It's Not There: Verbal Visuality and the Threat of Graphics in Interactive Fiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the power of computer graphics, text still has access tothat are unavailable in graphics including visual effects.Visuality and the Threat of Graphics in Interactive Fiction

Kashtan, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Connecticut/EZ Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provides access to loan funds that are otherwise unavailable to the borrower. EXP Job Creation Incentive Program (Connecticut) Connecticut Loan Program Yes StateProvince...

66

Stances on the Land: Political Perspectives on Land Use Governance in Vermont.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vermont, like many rural places in the developed world, has been the destination of many urban migrants seeking lifestyle amenities unavailable in the city. This (more)

Young, Thomas Hugh Niven

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: Import and export data for natural gas in BTUs is currently unavailable as we improve our methodology for this calculation. We will repost the data once this ...

68

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogy and Petrology, 111984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1007BF01150293 Source: View Original Conference Proceedings Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal...

69

Dipole-dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solid content of ground water) within the bedrock low explain its presence. Author(s): Fox, R. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 511978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI:...

70

Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

anomalies and surface manifestations related to the geothermal system. Author(s): Fox, R. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 511978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI:...

71

Cubas Education System: A Beacon of Light in Latin America Facing an Uncertain Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dominican Republic, and Venezuela. 3 Much of the comparisonCuba Chile Mexico Argentina Venezuela Peru Bolivia Paraguayon education as % of GNP for Venezuela is unavailable. While

Johnstone, Brian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

superimposed over the nearest DC layer solution. Author(s): Anderson, W. L. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 111977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.21726804958 Source:...

73

RRC Form H-1A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RRC Form H-1A Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: RRC Form H-1A Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable...

74

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: DOE Supported R&D for Gasifier OptimizationPlant Supporting Systems Conversion & Fouling Accurate physical models are currently unavailable for predicting rates of slag...

75

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: Import and export data for natural gas in BTUs is currently unavailable as we improve our methodology for this calculation. We will repost the ...

76

PML Uses Combined Optical Techniques to Provide Important ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contact: Nhan Van Nguyen 301-975-2044. ... This has given us access to measurements that were previously unavailable, Nguyen states. ...

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Priority Definitions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Definitions: Critical - Operation-hindering issue impacting more than 1 person Examples: Application unavailability, network printer issue when no comparable printer is in same...

78

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI: Unavailable Core Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Blue Mountain Geothermal...

79

Designing Dependable Storage Solutions for Shared Application Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outage penalty rate describes the cost (e.g., in US$ per hour) of data unavailability. After a failure, IEEE Abstract--The costs of data loss and unavailability can be large, so businesses use many data. Using realistic storage system requirements, we show that our design tool produces designs that cost up

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

80

Form PI-1 General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Form PI-1 Air Preconstruction Permit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form_PI-1_General_Application_for_Air_Preconstruction_Permit&oldid=631449" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863640201

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Notice_of_Intent_(NOI)_for_Storm_Water_Discharges_Associated_with_Construction_Activities_under_TPDES_General_Permit_(TXR150000)&oldid=598006"

82

The International Heat Flow Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The International Heat Flow Commission The International Heat Flow Commission Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The International Heat Flow Commission Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): A. E. Beck, V. Cermak Published: Geothermics, 1989 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Data Acquisition-Manipulation (Beck & Cermak, 1989) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_International_Heat_Flow_Commission&oldid=387748" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863774514

83

Blue Chip Consensus US GDP Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and metro area from Moodys Economy.com Equivalent to US-level Gross Domestic Product ? The GMP forecasts have a large impact on the peak load forecasts Rule of thumb: 1 % growth in RTO GMP ? approx. 1,000 MW growth in forecast RTO peak load

James F. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Optimal scheduling for disconnected cooperation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a distributed environment consisting of n processors that need to perform t tasks. We assume that communication is initially unavailable and that processors begin work in isolation. At some unknown point of time an unknown collection ...

Grzegorz Greg Malewicz; Alexander Russell; Alex Shvartsman

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Improving NLP through marginalization of hidden syntactic structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many NLP tasks make predictions that are inherently coupled to syntactic relations, but for many languages the resources required to provide such syntactic annotations are unavailable. For others it is unclear exactly how much of the syntactic annotations ...

Jason Naradowsky; Sebastian Riedel; David A. Smith

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DAAC WEB Site Outage, March 8, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2007 The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Thursday, March 8, 2007 due to...

87

DAAC WEB Site Outage, February 10, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2007 The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Saturday, February 10, 2007 due...

88

DAAC WEB Site Outage, March 14, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14, 2007 The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 due to...

89

DAAC WEB Site Outage, February 14, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2007 The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 due...

90

Web Page Error 404.1 Page Cannot be Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are looking for cannot be found. The Web site you are looking for is unavailable due to its identification configuration settings. Please try the following: If you typed the page...

91

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Maintenance, November 12 2007 9:00-11...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 12, 2007 9:00-11:00 EST The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Monday, November 12, 2007...

92

Design of a lightweight camping cot using carbon fiber tent poles and ripstop nylon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lightweight camping cot is currently unavailable in the backpacking market. Although camping cots do exist, they are not competitive in weight and size with sleeping pads typically used by campers. On average, sleeping ...

Ward, Walton (Walton Henry)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enrollment forms, contact Nicole Gee at x3697 or visit the website http:wdrs.fnal.govtrain-devuchicago.html. ES&H & Computing Sector website, CRL, Lasso unavailable Feb. 4...

94

EERE: Page Not Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Search Search Help Page Not Found We're sorry, but the page you're looking for may have been removed, has changed, or is unavailable. To find the information you need, you may...

95

Commonsense Computer Security, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:How important is your information? How much would it matter if your computer systems and their data were lost by accident?; tampered with maliciously?; destroyed by terrorist attack?; unavailable because of inefficient procedures?; ...

Martin R. Smith

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Directed Spray Mast  

Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a remotely-operated tank cleaning device for precise, high-pressure spray for use in limited access areas. The device offers features unavailable in tank cleaning technologies ...

97

DE. GM05-NA25851 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN ARMSTRONG...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEOC), in the event the on-site Pantex EOC is unavailable or uninhabitable to Emergency Response Organization (ERO) staff during an emergency at the Pantex Plant. C. AUTHORITY....

98

DE. GM05-NA25850 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN CARSON COUNTY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEOC), in the event the on-site Pantex EOC is unavailable or uninhabitable to Emergency Response Organization (ERO) staff during an emergency at the Pantex Plant. AUTHORITY. 1....

99

Business Continuity: IT Risk Management for International Corporations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Risk Management and Business Continuity are essential for the competitive capacity of any international corporation. The temporary unavailability of technology and services can endanger the existence of any company. It is cruical to ...

Martin Wieczorek; Bob Bartlett; Uwe Naujoks

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The 4 June 1999 Derecho Event: A Particularly Difficult Challenge for Numerical Weather Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warm season convective system rainfall forecasts remain a particularly difficult forecast challenge. For these events, it is possible that ensemble forecasts would provide helpful information unavailable in a single deterministic forecast. In ...

William A. Gallus Jr.; James Correia Jr.; Isidora Jankov

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Performance analysis of dynamic workflow scheduling in multicluster grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists increasingly rely on the execution of workflows in grids to obtain results from complex mixtures of applications. However, the inherently dynamic nature of grid workflow scheduling, stemming from the unavailability of scheduling information ... Keywords: grid scheduling, performance evaluation, workflows

Ozan Sonmez; Nezih Yigitbasi; Saeid Abrishami; Alexandru Iosup; Dick Epema

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China 28,905 42,134 53,559 43,289 124,406 Note: Import and export data for natural gas in BTUs is currently unavailable as we improve our methodology ...

103

Acoustical Rainfall Analysis: Rainfall Drop Size Distribution Using the Underwater Sound Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall estimation is difficult, especially in oceanic regions where land-based techniques are unavailable. Fortunately, rain produces a loud and unique sound underwater that can be used to detect and quantify rainfall. Laboratory studies of the ...

Jeffrey A. Nystuen

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aug. 28 CNAS, Sunflower and Procard will be unavailable Saturday, August 28, between 6 a.m. and 4 p.m. as the Fermilab Procard System is migrated to a new server. If you...

105

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, thefrom petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the i sectoralGas Other Petroleum Products Natural Gas Natural Gas Other

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimization of Quality of Service in Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensors equipped with solar cells and rechargeable batteries are useful in many outdoor, long-lasting applications. In these sensors the cycles of energy harvesting and battery recharge need to be managed appropriately in order to avoid sensor unavailability ...

Soledad Escolar; Stefano Chessa; Jesus Carretero

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Clean Cities: Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas)...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

case1": "Next video in 1", "other": "Next video in " This video is currently unavailable. Your browser does not currently recognize any of the video formats available. Click here...

109

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

110

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

111

Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Remote_Detection_Of_Quaternary_Borate_Deposits_With_Aster_Satellite_Imagery_As_A_Geothermal_Exploration_Tool&oldid=389959

112

Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa By S E Ingebritsen, M A Scholl And D R Sherrod Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa By S E Ingebritsen, M A Scholl And D R Sherrod Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): S. E. Ingebritsen, M. A. Scholl, D. R. Sherrod Published: Geothermics, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geothermal Literature Review At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1996)

113

Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Application_to_Occupy_or_Perform_Operations_Upon_a_State_Highway&oldid=675630" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863281925

114

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

115

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Bauer, I. Moeck, B. Norden, A. Schulze, M. H. Weber Published: Publisher Unknown, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Case_Study_For_Geothermal_Exploration_In_The_Ne_German_Basin-_Integrated_Interpretation_Of_Seismic_Tomography,_Litho-Stratigraphy,_Salt_Tectonics,_And_Thermal_Structure&oldid=390106"

116

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Watson Published: Proceedings of the ninth international symposium on remote sensing of environment, April 15-19, p. 1919-1932., 1974 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Reconnaissance_From_Quantitative_Analysis_Of_Thermal_Infrared_Imagery&oldid=387504" Category:

117

Application for a Temporary Water Use Permit for Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up to One Year Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for a Temporary Water Use Permit for Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up to One Year Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: TCEQ, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Application_for_a_Temporary_Water_Use_Permit_for_Up_to_10_Acre_Feet_and_Up_to_One_Year&oldid=648773" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

118

Monthly GDP Estimates for Inter-War Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nsumption, electricity consumption, merchandise on railways, commercial motors in use, postal receipts, building activity, iron and steel for home consumption, raw cotton delivered to mills, imports of raw materials, exports British manufactures, shipping... and the General tariff in February 1932 6 . However, neither of these policies seems to have generated immediate observable effects on the path of recovery with the economy continuing to slide between February and September 1932. Clearly, Temins hypothesis...

Mitchell, James; Solomou, Solomos; Weale, Martin

119

Monthly and Quarterly GDP Estimates for Interwar Britain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ended the Great depression we need good quality high frequency data and provided some high frequency analysis of the recovery profiles in the USA and Germany. However, he did not provide the high-frequency data needed to analyse the British case... -values Factor loadings (x100) Autoregressive Coeff t-value Coeff t-value Employment 1.27 12.65 -0.20 -2.62 Coal Consumption 0.96 7.40 0.79 3.96 Electricity Consumption 0.52 0.83 -0.37 -4.86 Railways 0.51 2.28 -0.50 -6.87 Motor 3.00 6.31 -0.39 -5...

Mitchell, James; Solomou, Solomos; Weale, M

120

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

122

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

123

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","LPG Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","LPG Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

124

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","Coal Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

125

Robotics and Energetic Systems Group Technology Need  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that currently does not exist. Sample Application: Remote Boiler Repair Leaks in boilers at fossil power plants cause an average unavailability of 5%. As leaks develop in the boiler, their severity is monitored based. At this point the thermal inertia of the boiler becomes the dominant phenomenon. At the end of the cool down

126

Exploring organizational expansion modes and their associated communication system requirements: consolidation and complementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expectation of firms following aggressive growth strategies is that firms expanding geographically will acquire extensive economic advantages unavailable to more conservative competitors. Growth-minded firms also believe that by integrating info-communication ... Keywords: Communication system requirements, Complementation, Consolidation, Organizational growth and expansion

J.Michael Tarn; H.Joseph Wen

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

User-centric PKI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of supporting Single Sign-On to the Web has proven elusive. A number of solutions have been proposed -- and some have even been deployed -- but the capability remains unavailable to most users and the solutions deployed raise concerns for both ... Keywords: PKI, authentication, single sign-on, web services

Radia Perlman; Charlie Kaufman

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A secure multiple-agent cryptographic key recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symmetric cryptography uses the same session key for message encryption and decryption. Without having it, the encrypted message will never be revealed. In case the session key is unavailable or government authorities need to inspect suspect messages, ... Keywords: key recovery, key recovery agent, key recovery center, secret sharing, session key

Kanokwan Kanyamee; Chanboon Sathitwiriyawong

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Maintenance, Thursday Mornings August...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursdays, August 7, and August 21, 2008 8:30-9:30 a.m. EDT The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Eastern Daylight Saving Time (EDT), on...

131

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Reboot, September 13 2007 8-8:15 EDT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 13, 2007 8-8:15 EDT The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 8:00 a.m. and 8:15 a.m., Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), on Thursday, September 13, 2007 due to...

132

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Maintenance, Thursday Morning November...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, November 13, 2008 8:30-9:30 a.m. EST The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Thursday, November 11,...

133

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Reboot, October 16 2007 9-9:15 EDT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 16, 2007 9-9:15 EDT The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 9:00 a.m. and 9:15 a.m., Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), on Tuesday, October 16, 2007 due to scheduled...

134

ORNL NASA DAAC Web Site Outage, Saturday May 15 from 3:00 a.m...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outage, Saturday, May 15, 2010 3:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT The ORNL DAAC Web site will be unavailable between 3:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), on Saturday, May 15,...

135

ORNL NASA DAAC Web Site Maintenance, Saturday Evening March 28...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saturday, March 28, 2009 8:00-10:00 p.m. EDT The ORNL DAAC Web site will be unavailable between 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), on Saturday, March 28...

136

ORNL NASA DAAC WEB Site Maintenance, February 6, 2008 7:30-8...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 6, 2008 7:30-8:00 a.m. EST The ORNL DAAC web site will be unavailable between 7:30 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Wednesday, February 6, 2008...

137

ORNL NASA DAAC Web Site Maintenance, Thursday Morning February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, February 19, 2009 8:30-9:30 a.m. EST The ORNL DAAC Web site will be unavailable between 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST), on Thursday, February 19...

138

Determining the orientation of marine CSEM receivers using orthogonal Procrustes rotation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the orientation of marine CSEM receivers using orthogonal Procrustes rotation analysis surveys can have unknown orientations because of the unavailability of compass and tilt recordings. In such situ- ations, only the orientation-independent parameters derived from the measured CSEM field vector

Key, Kerry

139

A hybrid method for flowshops scheduling with condition-based maintenance constraint and machines breakdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important assumptions in production scheduling is that the machines are permanently available without any breakdown. In the real world of scheduling, machines can be made unavailable due to various reasons such as preventive maintenance ... Keywords: Condition-based monitoring, Flowshop, Meta-heuristic, Preventive maintenance, Tauguchi

Ehram Safari; Seyed Jafar Sadjadi

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A multi-platform, multi-language environment for process modelling, simulation and optimisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process simulators like ASPEN PLUS and HYSYS are coming with the option of integrating their functions with special purpose programs for simulation and/or optimisation. However, a comprehensive account of how to do such integration is unavailable ... Keywords: automation, extensibility, genetic algorithms, integration, multi-objective optimisation, process modelling, simulation, simulators, styrene plant

N. Bhutani; A. Tarafder; G. P. Rangaiah; Ajay K. Ray

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lyndon B. Johnson School ofPublic Affairs Policy Research Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. demonstrate that plants provide food products by grinding wheat seeds into flour and using the flour to make or bulk food department of the supermarket. (If unavailable, use the amount of whole wheat flour listed in the recipe and explain how wheat is ground into flour.) 2. Other ingredients listed in the recipe on page T-4

Texas at Austin, University of

142

MASTER PLAN ChiefJosephDamHatcheryProgram This Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. demonstrate that plants provide food products by grinding wheat seeds into flour and using the flour to make or bulk food department of the supermarket. (If unavailable, use the amount of whole wheat flour listed in the recipe and explain how wheat is ground into flour.) 2. Other ingredients listed in the recipe on page T-4

143

Proven Performance of Seven Cold Climate Deep Retrofit Homes  

SciTech Connect

Seven test homes located in Massachusetts are examined within this report. The retrofit strategies of each home are presented along with a comparison of the pre- and post-retrofit airtightness achieved by the group. Pre- and post-retrofit utility bills were collected; energy models were used to estimate pre-retrofit energy use when bills were unavailable.

Osser, R.; Neuhauser, K.; Ueno, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOCKET NO. PA02-2-000 STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

knowledge of market conditions unavailable to its competitors. This informational trading advantage from EOL for allegations that Williams Energy Marketing & Trading Co. cornered the market for natural gas in California3-26-03 DOCKET NO. PA02-2-000 STAFF REPORT PRICE MANIPULATION IN WESTERN MARKETS FINDINGS

Laughlin, Robert B.

145

Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bearing failures are a leading cause of unavailability for power plant rotating machinery, often resulting in prolonged forced outages and costly repairs. This manual, which assists utilities in identifying bearing failure modes and selecting remedial actions to prevent future failures, provides guidelines for repair techniques.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Guidelines for Capturing Valuable Undocumented Knowledge from Energy Industry Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for capturing the valuable undocumented knowledge of managers and workers and making it available to other personnel when needed. The guidance, developed through strategic research performed in conjunction with four cooperating energy companies, is designed to help mitigate negative consequences as experienced personnel become unavailable due to retirement or other reasons.

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Reliability enhancement using optimal distribution feeder reconfiguration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure statistics show that distribution networks engage the most contribution to the customer unavailability services. Optimal reconfiguration of distribution systems has many advantages like total power losses reduction, voltage profile enhancement, ... Keywords: AENS, DFR, Distribution feeder reconfiguration (DFR), ISFLA, Improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm (ISFLA), MDFR, Multiobjective optimization, Reliability enhancement, SAIDI, SAIFI

Abdollah Kavousi-Fard; Mohammad-Reza Akbari-Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

STATE OF NEW MEXICO Educational Retirement Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the ERB selected TIAA-CREF and Fidelity as its ARP service providers. Each service provider will be offering enhancements previously unavailable to ARP participants. TIAA-CREF's new enhancements and Fidelity By selecting TIAA-CREF and Fidelity the ERB will be able to provide optimal value to ARP participants through

New Mexico, University of

149

Indirect adaptive H$_{&infty;}$ output feedback control based on LS-SVM for uncertain nonlinear systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel framework of indirect adaptive H$_{&infty;}$ control method based on least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) is proposed for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unavailable states and external disturbance. In this method, a state ... Keywords: H$_{&infty;}$ control, Least squares support vector machines, adaptive control, feedback control, nonlinear systems

Chunli Xie; Shao; Jiangtao Cao; Dandan Zhao

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): John Travis Finger, Eddie Ross Hoover Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Annex_7_-_The_Iea%27S_Role_In_Advanced_Geothermal_Drilling&oldid=389771" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

151

Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Geothermal Field, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Geothermal Field, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: cap rock, permeability, fault, fracture, clay, Coso Author(s): Davatzes, N.C.; Hickman, S.H. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2007) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controls_on_Fault-Hosted_Fluid_Flow:_Preliminary_Results_from_the_Coso_Geothermal_Field,_CA&oldid=473359"

152

Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The first phase of an electrical geophysical survey of the Coso Geothermal Area is described. The objective of the survey was to outline areas of anomalously conductive ground that may be associated with geothermal activity and to assist in locating drilling sites to test the geothermal potential. Author(s): Ferguson, R. B. Published: Publisher Unknown, 6/1/1973 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972)

153

Record of Decision on Mode of Transportation and Nevada Rail Corridor for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV (DOE/EIS-0250) (4/8/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 Federal Register 57 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 68 / Thursday, April 8, 2004 / Notices We must acknowledge and confirm these periods of unavailability before granting you an extension. To request this extension or to confirm our acknowledgement of any system unavailability, you may contact either (1) the persons listed elsewhere in this notice under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT (see VII. Agency Contacts) or (2) the e-GRANTS help desk at 1-888- 336-8930. You may access the electronic grant application for the Training Program- CFDA 84.103A at: http://e-grants.ed.gov. V. Application Review Information 1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this program competition are in 34 CFR Part 642.31 and the application package. Note: For the FY 2004 competition, the

154

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

155

,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Residual Fuel Oil ","Unswitchable Residual","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed as a Fuel","Fuel Oil Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

156

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

157

Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades Author(s): Steven Clausen, Michal Nemcok, Joseph Moore, Jeffrey Hulen, John Bartley Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mapping_Fractures_In_The_Medicine_Lake_Geothermal_System&oldid=388927

158

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Author(s): Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. Published: Geophysics, 10/12/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article

159

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/S0148-9062(97)87449-9 Source: View Original Journal Article Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Numerical_Evaluation_Of_Electromagnetic_Methods_In_Geothermal_Exploration_-_L_Pellerin,_J_M_Johnston_%26_G_W_Hohmann,_Geophysics,_61(1),_1996,_Pp_121-130&oldid=3883

160

Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1995 Document Number: Unavailable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

162

GTP ARRA Spreadsheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP ARRA Spreadsheet GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Details Activities (243) Areas (25) Regions (0) Abstract: Spreadsheet of ARRA projects provided by DOE on 3/24/2011 listing ARRA projects and exploration techniques used for each project. Author(s): Unknown Published: GTP, 2011/01/01 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Acoustic Logs At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Aeromagnetic Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP)

163

Reliability analysis of containment isolation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the Reliability Analysis of Containment Isolation System Project. Work was performed in five basic areas: design review, operating experience review, related research review, generic analysis and plant specific analysis. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and Integrated Leak Rate Test (ILRT) reports provided the major sources of containment performance information used in this study. Data extracted from LERs were assembled into a computer data base. Qualitative and quantitative information developed for containment performance under normal operating conditions and design basis accidents indicate that there is room for improvement. A rough estimate of overall containment unavailability for relatively small leaks which violate plant technical specifications is 0.3. An estimate of containment unavailability due to large leakage events is in the range of 0.001 to 0.01. These estimates are dependent on several assumptions (particularly on event duration times) which are documented in the report.

Pelto, P.J.; Ames, K.R.; Gallucci, R.H.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (27) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)

165

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in Southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Moore, J.L. Published: Publisher Unknown, 9/1/1987 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_interpretation_of_the_Coso_geothermal_field._Summary_report,_October_1986-August_1987&oldid=473519"

166

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Computational Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra-Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler water walls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for ultra-supercritical application to mitigate corrosion because these boilers will operate at much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical boilers.Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potentialFe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Improved Thermal Modeling Tools for Substation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratings of substation terminal equipment often limit power flow through transmission circuits. Capital investment in terminal equipment is generally modest in comparison to lines, transformers, and underground cables. Replacement difficulties are centered more on service availability than on cost. Detailed manufacturer test data is often unavailable for older equipment but ratings are simpler to calculate than for lines. Certain types of terminal equipment are tolerant of over-loading and problems in...

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wind Energy Asynchronous Generator Maintenance Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rush to develop todays massive wind energy sites, little attention is being given to the inevitable need to perform routine maintenance and develop practical means of assessing the condition of the components within the nacelles and other outside support equipment for the wind farms. Current operating models have not adequately established accurate assumptions or expectations on the unavailability of the wind turbines and the impact on lost generation. Contracts for purchase of their generation ...

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Wind Turbine Lubrication Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rush to develop todays massive wind energy sites, more attention should be paid to the inevitable need to perform routine maintenance and develop practical means of assessing the condition of the components within the nacelles and other outside support equipment for the wind farms. Current operating models have not adequately established accurate assumptions or expectations on the unavailability of the windmills and the impact on lost generation. Contracts for purchase of their generation output...

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

Identification of Critical-to-Power-Production Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial installations are increasingly dependent on digital equipment and systems to improve efficiency and provide advanced services. However, consequences of unavailability or failures can be severe in terms of safety, regulatory scrutiny, economics, and societal impacts. Current technologies allow, and sometimes require, complex digital systems and architectures that tend to increase the likelihood of certain types of failures and unanticipated, unintended, or unwanted behaviors that can adversely ...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Capturing and Using High-Value Undocumented Knowledge in the Nuclear Industry: Guidelines and Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains detailed guidelines and methods for eliciting, capturing, and passing along high-value tacit knowledge residing "in the heads" of expert personnel in the nuclear power industry. The guidance should be especially valuable to managers concerned about the departure of experienced and highly knowledgeable employees or about experts not being around at all times. The loss or unavailability of valuable knowledge can have negative operational, environmental, safety, and economic consequences.

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Enhancing Transport Layer Capability in HAPS-Satellite Integrated Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of HAPS/UAVs to enhance telecommunication capabilities has been proposed as an effective solution to support hot spot communications in limited areas. To ensure communication capabilities even in case of emergency (earthquake, power blackout, chemical/nuclear disaster, terrorist attack), when terrestrial fixed and mobile infrastructures are damaged or become unavailable, the access to satellites represents a reliable solution with worldwide coverage, even though it may suffer from shadowing impairment, especially in an urban environment.

C. E. Palazzi; C. Roseti; M. Luglio; M. Gerla; M. Y. Sanadidi; J. Stepanek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Capturing Undocumented Worker-Job-Knowledge: Overview and 2000 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the end-of-year 2000 status for the "Capturing Undocumented Worker-Job-Knowledge" project under the Strategic Human Performance Program. The project is developing solutions for mitigating negative consequences resulting from the loss of valuable undocumented knowledge as experienced personnel become unavailable due to retirement or other reasons. By the end of 2001, the project will issue practical guidance for capturing valuable undocumented knowledge in a variety of energy industry ...

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

EPRI Guidelines for PRA Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary tasks to support probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is a thorough and traceable data analysis to provide as much plant-specific history as possible to the PRA modeling, or well-founded industry information where plant-specific data are insufficient or unavailable, and to characterize the uncertainty surrounding this information to allow sensitivity analyses to be performed.Recent efforts have been made by industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Uncertainty Representation: Estimating Process Parameters for Forward Price Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market prices set the value of electric power assets and contracts, yet forward prices are unavailable for time horizons relevant to most valuations. Price forecasts are inherently uncertain because the drivers of prices are uncertain, but equilibrating market forces also work to reduce the growth of uncertainty over time. Consequently, quantifying the degree of future price uncertainty is difficult, but has tremendous strategic potential for power companies seeking to value real options and invest in fl...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Plant Engineering: Performance Diagnostic Test Program for the Nuclear Turbine Cycle at Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, many power generating companies are challenged to reduce operating costs, and at the same time, the cost of unit unavailability can be significant in today's power markets. In the past decade, management of nuclear power plants, including Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP), has been focused on reducing forced outage rates and nuclear-safety-related issues, with less attention paid to thermal performance. But recently, KHNP has been strongly challenged to increase unit thermal performance, as f...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heat capacity in weakly correlated liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously unavailable numerical data related to the heat capacity in two- and three-dimensional liquid Yukawa systems are obtained by means of fluctuation theory. The relations between thermal conductivity and diffusion constants are numerically studied and discussed. New approximation for heat capacity dependence on non-ideality parameter for weakly correlated systems of particles is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing theoretical and numerical data is discussed.

Khrustalyov, Yu. V.; Vaulina, O. S. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, 125412, Izhorskaya St., 13 bld.2, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 117303, Kerchenskaya St., 1A bld.1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Koss, X. G. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, 125412, Izhorskaya St., 13 bld.2, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computational Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultrasupercritcal Boilers Task 4: Fireside Corrosion Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls continues to be the number one issue resulting in forced outages and boiler unavailability for conventional coal-fired fossil power plants. Future plants, operating at ultrasupercritical steam conditions, will be subject to even higher temperatures, which might accelerate fireside corrosion in waterwall and superheater/reheater components. This report documents the initial testing for the fourth task of a six-task projectjointly sponsored by the Electric Power Rese...

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Recovery in Industrial Distillation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distillation processes are energy intensive separation processes which present attractive opportunities for energy conservation. Through the use of multistage vapor recompression, heat which is normally unavailable can be delivered at suitably high temperatures resulting in significant energy savings. The distillation process will be reviewed as it relates to both vapor recompression and heat pumping techniques and case study examples of these energy recovery methods will be discussed.

Paul, D. B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Broadband over Power Lines (BPL): FCC Emissions Compliance Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadband over power lines (BPL, a.k.a. broadband PLC) has been heralded as an opportunity for electric companies to enhance internal communication and control while delivering broadband service to areas where existing services are unavailable. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has published new regulations limiting radio frequency (RF) emissions from BPL equipment. This EPRI Technical Update provides an overview of the "FCC Report & Order 04-245" on BPL and gives guidance and details on the te...

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Use of Instrumentation and Control to Improve the Dependability of Critical-to-Production Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In industrial installations, the consequences of system unavailability or component failures can be severe in terms of safety, regulatory scrutiny, economics, and societal impacts. Utilities can, therefore, benefit by applying a systematic approach to identifying critical-to-production components and enhancing their dependability when appropriate.This report was prepared to provide assistance to nuclear utilities that would like to improve the dependability of critical-to-production ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogas, stalks and firewood by rural residents by region, and fossil fuel energy consumption refers variable is: Biogas consumption per capita Stalks consumption per capita Firewood consumption per capita FE

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

185

Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world -A case study on India Cline Guivarcha,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. 274pp. EIA (2008) International Energy Outlook 2008. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. 220pp. EIA (2006) International Energy Outlook 2006. Office

186

Removal of GDP Mandrels From Sputter-Coated Beryllium Capsules for NIF Targets (A25711)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 17th Target Fabrication Specialists Meeting, San Diego, California, 2006; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology17th Target Fabrication Specialists Meeting San Diego California, US, 2006999613405

Youngblood, K.P.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Real values derived using the GDP Chain-type Price Index, 2005 = 100.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin Transportation cost per short ton (nominal) Transportation

188

Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofermentation System Technology Assistance Program Licensing Staff Search For Technologies Available Technologies Licensing Opportunity Announcements Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Technology Licensing | Technology Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial readiness. TIP projects are proposed by ORNL scientists and engineers and selected competitively based on their potential for near-term societal or economic impact. TIP technologies are advanced through research and development and outreach to industry. TIP is funded by UT-Battelle licensing royalties. When a technology enters the TIP process, it is initially made unavailable

189

A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Northern California, gas-fired steam and peaking turbines, and cogenerators and other generation sources that are ?Qualifying Facilities? (QFs) under the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978 (PURPA). About half of in-state generating capacity... to as ?de-rating? the nominal capacity of units to a ?firm? capacity level. The forced outage rates for the gas plants are in the 6% to 13% range.21 Wind turbine generators present a special problem. The CAISO applies an 80% unavailability factor...

Joskow, Paul; Kahn, Edward

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

Refueling stations for natural gas vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unavailability of natural gas vehicle (NGV) refueling stations constitutes one of the major barriers to the wide spread utilization of natural gas in the transportation market. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the current technical and economic status of compressed natural gas vehicle refueling stations and to identify the components or design features that offer the greatest potential for performance improvements and/or cost reductions. Both fast-fill- and slow-fill-type refueling systems will be discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Biederman, R.T.; Jasionowski, W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Parabolic trough collector systems for thermal enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques offer a means of increasing US oil production by recovering oil otherwise unavailable when using primary or secondary production methods. The use of parabolic trough collector solar energy systems can expand the production of oil recovered by the most prevalent of these techniques, thermal EOR, by improving the economics and lessening the environmental impacts. These collector systems, their state of development, their application to EOR, and their capacity for expanding oil production are reviewed. An economic analysis which shows that these systems will meet investment hurdle rates today is also presented.

Niemeyer, W.A.; Youngblood, S.B.; Price, A.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Availability and Reliability Issues for ILC  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider (ILC) will be the largest most complicated accelerator ever built. For this reason extensive work is being done early in the design phase to ensure that it will be reliable enough. This includes gathering failure mode data from existing accelerators and simulating the failures and repair times of the ILC. This simulation has been written in a general fashion using MATLAB and could be used for other accelerators. Results from the simulation tool have been used in making some of the major ILC design decisions and an unavailability budget has been developed.

Himel, T.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; /SLAC; Ross, M.; /Fermilab

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

Leigh, Richard J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method of applying coatings to substrates and the novel coatings produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of a multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hitherto unavailable compositions, are provided. 2 figs.

Hendricks, C.D.

1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 lbs 40 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3556 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4665 lbs GAWR F/R: Unavailable Payload: 1109 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 109.3 in Track F/R: 62.0/61.6 in Length: 189.2 in Width: 71.7 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michellin Tire Model: Energy MXV458 Tire Size: P215/60R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32

200

362 Oil price shocks and real GDP growth: empirical evidence for some OECD countries by R. Jimnez-Rodrguez and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2004 all publications will carry a motif taken from the 100 banknote. This paper can be downloaded without charge from

Rebeca Jimnez-rodrguez; Marcelo Snchez; Rebeca Jimnez-rodrguez; Marcelo Snchez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (??? GDP ?and energy indicators, including economic energy intensity,

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy demand in China will rise from current levelsdemand reaches 5290 TWh in 2020 China reaches current world best practice energy

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency, lighting and heating usageas a way to evaluateand usage of energy-consuming equipment such as appliances, lighting and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 113 GW in Total electricity demand reaches 5930 TWh into 12%% by Total electricity demand reaches 5290 TWh in 202010% lower annual electricity demand with 5288 TWh generated

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry Iron & Steel Industry Equipment WaterIndustry Glass Ethylene Ammonia Paper Aluminium Cement Iron and Steelsteel, aluminum, paper, ammonia and ethylene, and glass in addition to an other industry

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Data:Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1986/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 3 Medium Commercial - 50 kW to 300 kW Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all three-phase consumers for all uses, with a demand of 50 kW or greater, but less than 300 kW, subject to the established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Where three-phase service is unavailable single-phase service may be provided under this schedule at option of the Cooperative. Source or reference: ISU Documentation

207

CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination 690-N (Ford Building) Fire System Isolation and Sanitary Sewer Grouting CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 09/02/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Firewater service to Building 690-N (the Ford Building) will be rendered unavailable by cutting and capping the firewater header to the building. Preparation for excavation and isolation will necessitate the removal of some existing vegetation (pine tree) for the fire system isolation to proceed. Additionally, all access points to the sanitary sewer lines from inside Building 690-N will be grouted closed. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000520.pdf More Documents & Publications

208

CX-007069: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7069: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7069: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007069: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install H Tank Farm to F Tank Farm Radio Repeater Station in E Area CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 08/31/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and F Tank Farm (FTF) personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and FTF, radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio.

209

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 2003/09/01 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Citation S.C. Smith. 2003. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration. In: Programs & Abstracts: Soil and Regolith Geochemistry in the Search for Mineral Deposits. IGES; 2003/09/01; Dublin, CA. Dublin, CA: IGES; p. 78 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermally_Speciated_Mercury_in_Mineral_Exploration&oldid=681717" Categories: References Geothermal References

210

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

211

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

212

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1 ) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 2 331111) 1998 3 2002 4 2006 4 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

213

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different mechanisms, enabling the use of green power sources when the resource itself is unavailable (for example, solar energy at night or wind energy on a calm day). Such devices also provide energy portability for consumer electronics and zero-emission options for transportation, in either hybrid or fully-electric vehicles. Many impressive battery technologies exist today, but the understanding of their operation is somewhat limited, which makes it very challenging to improve

214

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although not part of the current effort, two deep (approximately 2000 m) exploratory wells were drilled on the north flank of Hualalai near Puu Waawaa cinder cone. The geophysical data used for siting these wells were proprietary and hence unavailable for publication; however, the temperatures measured at the bottoms of the wells were reported to be below 20degrees C. Chemical analysis of water samples taken from these wells did not provide useful geothermal data due to contamination of the well water with drilling muds References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

215

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

216

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) The Mississippi Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (SED) enables the Mississippi Business Finance Corporation (MBFC) to make loans to qualified private companies that will increase employment and investment in the State. The State of Mississippi issues general obligation bonds as the source of funding under the SED Program. The bonds are issued on a composite basis. The costs of issuance are prorated to each company participating in the issue; allowing companies to obtain tax exempt financing that would otherwise be unavailable due to prohibitive costs. October 16, 2013 Small Employer Quality Jobs 7-Year Cash Incentive (Oklahoma) This program provides incentive payments to a qualifying small employer (90

217

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

218

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Projects Energy Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Colleen Sievers Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/28/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Citation Colleen Sievers. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects [Internet]. 09/28/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2011/09/28;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/carson_city_field/blm_information/newsroom/2011/september/blm_approves_salt.html

219

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

220

Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Docket No. EO-05-01: PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. and PEPCO Holdings, Inc. is hereby providing you with additional information concerning reliability impacts under various system conditions associated with the unavailability of the Potomac River Generating Station to serve load in the D.C. area. Also enclosed as part of this submittal is material provided by PEPCO (balance of sentence redacted) In addition, there is a discussion concerning the impacts of demand side response in addressing this situation. Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary - Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank 48 Tank 48 ETR Report Date: August 2006 ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which

222

EMSL: Capabilities: Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Announcements Computing Announcements Cascade: Cascade - Scheduled Downtime December 31, 2013 5:15 PM - This is a reminder that Cascade will be unavailable beginning at 0800 (PST) on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 for an update to the file system. We expect to return Cascade to service later in the afternoon. Please send e-mail to mscf-consulting@emsl.pnl.gov if you have any questions. Chinook: Chinook - Scheduled Downtime December 31, 2013 2:30 PM - This is a reminder that Chinook is being retired at midnight tonight 12/31/2013. Cascade, its replacement is having an outage on Jan. 7, 2014 beginning at 0800 PDT. For our MOLPRO users, there is now a submit_molpro script on Cascade for submitting MOLPRO jobs to use the most recent version of MOLPRO just installed. We expect to bring

223

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads January 30, 2013 NREL grid and dispatchable power experts are helping the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado, develop a system to maintain power to critical loads when power is unavailable from the local utility. Under an agreement with USAFA and in collaboration with Colorado Springs Utilities, NREL will design a USAFA microgrid using its Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid Design process. The four-step CORE process evaluates existing reports, gathers data, analyzes designs, and monitors project implementation and installation. The data gathering and preliminary generation design evaluation phases are nearly complete. Generation options identified during the preliminary

224

Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 10375 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Industrial 10 kVa of Transformer Capacity or less Commercial Commercial and Industrial 15 - 25 kVa of Transformer Capacity Commercial Commercial and Industrial 37.5 kVa of Transformer Capacity or larger Commercial Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Remote Access Unavailable

225

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

226

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Release Coupling Magnetic Release Coupling An engineer at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a magnetic release coupling that offers features unavailable in coupling technologies currently on the market. Background The magnetic release coupling was originally conceived to reduce exposure of works to radiation and to eliminate inadvertent decoupling of pipe connections. The magnetic coupling provided a quick disconnect connection that did not require time consuming assembly and disassembly while providing a secure connection with a streamlined outer profile for use with no catching or interference problems. The coupling also provided excellent response to impact. After conception, the coupling was projected into other uses such as torque transfer, component connections, hidden

227

Slide03 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide03 Slide03 Slide03 Google, non-Googleable evolution Google: v., to search for information through Google Googleable: adj., information found by Googling Non-Googleable: adj., information that cannot be found by Googling In fact, much of the information on the Web is inherently unavailable to Google and Yahoo! This key limitation would come as a surprise to many Web users, especially young students. The concept that if you "Google" long enough you can find it, is so firmly entrenched in the Web-cognizant public, that the word "Google" has been elevated to a verb. In the Web-savvy vernacular, "To Google" of course means to search the Web using the Google search engine. For example, to find information about the interagency organization CENDI, one "Googles" CENDI.

228

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide03 Submitted by gibsone on Wed, 2013-08-21 13:12 FY2007-nsf Slide03 Google, non-Googleable evolution Google: v., to search for information through Google Googleable: adj., information found by Googling Non-Googleable: adj., information that cannot be found by Googling In fact, much of the information on the Web is inherently unavailable to Google and Yahoo! This key limitation would come as a surprise to many Web users, especially young students. The concept that if you "Google" long enough you can find it, is so firmly entrenched in the Web-cognizant public, that the word "Google" has been elevated to a verb. In the Web-savvy vernacular, "To Google" of course means to search the Web using the Google search engine. For example, to find information about the

229

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide05 Submitted by gibsone on Wed, 2013-08-21 13:12 FY2007-nsf Slide05 OSTI Mission * Information fuels discovery * Superior access to quality information speeds discovery The mission of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information is to advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to DOE researchers and the American people. Search capability is key to our mission. We have developed a different kind of search technology to retrieve that information which is unavailable to Google. Its use in gateways such as Science.gov and WorldWideScience.org is what Eleanor Frierson and I came here to talk about today. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64 Reply (If you're a human, don't change the following field)

230

APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards Three technologies developed for use at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory have won R&D 100 awards. The awards are given annually by R&D Magazine to the 100 most significant technical products of the year. X-RAY SCANNING MICROPROBE The hard x-ray scanning microprobe is a noninvasive tool that provides spatial resolution previously unavailable with x-rays, thereby expanding the potential of traditional x-ray techniques. It was developed by Barry Lai, Zhonghou Cai, Jörg Maser, Dan Legnini and Peter Ilinski of the APS Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team. Wenbing Yun of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory contributed to the technology.

231

NREL: Technology Deployment - NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads January 30, 2013 NREL grid and dispatchable power experts are helping the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado, develop a system to maintain power to critical loads when power is unavailable from the local utility. Under an agreement with USAFA and in collaboration with Colorado Springs Utilities, NREL will design a USAFA microgrid using its Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid Design process. The four-step CORE process evaluates existing reports, gathers data, analyzes designs, and monitors project implementation and installation. The data gathering and preliminary generation design evaluation phases are nearly complete. Generation options identified during the preliminary

232

Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors John Snow and Fausto Batini Published Enel Nort America, 04/22/2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Citation John Snow,Fausto Batini. 04/22/2008. Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting. Cedar City, UT. Enel Nort America. 24p. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enel_North_America_Utah_Geothermal_Working_Group_Meeting&oldid=680551" Categories: References Geothermal References

233

Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Stratigraphy and geophysical logs of three petroleum test boreholes in the Raft River Valley are presented. The geophysical logs include: temperature, resistivity, spontaneous potential, gamma, caliper, and acoustic logs. Author(s): Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/6272996 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Raft River Geothermal Area

234

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

235

Validation of Cloud Properties Derived from GOES-9 Over the ARM TWP Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Derived from Cloud Properties Derived from GOES-9 Over the ARM TWP Region M. M. Khaiyer, M. L. Nordeen, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and W. L. Smith, Jr. Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautic and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction Satellite data are essential for monitoring clouds and radiative fluxes where ground-based instruments are unavailable. On April 24, 2003, the ninth geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES-9) began operational coverage of the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), replacing the failing fifth geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS-5). The GOES-9 imager provides the opportunity for enhanced monitoring of clouds and radiation over the TWP because it has better spatial resolution and

236

Bernstein-060211 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bernstein-060211 Bernstein-060211 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Professor Elliot R. Bernstein Colorado State University TITLE: "Neutral Cluster Studies of Heterogeneous Catalytic Mechanisms" DATE: Thursday, June 2, 2011 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: Stefan Vajda Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: Heterogeneous catalysis is a major synthetic approach to the generation and production of new materials and important industrial chemicals. Moreover, small clusters and nanoparticles are often responsible for inducing new chemical reactions, both wanted and unwanted. Our studies are focused on the mechanisms for both types of reactions (catalysis and nanoparticle), because mechanistic understanding in these instances (currently unavailable) can lead to improved catalytic reactions and better

237

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 SRS Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in

238

Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 07/22/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement [Internet]. 07/22/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City

239

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

240

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-020.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 SECTION A. Project Title: Interim Storage Area for Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) SECTION B. Project Description: Currently, dedicated space is unavailable for above-grade storage of Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) containing 55-gal drums of remote handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU). In the past this waste was packaged in specially constructed liners and placed into the RSWF. When ready for transfer this waste would then be removed from RSWF and transferred to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) where it was sorted and repackaged for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this new interim storage area is needed to eliminate special packaging and placement into RSWF in order to reduce costs and exposure associated with repackaging

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

242

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 7b.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1331111) 1998 2 2002 3 20063 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

243

EIA-411 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-411 Data Form EIA-411 Data Release Date: January 28, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2013 Form EIA-411, “Coordinated Bulk Power Supply and Demand Program Report” Form EIA-411 collects electric reliability information from the Nation’s power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas:

244

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 13090 of 28,905 results. 81 - 13090 of 28,905 results. Rebate Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.'''''... http://energy.gov/savings/energy-efficient-home-improvements-program Download CX-006726: Categorical Exclusion Determination Well Coring-Schlumberger Carbon Services CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 03/19/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006726-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EA-1106: Final Environmental Assessment Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1106-final-environmental-assessment Download Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document

245

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

About LEDP About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to grant surplus and available used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges in the United States for use in energy oriented educational programs. This grant program is sponsored by the Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS). The listing of equipment available through LEDP is updated as new equipment is identified. It is available at no cost for a limited time and is granted on a first-received qualified application basis. Specific items may be recalled for DOE use and become unavailable through the program after the

246

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment. Universities, colleges and other non-profit educational institutions of higher learning in the United States are eligible to apply for equipment to use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical, and environmental sciences, and in engineering. The equipment listed in this database is available for grant; however, specific items may be recalled for DOE use and become unavailable through the program. Frequently Asked Questions Who is eligible to apply for equipment? Any non-profit, educational institution of higher learning, such as a middle school, high school, university, college, junior college, technical

247

BNL | Accelerators for Applied Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators for Applied Research Accelerators for Applied Research Brookhaven National Lab operates several accelerator facilities dedicated to applied research. These facilities directly address questions and concerns on a tremendous range of fields, including medical imaging, cancer therapy, computation, and space exploration. Leading scientists lend their expertise to these accelerators and offer crucial assistant to collaborating researchers, pushing the limits of science and technology. Interested in gaining access to these facilities for research? See the contact number listed for each facility. RHIC tunnel Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)-positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis-produces commercially unavailable radioisotopes for use by the

248

V-189: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users 9: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host V-189: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host July 1, 2013 - 12:48am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host PLATFORM: VirtualBox 4.2.12 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Oracle VirtualBox. REFERENCE LINKS: VirtualBox ticket: 11863 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028712 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A local user on the guest operating system can issue a 'tracepath' command to cause the network on the target host system to become unavailable. IMPACT: A local user on a guest operating system can cause denial of service conditions on the target host system.

249

Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geoscience case study- appendixes geoscience case study- appendixes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. Author(s): Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis, J. A. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 11/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5988071 Source: View Original Report Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Raft_River_geoscience_case_study-_appendixes&oldid=473481

250

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant in Churchill County Plant in Churchill County Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Mark Struble Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 02/13/2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Citation Mark Struble. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County [Internet]. 02/13/2005. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2005/02/13;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/info/newsroom/Carson_City_News_Archives/2005/02/blm_approves_salt.html

251

EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications Complex A primary mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to maintain the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in a safe, secure, and reliable manner. Aging weapons contain dated and now unavailable technologies. Modernization of these weapon system components is integral to DOE's responsibility to meet its stockpile stewardship requirements for enhanced performance, and increased safety, security, and reliability in weapons systems. To meet this responsibility, there is a need to modernize key weapon components utilizing microelectronics available only at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). DOE has identified an increasing

252

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

253

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield. Author(s): Glaspey, Douglas J. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/30/2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/922630 Source: View Original Report Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

254

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-020.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: Interim Storage Area for Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) SECTION B. Project Description: Currently, dedicated space is unavailable for above-grade storage of Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) containing 55-gal drums of remote handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU). In the past this waste was packaged in specially constructed liners and placed into the RSWF. When ready for transfer this waste would then be removed from RSWF and transferred to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) where it was sorted and repackaged for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this new interim storage area is needed to eliminate special packaging and placement into RSWF in order to reduce costs and exposure associated with repackaging

255

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Citation D.E. White,M.E. Hinkle,I. Barnes. 1970. Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713.

256

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BOREHOLES; WELL DRILLING; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; IDAHO; EQUIPMENT; GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS; WELL CASINGS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; DRILLING; EXPLORATION; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA; WELLS Author(s): Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 10/1/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5091938 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

257

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection? What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection? by Tim Byrne on Fri, 20 Mar, 2009 The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information legacy collection contains an estimated one million technical reports representing six decades of energy research that is, for the most part, unavailable in electronic format. On average, OSTI receives close to two hundred requests each month to digitize specific reports, with the vast majority of the requests coming from DOE employees and contractors. The legacy collection represents an enormous investment in research and development from the Atomic Energy Commission, Energy Research and Development Administration and Department of Energy. With the growing tendency of many researchers to rely solely on research information available

258

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Loans: Up to $20,000 for 100% of cost as long as 85% of work is for qualifying home improvements Homeowner Energy Efficient Rebates (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying improvements up to $2,000 Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of costs up to $20,000 '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.'''''

259

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2 2002 3 2006 3 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 3. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil, coal or coke.

260

LTUG09_HardwareLessonsLearned.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tape Users Group Tape Users Group Sun StorageTek Tape Hardware Migration Experiences Jason Hick 9940B & T10KA to T10KB Serial 9310s to TCP/IP SL8500 Large Tape Users Group Replacing Old Hardware  8ea 9310s containing 40,000+ cartridges (91% occupied) - 16,130 x 9940B tape cartridges - 17,700 x 9840A tape cartridges - 6,859 x T10KA tape cartridges - 34 x 9940B tape drives (3-way & 1-way) - 18 x T10KA tape drives (3-way & 1-way)  Some reasons Sun provided us: - 9940B availability of replacement parts/drives (several weeks on 2-3 occasions) - T10KA sensitive to unavailability of drives and couldn't repair fast enough - 9310s going end-of-life  Some temporary solutions for above: - Buy local spare parts cache - Support for 9310s from 3rd party

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hopper Featured Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be unavailable from 8am Wednesday, Sept 19 until 5pm Friday, Sept 21, during and after the scheduled Hopper maintenance. If your job depends on /project, please add the following "gres" setting in your batch script (so that your job won't start and fail during the /project outage): #PBS -l gres=project If your job is already queued (but not yet running), the following

262

Microsoft Word - CX-Ostrander-Troutdale-access_road_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Rick Ross Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Ostrander-Troutdale No. 1 transmission line access road maintenance including grading and rocking of road surfaces and installation of water bars and cross drain culverts Budget Information: Work Order #: Unavailable PP&A Project No.: PP&A #1740 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities for rights-of-way, infrastructures (e.g. roads) routine maintenance activities corrective are required to maintain and preserve infrastructures in a condition suitable for the facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The proposed project is located within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

263

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

264

Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters of Nevada Thermal Waters of Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1979 Report Number Bulletin 91 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Thermal Waters of Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside,John H. Schilling (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1979. Thermal Waters of Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Bulletin 91. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Waters_of_Nevada&oldid=690515" Categories: References Geothermal References

265

Microsoft Word - NERSC_Results.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliability Results of NERSC Systems Reliability Results of NERSC Systems Akbar Mokhtarani, William Kramer, Jason Hick NERSC - LBNL Abstract In order to address the needs of future scientific applications for storing and accessing large amounts of data in an efficient way, one needs to understand the limitations of current technologies and how they may cause system instability or unavailability. A number of factors can impact system availability ranging from facility-wide power outage to a single point of failure such as network switches or global file systems. In addition, individual component failure in a system can degrade the performance of that system. This paper focuses on analyzing both of these factors and their impacts on the computational and storage systems at NERSC. Component failure data

266

Report on Preliminary Engineering Study for Installation of an Air Cooled Steam Condenser at Brawley Geothermal Plant, Unit No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Brawley Geothermal Project comprises a single 10 MW nominal geothermal steam turbine-generator unit which has been constructed and operated by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Geothermal steam for the unit is supplied through contract by Union Oil Company which requires the return of all condensate. Irrigation District (IID) purchases the electric power generated and provides irrigation water for cooling tower make-up to the plant for the first-five years of operation, commencing mid-1980. Because of the unavailability of irrigation water from IID in the future, SCE is investigating the application and installation of air cooled heat exchangers in conjunction with the existing wet (evaporative) cooling tower with make-up based on use of 180 gpm (nominal) of the geothermal condensate which may be made available by the steam supplier.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Photovoltaics as an operating energy system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the short time since the discovery of the modern solar cell in 1954, terrestrial photovoltaic power system technology has matured in all areas, from collector reliability to system and subsystem design and operations. Today's PV systems are finding widespread use in powering loads where conventional sources are either unavailable, unreliable, or too costly. A broad range of applications is possible because of the modularity of the technology---it can be used to power loads ranging from less than a watt to several megawatts. This inherent modularity makes PV an excellent choice to play a major role in rural electrification in the developing world. The future for grid-connected photovoltaic systems is also very promising. Indications are that several of today's technologies, at higher production rates and in megawatt-sized installations, will generate electricity in the vicinity of $0.12/kWh in the near future. 12 refs., 3 figs.

Jones, G.J.; Post, H.N.; Thomas, M.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

General reliability and safety methodology and its application to wind energy conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In conventional system reliability calculations, each component may be in the Operable state or the Under Repair state. These calculations derive system unavailability, or the probability of the system's being down for repairs. By introducing a third component state between Operable and Under Repair - namely, Defective, But Defect Undetected - the methods developed in this report enable system safety projections to be made in addition to availability projections. Also provided is a mechanism for computing the effect of inspection schedules on both safety and availability. A Reliability and Safety Program (RASP) is detailed which performs these computations and also calculates costs for system inspections and repairs. RASP is applied to a simplified wind energy conversion system example.

Edesess, M.; McConnell, R. D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Outsourcing Logistics in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply chain challenges that the Oil and Gas industry faces in material logistics have enlarged in the last few decades owing to an increased hydro-carbon demand. Many reasons justify the challenges, such as exploration activities which have moved to remote locations, not only increasing distances from supply houses and refineries but also escalating logistics costs. Mammoth costs of material unavailability drive the inefficiencies largely. The objectives of the study is to discover the logistics needs of oil and gas companies, the motivation, benefits and the requirements of outsourcing logistics. The study aims to identify the material supply chain inefficiencies in the industry and proposes solutions to solve them. In this study, Oil and Gas industrys outsourcing practices in logistics are analyzed along with the trends of the third party logistics companies serving the industry. The participants of this study are from different companies in the Oil and Gas industry dealing with supply chain operations.

Herrera, Cristina 1988-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Distributed video coding for arrays of remote sensing nodes : final report.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for the Sandia National Laboratory funded Student Fellowship position at New Mexico State University (NMSU) from 2008 to 2010. Ivan Mecimore, the PhD student in Electrical Engineering at NMSU, was conducting research into image and video processing techniques to identify features and correlations within images without requiring the decoding of the data compression. Such an analysis technique would operate on the encoded bit stream, potentially saving considerable processing time when operating on a platform that has limited computational resources. Unfortunately, the student has elected in mid-year not to continue with his research or the fellowship position. The student is unavailable to provide any details of his research for inclusion in this final report. As such, this final report serves solely to document the information provided in the previous end of year summary.

Mecimore, Ivan (New Mexico State University); Creusere, Chuck D. (New Mexico State University); Merchant, Bion John

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters  

SciTech Connect

In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Statistical analysis of cascading failures in power grids  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a new microscopic model of cascading failures in transmission power grids. This model accounts for automatic response of the grid to load fluctuations that take place on the scale of minutes, when optimum power flow adjustments and load shedding controls are unavailable. We describe extreme events, caused by load fluctuations, which cause cascading failures of loads, generators and lines. Our model is quasi-static in the causal, discrete time and sequential resolution of individual failures. The model, in its simplest realization based on the Directed Current description of the power flow problem, is tested on three standard IEEE systems consisting of 30, 39 and 118 buses. Our statistical analysis suggests a straightforward classification of cascading and islanding phases in terms of the ratios between average number of removed loads, generators and links. The analysis also demonstrates sensitivity to variations in line capacities. Future research challenges in modeling and control of cascading outages over real-world power networks are discussed.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pfitzner, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many building owners and facility managers are deeply interested in both operation and maintenance costs related to a building's life cycle. Optimizing energy consumption and obtaining long equipment activity requires sophisticated management. If the data needed for this management are unavailable, then measures must be taken to augment them. We were able to lower power consumption in heat source equipment by ap-proximately 12% by means of analysis and evaluations as well as using optimum measurement features that al-low measuring operation data without stopping opera-tion of surface measurement equipment. More cost-effective renewal plans and designs were achieved by proposing equipment specifications based on the cooling and heating load during operation.

Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Recent results from the carbon fusion project at Notre Dame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carbon fusion project at Notre Dame is aimed towards measuring the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C fusion cross section and its decay branches relevant to astrophysics down to the lowest possible energies. To complement this approach, we are also exploring new techniques for providing more reliable extrapolations of the cross sections in the energy ranges where experimental data are unavailable. In this paper, we report two recent results: 1) an upper limit for the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C fusion cross section, and 2) a new measurement of {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,n) along with an improved extrapolation technique based on the mirror reaction channel, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p). The outlook for astrophysical heavy-ion fusion studies at Notre Dame is also discussed.

Bucher, Brian; Notani, Masahiro; Alongi, Adam; Browne, Justin; Cahillane, Craig; Dahlstrom, Erin; Davies, Paul; Fang Xiao; Lamm, Larry; Ma Chi; Moncion, Alexander; Tan Wanpeng; Tang Xiaodong; Thomas, Spencer [Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first three years of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. Because the hatchery and the evaluation study and the fish health monitoring investigations are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The majority of the data that is crucial for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Onjukka, Sam T.; Focher, Shannon M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Parameterization and sensitivity analysis of the BIOME-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model: Net primary production controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Ecosystem simulation models use descriptive input parameters to establish the physiology, biochemistry, structure, and allocation patterns of vegetation functional types, or biomes. For single-stand simulations it is possible to measure required data, but as spatial resolution increases, so too does data unavailability. Generalized biome parameterizations are then required. Undocumented parameter selection and unknown model sensitivity to parameter variation for larger-resolution simulations are currently the major limitations to global and regional modeling. The authors present documented input parameters for a process-based ecosystem simulation model, BIOME BGC, for major natural temperate biomes. Parameter groups include the following: turnover and mortality; allocation; carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N); the percent of plant material in labile, cellulose, and lignin pools; leaf morphology; leaf conductance rates and limitations; canopy water interception and light extinction; and the percent of leaf nitrogen in Rubisco (ribulose bisphosphate-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase) (PLNR). Using climatic and site de-

Michael A. White; Peter E. Thornton; Steven W. Running; Ramakrishna R. Nemani

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The most crucial data for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available. A comprehensive fish health monitoring regimen was incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation study for Umatilla Hatchery. This is a unique feature of the Umatilla Hatchery evaluation project.

Keefe, MaryLouise; Carmichael, Richard W.; French, Rod A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluation of the uranium double spike technique for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a uranium double spike in analysis of environmental samples showed that a {sup 235}U enrichment of 1% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.00732) can be distinguished from natural ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.00725). Experiments performed jointly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) used a carefully calibrated double spike of {sup 233}U and {sup 236}U to obtain much better precision than is possible using conventional analytical techniques. A variety of different sampling media (vegetation and swipes) showed that, provided sufficient care is exercised in choice of sample type, relative standard deviations of less than {+-} 0.5% can be routinely obtained. This ability, unavailable without use of the double spike, has enormous potential significance in the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities.

Hemberger, P.H.; Rokop, D.J.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, D.H.; Turner, M.L.; Barshick, C.M.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors C. Kreemer, Geoffrey Blewitt and William C. Hammond Editors John S. Oldow and Patricia H. Cashman Published Geological Society of America, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation

286

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission Virginia's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the restructuring laws, but still require emissions and fuel mix disclosure. Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provider must file a report

287

Training Topic Group Conference Call June 16, 1999 ROLL CALL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 16, 1999 June 16, 1999 ROLL CALL Aubrey Godwin Larry Grove Deena LaRue Carol O'Claire Jim Price Scott Ramsay Bill Ruting Randy Small STATUS OF TRAINING MODULES The subcontractor has forwarded to HAMMER one hardcopy and CD-ROM containing Modules 1-4 student workbooks, instructor guides, and viewgraphs for review. Review comments are being incorporated, and corrected CD-ROM will be forwarded to HAMMER tomorrow. Modules 1-4 material will be used during the July TEC/WG breakout sessions where facilitated and self-study training pilots will be conducted. Scott Ramsay, Rich Gale, and Wilbur Smith will be trainers for the facilitated sessions. Bill Ruting will conduct one self-study session, and another person will be identified to conduct the other self-study session as Tom Breckenridge is unavailable to assist. Modules

288

Tips & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights Images: (optional) Only images in JPEG, BMP, GIF, or PNG can be accepted up to 10 Mb. The image caption is limited to 500 characters. Tip: For comparisons, lay multiple images out side by side, vertically or in a grid formation to create a single image file for uploading on the Research Highlight Submittal Form. Trick: If image editing soft ware is unavailable, the task can be accomplished using Microsoft (MS) Word as follows: 1. Insert or paste the images on a blank MS Word document and arrange them as desired. 2. Use the "Print Screen" function on the computer to capture the composite image. 3. Paste the new image (created from "Print Screen") onto a new blank MS Word document or

289

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Basin and Range Province; Cassia County Idaho; economic geology; exploration; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; heat flow; heat flux; Idaho; North America; Raft River basin; south-central Idaho; surveys; temperature; thermal conductivity; United States; USGS Author(s): Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1986 Document Number: Unavailable

290

Definition: Forced Outage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forced Outage Forced Outage Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forced Outage The removal from service availability of a generating unit, transmission line, or other facility for emergency reasons., The condition in which the equipment is unavailable due to unanticipated failure.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Forced_Outage&oldid=480310" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data

291

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nd nd Energy & Innovation Conference November 28-29, 2012 Partnering for Innovation: Critical Materials Roe-Hoan Yoon, Lead Paul King, Business Development Critical Materials Strategic Growth Area NETL-Regional University Allience 2 o Critical: * Intrinsically rare, low grade, or currently unavailable in the United States. o Energy Critical Elements: * Chemical elements that are essential for the deployment of transformative energy technologies. Critical Materials-Definition 3 Application of Critical Materials 3 4  Short Term (present t - 2015) Criticality Matrix Your Logo  Mid Term (2015 - 2025) 5  Essential for the U.S. leading the 6 th wave of technology innovation o Renewable energy development o High-tech industry o Sustainability

292

Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data January 19, 2012 - 2:54pm Addthis Aneesh Chopra What does this mean for me? 6 million utility customers in California now have access to their electricity usage data through the Green Button program, and millions more will get access as the program expands. This article is cross-posted from the White House blog. Imagine being able to shrink your utility bill, or knowing the optimal size and cost-effectiveness of solar panels for your home, or verifying that energy-efficiency retrofit investments have successfully paid for themselves over time. Far too often these and similarly important-and potentially money-saving-opportunities are unavailable to us. Why?

293

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Homeowner energy efficient improvements (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying costs up to $2,000 Whole-house evaluation: $150 for the first 1000 customers '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.''''' Kentucky offers ENERGY STAR Home Performance rebates and loans for

294

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

Jiles, David C. (Ames, IA); Sipahi, Levent B. (Ames, IA)

1994-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work for Others Agreement Work for Others Agreement scientists The DOE national laboratories were granted the authority to perform work for others by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 [Public Law 83-703; 42 USC 2053]. Work For Others programs at the DOE national laboratories are governed by DOE Directive 481.1-1A, "Reimbursable Work for Non-Federal Sponsors: Process Manual." Work For Others agreements provide an excellent way for companies, universities, and other entities to access the unique facilities, technologies, and expertise available at ORNL on a project-specific basis. This gives the sponsor access to research and development expertise and technology unavailable in the private sector, without having to expend the capital cost of developing or re-creating such facilities, expertise, and technology for itself.

297

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the sampling and analytical techniques used for tracer analysis in the Raft River and East Mesa field tests. The collection procedures and sample preservation techniques, analytical methods and possible sources of contamination or error are discussed in detail. Author(s): Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 12/1/1984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5121460

298

Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," 411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," collects information from the Nation's power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas: the security of the electrical systems; the usage of

299

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

300

Potomac River Generating Station Dept. of Energy Case No. EO-05-01; September 8, 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Craig A. Glazer Craig A. Glazer Vice President - Federal Government Policy PJM Washington Office (202) 393-7756 .FAX (202) 393-7741 e-mail: glazec@pjm.com CRITICAL ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE INFORMATION HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THIS SUBMITTAL FOR PRIVILEGED TREATMENT September 8, 2005 Lawrence Mansueti Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Rm. 8H-033 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Potomac River Generating Station Dept. of Energy Case No. EO-05-01 Dear Mr. Mansueti: PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. and PEPCO Holdings, Inc. is hereby providing you with additional information concerning reliability impacts under various system conditions associated with the unavailability of the Potomac River Generating Station to serve load in the D.C. area.

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301

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Author William V. Parker Published EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Citation William V. Parker. Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging [Internet]. 2012. N/A. EIJ Earth Imaging Journal. [updated 2013/09/20;cited 2013/09/20]. Available from: http://eijournal.com/2012/discover-the-benefits-of-radar-imaging GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar imaging Details Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): William V. Parker Published: EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012

302

Candu 6 severe core damage accident consequence analysis for steam generator tube rupture scenario using MAAP4-CANDU V4.0.5A: preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the preliminary results of the consequence analysis for a generic AECL CANDU 6 station, when it undergoes a postulated, low probability Steam Generator multiple Tube Rupture (SGTR) severe accident with assumed unavailability of several critical plant safety systems. The Modular Accident Analysis Program for CANDU (MAAP4-CANDU) code was used for this analysis. The SGTR accident is assumed to begin with the guillotine rupture of 10 steam generator tubes in one steam generator in Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) loop 1. For the reference case, the following systems were assumed unavailable: moderator and shield cooling, emergency core cooling, crash cool-down, and main and auxiliary feed water. Two additional cases were analyzed, one with the crash cool-down system available, and another with the crash cool-down and the auxiliary feed water systems available. The three scenarios considered in this study show that most of the initial fission product inventory would be retained within the containment by various fission product retention mechanisms. For the case where the crash cool-down system was credited but the auxiliary feed water systems were not credited, the total mass of volatile fission products released to the environment including stable and radioactive isotopes was about four times more than in the reference case, because fission products could be released directly from the PHTS to the environment through the Main Steam Safety Valves (MSSVs), bypassing the containment. For the case where the crash cool-down and auxiliary feed water systems were credited, the volatile fission product release to the environment was insignificant, because the fission product release was substantially mitigated by scrubbing in the water pool in the secondary side of the steam generator (SG). (authors)

Petoukhov, S.M.; Awadh, B.; Mathew, P.M. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM TO SELECTED PORTIONS OF THE NUCLEAR HVAC SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design requirement probability of 0.01 or less in a 4-hour period ensures that the nuclear heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in the primary confinement areas of the Dry Transfer Facilities (DTFs) and Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) is working during a Category 1 drop event involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) assemblies (BSC 2004a , Section 5.1.1.48). This corresponds to an hourly HVAC failure rate of 2.5E-3 per hour or less, which is contributed to by two dominant causes: equipment failure and loss of electrical power. Meeting this minimum threshold ensures that a Category 1 initiating event followed by the failure of HVAC is a Category 2 event sequence. The two causes for the loss of electrical power include the loss of offsite power and the loss of onsite power distribution. Thus, in order to meet the threshold requirement aforementioned, the failure rate of mechanical equipment, loss of offsite power, and loss of onsite power distribution must be less than or equal to 2.5E-3 per hour for the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF. The loss of offsite power occurs at a frequency of 1.1E-5 per hour (BSC 2004a, Section 5.1.1.48). The purpose of this analysis is to determine the probability of occurrence of the unavailability of the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF due to loss of electrical power. In addition, this analysis provides insights on the contribution to the unavailability of the HVAC system due to equipment failure. The scope of this analysis is limited to finding the frequency of loss of electrical power to the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF.

N. Ramirez

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Session 19: Geothermal Materials Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the most pressing problems constraining the development of geothermal energy is the lack of satisfactory component and system reliability. This is due to the unavailability, on a commercial scale, of cost-effective materials that can function in a wide range of geothermal environments and to the unavailability of a comprehensive body of directly related test data or materials selection experience. In 1976, the GHTD started the Geothermal Materials Program to address materials-related problems, and since 1978 Brookhaven National Laboratory has provided technical and managerial assistance in the implementation of the effort. Major successes have been attained in the development of elastomers for high-temperature applications and in the use of polymer concrete liners for corrosion protection. Both technologies have been successfully transferred to industry. Current efforts in metallic and nonmetallic materials development and corrosion protection will be summarized. In the metals area, testing of a series of experimental stainless steels has led to compositions which show a very remarkable resistance to pitting corrosion in hot chloride electrolytes. Combinations of molybdenum and nitrogen are very beneficial. Alternate materials for line shaft pump bearings have been identified through tests in simulated hot brine. Cermets and carbides show promise of extending pump life. A series of drill bit steels has been examined for fatigue and hot fracture toughness. The work has indicated alloys with properties that exceed those of materials now in use. A major finding in the nonmetallic materials area has been the development of fluorinated elastomers for use in statis seals at temperatures greater than 300 C. Field testing has just commenced, but based upon laboratory results, the work is very promising. Commercialization of this material is underway. Technology transfer of a 240 C EPDM was completed earlier. Field testing of polymer concrete-lined pipe has been successful, and at least one commercial source of the material now exists. Programs started in FY 1983 include the development of high-thermal-conductivity composites for heat exchanger tubes and elastomers for dynamic seal applications. Cathodic protection measurements of carbon steel have been made, both in the laboratory and in the field, which showed the feasibility of such protection of some carbon steel components, e.g., the outer surface of well casing. More work is suggested to include heat exchanges. Studies of corrosion in binary systems is also reviewed.

van Rooyen, Daniel

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.Degradation pc 2. D. Energy Consumption pc 3. D. GDP pc 4.

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Procyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP MonetaryProcyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP PC of MI & ERSFiscal Procyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP Monetary

Aizenman, Joshua; Chinn, Menzie David; Ito, Hiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Monthly Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP (Thousand Btu per chained (2005) dollar) Total Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP

309

Cisco Systems, Inc. Responses to Department of Commerce ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to-year increase in real per capita GDP ... But beyond increases in GDP and employment ... by dramatic innovation in healthcare, education, and energy. ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Globalization and the Sustainability of Large Current Account Imbalances: Size Matters*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current account/GDP of AOCs. Plotted for the case where cu Caccount deficit/GDP of AOCs will double in ten years, from

Aizenman, Joshua; Sun, Yi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Globalization and the Sustainability of Large Current Account Imbalances: Size Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

account deficit/GDP of AOCs will double in ten years, fromcurrent account/GDP of AOCs. Plotted for the case where cu C

Aizenman, Joshua; Sun, Yi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Challenge The decommissioning of GDP facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of...

313

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... Total Energy Consumption: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP: State: Trillion Btu:

314

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and FTF personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and F Tank Farm (FTF), radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio. The installation of the radio repeater station in this PA will allow full and effective radio communications between HTF and FTF. The radio repeater station consists of a pole mounted antenna, a repeater station mounted on a concrete pad at the foot of the pole, and electrical power supplied to the repeater by a nearby electrical panel. The installation will be in E-Area,

315

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 19983 20024 20064 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 4. Denominators represent the value of production for the entire iron and still mills (NAICS 331111), not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, coal, residual fuel oil or coke.

316

Data:44ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Remote Access Unavailable Sector: Description: Applicable to Distributed Generation smaller than 3 MW of connected generation connected in parallel operation to the Cooperative's lines in accordance with the Cooperative's service rules and regulations and the Cooperative's Distributed Generation Procedures and Guidelines Manual for members. This rate is not applicable to temporary, shared, or resale service. This rate is applicable to service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter.

317

Data:Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Decatur County Rural E M C Effective date: 2010/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: OPTIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY RIDER FOR SINGLE PHASE RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS (1,000kWh LIMIT) Sector: Residential Description: Available to any member of the Corporation with less than 25 kW monthly demand taking service concurrently under Schedule SP Single Phase Electric Service. The Corporation reserves the right to limit the total number of participants under this Rider. Energy sold pursuant to this Rider is generated using renewable resources. While the Corporation expects that power generated from renewable resources will be readily available on the wholesale market, the Corporation makes no guarantee that such resources will be available at all times. If the Corporation determines that for any reason that renewable resources are unavailable or insufficient to furnish the member purchases hereunder, the Corporation may suspend application of this Rider. When the renewable resources again become available, the Corporation may resume application of this Rider.

318

EIA - Future role of the United States in world coal trade  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future role of the United States in world coal trade Future role of the United States in world coal trade International Energy Outlook 2010 Future role of the United States in world coal trade U.S. coal exports increased each year from 2002 to 2008 at an average annual rate of 12.8 percent, to 82 million tons in 2008. Some analysts have viewed the sharp increase in U.S. exports as an indication of the growing importance of the United States as a world coal supplier. There has also been speculation that China's growing demand for coal will support this trend in the future. However, U.S. coal is a relatively high-cost supply source when shipped to Asian markets, and in the long term U.S. coal will be competing in the Chinese market with lower cost suppliers, notably Australia and Indonesia among others. U.S. exports compete most strongly in European markets and then only when less expensive options are unavailable. In IEO2010, the United States remains a marginal coal supplier over the long term, responding to short-term disruptions or spikes in demand rather than significantly expanding its market share of world coal trade.

319

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and FTF personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and F Tank Farm (FTF), radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio. The installation of the radio repeater station in this PA will allow full and effective radio communications between HTF and FTF. The radio repeater station consists of a pole mounted antenna, a repeater station mounted on a concrete pad at the foot of the pole, and electrical power supplied to the repeater by a nearby electrical panel. The installation will be in E-Area,

320

Data:F14544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Transmission Voltage Supplemental Services: For NRG Energy Center LLC 16 MW EWG Unit Sector: Industrial Description: "AVAILABILITY: This tariff is available to the 16 MW electric generating station operated by NRG Energy Center, LLC as an Exempt Wholesale Generator ("EWG") and located at 1280 West North Street ("16 MW EWG Unit"). The facility sells capacity and associated energy to third parties and normally provides for its own electrical demand and energy requirements, but requires intermittent service when that source of supply is unavailable. This tariff is available to provide supplemental capacity and associated energy for occasional plant start up and standby needs for the 16 MW EWG Unit, but it shall not be available for 1) resale or 2) for supply of plant auxiliary services for any other plant or generating station."

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321

Data:A289622a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 22a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Greenville Utilities Comm Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large General Service- Backstand/ Emergency Service Sector: Commercial Description: *kW rate as would be billed according to the electric rate schedule applicable to the user This schedule is available for electric service used by a non-residential customer desiring service to supplement electricity normally provided by Commission approved, customer-owned, cogeneration equipment during times of unavailability or curtailment of such equipment. The schedule is applicable to customers receiving service under either Electric Rate Schedule No. 3-CP-C, Large General Service-CP-C or Electric Rate Schedule No. 11, Medium General Service.

322

Reliability assessment of active residential solar energy systems, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Experiences with active solar energy systems in the last few years have, in many cases, been less than encouraging. A quantification of the problem areas discovered in a sampling of the active residential solar energy systems in the state of Colorado is presented. While many problems were found, the potential for easy solution of the problems by design or installation refinement is great. Reported is a summary of the findings of the mechanical inspections of twelve systems during the 1978-79 winter. Only one system operated at its expected mechanical, thermal and economic performance level. Four other systems performed well mechanically, but only one of these had thermal performance meeting design expectations. The remaining seven systems did not work well mechanically or thermally. One significantly raised the utility bill of the residence on which it was installed. Poor system design was found to be the major cause of low performance. Also, installation quality was low and installation errors were frequent. Qualified solar system service was virtually unavailable. Nearly all the problems found were solvable using present technology. The greatest immediate need is for training of designers, installers and service people and support of off-market development of total systems.

Sharp, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Using a Balun Transformer Combiner for High Power Microwave Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel coaxial power combiner design has been duplicated that has distinct advantages over other combiner geometries that can handle high power. This design is being applied to combine four 3 kW power supplies to obtain a 10 kW, 5 MHz system for an ICRF antenna on HSX. In the past, Wilkinson type combiners have had limited application to high power systems because of the lack of non-inductive, high power, 100 Omega balance loads. With this new design, standard 50 Omega dummy loads can be used instead for the balance load. The cost is considerably lower than lumped element combiner designs which are dominated by capacitor costs. At such a relatively low frequency, a 3-dB quarter-wave coupled-line coupler becomes impractically long, and a conventional branch-line hybrid requires 35 Omega-line, which is commercially unavailable. The balun combiner uses less transmission line than a ring hybrid and has good bandwidth characteristics even away from its best line impedance. Theoretical calculations and modeling were performed for line impedances from 65 Omega to 75 Omega. Measurements from a low-power test device show excellent agreement with theory, and construction of the high power system is underway.

Kaufman, Michael C [ORNL; Pesavento, Philip V [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Conversion of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to convert the UMR Reactor fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and to ship the HEU fuel back to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site. The actual core conversion was completed in the summer of 1992. The HEU fuel was offloaded to an onsite storage pit where it remained until July, 1996. In July, 1996, the HEU fuel was shipped to the DOE Savannah River Site. The objectives of the project have been achieved. DOE provided the following funding for the project. Several papers were published regarding the conversion project and are listed in the Attachment. In retrospect, the conversion project required much more time and effort than originally thought. Several difficulties were encountered including the unavailability of a shipping cask for several years. The authors are grateful for the generous funding provided by DOE for this project but wish to point out that much of their efforts on the conversion project went unfunded.

Bolon, A.E.; Straka, M.; Freeman, D.W.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

A substantial fraction of HVAC energy use in large commercial buildings is due to fan operation. Fan energy use depends in part on the relationship between system pressure drop and flow through the fan, which is commonly called a "system curve." As a step toward enabling better selections of air-handling system components and analyses of common energy efficiency measures such as duct static pressure reset and duct leakage sealing, this paper shows that a simple four-parameter physical model can be used to define system curves. Our model depends on the square of the fan flow, as is commonly considered. It also includes terms that account for linear-like flow resistances such as filters and coils, and for supply duct leakage when damper positions are fixed or are changed independently of static pressure or fan flow. Only two parameters are needed for systems with variable-position supply dampers (e.g., VAV box dampers modulating to control flow). For these systems, reducing or eliminating supply duct leakage does not change the system curve. The parametric system curve may be most useful when applied to field data. Non-linear techniques could be used to fit the curve to fan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design, when measurements are unavailable, one could use duct design calculation tools instead to determine the coefficients.

Sherman, Max; Wray, Craig

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database : wind plant reliability benchmark.  

SciTech Connect

To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems' ORAPWind%C2%AE (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREW's reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Keifer, Sharon (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

Olsen, A.R.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume IV; Washington Subbasin Above McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fishereis, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SuperB Technical Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic climate led to a formal cancelation of the project on Nov 27, 2012.

SuperB Collaboration; M. Baszczyk; P. Dorosz; J. Kolodziej; W. Kucewicz; M. Sapor; A. Jeremie; E. Grauges Pous; G. E. Bruno; G. De Robertis; D. Diacono; G. Donvito; P. Fusco; F. Gargano; F. Giordano; F. Loddo; F. Loparco; G. P. Maggi; V. Manzari; M. N. Mazziotta; E. Nappi; A. Palano; B. Santeramo; I. Sgura; L. Silvestris; V. Spinoso; G. Eigen; J. Zalieckas; Z. Zhuo; L. Jenkovszky; G. Balbi; M. Boldini; D. Bonacorsi; V. Cafaro; I. D'Antone; G. M. Dallavalle; R. Di Sipio; F. Fabbri; L. Fabbri; A. Gabrielli; D. Galli; P. Giacomelli; V. Giordano; F. M. Giorgi; C. Grandi; I. Lax; S. Lo Meo; U. Marconi; A. Montanari; G. Pellegrini; M. Piccinini; T. Rovelli; N. Semprini Cesari; G. Torromeo; N. Tosi; R. Travaglini; V. M. Vagnoni; S. Valentinetti; M. Villa; A. Zoccoli; J. -F. Caron; C. Hearty; P. F. -T. Lu; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. -C. So; M. Yu. Barnyakov; V. E. Blinov; A. A. Botov; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; S. A. Kononov; E. A. Kravchenko; E. B. Levichev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; D. A. Shtol; Y. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. Cardini; M. Carpinelli; D. S. -T. Chao; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; K. Flood; J. Hanson; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; R. Y. Zhu; N. Randazzo; E. De La Cruz Burelo; Y. Zheng; P. Campos; M. De Silva; A. Kathirgamaraju; B. Meadows; B. Pushpawela; Y. Shi; M. Sokoloff; G. Lopez Castro; V. Ciaschini; P. Franchini; F. Giacomini; A. Paolini; G. A. Calderon Polania; S. Laczek; P. Romanowicz; B. Szybinski; M. Czuchry; L. Flis; D. Harezlak; J. Kocot; M. Radecki; M. Sterzel; T. Szepieniec; T. Szymocha; P. Wjcik; M. Andreotti; W. Baldini; R. Calabrese; V. Carassiti; G. Cibinetto; A. Cotta Ramusino; F. Evangelisti; A. Gianoli; E. Luppi; R. Malaguti; M. Manzali; M. Melchiorri; M. Munerato; C. Padoan; V. Santoro; L. Tomassetti; M. M. Beretta; M. Biagini; M. Boscolo; E. Capitolo; R. de Sangro; M. Esposito; G. Felici; G. Finocchiaro; M. Gatta; C. Gatti; S. Guiducci; S. Lauciani; P. Patteri; I. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; P. Raimondi; M. Rama; C. Sanelli; S. Tomassini; P. Fabbricatore; D. Delepine; M. A. Reyes Santos; M. Chrzaszcz; R. Grzymkowski; P. Knap; J. Kotula; T. Lesiak; J. Ludwin; J. Michalowski; B. Pawlik; B. Rachwal; M. Stodulski; J. Wiechczynski; M. Witek; L. Zawiejski; M. Zdybal; V. Y. Aushev; A. Ustynov; N. Arnaud; P. Bambade; C. Beigbeder; F. Bogard; M. Borsato; D. Breton; J. Brossard; L. Burmistrov; D. Charlet; V. Chaumat; O. Dadoun; M. El Berni; J. Maalmi; V. Puill; C. Rimbault; A. Stocchi; V. Tocut; A. Variola; S. Wallon; G. Wormser; F. Grancagnolo; E. Ben-Haim; S. Sitt; M. Baylac; O. Bourrion; J. -M. Deconto; Y. Gomez Martinez; N. Monseu; J. -F. Muraz; J. -S. Real; C. Vescovi; R. Cenci; A. Jawahery; D. Roberts; E. W. Twedt; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; S. Nderitu; P. Patel; S. H. Robertson; D. Swersky; A. Warburton; E. Cuautle Flores; G. Toledo Sanchez; P. Biassoni; L. Bombelli; M. Citterio; S. Coelli; C. Fiorini; V. Liberali; M. Monti; B. Nasri; N. Neri; F. Palombo; F. Sabatini; A. Stabile; A. Berra; A. Giachero; C. Gotti; D. Lietti; M. Maino; G. Pessina; M. Prest; J. -P. Martin; M. Simard; N. Starinski; P. Taras; A. Drutskoy; S. Makarychev; A. V. Nefediev; A. Aloisio; S. Cavaliere; G. De Nardo; M. Della Pietra; A. Doria; R. Giordano; A. Ordine; S. Pardi; G. Russo; C. Sciacca; I. I. Bigi; C. P. Jessop; W. Wang; M. Bellato; M. Benettoni; M. Corvo; A. Crescente; F. Dal Corso; U. Dosselli; C. Fanin; A. Gianelle; S. Longo; M. Michelotto; F. Montecassiano; M. Morandin; R. Pengo; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; R. Stroili; L. Gaioni; A. Manazza; M. Manghisoni; L. Ratti; V. Re; G. Traversi; S. Zucca; S. Bizzaglia; M. Bizzarri; C. Cecchi; S. Germani; M. Lebeau; P. Lubrano; E. Manoni; A. Papi; A. Rossi; G. Scolieri; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; A. Fella; F. Forti; M. Giorgi; L. Lilli; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Paladino; F. Pantaleo; E. Paoloni; A. L. Perez Perez; G. Rizzo; J. Walsh; A. Fernndez Tllez; G. Beck; M. Berman; A. Bevan; F. Gannaway; G. Inguglia; A. J. Martin; J. Morris; V. Bocci; M. Capodiferro; G. Chiodi; I. Dafinei; N. V. Drenska; R. Faccini; F. Ferroni; C. Gargiulo; P. Gauzzi; C. Luci; R. Lunadei; G. Martellotti; F. Pellegrino; V. Pettinacci; D. Pinci; L. Recchia; D. Ruggeri; A. Zullo; P. Camarri; R. Cardarelli; C. De Santis; A. Di Ciaccio; V. Di Felice; F. Di Palma; A. Di Simone; L. Marcelli; R. Messi; D. Moricciani; R. Sparvoli; S. Tammaro; P. Branchini; A. Budano; S. Bussino; M. Ciuchini; F. Nguyen; A. Passeri; F. Ruggieri; E. Spiriti; F. Wilson; I. Leon Monzon; J. R. Millan-Almaraz; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; D. Aston; B. Dey; A. Fisher; P. D. Jackson; D. W. G. S. Leith; S. Luitz; D. MacFarlane; M. McCulloch; S. Metcalfe; A. Novokhatski; S. Osier; R. Prepost; B. Ratcliff; J. Seeman; M. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; U. Wienands; W. Wisniewski; B. D. Altschul

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Western Ledge Reef Wreck: The Analysis and Reconstruction of the Late 16th-Century Ship of the Spanish Empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Ledge Reef Wreck, discovered and later excavated in Bermuda between 1989 and 1991, is a prime example of Iberian shipbuilding within a broader Atlantic context. Operating during the late 16th-century, arguably one of the most fascinating periods of Spanish maritime history, the ship epitomizes the culture and technology identified with the celebrated fleets of the Carrera de Indias. By combining the new and previously unavailable data with that of the original reports, this dissertation outlines the structural details of this small utilitarian vessel which plowed the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and the Spanish America. Regarded as one of the better preserved Iberian shipwrecks in the New World, the hull timbers were disassembled and raised to the surface for detailed recording and analysis; the most comprehensive being the study and reconstruction presented in this dissertation. This data not only illustrates the transition from late medieval ship construction founded on the unempirical and intuitive style of local shipwrights to that of the geometrically- and scientific-rooted Renaissance design philosophy, but also to a frame-led assembly sequence. The hull remains and associated cultural material excavated from the site prove to be an important 16th- and 17th-century collection of Spanish and New World origin, which collectively reinforce the notion that the Western Ledge Reef Wreck was on its homebound course when it sunk among treacherous Bermuda reefs sometime between 1560 and 1600.

Bojakowski, Piotr

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Markovian reliability analysis under uncertainty with an application on the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for the assessment of uncertainties about reliability of nuclear reactor systems described by markov models is developed, and the uncertainties about the failure probability of the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are assessed. Failure and repair rates and all other inputs of reliability analysis are taken as random variables with known probability distribution functions (pdf's). The pdf of reliability is calculated by both a Monte Carlo simulation and a Taylor series expansion approximation. Three techniques are developed to reduce the computational effort: ordering of system states, merging of Markov processes, and judicious choice of time steps. A Markov model has been used for reliability analysis under uncertainty of the shutdown system of the CRBR. It accounts for common-cause failures, interdependences between unavailability of the system and occurrence of transients, and inspection and maintenance procedures that depend on the state of the system and that include possibility of human errors. Under these conditions, the failure probability of the shutdown system differs significantly from that computed without common-cause failures, human errors, and input uncertainties.

Papazoglou, I.A.; Gyftopoulos, E.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Physics of the Intergalactic Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intergalactic space is filled with a pervasive medium of ionized gas, the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). A residual neutral fraction is detected in the spectra of Quasi-Stellar Objects at both low and high redshifts, revealing a highly fluctuating medium with temperatures characteristic of photoionized gas. The statistics of the fluctuations are well-reproduced by numerical gravity-hydrodynamics simulations within the context of standard cosmological structure formation scenarios. As such, the study of the IGM offers an opportunity to probe the nature of the primordial density fluctuations on scales unavailable to other methods. The simulations also suggest the IGM is the dominant reservoir of baryons produced by the Big Bang, and so the principal source of the matter from which galaxies formed. The detection of metal systems within the IGM shows that it was enriched by evolved stars early in its history, demonstrating an intimate connection between galaxy formation and the IGM. The author presents a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the structure and physical properties of the IGM and its relation to galaxies, concluding with comments on prospects for furthering the study of the IGM using future ground-based facilities and space-based experiments.

Avery A. Meiksin

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC SIGNATURES OF FLARES OBTAINED BY SOHO/MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER AND GONG INSTRUMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of seismic responses to solar flares were carried out using time-distance (TD) and holography techniques applied to SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) Dopplergrams obtained from space and unaffected by terrestrial atmospheric disturbances. However, the ground-based network GONG is potentially a very valuable source of sunquake observations, especially in cases where space observations are unavailable. In this paper, we present an updated technique for pre-processing of GONG observations for the application of subjacent vantage holography. Using this method and TD diagrams, we investigate several sunquakes observed in association with M- and X-class solar flares and compare the outcomes with those reported earlier using MDI data. In both GONG and MDI data sets, for the first time, we also detect the TD ridge associated with the 2001 September 9 flare. Our results show reassuringly positive identification of sunquakes from GONG data that can provide further information about the physics of seismic processes associated with solar flares.

Zharkov, S.; Matthews, S. A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zharkova, V. V. [Horton D Building, Department of Mathematics, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

A new image representation for compact and secure communication  

SciTech Connect

In many areas of nuclear materials management there is a need for communication, archival, and retrieval of annotated image data between heterogeneous platforms and devices to effectively implement safety, security, and safeguards of nuclear materials. Current image formats such as JPEG are not ideally suited in such scenarios as they are not scalable to different viewing formats, and do not provide a high-level representation of images that facilitate automatic object/change detection or annotation. The new Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) open standard for representing graphical information, recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is designed to address issues of image scalability, portability, and annotation. However, until now there has been no viable technology to efficiently field images of high visual quality under this standard. Recently, LANL has developed a vectorized image representation that is compatible with the SVG standard and preserves visual quality. This is based on a new geometric framework for characterizing complex features in real-world imagery that incorporates perceptual principles of processing visual information known from cognitive psychology and vision science, to obtain a polygonal image representation of high fidelity. This representation can take advantage of all textual compression and encryption routines unavailable to other image formats. Moreover, this vectorized image representation can be exploited to facilitate automated object recognition that can reduce time required for data review. The objects/features of interest in these vectorized images can be annotated via animated graphics to facilitate quick and easy display and comprehension of processed image content.

Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, A. N. (Alexei N.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Preliminary Analysis and Case Study of Transmission Constraints and Wind Energy in the West: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind developers typically need long-term transmission service to finance their projects; however, most of the capacity on several key paths is reserved by existing firm contracts. Because non-firm contracts are only offered for periods up to 1 year, obtaining financing for the wind project is generally not possible when firm capacity is unavailable. However, sufficient capacity may exist on the constrained paths for new wind projects that can risk curtailment for a small number of hours of the year. This paper presents the results of a study sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a work group participant in the Rocky Mountain Area Transmission Study (RMATS). Using recent historical power flow data, case studies were conducted on the constrained paths between Wyoming-Colorado (TOT3) and Montana-Northwest, coinciding with areas of exceptional wind resources. The potential curtailment frequency for hypothetical 100-MW and 500-MW wind plants was calculated using hourly wind data. The results from the study indicate that sufficient potential exists for innovative transmission products that can help bring more wind to load centers and increase the efficiency of the existing transmission network.

Milligan, M.; Berger, D. P.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Scalar Reconciliation for Gaussian Modulation of Two-Way Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) systems allow higher key rates and improved transmission distances over standard telecommunication networks in comparison to the one-way CVQKD protocols. To exploit the real potential of two-way CVQKD systems a robust reconciliation technique is needed. It is currently unavailable, which makes it impossible to reach the real performance of a two-way CVQKD system. The reconciliation process of correlated Gaussian variables is a complex problem that requires either tomography in the physical layer that is intractable in a practical scenario, or high-cost calculations in the multidimensional spherical space with strict dimensional limitations. To avoid these issues, we propose an efficient logical layer-based reconciliation method for two-way CVQKD to extract binary information from correlated Gaussian variables. We demonstrate that by operating on the raw-data level, the noise of the quantum channel can be corrected in the scalar space and the reconciliation can be extended to arbitrary high dimensions. We prove that the error probability of scalar reconciliation is zero in any practical CVQKD scenario, and provides unconditional security. The results allow to significantly improve the currently available key rates and transmission distances of two-way CVQKD. The proposed scalar reconciliation can also be applied in one-way systems as well, to replace the existing reconciliation schemes.

Laszlo Gyongyosi

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Considerations for Planting Corn into Damaged Fields of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many folks are still assessing the condition of wheat fields damaged by the low temperatures of the past week. In some situations, additional damage to wheat has occurred from standing water in fields due to frequent rains this winter and spring. Some growers may decide replanting damaged wheat fields to corn is a viable economic option. Some of the key considerations for doing so are described in this article. Killing the Remaining Stand of Wheat For damaged wheat fields that will be planted to corn, complete and timely control of the existing wheat is more important than if planting to soybean. Corn is more sensitive to early-season weed competition than soybean. Living wheat plants are essentially weeds and can absorb nitrogen and make it unavailable for the corn plants during the same growing season. Use of a glyphosate-based burndown program should include the use of glyphosate at 1.5 lb ae/A + 2.4-D at 1-2 pts/A. The herbicide 2,4-D is needed to control glyphosateresistant marestail which is very prevalent in southern Indiana and help with control of emerged common lambsquarter and ragweed. Apply in a spray volume of 10 to 15 GPA

Bill Johnson; Tony Vyn; Jim Camberato; Christian Krupke; Rl (bob Nielsen; Depts Of Botany; Plant Pathology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Target Selection using Geo-Demographic Joint Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managers often face the problem of limited data at the individual customer level. A common practice is to augment the limited available customer level data with averages for the group to which the customer belongs. We demonstrate using a target selection problem that this standard practice of using group (zip code) averages as a proxy for individual information leads to biased inference and erroneous managerial decisions. We therefore propose that firms use conditional averages, i.e., rather than use the raw averages for the group, use averages conditional on the available individual information in the firms internal databases. However, this is hard to implement in practice because group level joint distributions are unavailable. We develop a flexible and scalable approach to obtain group level joint distributions by augmenting the available group level marginal distributions with joint distribution information from a representative sample of individuals at the aggregate market level that comprises all the groups which form the aggregate market. Our approach to infer joint distributions has a wide range of applications in marketing and empirical industrial organization.

Jason A. Duan; Sachin Sancheti; K. Sudhir

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Analysis of the power consumption of a multimedia server under different dvfs policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractDynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) has been a useful power management strategy in embedded systems, mobile devices, and wireless sensor networks. Recently, it has also been proposed for servers and data centers in conjunction with service consolidation and optimal resource-pool sizing. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the scope and usefulness of DVFS in a server environment. We set up a multimedia server which will be used in two different scenarios. In the first scenario, the server will host requests to download video files of known and available formats. In the second scenario, videos of unavailable formats can be accepted; in which case the server employs a transcoder to convert between AVI, MPEG and SLV formats before the videos are downloaded. The workload we generate has a uniform arrival rate and an exponentially distributed video size. We use four dynamic scaling policies which are widely used with existing mainstream Linux operating systems. Our observation is that while the gain of DVFS is clear in the first scenario (in which a predominantly IO-bound application is used), its use in the second scenario is rather counterproductive. Index TermsEnergy consumption of servers, dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, power consumption analysis, dynamic power management, energy consumption I.

Waltenegus Dargie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Concentrated solar thermal (cst) system for fuelwood replacement and for household water sanitation in developing countries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrated Solar Thermal (CST) is a proven renewable energy technology that harnesses solar irradiation in its most primitive form. This technology with roots in ancient history is growing at a fast pace in recent times. Developing countries could use CST to solve fundamental human-needs challenges, such as for the substitution of fuelwood and the treatment of water for household use. This paper proposes a conceptual design for a standardized modular CST for these applications in developing countries. A modular-designed parabolic CST with an aperture area of 7.5 m2 is adequate to provide enough solar thermal energy to replace the fuelwood need (5 tons/yr) or to pasteurize the minimum daily water requirement (2500 liters) for a household. Critical parameters of the CST are discussed and an affordable solid thermal storage is recommended to be used as a backup when sunlight is unavailable. A funding program that includes in-country resources and external funding will be needed to sustain the development and wide spread adaptation of this technology.

Akinjiola, O. P.; Balachandran, U. (Energy Systems); (Rsage Research, LLC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Verification of a Depletion Method in SCALE for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This study describes a new method utilizing the Dancoff factor to model a non-standard TRISO fuel form characteristic of the AHTR reactor design concept for depletion analysis using the TRITON sequence of SCALE and the validation of this method by code-to-code comparisons. The fuel used in AHTR has the TRISO particles concentrated along the edges of a slab fuel element. This particular geometry prevented the use of a standard DOUBLEHET treatment, previously developed in SCALE to handle NGNP-designed fuel. The new method permits fuel depletion on complicated geometries that traditionally can be handled only by continuous energy based depletion code systems. The method was initially tested on a fuel design typical of the NGNP, where the DOUBLEHET treatment is available. A more comprehensive study was performed using the VESTA code that uses the continuous energy MCNP5 code as a transport solver and ORIGEN2.2 code for depletion calculations. Comparisons of the results indicate good agreement of whole core characteristics, such as the multiplication factor, and the isotopics, including their spatial distribution. Key isotopes analyzed included 235U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu. The results from this study indicate that the Dancoff factor method can generate estimates of core characteristics with reasonable precision for scoping studies of configurations where the DOUBLEHET treatment is unavailable.

KELLY, RYAN [Texas A& M University; Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

A study of aggregation bias in estimating the market for home heating and cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

Econometricians frequently propose parametric models which are contingent on an underlying assumption of rational economic agents maximizing their utility. Accurate estimation of the parameters of these models depends on using data disaggregated to the level of the actual agents, usually individual consumers or firms. Using data at some other level of aggregation introduces bias into the inferences made from the data. Unfortunately, properly disaggregated data is often unavailable, or at least, much more costly to obtain than aggregate data. Research on consumer choice of home heating equipment has long depended on state-level cross-sectional data. Only recently have investigators been able to build up and successfully use data on consumer attributes and choices at the household level. A study estimated for the Electric Power Research Institute REEPS model is currently one of the best of these. This paper examines the degree of bias that would be introduced in that study if only average data across SMSAs or states were used at several points in the investigation. We examine the market shares and elasticities estimated from that model using only the mean values of the exogenous variables, and find severe errors to be possible. However, if the models were calibrated on only aggregate data originally, we find that proper treatment allows market shares and elasticities to be found with little error relative to the disaggregate models. 22 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pakistan: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report summarizes the energy and economic situation in Pakistan.

Gazdar, M.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Critical review of the chemistry and thermodynamics of technetium and some of its inorganic compounds and aqueous species  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and thermodynamic data for Technetium (Tc) and some of its inorganic compounds and aqueous species are reviewed here. Major emphasis is given to systems with potential geochemical applications, especially the geochemistry of radioactive waste disposal. Compounds considered include oxides, hydroxides, hydrates oxides, halides, oxyhalides, double halides, and sulfides. The aqueous species considered include those in both noncomplexing media (pertechnetates, technetates, aquo-ions, and hydrolyzed cations) and complexing media (halides, sulfates, and phosphates). Thermodynamic values are recommended for specific compounds and aqueous ions when reliable experimental data are available. Where thermodynamic data are inadequate or unavailable, the chemistry is still discussed to provide information about what needs to be measured, and which chemistry needs to be clarified. A major application of these thermodynamic data will be for chemical equilibrium modeling and for construction of potential-pH diagrams for aqueous solutions. Unfortunately, the present lack of data precludes such calculations for complexing aqueous media. The situation is much better for noncomplexing aqueous media, but the chemistry and thermodynamics of cationic Tc(V) species and hydrolyzed Tc(III) species are poorly understood. 240 references, 6 tables.

Rard, J.A.

1983-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Reliability Results of NERSC Systems  

SciTech Connect

In order to address the needs of future scientific applications for storing and accessing large amounts of data in an efficient way, one needs to understand the limitations of current technologies and how they may cause systeminstability or unavailability. A number of factors can impact system availability ranging from facility-wide power outage to a single point of failure such as network switches or global file systems. In addition, individual component failure in a system can degrade the performance of that system. This paper focuses on analyzing both of these factors and their impacts on the computational and storage systems at NERSC. Component failure data presented in this report primarily focuses on disk drive in on of the computational system and tape drive failure in HPSS. NERSC collected available component failure data and system-wide outages for its computational and storage systems over a six-year period and made them available to the HPC community through the Petascale Data Storage Institute.

Petascale Data Storage Institute (PDSI); Mokhtarani, Akbar; Mokhtarani, Akbar; Kramer, William; Hick, Jason

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Application of Standard Maintenance Windows in PHWR Outage  

SciTech Connect

The concept of Standard Maintenance Windows has been widely used in the planned outage of light water reactor in the world. However, due to the specific feature of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), it has not come to a consensus for the PHWR owners to adopt Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage aiming at the optimization of outage duration. Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC), with their experience gained in the previous outages and with reference to other PHWR power plants, has identified a set of Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage. It can be applied to similar PHWR plants and with a few windows that are specific to Qinshan Phase III NPP. The use of these Standard Maintenance Windows in planned outage has been proved to be effective in control shutdown nuclear safety, minimize the unavailability of safety system, improve the efficient utilization of outage duration, and improved the flexibility of outage schedule in the case of emergency issue, which forced the revision of outage schedule. It has also formed a solid foundation for benchmarking. The identification of Standard Maintenance Windows and its application will be discussed with relevant cases for the common improvement of outage duration. (author)

Fuming Jiang [Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company, Ltd. (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies of the antiarrhythmic drug meobentine (N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-N prime , N double prime -dimethylguanidine) and its N-(4-trifluoromethyoxybenzyl)-N prime , N double prime - dimethylguanidine analogue, fluorobentine in the rat, dog and man  

SciTech Connect

A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed that was able to detect 40 pg meobentine (M) in 0.1 ml plasma. Cross-reactivity of suspected M metabolites was very low. This RIA was later also used to assay for fluorobentine (F), a fluorine analogue of M. M exhibits three-compartment open model iv kinetics in the rat, dog, and man. Terminal drug half-life in the rat, dog, and man; total-body clearance in the rat, dog, and man; and terminal-phase volume of distribution in the rat, dog, and man were determined. (14C)-M absorption is essentially complete in the rat and dog, but this parameter could not be directly ascertained in man. Relative oral drug bioavailability is linear in the rat and dog but falls off between 5-10 mg/kg in man. F was synthesized in an attempt to counteract suspected problems with M's poor absorption or extensive metabolism that might be affecting its efficacy in humans. F would likely be unavailable for O-demethylation, might well be more lipophilic than M, and yet still be active.

Warren, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Keifer, Sharon (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessment of the possibility of forecasting future natural gas curtailments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for determining probabilities of future natural-gas-supply interruptions by combining long-range weather forecasts and natural-gas supply/demand projections. An illustrative example which measures the probability of occurrence of heating-season natural-gas curtailments for industrial users in the southeastern US is analyzed. Based on the information on existing long-range weather forecasting techniques and natural gas supply/demand projections enumerated above, especially the high uncertainties involved in weather forecasting and the unavailability of adequate, reliable natural-gas projections that take account of seasonal weather variations and uncertainties in the nation's energy-economic system, it must be concluded that there is little possibility, at the present time, of combining the two to yield useful, believable probabilities of heating-season gas curtailments in a form useful for corporate and government decision makers and planners. Possible remedial actions are suggested that might render such data more useful for the desired purpose in the future. The task may simply require the adequate incorporation of uncertainty and seasonal weather trends into modeling systems and the courage to report projected data, so that realistic natural gas supply/demand scenarios and the probabilities of their occurrence will be available to decision makers during a time when such information is greatly needed.

Lemont, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

SuperB Technical Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic ...

Baszczyk, M; Kolodziej, J; Kucewicz, W; Sapor, M; Jeremie, A; Pous, E Grauges; Bruno, G E; De Robertis, G; Diacono, D; Donvito, G; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Giordano, F; Loddo, F; Loparco, F; Maggi, G P; Manzari, V; Mazziotta, M N; Nappi, E; Palano, A; Santeramo, B; Sgura, I; Silvestris, L; Spinoso, V; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Zhuo, Z; Jenkovszky, L; Balbi, G; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Cafaro, V; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Di Sipio, R; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Gabrielli, A; Galli, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giorgi, F M; Grandi, C; Lax, I; Meo, S Lo; Marconi, U; Montanari, A; Pellegrini, G; Piccinini, M; Rovelli, T; Cesari, N Semprini; Torromeo, G; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Vagnoni, V M; Valentinetti, S; Villa, M; Zoccoli, A; Caron, J -F; Hearty, C; Lu, P F -T; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y -C; Barnyakov, M Yu; Blinov, V E; Botov, A A; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kononov, S A; Kravchenko, E A; Levichev, E B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Shtol, D A; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Cardini, A; Carpinelli, M; Chao, D S -T; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Hanson, J; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Zhu, R Y; Randazzo, N; Burelo, E De La Cruz; Zheng, Y; Campos, P; De Silva, M; Kathirgamaraju, A; Meadows, B; Pushpawela, B; Shi, Y; Sokoloff, M; Castro, G Lopez; Ciaschini, V; Franchini, P; Giacomini, F; Paolini, A; Polania, G A Calderon; Laczek, S; Romanowicz, P; Szybinski, B; Czuchry, M; Flis, L; Harezlak, D; Kocot, J; Radecki, M; Sterzel, M; Szepieniec, T; Szymocha, T; Wjcik, P; Andreotti, M; Baldini, W; Calabrese, R; Carassiti, V; Cibinetto, G; Ramusino, A Cotta; Evangelisti, F; Gianoli, A; Luppi, E; Malaguti, R; Manzali, M; Melchiorri, M; Munerato, M; Padoan, C; Santoro, V; Tomassetti, L; Beretta, M M; Biagini, M; Boscolo, M; Capitolo, E; de Sangro, R; Esposito, M; Felici, G; Finocchiaro, G; Gatta, M; Gatti, C; Guiducci, S; Lauciani, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Raimondi, P; Rama, M; Sanelli, C; Tomassini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Delepine, D; Santos, M A Reyes; Chrzaszcz, M; Grzymkowski, R; Knap, P; Kotula, J; Lesiak, T; Ludwin, J; Michalowski, J; Pawlik, B; Rachwal, B; Stodulski, M; Wiechczynski, J; Witek, M; Zawiejski, L; Zdybal, M; Aushev, V Y; Ustynov, A; Arnaud, N; Bambade, P; Beigbeder, C; Bogard, F; Borsato, M; Breton, D; Brossard, J; Burmistrov, L; Charlet, D; Chaumat, V; Dadoun, O; Berni, M El; Maalmi, J; Puill, V; Rimbault, C; Stocchi, A; Tocut, V; Variola, A; Wallon, S; Wormser, G; Grancagnolo, F; Ben-Haim, E; Sitt, S; Baylac, M; Bourrion, O; Deconto, J -M; Martinez, Y Gomez; Monseu, N; Muraz, J -F; Real, J -S; Vescovi, C; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D; Twedt, E W; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Nderitu, S; Patel, P; Robertson, S H; Swersky, D; Warburton, A; Flores, E Cuautle; Sanchez, G Toledo; Biassoni, P; Bombelli, L; Citterio, M; Coelli, S; Fiorini, C; Liberali, V; Monti, M; Nasri, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Sabatini, F; Stabile, A; Berra, A; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Lietti, D; Maino, M; Pessina, G; Prest, M; Martin, J -P; Simard, M; Starinski, N; Taras, P; Drutskoy, A; Makarychev, S; Nefediev, A V; Aloisio, A; Cavaliere, S; De Nardo, G; Della Pietra, M; Doria, A; Giordano, R; Ordine, A; Pardi, S; Russo, G; Sciacca, C; Bigi, I I; Jessop, C P; Wang, W; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Corvo, M; Crescente, A; Corso, F Dal; Dosselli, U; Fanin, C; Gianelle, A; Longo, S; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Morandin, M; Pengo, R; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Stroili, R; Gaioni, L; Manazza, A; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Re, V; Traversi, G; Zucca, S; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Cecchi, C; Germani, S; Lebeau, M; Lubrano, P; Manoni, E; Papi, A; Rossi, A; Scolieri, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Fella, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M; Lilli, L; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paladino, A; Pantaleo, F; Paoloni, E; Perez, A L Perez; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Tllez, A Fernndez; Beck, G; Berman, M; Bevan, A; Gannaway, F; Inguglia, G; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Bocci, V; Capodiferro, M; Chiodi, G; Dafinei, I; Drenska, N V; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Gargiulo, C; Gauzzi, P; Luci, C; Lunadei, R; Martellotti, G; Pellegrino, F; Pettinacci, V; Pinci, D; Recchia, L; Ruggeri, D; Zullo, A; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; De Santis, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Felice, V; Di Palma, F; Di Simone, A; Marcelli, L; Messi, R; Moricciani, D; Sparvoli, R; Tammaro, S; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bussino, S; Ciuchini, M; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Ruggieri, F; Spiriti, E; Wilson, F; Monzon, I Leon; Millan-Almaraz, J R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Aston, D; Dey, B; Fisher, A; Jackson, P D; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; MacFarlane, D; McCulloch, M; Metcalfe, S; Novokhatski, A; Osier, S; Prepost, R; Ratcliff, B; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M; Va'vra, J; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W; Altschul, B D; Purohit, M V; Baudot, J; Ripp-Baudot, I; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Bezshyyko, O; Dolinska, G; Soffer, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Investigation of the effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent sintering of nanosize powders. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With current technology and available raw materials, one knows that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to produce a monolithic ceramic material with an average grain size of less than 100 nm. The grains of ceramic materials cannot be refined by cold working as is typically done in metals. Hence, the starting ceramic powder must be of a smaller or similar particle size as the desired grain size for the final product. The availability of nanosize (<100 nm) ceramic powders, however, is limited. In many cases, the powders consist of polymorphic mixtures, precursors, or amorphous phases of the desired material. Phase transformation during sintering is difficult to control, and when it does occur it usually is accompanied by significant microstructural changes and grain growth. An example of such a powder is Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. To the best of the authors` knowledge, high purity nanosize {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is unavailable commercially. However, a variety of nanosize transitional forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including the {gamma} and {delta} polymorphs, are commercially available in large quantities as mixtures. Results on the compaction and sintering of nanosize {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder are reported here.

Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.J.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Ceramics Div.

1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Indonesia: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

SciTech Connect

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy have covered Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report covers Indonesia. 37 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Prawiraatmadja, W.; Yamaguchi, N.; Breazeale, K.; Basari, S.R.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

On-farm use of biomass fuels: market penetration potential during normal and fuel-emergency conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biomass fuels produced in decentralized facilities to replace the centrally produced fuels currently used in agriculture is examined. Two issues are examined. Will biomass fuels become cost-competitive relative to central fuels. And, what is the potential for biomass fuels to replace central fuels during emergency conditions when central fuels are unavailable. To answer these questions, descriptions of a range of currently available biomass technologies have been prepared and estimates made of current and projected agricultural fuel needs and biomass-feedstock availabilities. A variety of assumptions about future conditions have been adopted, the most important of which is that central fuel prices escalate at 7.5% annually relative to the commodities and inputs used to produce biomass fuel products. Under these assumptions, a number of biomass fuels will become cost-competitive during the 1980s, but most will do so late in the decade. Moreover, once these fuels become cost-competitive, penetration will occur gradually. Market forces thus will not markedly reduce the vulnerability of agriculture to energy-supply interruptions during this period. Biomass fuels could, however, play an important role during a fuel emergency. Estimates indicate they could replace up to about 60% of annual agricultural-sector fuel consumption by 1990, during the course of a fuel emergency of one year's duration.

Bjornstad, D.J.; Hillsman, E.L.; Tepel, R.C.; Mills, J.B.; CHester, C.V.; Klepper, O.H.; Borkowski, R.J.; Nichols, J.; Rainey, J.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, July--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the eighth quarterly technical progress report. During this quarter the project was initiated, after transfer via a novation agreement, at the Colorado School of Mines. Project initiation activities have included: set up of catalyst synthesis apparatus; training on x-ray diffraction and FTIR apparatus; set up of catalyst testing reactor; set up of reactor product analytical systems; and set up of method development for measuring catalyst acidity via FTIR. At the end of this quarter significant progress had been made towards completion of these initiation activities. Several catalyst syntheses have been performed and the catalysts characterized by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The catalyst testing reactor system is operational. Reactor product analysis system is nearing completion. Initiation of this system was delayed by the unavailability of a Valco valve which has just recently arrived. Set up of the in-situ FTIR cell for catalyst acidity studies has begun. In this report the results of several catalyst syntheses are reported along with characterization results. In particular, impregnation of vanadyl pyrophosphate with potassim nitrate dramatically reduced the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Such groups may be important in the non-selective, total oxidation of hydrocarbons. Also, preliminary experimental results on FTIR spectra of adsorbed pyridine are presented. It is shown that pyridine adsorbed on the catalyst surface can be easily observed by the diffuse reflectance IR technique. We plan to apply this technique to measurement of the acid site strength of surfaces modified with promoters.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

SAR/QSAR methods in public health practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) modeling play an important and active role in ATSDR programs in support of the Agency mission to protect human populations from exposure to environmental contaminants. They are used for cross-chemical extrapolation to complement the traditional toxicological approach when chemical-specific information is unavailable. SAR and QSAR methods are used to investigate adverse health effects and exposure levels, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties of hazardous chemical compounds. They are applied as a part of an integrated systematic approach in the development of Health Guidance Values (HGVs), such as ATSDR Minimal Risk Levels, which are used to protect populations exposed to toxic chemicals at hazardous waste sites. (Q)SAR analyses are incorporated into ATSDR documents (such as the toxicological profiles and chemical-specific health consultations) to support environmental health assessments, prioritization of environmental chemical hazards, and to improve study design, when filling the priority data needs (PDNs) as mandated by Congress, in instances when experimental information is insufficient. These cases are illustrated by several examples, which explain how ATSDR applies (Q)SAR methods in public health practice.

Demchuk, Eugene, E-mail: edemchuk@cdc.gov; Ruiz, Patricia; Chou, Selene; Fowler, Bruce A.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chemical Characterization of an Envelope A Sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A whole tank composite sample from Hanford waste tank 241-AN-103 was received at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and chemically characterized. Prior to characterization the sample was diluted to {approximately}5 M sodium concentration. The filtered supernatant liquid, the total dried solids of the diluted sample, and the washed insoluble solids obtained from filtration of the diluted sample were analyzed. A mass balance calculation of the three fractions of the sample analyzed indicate the analytical results appear relatively self-consistent for major components of the sample. However, some inconsistency was observed between results where more than one method of determination was employed and for species present in low concentrations. A direct comparison to previous analyses of material from tank 241-AN-103 was not possible due to unavailability of data for diluted samples of tank 241-AN-103 whole tank composites. However, the analytical data for other types of samples from 241-AN-103 we re mathematically diluted and compare reasonably with the current results. Although the segments of the core samples used to prepare the sample received at SRTC were combined in an attempt to produce a whole tank composite, determination of how well the results of the current analysis represent the actual composition of the Hanford waste tank 241-AN-103 remains problematic due to the small sample size and the large size of the non-homogenized waste tank.

Hay, M.S.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

2008. Approximating learning curves for active-learning-driven annotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active learning (AL) is getting more and more popular as a methodology to considerably reduce the annotation effort when building training material for statistical learning methods for various NLP tasks. A crucial issue rarely addressed, however, is when to actually stop the annotation process to profit from the savings in efforts. This question is tightly related to estimating the classifier performance after a certain amount of data has already been annotated. While learning curves are the default means to monitor the progress of the annotation process in terms of classifier performance, this requires a labeled gold standard which in realistic annotation settings, at least is often unavailable. We here propose a method for committee-based AL to approximate the progression of the learning curve based on the disagreement among the committee members. This method relies on a separate, unlabeled corpus and is thus well suited for situations where a labeled gold standard is not available or would be too expensive to obtain. Considering named entity recognition as a test case we provide empirical evidence that this approach works well under simulation as well as under real-world annotation conditions. 1.

Katrin Tomanek; Udo Hahn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

HydraNet-FT: network support for dependable servors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes an infrastructure to dynamically replicate services across an internetwork and have them provide a single fault tolerant service access point to clients. For service replication, it relies on previous work for network support for large-scale service scaling within the HydraNet effort. The current work develops a means to combine service replication with TCP communication service to provide fault-tolerant services in a fully client-transparent fashion. The HydraNet-FT infrastructure consists of two components: host servers and redirecting. Host servers are hosts that are specially equipped to act as servers for replicated and fault-tolerant services. The location of the host servers is known to the redirecting, specially equipped routers that detect requests for replicated services and direct the requests to them. Host servers allow one-to-many message delivery from the client to servers and many-to-one message delivery from the servers to the clients. They also provide a low-latency failure estimator to determine server unavailability due to failure or congestion. A management protocol allows to dynamically install or remove service replica and reconfigure the system in case of failure or prolonged congestion of a server in the system. The thesis studies the results obtained by implementing the infrastructure on an experimental testbed. Throughput results indicate that the amount of overhead imposed by using the HydraNet-FT scheme is not unreasonably high.

Shenoy, Gurudatt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Screening criteria for microbial for processes  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) has maintained a microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) field project data base since 1985. One of the major goals of this data base is to continue to document characteristics of reservoirs used for MEOR field projects and to assist the US Department of Energy by revising published screening criteria for MEOR processes. Since the last update of this data base in 1987, the number of MEOR field projects entered has increased from 39 to 65. Microbial EOR has been recognized as a potentially cost-effective method, particularly for stripper well production. Stripper wells are particularly in need of cost-effective EOR because independent operators produce about 40% of the total oil recovered, but cannot conduct needed EOR research. Microbial methods for improving oil recovery are potentially cost-effective and particularly well suited to be applied in today's economic climate. The lower price of crude oil as well as a more general acceptance of use of biotechnological processes has probably contributed to this increase. Although in some instances information was unavailable or not reported for each element of the data base, there exists adequate data to demonstrate both the viability and variety of options for using microbial technology for improved oil production. this report updates the data base and provides summary of several of the more important MEOR field experiments conducted during the 1970s and 1980s. 19 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Bryant, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Information Needs, 1992 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful application of adaptive management to rebuilding the Columbia Basin`s anadromous fish resources requires that available information and experience be organized and shared between numerous organizations and individuals. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin`s collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases and recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognize these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project is now completing the process of scoping and identification of information needs. Construction of prototype systems will begin in 1992. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information on System scoping and needs identification phase.

Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Kinney, William J. (Washington Department of Fishereis, Olympia, WA); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

New synthesis of TATB process development studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We described a new synthesis of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) in 1996 at the 27th International Annual Conference of ICT. 1,1,1-trialkylhydrazinium salts are highly reactive reagents which aminate nitroaromatic compounds through vicarious nucleophilic substitution (VNS) of hydrogen. When applied to picramide, these reagents produce TATB in high yield. Traditionally, TATB has been manufactured in the USA by nitration of the relatively expensive and domestically unavailable 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (TCB) to give 2,4,6-,trichloro- 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) which is then aminated to yield TATB. Elevated temperatures (150{degrees}C) are required for both reactions. Our new VNS synthesis potentially affords an inexpensive and a more environmentally benign preparation of TATB. We describe in this report our progress in scaling up the synthesis of TATB from the laboratory to the pilot plant. We will discuss structure and control of impurities, changes in yield/quality with reaction conditions, choice of solvents, workup and product isolation, safety, and environmental considerations. Particle size characterizations as well as small-scale safety and performance testing will also be discussed.

Schmidt, R.D.; Mitchell, A.R.; Pagoria, P.F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

New synthesis of TATB. Process development studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have discovered that 1,1,1-trialkylhydrazinium salts are highly reactive reagents which aminate nitroaromatic compounds through vicarious nucleophilic substitution (VNS) of hydrogen. When applied to picramide, these reagents produce TATB in high yield. Traditionally, TATB has been manufactured in the USA by nitration of the relatively expensive and domestically unavailable 1,3,5- trichlorobenzene (TCB) to give 2,4,6-trichloro- 1,3,5- trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) which is then aminated to yield TATB. Elevated temperatures (1500 C) are required for both reactions. Our new VNS synthesis potentially affords an inexpensive and a more environmentally benign preparation of TATB. We describe in this report our progress in scaling up the synthesis of TATB from the laboratory to the pilot plant. We will discuss structure and control of impurities, changes in yield/quality with reaction conditions, choice of solvents, workup and product isolation, safety, and environmental considerations. Particle size characterizations as well as small-scale safety and performance testing will also be discussed.

Schmidt, R. D., LLNL

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Achieving Superior Plant Energy Performance Utilizing Real-time Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After years of attempting to streamline operations in an effort to reduce operational costs, many industrial manufacturers are turning to strategic energy management as a potential money-saving strategy. In their efforts, managers face a number of significant barriers such as low awareness and expertise, elevated financial hurdle rate, lack of capital allocation and procurement constraints. In addition, energy efficiency efforts may be hampered by traditional single point energy reduction methods such as reviewing utility bills, getting equipment upgrade suggestions from vendors or one-time energy audits. Research demonstrates that these techniques have neither the visibility nor continuity to achieve energy reductions that are consistent and persistent. With the right Best Practices, however, using new methodologies and technologies unavailable only a few years ago, enterprises can achieve dramatic energy reductions and their resulting cost savings. These Best Practices are founded on 1) application of a systematic methodology for understanding where energy is used and how to reduce it; and 2) achieving visibility into sufficiently granular real-time information on key performance indicators; 3) integrating new technology into overall corporate strategy and processes to change behavior.

Subramanya, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Data:9ca64540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 4540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Distributed Generation Rider over 25 kW Remote Access Unavailable Sector: Description: Applicable to Distributed Generation smaller than 3 MW of connected generation connected in parallel operation to the Cooperative's lines in accordance with the Cooperative's service rules and regulations and the Cooperative's Distributed Generation Procedures and Guidelines Manual for members. This rate is not applicable to temporary, shared, or resale service. This rate is applicable to service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter.

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381

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

First principles screening of destabilized metal hydrides for high capacity H2 storage using scandium (presentation had varying title: Accelerating Development of Destabilized Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage Using First Principles Calculations)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Favorable thermodynamics are a prerequisite for practical H2 storage materials for vehicular applications. Destabilization of metal hydrides is a versatile route to finding materials that reversibly store large quantities of H2. First principles calculations have proven to be a useful tool for screening large numbers of potential destabilization reactions when tabulated thermodynamic data are unavailable. We have used first principles calculations to screen potential destabilization schemes that involve Sc-containing compounds. Our calculations use a two-stage strategy in which reactions are initially assessed based on their reaction enthalpy alone, followed by more detailed free energy calculations for promising reactions. Our calculations indicate that mixtures of ScH2 + 2LiBH4, which will release 8.9 wt.% H2 at completion and will have an equilibrium pressure of 1 bar at around 330 K, making this compound a promising target for experimental study. Along with thermodynamics, favorable kinetics are also of enormous importance for practical usage of these materials. Experiments would help identify possible kinetic barriers and modify them by developing suitable catalysts.

Alapati, S.; Johnson, J.K.; Sholl, D.S.; Dai, B. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA)--last author not shown on publication, only presentation

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators ( ??? GDPand energy indicators, including economic energy intensity,

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

UNIVERSITE PARIS I PANTHEON -SORBONNE U.F.R. DE SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agreement on Tarrifs and Trade GDP Gross Domesic Product GNI Gross National Income GNP Gross National

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors with rare-earth (RE) magnets are almost universally used for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) because of their superior properties, particularly power density. However, there is now a distinct possibility of limited supply or very high cost of RE magnets that could make IPM motors unavailable or too expensive. Because development of electric motors is a critical part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Power Electronics and Motors activity, DOE needs to determine which options should be investigated and what barriers should be addressed. Therefore, in order to provide a basis for deciding which research topics should be pursued, an assessment of various motor technologies was conducted to determine which, if any, is potentially capable of meeting FreedomCAR 2015 and 2020 targets. Highest priority was given to IPM, surface mounted permanent magnet (SPM), induction, and switched reluctance (SR) motors. Also of interest, but with lesser emphasis, were wheel motors, multiple-rotor motors, motors with external excitation, and several others that emerged from the assessment. Cost and power density (from a design perspective, the power density criterion translates to torque density) are emerging as the two most important properties of motors for traction drives in hybrid and EVs, although efficiency and specific power also are very important. The primary approach for this assessment involved interviews with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), their suppliers, and other technical experts. For each technology, the following issues were discussed: (1) The current state-of-the-art performance and cost; (2) Recent trends in the technology; (3) Inherent characteristics of the motor - which ones limit the ability of the technology to meet the targets and which ones aid in meeting the target; (4) What research and development (R&D) would be needed to meet the targets; and (5) The potential for the technology to meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

Fezzler, Raymond [BIZTEK Consulting, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Finial Scientific/Technical Report: Application of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Process for the Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion is a novel combustion technology for the inherent separation of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}. In 1983, Richter and Knoche proposed reversible combustion, which utilized both the oxidation and reduction of metal. Metal associated with its oxidized form as an oxygen carrier was circulated between two reactors--oxidizer and reducer. In the reducer, the solid oxygen carrier reacts with the fuel to produce CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and elemental metal only. Pure CO{sub 2} will be obtained in the exit gas stream from the reducer after H{sub 2}O is condensed. The pure CO{sub 2} is ready for subsequent sequestration. In the oxidizer, the elemental metal reacts with air to form metal oxide and separate oxygen from nitrogen. Only nitrogen and some unused oxygen are emitted from the oxidizer. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that CO{sub 2} is not diluted with nitrogen but obtained in a relatively pure form without any energy needed for separation. In addition to the energy-free purification of CO{sub 2}, the CLC process also provides two other benefits. First, NO{sub x} formation can be largely eliminated. Secondly, the thermal efficiency of a CLC system is very high. Presently, the CLC process has only been used with natural gas. An oxygen carrier based on an energy balance analysis and thermodynamics analysis was selected. Copper (Cu) seems to be the best choice for the CLC system for solid fuels. From this project, the mechanisms of CuO reduction by solid fuels may be as follows: (1) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are available, reduction of CuO could start at about 400 C or less. (2) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is lower, reduction of CuO could occur at an onset temperature of about 500 C, char gasification reactivity in CO{sub 2} was lower at lower temperatures. (3) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is higher than 750 C, all reaction reactivities were improved, especially the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of char. Thus, the reduction of CuO by the gasification product CO could proceed quickly. Based on the results obtained, the following coal characteristics would be desirable for the Chemical Looping Combustion process: high volatile matter with a high reactivity of the char produced. PRB coal meets these criteria while being comparatively less expensive and also very abundant. The high moisture content present in PRB coal might also increase the reactivity for char gasification through the development of pore structure and specific surface area in the char during pyrolysis. Biomass materials are also suitable, considering the reaction mechanism of CLC system of solid fuels. The feasibility of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels was verified by focusing on PRB coal and biomass. Based on PRB coal as the preferred solid fuel in the development of the CLC system, the mass, energy and system in a dual reactor recirculation system has been determined. In the Cu oxidation tests, it was confirmed that the heating rate is the most important effect on the Cu oxidation process. Lower heating rates and lower operational temperatures would result in incomplete conversion of Cu to CuO. Cu{sub 2}O may be the intermediate product. The operating temperature did not affect the reaction rate of the oxidation process. Under any operating conditions, the exothermic properties are clearly shown.

Dr. Wei-Ping Pan; Dr. John T. Riley

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Data:E8fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Central Indiana REMC Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OPTIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY RIDER RATE. Sector: Residential Description: Available to all consumers taking service concurrently under Rate Schedule - RS, Residential and Farm Rate; Rate Schedule - RS-TOU, Residential Time-of-Use Rate; Rate Schedule - RS-SEA, Residential Seasonal Rate; and Rate Schedule - ETS, Residential Off-Peak Rate . Rider is for the purchase of energy from renewable resources (predominantly landfill methane gas generation) South Central Indiana Rural Electric Membership Corporation reserves the right to limit the total number of participants under this Optional Rider. Energy sold pursuant to this Optional Rider is generated using renewable resources. While the Corporation expects that power generated from renewable resources will be readily available on the wholesale market, the Corporation makes no guarantee that such resources will be available at all times. If the Corporation determines that for any reason renewable resources are unavailable or insufficient to furnish the retail consumer purchases hereunder, the Corporation may suspend application of this Optional Rider. When the renewable resources again become available, the Corporation may resume application of this Optional Rider.

388

FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

Raymond L. Mazza

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume II; Oregon Subbasins Above Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fixtion of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and fedend fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions am based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CM project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CM project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume 1; Oregon Subbasins Below Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CIS project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

Bradley, D.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, ..beta../sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of ..beta... A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of /sup 1/H with /sup 2/H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids.

Eckman, R.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Bioremediation of aqueous pollutants using biomass embedded in hydrophilic foam. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of this project was to examine the potential of a novel hydrophilic polyurethane foam as an immobilization medium for algal, bacteria, and other types of biomass, and to test the resulting foam/biomass aggregates for their use in cleaning up waters contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides and toxic organic compounds. Initial investigations focused on the bioremoval of heavy metals from wastewaters at SRS using immobilized algal biomass. This effort met with limited success for reasons which included interference in the binding of biomass and target metals by various non-target constituents in the wastewater, lack of an appropriate wastewater at SRS for testing, and the unavailability of bioreactor systems capable of optimizing contact of target pollutants with sufficient biomass binding sites. Subsequent studies comparing algal, bacterial, fungal, and higher plant biomass demonstrated that other biomass sources were also ineffective for metal bioremoval under the test conditions. Radionuclide bioremoval using a Tc-99 source provided more promising results than the metal removal studies with the various types of biomass, and indicated that the alga Cyanidium was the best of the tested sources of biomass for this application. However, all of the biomass/foam aggregates tested were substantially inferior to a TEVA resin for removing Tc-99 in comparative testing. The authors also explored the use of hydrophilic polyurethane foam to embed Burkholderia cepacia, which is an efficient degrader of trichloroethylene (TCE), a contaminant of considerable concern at SRS and elsewhere. The embedded population proved to be incapable of growth on nutrient media, but retained respiratory activity. Lastly, the degradative capabilities of embedded G4 were examined. Phenol- or benzene-induced bacteria retained the ability to degrade TCE and benzene. The authors were successful in inducing enzyme activity after the organisms had already been embedded.

Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Santo Domingo, J.; Zingmark, R.G.; Whitaker, M.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Simulation of operational transients in a VVER-1000 nuclear power plant using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RELAP5/MOD3.2 nodalization model of a VVER-1OOO (V-320) nuclear power plant was updated, improved and validated against available experimental data. The data included integrated test results obtained from actual power plant testing. The steady state and the operational transients test data describe the behavior of the Unit 5 of Kozloduy NPP (Bulgaria). The operational transients consisted of a loss of flow caused by the successive trip of two main coolant pumps without reactor scram. A validation process of the developed model has been performed in two stages comprising an initial and a transient validation. The comparison between experimental data and calculation results proved the adequacy of the model and also the code capacity to reproduce main plant parameter evolutions. The plant model was also used for a preliminary analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LB LOCA) which is the design basis accident (DBA) for the VVER-1000 plants. Due to the limitations of the utilized code version (unavailability of the redwood model), only the first stage (blowdown) of the accident was investigated. The results have been compared with similar calculations obtained by the Russian specialists with an indigenous thermal-hydraulic code (TECH-M). The comparison showed a good agreement. For the most important calculated parameter (hot spot cladding temperature) an uncertainty analysis using the response surface method was performed. The nodalization model seems to be adequate for the class of transients and accidents investigated, but the inclusion of the reactor specific point kinetics parameters, emergency headwater system model and updating some of the component parameters (e.g. main coolant pump friction) will increase its area of applicability.

Moscalu, Dionisie Radu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria in the propane-1-propanol system  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure isothermal vapor liquid equilibrium data were measured for the propane-1-propanol system at 81.6, 105.2, and 120.1 C in a static equilibrium cell with liquid-phase sampling by a piston-driven sampling rod and homogenizing the sample with a static jet mixer. The vapor phase was sampled by releasing it into an evacuated manifold, and the gas chromatograph was calibrated with a new variable volumetric device. Satisfactory modeling was achieved with the combined method using the UNIQUAC equation with equations of sate: the group contribution EOS, Peng-Robinson EOS, or the two-parameter Virial EOS. Differences between the measured and calculated vapor-phase mole fractions, however, were significant for the lower pressure regions of the 81.6 and 120.1 C isotherms. UNIQUAC parameters, hitherto unavailable, with fairly strong temperature dependence in the 81.6 to 120.1 C range are proposed for the system. The covariance matrix indicated a significant correlation among the parameters. The classical mixing rule interaction parameters required for the original Peng-Robinson EOS in the combined method were obtained using the direct method and were temperature-independent for the isotherms for which the propane was supercritical. The possibility of propane/1-propanol immiscibility was theoretically examined according to the criteria of Baker et al. The plots of Gibbs energy of mixing vs. phase mole fractions did not indicate liquid-phase splitting, but the inferences are EOS-dependent and must await visual confirmation. The authors earlier vapor-phase thermodynamic consistency test indicated the data for all three data sets not to be inconsistent.

Muehlbauer, A.L.; Raal, J.D. (Univ. of Natal, Durban (South Africa))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study  

SciTech Connect

Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

An investigation of key blow fly (Diptera:Calliphoridae) species of forensic importance occurring in Brazos and Burleson Counties of Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic entomology makes use of an entomologist's knowledge about biology, insect taxonomy, and carrion ecology. This knowledge can be used as a tool to help investigators solve crimes. In order to use entomological information to help solve crimes committed in Texas, a database of pertinent information must be prepared. The two orders of insects that are most commonly used to help establish such things as time of death (Post Mortem Interval), location, and manner of death are Diptera and Coleoptera. Of these orders, blow flies (Diptera:Calliphoridae) are the insects of most importance because they colonize a corpse or carcass first, often within minutes of exposure. Exposed pig carcasses were used to survey the species of blow flies present in Brazos and Burleson Counties. Cynomyopsis (=Cynomya) cadaverina (Townsend), Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy), and Calliphora livida (Hall) have proved to be the three most important species to colonize carcasses during the winter and early spring. These are blue bottle flies, and morphologically very similar. The larvae are so similar that taxonomic keys do not distinguish between C. livida and C. vicina. These species of blow flies were chosen for identification using a method involving analysis of their mitochondrial DNA. The results of this study have shown that the species of blow flies in a given geographical area (Brazos and Burleson Counties) differ between seasons and locations, and that analysis of the mtDNA of these flies can be used as a method of identification when morphological methods are unavailable. In addition, some common methods of preservation were tested in order to provide recommendations about how these methods affect the amplification of the mtDNA of preserved specimens.

Tenorio, Felix Mariana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

{sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351  

SciTech Connect

Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US DOE is developing a series for models of environmental systems. Both zero-order and detailed models are being developed. Detailed models are based on fundamental engineering principles and the use of detailed physical and chemical property data; reliance on empirical relationships and correlations is minimized. The key advantage of detailed models is their predictive capabilities and utility in performing valid comparative analyses. An important prerequisite to the development of detailed models in the availability of representative, long-term process and environmental data. These data are needed both to develop the models as well as to validate them. Zero-order models are less rigorous and have less predictive capability than detailed models since they are based on empirical estimates and simple correlations. However, they can be developed relatively quickly and are significantly less expensive to develop and use compared to detailed models. Zero-order models are useful in identifying potential environmental or control technology problems. As such, they can help direct future research and development efforts. They can provide useful information when comprehensive data are unavailable for detailed modeling, and can be used as a screening tool to identify process alternatives which appear to warrant more detailed modeling. This report describes a zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant located near Beulah, North Dakota. The model estimates how trace elements entering the plant in the feed coal are distributed to the plant's process and waste streams. Elements that may be introduced to the plant's waste streams from sorbents and/or catalysts (e.g., Vanadium in makeup Stretford solution) are not considered in the model. 13 refs.

Thomas, W.C.; Page, G.C.; Magee, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

Matthews, H.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Owens, Lloyd [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Remote power systems with advanced storage technologies for Alaskan villages  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote Alaskan communities pay economic and environmental penalties for electricity, because they must import diesel as their primary fuel for electric power production, paying heavy transportation costs and potentially causing environmental damage with empty drums, leakage, and spills. For these reasons, remote villages offer a viable niche market where sustainable energy systems based on renewable resources and advanced energy storage technologies can compete favorably on purely economic grounds, while providing environmental benefits. These villages can also serve as a robust proving ground for systematic analysis, study, improvement, and optimization of sustainable energy systems with advanced technologies. This paper presents an analytical optimization of a remote power system for a hypothetical Alaskan village. The analysis considers the potential of generating renewable energy (e.g., wind and solar), along with the possibility of using energy storage to take full advantage of the intermittent renewable sources available to these villages. Storage in the form of either compressed hydrogen or zinc pellets can then provide electricity from hydrogen or zinc-air fuel cells when renewable sources are unavailable.The analytical results show a great potential to reduce fossil fuel consumption and costs basing renewable energy combined with advanced energy storage devices. The best solution for our hypothetical village appears to be a hybrid energy system, which can reduce consumption of diesel fuel by over 50% with annualized cost savings by over 30% by adding wind turbines to the existing diesel generators. When energy storage devices are added, diesel fuel consumption and costs can be reduced substantially more. With optimized energy storage, use of the diesel generatorss can be reduced to almost zero, with the existing equipment only maintained for added reliability. However about one quarter of the original diesel consumption is still used for heating purposes. (We use the term diesel to encompass the fuel, often called heating or fuel oil, of similar or identical properties.)

Isherwood, W.; Smith, R.; Aceves, S.; Berry, G.; Clark, W.; Johnson, R.; Das, D.; Goering, D.; Seifert, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Platform Chemicals from an Oilseed Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US chemical industry is $460 billion in size where a $150 billion segment of which is non-oxygenated chemicals that is sourced today via petroleum but is addressable by a renewable feedstock if one considers a more chemically reduced feedstock such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oil, due to its chemical functionality, provides a largely untapped opportunity as a renewable chemical source to replace petroleum-derived chemicals and produce platform chemicals unavailable today. This project examined the fertile intersection between the rich building blocks provided by vegetable oils and the enhanced chemical modification capability provided by metathesis chemistry. The technology advanced in this study is the process of ethylene cross-metathesis (referred to as ethenolysis) with vegetable oil and vegetable oil derivatives to manufacture the platform-chemical 9-decenoic acid (or 9DA) and olefin co-products. The project team meet its goals of demonstrating improved catalyst efficiencies of several multiples, deepening the mechanistic understanding of metathesis, synthesis and screening of dozens of new catalysts, designing and modeling commercial processes, and estimating production costs. One demonstrable result of the study was a step change improvement in catalyst turnover number in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate as reported here. We met our key measurable of producing 100 lbs of 9DA at the pilot-scale, which demonstrated ability to scale-up ethenolysis. DOE Project funding had significant positive impact on development of metathetically modified vegetable oils more broadly as the Cargill/Materia partnership, that was able to initiate primarily due to DOE funding, has succeeded in commercializing products, validating metathesis as a platform technology, and expanding a diverse products portfolio in high value and in large volume markets. Opportunities have expanded and business development has gained considerable momentum and enabled further expansion of the Materia/Cargill relationship. This project exceeded expectations and is having immediate impact on DOE success by replacing petroleum products with renewables in a large volume application today.

Tupy, Mike; Schrodi Yann

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Validation of Hybrid2 with the Froeya Island data set  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To validate the simulation model Hybrid2, the authors simulated the performance of the Froeya system and compared it to measured data. The hybrid system, located on the Norwegian island of Froeya, is a wind/diesel with short-term battery storage and a dump load. Almost 17 days of system operation data are available from EFI, the Norwegian Electrical Research Institute of Norway. The same data set has been used to validate the European Wind Diesel Logistic Modeling Package (WDL) (Infield 1993, 1994). The authors input the measured time series of primary load and wind speed for this validation. As was the case for the validation of WDL, they modified the primary load to account for a gap in the measured energy balance. The wind speed was also corrected to account for the temporary unavailability of the wind turbine. When the Hybrid2 simulation is performed using the EFI input parameters for these components, the simulated energy production of the wind turbine and diesel is within 2% of the measured values. The simulated battery efficiency is much lower than was indicated in the measurements (which may be the case because the Alcad battery that was used in the simulation is not the same as the battery used in the Froeya system). Even so, the role of this short-term storage and the dispatch strategy is well represented, as shown by the good correspondence of 31% between the measured and simulated number of diesel starts. In addition, simulated fuel consumption was within 2% of the measured value, an accuracy sufficient for most design studies.

Dijk, V. van; Baring-Gould, E.I.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Oil shale: a framework for development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price escalation of petroleum in recent times has removed the economic barrier to shale oil production, or soon will. A technological base for production is available which can be rapidly developed to the size and quality needed. The resource base in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado can support production of 1 to 5 million barrels of oil per day for hundreds of years. Institutional problems are the major remaining impediment to the development of oil shale. The small part of the resource in private hands is economically marginal and cannot support large production rates or the most efficient methods. The best land is owned by the Federal Government and is unavailable under present laws and policies. The lack of an integrated federal policy and an implementation plan prevents the development that is now technically and economically practical. One possible solution is a Piceance Basin Authority chartered by Congress to efficiently manage this resource and coordinate the federal governmental responsibility for oil shale resource development and conservation, water development, environmental control, and land use policy. It should be located in Colorado for an effective interaction with State and local authorities where both have responsibility. Government lands must be made accessible on a scale suitable to the technology and in a way that is acceptable to the public and to industry. Government and industry can then cooperate in a unitized, coordinated development of the resource and the area. With access to the resource and a clear government responsibility for area-wide, non-commercial planning and development, industry can provide the technology and capital for production and marketing of shale oil on an economically competitive basis.

Lewis, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Permeability prediction and drainage capillary pressure simulation in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of reservoir porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure is essential to exploration and production of hydrocarbons. Although porosity can be interpreted fairly accurately from well logs, permeability and capillary pressure must be measured from core. Estimating permeability and capillary pressure from well logs would be valuable where cores are unavailable. This study is to correlate permeability with porosity to predict permeability and capillary pressures. Relationships between permeability to porosity can be complicated by diagenetic processes like compaction, cementation, dissolution, and occurrence of clay minerals. These diagenetic alterations can reduce total porosity, and more importantly, reduce effective porosity available for fluid flow. To better predict permeability, effective porosity needs to be estimated. A general equation is proposed to estimate effective porosity. Permeability is predicted from effective porosity by empirical and theoretical equations. A new capillary pressure model is proposed. It is based on previous study, and largely empirical. It is tested with over 200 samples covering a wide range of lithology (clean sandstone, shaly sandstone, and carbonates dominated by intergranular pores). Parameters in this model include: interfacial tension, contact angle, shape factor, porosity, permeability, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure. These parameters can be measured from routine core analysis, estimated from well log, and assumed. An empirical equation is proposed to calculate displacement pressure from porosity and permeability. The new capillary-pressure model is applied to evaluate sealing capacity of seals, calculate transition zone thickness and saturation above free water level in reservoirs. Good results are achieved through integration of well log data, production data, core, and geological concepts.

Wu, Tao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Quantitative troubleshooting of industrial exhaust ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

This article proposes two troubleshooting tools that may allow precise and accurate assessment of changes to ventilation systems of any type. Both are useful in discovering and quantifying most modifications that affect the distribution of airflows among the branches and static pressures throughout the system. The approaches are derived from energy balance considerations, using power loss coefficients (X) computed for any contiguous section of the system from the duct velocities and static pressures measured at that section`s inlets and outlets. The value of X for a given portion of the system should be nearly constant with changes in airflow and with modifications to other portions of the system. Responsiveness to local modifications and insensitivity to changes elsewhere in the system - including gross changes in fan performance - make X coefficients a valuable troubleshooting tool. Static pressure ratios within a given branch are functionally related to ratios of X coefficients. Therefore, they vary with modifications to the branch and are highly insensitive to changes outside that branch. Unlike X coefficients, determination of static pressure ratios does not require velocity traverses, making them faster and easier to determine than X values. On the other hand, values of X are more universally applicable and have direct physical significance. Use of both static pressure ratios and X coefficients are described in a suggested troubleshooting procedure. Systematic measurement errors have surprisingly little impact on the usefulness of values of X or static pressure ratios. The major impediment to using either tool is the necessity for {open_quotes}baseline{close_quotes} measurements, which are often unavailable. On the other hand, a baseline for future comparisons can be created piecemeal, beginning at any time and extending over any period of time. 11 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Guffey, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the sensor.

Betteridge, William J

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology developed in this program.

Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, 4, 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development process of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Units 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant. The units are Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) plant, 1000 MWe class pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two loops of primary coolant system. The severe accident management guidelines for the units have been completed in 2002. The generic severe accident management guidance for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant has been used as the basis when developing Ulchin severe accident management guideline. Result of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for each unit was reviewed to integrate its insight into the SAMG. It indicates that each unit has a balanced design to any specific initiating events for core damage. Seven severe accident management strategies are applied in Ulchin SAMG. Seven strategies are (1) Inject into the steam generator (2) De-pressurize the RCS (3) Inject into the RCS (4) Inject into the containment (5) Control the fission product release into environment (6) Control the containment pressure and temperature and (7) Control hydrogen concentration in the containment. The range and capability of essential instrument for performing the strategies are assessed. Computational aids are developed to complement the unavailable instrument during the accident and to assist the operator's decision choosing strategies. To examine the ability of the SAMG to fulfill its intended function, small loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with the failure of safety injection was selected as a reference scenario. The scenario was analyzed using MAAP code. The evaluation of the SAMG using this sequence has been successfully completed. (authors)

Kim, Hyeong T.; Yoo, Hojong; Lim, Hyuk Soon; Park, Jong W.; Lim, Woosang; Oh, Seung Jong [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon, 305-380 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul [Future and Challenges, Inc (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An assessment of subsea production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decreasing gap between technology and the it?s applicability in the oil industry has led to a rapid development of deepwater resources. Beginning with larger fields where the chances of economic success are high, to marginal fields where project economics becomes a more critical parameter, the petroleum industry has come a long way. However, the ever growing water depths and harsher environments being encountered are presently posing challenges to subsea production. Being able to develop a field and then proceeding to ensure flow for the life of the field comprises many situations where the production equipment can fail and falter or through external factors, be deemed unavailable. Some of the areas where most of the current developments in subsea production are being seen are in subsea processing, flow assurance, long term well monitoring and intervention technologies ? areas that pose some of the biggest challenges to smooth operation in the deepwater environment. This research highlights the challenges to overcome in subsea production and well systems and details the advances in technology to mitigate those problems. The emphasis for this part of the research is on multiphase pumping, subsea processing, flow assurance, sustained casing pressure problems and well intervention. Furthermore, most operators realize a reduced ultimate recovery from subsea reservoirs owing to the higher backpressure imposed by longer flowlines and taller risers. This study investigates the reasons for this by developing a global energy balance and detailing measures to improve production rates and ultimate recoveries. The conclusions from this energy balance are validated by simulating a deepwater field under various subsea production scenarios.

Devegowda, Deepak

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Redesign of Electrical Installations to Maximize the Use of Photo Voltaic (PV) Cells at the End Use of Consumers in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new idea of redesigning the electrical installations inside residential premises is presented in this paper. The idea is based on having two separate circuits' installations. The first is A.C circuit which can be served by electric grid at standard operating voltage of 230 volts. While the second is D.C circuit being feed directly from the PV cells to meet the demand of all electrical appliances operated at tapered voltage between 12, 24 and 48 volts. The problem of unavailability of PV cell generation during the absence of sun is discussed and solved by introducing a smart interface between the power utility and the consumer having this micro generation PV cells. Smart bidirectional kWh energy meter is used to register the energy consumed by the consumer and the energy being produced by PV cells owned by the consumer himself. In this paper ten years were used to assess the advantages of using this method in Kuwait power systems. Besides the reduction in expansion cost for the power system, a significant release of system capacity was also assessed. Computer software was used to perform the load flow for typical days of the year to show clearly the behavior of the system under these new conditions. As a result of applying this new technique, generator units, transformers, over headlines and underground cables capacity were released. The voltage drop and energy losses through the power system network were reduced as result of reducing the current flow in them. A comparison between continuing to meet the expansion of the system in Kuwait with conventional electric power equipment and using new technique is presented in this paper.

Alatrash, J.; Mhaisen, N.; Ismail, Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Applicability of digital terrain analyses to wind energy prospecting and siting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent publication of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) database by the US Geological Survey (USGS) has provided a unique opportunity for the development of cost-effective wind energy prospecting technology. This database contains terrain elevation values on a Latitude-Longitude grid with a resolution of 3 arc-seconds (about 90 m) for the contiguous United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. This database has been coupled with software that will produce shaded-relief maps on a laser printer in a format compatible with the state wind power maps in the US wind energy atlas. By providing a much higher resolution of the terrain features than was possible when the US atlas was prepared, these maps can be useful in general wind prospecting activities. As highly resolved as the 90-m DEM data seem to be when compared to the atlas grid, they still appear to be too coarse to resolve terrain features in the detail required for local wind flow characterization and wind plant layout. Gridded terrain data at about 10-m resolution are available from the USGS for some areas of the United States. In areas where these data are unavailable, they may be generated by digitizing and gridding the contours from a 1:24,000-scale USGS map over the area of interest. Comparisons of terrain profiles from cross sections of the 10-m and 90-m data provide an indication of the effect of resolution on the reliability of terrain feature representation. Oblique views of the terrain in shaded-relief format provide a dramatic enhancement of the shape and relative position of features of interest.

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Birn, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Castellano, C.C. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Recent improvements to the DIII-D neutral beam instrumentation and control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DIII-D neutral beam (NB) instrumentation and control (I and C) system provides for operational control and synchronization of the eight DIII-D neutral beam injection systems, as well as for pertinent data acquisition and safety interlocking. Recently, improvements were made to the I and C system. With the replacement of the NB control computers, new signal interfacing was required to accommodate the elimination of physical operator panels, in favor of graphical user interface control pages on computer terminal screens. The program in the mode control (MC) programmable logic controller (PLC), which serves as a logic-processing interface between the NB control computers and system hardware, was modified to improve the availability of NB heating of DIII-D plasmas in the event that one or more individual beam systems suddenly become unavailable while preparing for a tokamak experimental shot sequences. An upgraded computer platform was adopted for the NB control system operator interface and new graphical user interface pages were developed to more efficiently display system status data. A failure mode of the armor tile infrared thermometers (pyrometers), which serve to terminate beam pulsing if beam shine-through overheats wall thermal shielding inside the DIII-D tokamak, was characterized such that impending failures can be detected and repairs effected to mitigate beam system down-time. The hardware that controls gas flow to the beamline neutralizer cells was upgraded to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and interlocking was provided to terminate beam pulsing in the event of insufficient neutralizer gas flow. Motivation, implementation, and results of these improvements are presented.

Kellman, D.H.; Hong, R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Light and sound underground: a study of rave culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsating colors flash, beat throbs deeper, deeper down, lift me up into this ecstasy: the world of rave. Rave culture is a strikingly significant, subversive subculture of recent and current times. Unique to the subculture are: rave music, rave dance, rave fashion, as well as specific tools and machines (i.e. technology used), behaviors, rituals, mind-altering drugs, jargon, and above all, the ecstatic community events that are raves. A subculture must provide for its participants something that may well be unavailable to them from the dominant culture. This starts with a sense of belonging to a "group" that appeals to them rationally and aesthetically. Rave in particular provides inclusion in an international community, as well as senses of festivity, intensity, emotional release, and collective experience; these in turn invoke alternative ideas/modes of thought and behavior/ways of living. After the death of anti-culture with the punks, effective subculture required a new direction: enter rave, endorsing on one hand a technology-glutted futurism ruled by machine-human interfaces, and at the same time a return to ancient tribal beats and nomadism. Rave's innovation lies in its extraction from culture of the essential: collective experience, festivity, and transcendence; and its exclusion of the superfluous "meaning" centers: politics, ideology, religion, race, ethnicity, even geography. The meaning of rave as a subversive art is not, as many critics claim, merely escapism, but an acute reaction to dominant culture in its offering of the experience itself. The cultural value of the rave lies in its construction of a working and contemporary transcendent collective experience, a space for being-in-the-moment. Within and with that act (which is art) a rave gains power to influence the future evolution of human thought and society, and to cut a path back to a once supernatural past, simultaneously in the moment and utterly timeless.

Harrison, Summer Gioia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Fundamental Physics with the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) is a joint European-U.S. Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the pure tensor metric nature of gravitation - a fundamental postulate of Einstein's theory of general relativity. By using a combination of independent time-series of highly accurate gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun, along with measurements of the Shapiro time delay on interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than 0.1 picoradians and 1 cm), LATOR will significantly improve our knowledge of relativistic gravity. The primary mission objective is to i) measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter \\gamma with accuracy of a part in 10^9. (1-\\gamma) is a direct measure for presence of a new interaction in gravitational theory, and, in its search, LATOR goes a factor 30,000 beyond the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. The mission will also provide: ii) first measurement of gravity's non-linear effects on light to ~0.01% accuracy; including both the Eddington \\beta parameter and also the spatial metric's 2nd order potential contribution (never measured before); iii) direct measurement of the solar quadrupole moment J2 (currently unavailable) to accuracy of a part in 200 of its expected size; iv) direct measurement of the "frame-dragging" effect on light by the Sun's gravitomagnetic field, to 1% accuracy. LATOR's primary measurement pushes to unprecedented accuracy the search for cosmologically relevant scalar-tensor theories of gravity by looking for a remnant scalar field in today's solar system. We discuss the mission design of this proposed experiment.

LATOR Collaboration; S. G. Turyshev; H. Dittus; M. Shao; K. L. Nordtvedt, Jr.; C. Laemmerzahl; S. Theil; W. Ertmer; E. Rasel; R. Foerstner; U. Johann; S. Klioner; M. Soffel; B. Dachwald; W. Seboldt; V. Perlick; M. C. W. Sandford; R. Bingham; B. Kent; T. J. Sumner; O. Bertolami; J. Paramos; B. Christophe; B. Foulon; P. Touboul; P. Bouyer; T. Damour; S. Reynaud; C. Salomon; A. Brillet; F. Bondu; J. -F. Mangin; E. Samain; C. Erd; J. C. Grenouilleau; D. Izzo; A. Rathke; S. W. Asmar; M. Colavita; Y. Gursel

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optical Design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) mission. By using a combination of independent time-series of highly accurate gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun along with measurements of the Shapiro time delay on the interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than $10^{-13}$ radians and 1 cm), LATOR will significantly improve our knowledge of relativistic gravity. The primary mission objective is to i) measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter $\\gamma$ with accuracy of a part in 10$^9$. $(1-\\gamma)$ is a direct measure for presence of a new interaction in gravitational theory, and, in its search, LATOR goes a factor 30,000 beyond the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. Other mission objectives include: ii) first measurement of gravity's non-linear effects on light to $\\sim$0.01% accuracy; including both the traditional Eddington $\\beta$ parameter and also the spatial metric's 2nd order potential contribution (never been measured before); iii) direct measurement of the solar quadrupole moment $J_2$ (currently unavailable) to accuracy of a part in 200 of its expected size; iv) direct measurement of the ``frame-dragging'' effect on light by the Sun's rotational gravitomagnetic field to one percent accuracy. LATOR's primary measurement pushes to unprecedented accuracy the search for cosmologically relevant scalar-tensor theories of gravity by looking for a remnant scalar field in today's solar system. The key element of LATOR is a geometric redundancy provided by the laser ranging and long-baseline optical interferometry. We discuss the mission and optical designs of this proposed experiment.

Slava G. Turyshev; Michael Shao; Kenneth L. Nordtvedt

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy/GDP CO2/Energy 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). ... Company: DOE/EIA Other ...

427

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas Largestto-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP given Chinasgoal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Export.gov - 05312011 Lithuania Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

financial crisis didn't spare Lithuania: negative growth in Q4 reduced the annual GDP growth rate to 3.2% and in 2009 GDP shrank by 15%. Business bankruptcies rose and...

429

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

430

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas Largestone-to-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP given Chinagoal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. Announcement of Energy Consumption per Unit GDP andEvaluation System for Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP,The Challenge of Reducing Energy Consumption of the Top-1000

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Media Freedom, Bureaucratic Incentives, and the Resource Curse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GDP per capita, PPP Log oil reserves Democracy Log land areaGDP per capita PPP, Log oil reserves, Log land area, and Logfrom Polity IV, and oil reserves and oil production from BP.

Egorov, Georgy; Guriev, Sergei; Sonin, Konstantin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ISMT Standard Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sources: World Bank, World Semiconductor Trade Statistics, VLSI Research, SIA, SEMI 2004 data (GDP from 2003 ... per year Energy reduction ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

2010 Freese and Nichols Baldrige Award Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Private Sector, Military/Government and Energy. ... and national interest rates, GDP, unemployment, the ... Average Training Hours per Employee # of ...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipalities GDP, Energy Consumption and Other IndicatorsEnergy Consumption 31 Figure 33 Primary Energy Consumption in Different

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

An empirical investigation on different methods of economic growth rate forecast and its behavior from fifteen countries across five continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our empirical results show that we can predict GDP growth rate more accurately in continent with fewer large economies

Yip Chee Yin; Lim Hock-Eam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy intensity (Energy consumption/real $ GDP) About the Annual Energy Outlook. Contact Information and Staff; ... Updated capital cost for ...

438

The Causes of Trade Globalization: A Political-Economy and World-Systems Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption ? Hegemony ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI IndicatorEnergy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI IndicatorEnergy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI Indicator

Kwon, Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Data:715d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSB - 2 Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 5,000 kW and less than or equal to 15,000 kW Fixed monthly charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

440

Data:5a9411be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSB - 1 Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 5,000 kW and less than or equal to 15,000 kW Fixed monthly charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Data:693b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northcentral Mississippi E P A Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Manufacturing Service SMSB (5000 kW - 15000 kW) Sector: Industrial Description: *This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective contract demand is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

442

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

443

Data:55d73aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cullman Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: MSC Manufacturing Service Rate Sector: Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

444

Data:Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Murray, Kentucky (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Rate- Schedule SMSB Sector: Commercial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective contract demand is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

445

Data:31f3d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSD Sector: Industrial Description: * greater than 25,000 kW Fixed Monthly Charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

446

Data:572ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Knoxville Utilities Board Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE MSB Sector: Industrial Description: This rate, subject to availability from TVA, shall be available for firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other applicable conditions specified below in this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

447

Data:4be888d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 88d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSC Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 15,000 kW and less than or equal to 25,000 kW Fixed Customer Charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

448

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM NMR OF SOLIDS BY MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, {beta}{sub m} = Arccos(3{sup -1/2}), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of {beta}. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H{sub D} was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H{sub D}, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of {sup 1}H with {sup 2}H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids. Theoretical and technical aspects are described in the text with comments on the application of the principles to other nuclei of interest.

Eckman, R.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NORMETEX PUMP ALTERNATIVES STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying resistances to ionizing radiation - aromatic polymers such as polyimide Vespel (TM) and the elastomer EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) have been found to be more resistant to degradation in tritium than other polymers. This report presents information to help select replacement pumps for Normetex pumps in tritium systems. Several pumps being considered as Normetex replacement pumps are discussed.

Clark, Elliot A.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Experimental measurements and modeling prediction of flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flammability limit is a significant safety issue for industrial processes. A certain amount of flammability limit data for pure hydrocarbons are available in the literature, but for industrial applications, there are conditions including different combinations of fuels at standard and non-standard conditions, in which the flammability limit data are scarce and sometimes unavailable. This research is two-fold: (i) Performing experimental measurements to estimate the lower flammability limits and upper flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures, conducting experimental data numerical analysis to quantitatively characterize the flammability limits of these mixtures with parameters, such as component compositions, flammability properties of pure hydrocarbons, and thermo-kinetic values; (ii) Estimating flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures through CFT-V modeling prediction (calculated flame temperature at constant volume), which is based on a comprehensive consideration of energy conservation. For the experimental part, thermal detection was used in this experiment. The experimental results indicate that the experimental results fit Le Chateliers Law within experimental uncertainty at the lower flammability limit condition. At the upper flammability limit condition, Le Chateliers Law roughly fits the saturated hydrocarbon mixture data, while with mixtures that contain one or more unsaturated components, a modification of Le Chateliers is preferred to fit the experimental data. The easy and efficient way to modify Le Chateliers Law is to power the molar percentage concentrations of hydrocarbon components. For modeling prediction part, the CFT-V modeling is an extended modification of CAFT modeling at constant volume and is significantly related to the reaction vessel configuration. This modeling prediction is consistent with experimental observation and Le Chateliers Law at the concentrations of lower flammability limits. When the quenching effect is negligible, this model can be simplified by ignoring heat loss from the reaction vessel to the external surroundings. Specifically, when the total mole changes in chemical reactions can be neglected and the quenching effect is small, CFTV modeling can be simplified to CAFT modeling.

Zhao, Fuman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Development of new methodologies for evaluating the energy performance of new commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of Measurement and Verification (M&V) of a new building continues to become more important because efficient design alone is often not sufficient to deliver an efficient building. Simulation models that are calibrated to measured data can be used to evaluate the energy performance of new buildings if they are compared to energy baselines such as similar buildings, energy codes, and design standards. Unfortunately, there is a lack of detailed M&V methods and analysis methods to measure energy savings from new buildings that would have hypothetical energy baselines. Therefore, this study developed and demonstrated several new methodologies for evaluating the energy performance of new commercial buildings using a case-study building in Austin, Texas. First, three new M&V methods were developed to enhance the previous generic M&V framework for new buildings, including: 1) The development of a method to synthesize weathernormalized cooling energy use from a correlation of Motor Control Center (MCC) electricity use when chilled water use is unavailable, 2) The development of an improved method to analyze measured solar transmittance against incidence angle for sample glazing using different solar sensor types, including Eppley PSP and Li-Cor sensors, and 3) The development of an improved method to analyze chiller efficiency and operation at part-load conditions. Second, three new calibration methods were developed and analyzed, including: 1) A new percentile analysis added to the previous signature method for use with a DOE-2 calibration, 2) A new analysis to account for undocumented exhaust air in DOE-2 calibration, and 3) An analysis of the impact of synthesized direct normal solar radiation using the Erbs correlation on DOE-2 simulation. Third, an analysis of the actual energy savings compared to three different energy baselines was performed, including: 1) Energy Use Index (EUI) comparisons with sub-metered data, 2) New comparisons against Standards 90.1-1989 and 90.1-2001, and 3) A new evaluation of the performance of selected Energy Conservation Design Measures (ECDMs). Finally, potential energy savings were also simulated from selected improvements, including: minimum supply air flow, undocumented exhaust air, and daylighting.

Song, Suwon

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

COMPENSATION OF FAST KICKER ROLLS WITH SKEW QUADRUPOLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the third generation light sources lead to the implementation of the top-up operation, when injection occurs while users collect data. The beam excursions due to the non-closure of the injection bump can spoil the data and need to be suppressed. In the horizontal plane compensation can be achieved by adjusting timing and kick amplitudes. The rolls of the kicker magnets create non-closure in the vertical plane and usually there is no means for correction. In the paper we describe proposed compensation scheme utilizing two skew quadrupoles placed inside the injection bump. The third generation light sources implement top-up operation firstly introduced at Advanced Photon Source. In this mode the circulating beam current is supported near constant by frequent injection of small charge, while photon beam is delivered for users. The beam perturbations caused by the mismatched injection bump can provide undesired noise in the user data. Usually the injection trigger is distributed to the users end stations so that those affected would be able to blank data acquisition. Nevertheless, as good operational practice such transients should be suppressed as much as possible. In the horizontal plane (which is commonly used for injection) one can adjust individual kicker strength as well as trigger delay while observing motion of the stored beam centroid. In the vertical plane such means are unavailable in the most cases. The possible solutions include dedicated weak vertical kickers and motorized adjustment of the roll angle of the injection kickers. Both abovementioned approaches are expensive and can significantly deteriorate reliability. We suggest two employ two skew quadrupoles (to correct both angle and position) placed inside the injection bump. In this case the beam position itself serves as measure of the kicker strength (assuming that kickers are well matched) and vertical kicks from the skew quadrupoles will be self synchronized with injection bump. In this paper we will consider the case when injection hardware (kickers and septa) are located in the same straight. Such an approach simplifies consideration but it can be generalized.

Pinayev, I.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to Stores requesting respirators; and Recommendation of improvements at the supplier (ORNL Laundry and Quality groups).

Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the greatest challenges facing the nuclear power industry is the final disposition of nuclear waste. To meet the needs of the nuclear power industry, a new fuel assembly design, called DUPLEX, has been developed which provides higher fuel burnups, burns transuranic waste while reducing minor actinides, reduces the long term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, and was developed for use in current light water reactors. The DUPLEX design considered in this thesis is based on a seed and blanket unit (SBU) configuration, where the seed region contains standard UO2 fuel, and the blanket region contains an inert matrix (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 fuel. The research efforts of this thesis are first to consider the higher burnup effects on DUPLEX assembly thermal-hydraulic performance and thermal safety margin over the assemblys expected operational lifetime. In order to accomplish this, an existing burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic methodology for conventional homogeneous fuel assemblies has been updated to meet the modeling needs specific to SBU-type assemblies. The developed framework dramatically expands the capabilities of the latest thermal-hydraulic evaluation framework such that the most promising and unique DUPLEX fuel design can be evaluated. As part of this updated methodology, the posed DUPLEX design is evaluated with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, peak fuel temperatures for both regions, and the peak cladding temperatures, under ANS Condition I, II, and III transient events with the thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. Due to difficulty in the fabrication and handling of minor actinide dioxides, documented thermal conductivity values for the considered IMF design are unavailable. In order to develop a representative thermal conductivity model for use in VIPRE-01, an extensive literature survey on the thermal conductivity of (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 component materials and a comprehensive review of combinatory models was performed. Using the updated methodology, VIPRE-01 is used to perform steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses for the DUPLEX fuel assembly. During loss-of-flow accident scenarios, the DUPLEX design is shown to meet imposed safety criteria. However, using the most conservative thermal conductivity modeling approach for (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2, the blanket region fuel temperatures remain only slightly below the design limit.

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

FREE-ELECTRON LASERS  

SciTech Connect

We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this new technology extends from the fields of solid-state physics, gas- and liquid-phase photochemistry, and surface catalysis to futuristic schemes for ultrahigh-energy linear accelerators.

Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460