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  2. Quantifying the Impact of Unavailability in Cyber-Physical Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Federick T.; Mili, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system discussed in this work manages a distributed control network for the Tunisian Electric & Gas Utility. The network is dispersed over a large geographic area that monitors and controls the flow of electricity/gas from both remote and centralized locations. The availability of the SCADA system in this context is critical to ensuring the uninterrupted delivery of energy, including safety, security, continuity of operations and revenue. Such SCADA systems are the backbone of national critical cyber-physical infrastructures. Herein, we propose adapting the Mean Failure Cost (MFC) metric for quantifying the cost of unavailability. This new metric combines the classic availability formulation with MFC. The resulting metric, so-called Econometric Availability (EA), offers a computational basis to evaluate a system in terms of the gain/loss ($/hour of operation) that affects each stakeholder due to unavailability.

  3. Emergency diesel generator: Maintenance and failure unavailability, and their risk impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, P.; Kim, I.; Uryasev, S.; Penoyar, J.; Vesely, W.

    1994-11-01

    Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) provide on-site emergency alternating current (ac) electric power for a nuclear plant in the event that all off-site power sources are lost. Existing regulations establish requirements for designing and testing of these on-site power sources to reduce to an acceptable level the probability of losing all ac power sources. Operating experience with EDGs has raised questions about their testing and maintenance to achieve the EDG reliability levels and the total EDG unavailability experienced (fraction of time EDG is out-of-service due to testing, maintenance, and failures). In this report, recent operating experience is used to assess EDG unavailability due to testing, maintenance, and failures during reactor power operation and during plant shutdown. Recent data show an improvement in EDG reliability, but an increase in EDG unavailability due to maintenance, a significant portion of which is due to routinely scheduled maintenances. Probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) of selected nuclear power plants are used to assess the risk impact of EDG unavailability due to maintenance and failure during power operation, and during different stages of plant shutdown. The results of these risk analyses suggest qualitative insights for scheduling EDG maintenance that will have minimal impact on risk of operating nuclear power plants.

  4. Digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants. Risk-screening of environmental stressors and a comparison of hardware unavailability with an existing analog system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present a screening study to identify environmental stressors for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP) which can be potentially risk-significant, and compare the hardware unavailability of such a system with that of its existing analog counterpart. The stressors evaluated are temperature, humidity, vibration, radiation, electro-magnetic interference (EMI), and smoke. The results of risk-screening for an example plant, subject to some bounding assumptions and based on relative changes in plant risk (core damage frequency impacts of the stressors), indicate that humidity, EMI from lightning, and smoke can be potentially risk-significant. Risk from other sources of EMI could not be evaluated for a lack of data. Risk from temperature appears to be insignificant as that from the assumed levels of vibrations. A comparison of the hardware unavailability of the existing analog Safety Injection Actuation System (SIAS) in the example plant with that of an assumed digital upgrade of the system indicates that system unavailability may be more sensitive to the level of redundancy in elements of the digital system than to the environmental and operational variations involved. The findings of this study can be used to focus activities relating to the regulatory basis for digital I&C upgrades in NPPs, including identification of dominant stressors, data-gathering, equipment qualification, and requirements to limit the effects of environmental stressors. 30 refs., 8 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. Slovenia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Slovenia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SI 3-letter ISO code SVN Numeric ISO code...

  6. Peru: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Peru Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PE 3-letter ISO code PER Numeric ISO code...

  7. Guadeloupe: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Guadeloupe Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.03 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GP 3-letter ISO code GLP Numeric ISO...

  8. Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Australia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AU 3-letter ISO code AUS Numeric ISO code...

  9. Gambia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Gambia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GM 3-letter ISO code GMB Numeric ISO code...

  10. Antigua and Barbuda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Antigua and Barbuda Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AG 3-letter ISO code ATG Numeric ISO code...

  11. Thailand: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Thailand Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TH 3-letter ISO code THA Numeric ISO code...

  12. Sierra Leone: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Sierra Leone Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SL 3-letter ISO code SLE Numeric ISO code...

  13. Djibouti: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Djibouti Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code DJ 3-letter ISO code DJI Numeric ISO code...

  14. Saint Barthélemy: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  15. Taiwan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. Georgia (country): Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Georgia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.17 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GE 3-letter ISO code GEO Numeric ISO...

  17. France: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name France Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 11.29 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FR 3-letter ISO code FRA Numeric ISO...

  18. Croatia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Croatia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code HR 3-letter ISO code HRV Numeric ISO code...

  19. Palau: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Palau Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PW 3-letter ISO code PLW Numeric ISO code...

  20. Uganda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Uganda Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code UG 3-letter ISO code UGA Numeric ISO...

  1. Ireland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Ireland Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.69 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code IE 3-letter ISO code IRL Numeric ISO...

  2. Cayman Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  3. Myanmar: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  4. Armenia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    ,"inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Armenia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.22 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AM 3-letter ISO...

  5. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pages 12 and 13 are unavailable Appendix B is unavailable

  6. New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts.

  7. Marshall Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Marshall Islands Population 56,429 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MH 3-letter ISO code MHL Numeric ISO code...

  8. San Marino: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name San Marino Population 32,576 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SM 3-letter ISO code SMR Numeric ISO code...

  9. Anguilla: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Anguilla Population 13,452 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AI 3-letter ISO code AIA Numeric ISO code...

  10. Tuvalu: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tuvalu Population 10,837 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TV 3-letter ISO code TUV Numeric ISO code...

  11. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  12. DOE_OR_21548_590_R_0.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Figure 1-1 is unavailable

  13. DOE_OR_21548_667_R_0.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pages 44 and 45 are unavailable

  14. Kenya: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kenya Population 38,610,097 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.21 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KE 3-letter ISO code KEN Numeric ISO...

  15. Greenland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Greenland Population 56,968 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GL 3-letter ISO code GRL Numeric ISO...

  16. United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    page. Country Profile Name United States Population 320,206,000 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO...

  17. Syria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Syria Population 17,951,639 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.84 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SY 3-letter ISO code SYR Numeric ISO...

  18. South Korea: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name South Korea Population 51,302,044 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KR 3-letter ISO code KOR Numeric ISO code...

  19. Somalia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Somalia Population 10,428,043 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SO 3-letter ISO code SOM Numeric ISO...

  20. Montserrat: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Montserrat Population 4,900 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MS 3-letter ISO code MSR Numeric ISO...

  1. Nepal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Nepal Population 26,494,504 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.08 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NP 3-letter ISO code NPL Numeric ISO...

  2. Nauru: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Nauru Population 9,275 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NR 3-letter ISO code NRU Numeric ISO...

  3. Northern Mariana Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Northern Mariana Islands Population 53,833 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MP 3-letter ISO code MNP Numeric ISO code...

  4. Turks and Caicos Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Turks and Caicos Islands Population 31,458 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TC 3-letter ISO code TCA Numeric ISO...

  5. Portugal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Country Profile Name Portugal Population 10,562,178 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 1.06 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PT 3-letter ISO code PRT Numeric ISO...

  6. Republic of Macedonia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Republic of Macedonia Population 2,022,547 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MK 3-letter ISO code MKD Numeric ISO code...

  7. Slovakia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Slovakia Population 5,397,036 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.80 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SK 3-letter ISO code SVK Numeric ISO...

  8. Bhutan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Bhutan Population Unavailable GDP 1,488,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.05 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BT 3-letter ISO code BTN Numeric ISO...

  9. Saint Helena: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Saint Helena Population 4,255 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SH 3-letter ISO code SHN Numeric ISO...

  10. Malaysia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Malaysia Population 28,334,135 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 2.45 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MY 3-letter ISO code MYS Numeric ISO...

  11. New Zealand: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name New Zealand Population 4,242,048 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NZ 3-letter ISO code NZL Numeric ISO code...

  12. Pakistan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Pakistan Population 196,174,380 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 2.48 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PK 3-letter ISO code PAK Numeric ISO...

  13. Moldova: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Moldova Population Unavailable GDP 8,738,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.14 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MD 3-letter ISO code MDA Numeric ISO...

  14. Bangladesh: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Bangladesh Population 156,594,962 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.87 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BD 3-letter ISO code BGD Numeric ISO...

  15. Bahrain: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Bahrain Population 1,234,571 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.55 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BH 3-letter ISO code BHR Numeric ISO...

  16. Sweden: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Sweden Population 9,658,301 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 2.22 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SE 3-letter ISO code SWE Numeric ISO...

  17. Structures of NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-02-01

    Crystal structures of the bacterial ?1,6-fucosyltransferase NodZ in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose are presented. Rhizobial NodZ ?1,6-fucosyltransferase (?1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5?-diphosphate-?-l-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signalling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two ?1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of ?1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 Å resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme–product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-l-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 Å resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among ?1,2-, ?1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand ?C2 and helix ?C3. In addition, there is a shift of the ?C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  18. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition, there is a shift of the {alpha}C3 helix itself upon GDP-Fuc binding.

  19. Rate Of Oxidation Of Plasma Polymer (GDP or CH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, B; Letts, S; Fearon, E

    2005-10-26

    There has been concern and uncertainty about the level of O incorporation in plastic shells prepared by coating mandrels with plasma polymer (GDP) and the Ge-doped analogs. In FY05 we undertook a controlled study of the rate of oxidation under various conditions, both to quantify the levels and to determine methods for restricting the le levels. Our results are shown in the Figure below. In summary, the level can be kept to less than 0.2 atom % by pyrolyzing the shells at 300 C (which is necessary for the removal of the P{alpha}MS mandrel), and then restricting the exposure to air to less than about 100 hours, which is easy to do. Based on this result we believe the NIF capsule specification for O can safely be lowered to 0.2 atom %, and this level should be used in future design calculations.

  20. Roughness Optimization at High Modes for GDP CHx Microshells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theobald, M.; Dumay, B.; Chicanne, C.; Barnouin, J.; Legaie, O.; Baclet, P.

    2004-03-15

    For the ''Megajoule'' Laser (LMJ) facility of the CEA, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) is the nominal ablator to be used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. These capsules contain the fusible deuterium-tritium mixture to achieve ignition. Coatings are prepared by glow discharge polymerization (GDP) with trans-2-butene and hydrogen. The films properties have been investigated. Laser fusion targets must have optimized characteristics: a diameter of about 2.4 mm for LMJ targets, a thickness up to 175 {mu}m, a sphericity and a thickness concentricity better than 99% and an outer and an inner roughness lower than 20 nm at high modes. The surface finish of these laser fusion targets must be extremely smooth to minimize hydrodynamic instabilities.Movchan and Demchishin, and later Thornton introduced a structure zone model (SZM) based on both evaporated and sputtered metals. They investigated the influence of base temperature and the sputtering gas pressure on structure and properties of thick polycrystalline coatings of nickel, titanium, tungsten, aluminum oxide. An original cross-sectional analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows amorphous materials characterization and permits to make an analogy between the amorphous GDP material and the existing model (SZM). The purpose of this work is to understand the relationship between the deposition parameters, the growing structures and the surface roughness.The coating structure as a function of deposition parameters was first studied on plane silicon substrates and then optimized on PAMS shells. By adjusting the coating parameters, the structures are modified, and in some case, the high modes roughness decreases dramatically.

  1. Cloning and characterization of GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per) from Escherichia coli O157:H7 and synthesis of GDP-perosamine in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Guohui; Liu Jun; Liu Xiang; Chen Min; Zhang Houcheng Wang, Peng George

    2007-11-23

    GDP-perosamine synthetase (Per, E.C. not yet classified) is important to the synthesis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 O-antigen. The mutant in per gene can disrupt the synthesis of O157 O-antigen. In this study, GDP-perosamine synthetase was cloned from E. coli O157:H7 and over-expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant His-tagged Per fusion protein was a decamer with molecular weight of 431 kDa. The optimal pH value of this recombinant protein was 7.5. The divalent ions had no significant effect on Per-catalyzed reaction. The K{sub m} and K{sub cat}/K{sub m} for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose were 0.09 mM and 2.1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} S{sup -1}, and those for L-glutamate were 2 mM and 0.52 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}S{sup -1}, respectively. Per was used to synthesize GDP-perosamine from GDP-mannose together with recombinant GDP-mannose dehydratase (GMD, E.C. 4.2.1.47). The purified GDP-perosamine was identified by MS and NMR. In summary, this work provided a feasible approach for the synthesis of GDP-perosamine which can lead to the study of LPS biosynthesis of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Thin GDP Shells Used as Cryogenic Direct Drive Targets at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Czechowicz, D.G.; Chen, K.C.; Dicken, M.; Morris, C.; Andrews, R.; Greenwood, A.; Castillo, E.

    2004-03-15

    Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, we present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters ('standard GDP') using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters ('strong GDP') of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  3. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  4. Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-22

    Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

  5. Crystal structure of a tetrameric GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase from a bacterial GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, N.A.; Mulichak, A.M.; Lam, J.S.; Rocchetta, H.L.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    D-Rhamnose is a rare 6-deoxy monosaccharide primarily found in the lipopolysaccharide of pathogenic bacteria, where it is involved in host-bacterium interactions and the establishment of infection. The biosynthesis of D-rhamnose proceeds through the conversion of GDP-D-mannose by GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose, which is subsequently reduced to GDP-D-rhamnose by a reductase. We have determined the crystal structure of GMD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in complex with NADPH and GDP. GMD belongs to the NDP-sugar modifying subfamily of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) enzymes, all of which exhibit bidomain structures and a conserved catalytic triad (Tyr-XXX-Lys and Ser/Thr). Although most members of this enzyme subfamily display homodimeric structures, this bacterial GMD forms a tetramer in the same fashion as the plant MUR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The cofactor binding sites are adjoined across the tetramer interface, which brings the adenosyl phosphate moieties of the adjacent NADPH molecules to within 7 {angstrom} of each other. A short peptide segment (Arg35-Arg43) stretches into the neighboring monomer, making not only protein-protein interactions but also hydrogen bonding interactions with the neighboring cofactor. The interface hydrogen bonds made by the Arg35-Arg43 segment are generally conserved in GMD and MUR1, and the interacting residues are highly conserved among the sequences of bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs. Outside of the Arg35-Arg43 segment, residues involved in tetrameric contacts are also quite conserved across different species. These observations suggest that a tetramer is the preferred, and perhaps functionally relevant, oligomeric state for most bacterial and eukaryotic GMDs.

  6. A Rac1--GDP trimer complex binds zinc with tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, displacing magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prehna, G.; Stebbins, C

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3221 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  7. A Rac1-GDP Trimer Complex Binds Zinc with Tetrahedral and Octahedral Coordination, Displacing Magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prehna,G.; Stebbins, E.

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3{sub 2}21 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  8. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Bacillus subtilis GTPase YphC–GDP complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ling; Muench, Stephen P.; Roujeinikova, Anna; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The Bacillus subtilis YphC gene encodes an essential GTPase thought to be involved in ribosome binding and whose protein product may represent a target for the development of a novel antibacterial agent. Sequence analysis reveals that YphC belongs to the EngA family of GTPases, which uniquely contain two adjacent GTP-binding domains. Crystals of a selenomethionine-incorporated YphC–GDP complex have been grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and polyethylene glycol as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.71, b = 65.05, c = 110.61 Å, and have one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Data sets at three different wavelengths were collected on a single crystal to 2.5 Å resolution at the Daresbury SRS in order to solve the structure by MAD. Ultimately, analysis of YphC in complex with GDP may allow a greater understanding of the EngA family of essential GTPases.

  9. Characterization of a Ras Mutant with Identical GDP- and GTP-Bound Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, B.; Boykevisch, S; Zhao, C; Kunzelmann, S; Bar-Sagi, D; Herrmann, C; Nassar, N

    2009-01-01

    We previously characterized the G60A mutant of Ras and showed that the switch regions of the GTP-bound but not the GDP-bound form of this mutant adopt an 'open conformation' similar to that seen in nucleotide-free Ras. Here, we mutate Lys147 of the conserved {sup 145}SAK{sup 147} motif in the G60A background and characterize the resulting double mutant (DM). We show that RasDM is the first structure of a Ras protein with identical GDP- and GTP-bound structures. Both structures adopt the open conformation of the active form of RasG60A. The increase in the accessible surface area of the nucleotide is consistent with a 4-fold increase in its dissociation rate. Stopped-flow experiments show no major difference in the two-step kinetics of association of GDP or GTP with the wild type, G60A, or RasDM. Addition of Sos fails to accelerate nucleotide exchange. Overexpression of the G60A or double mutant of Ras in COS-1 cells fails to activate Erk and shows a strong dominant negative effect. Our data suggest that flexibility at position 60 is required for proper Sos-catalyzed nucleotide exchange and that structural information is somehow shared among the switch regions and the different nucleotide binding motifs.

  10. Gambia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear NA 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  11. Democratic Republic of Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear NA 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  12. Guam: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  13. American Samoa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  14. Republic of the Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basis Full text unavailable. Notes Full text unavailable. References Takeshi Nishimura, Michael Fehler, W. Scott Baldridge, Peter Roberts, Lee Steck (1997) Heterogeneous...

  16. Structural basis of GDP release and gating in G protein coupled Fe[superscript 2+] transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilfoyle, Amy; Maher, Megan J.; Rapp, Mikaela; Clarke, Ronald; Harrop, Stephen; Jormakka, Mika

    2009-09-29

    G proteins are key molecular switches in the regulation of membrane protein function and signal transduction. The prokaryotic membrane protein FeoB is involved in G protein coupled Fe{sup 2+} transport, and is unique in that the G protein is directly tethered to the membrane domain. Here, we report the structure of the soluble domain of FeoB, including the G protein domain, and its assembly into an unexpected trimer. Comparisons between nucleotide free and liganded structures reveal the closed and open state of a central cytoplasmic pore, respectively. In addition, these data provide the first observation of a conformational switch in the nucleotide-binding G5 motif, defining the structural basis for GDP release. From these results, structural parallels are drawn to eukaryotic G protein coupled membrane processes.

  17. Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

    2005-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

  18. Helix Dipole Movement and Conformational Variability Contribute to Allosteric GDP Release in G[alpha] Subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preininger, Anita M.; Funk, Michael A.; Oldham, William M.; Meier, Scott M.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Adhikary, Suraj; Kimple, Adam J.; Siderovski, David P.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, Tina M.

    2009-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Galphabetagamma) transmit signals from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream effectors through a guanine nucleotide signaling cycle. Numerous studies indicate that the carboxy-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha subunits participates in Galpha-receptor binding, and previous EPR studies suggest this receptor-mediated interaction induces a rotation and translation of the alpha5 helix of the Galpha subunit [Oldham, W. M., et al. (2006) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13, 772-777]. On the basis of this result, an engineered disulfide bond was designed to constrain the alpha5 helix of Galpha(i1) into its EPR-measured receptor-associated conformation through the introduction of cysteines at position 56 in the alpha1 helix and position 333 in the alpha5 helix (I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1)). A functional mimetic of the EPR-measured alpha5 helix dipole movement upon receptor association was additionally created by introduction of a positive charge at the amino terminus of this helix, D328R Galpha(i1). Both proteins exhibit a dramatically elevated level of basal nucleotide exchange. The 2.9 A resolution crystal structure of I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) in complex with GDP-AlF(4)(-) reveals the shift of the alpha5 helix toward the guanine nucleotide binding site that is anticipated by EPR measurements. The structure of the I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) subunit further revealed altered positions for the switch regions and throughout the Galpha(i1) subunit, accompanied by significantly elevated crystallographic temperature factors. Combined with previous evidence in the literature, the structural analysis supports the critical role of electrostatics of the alpha5 helix dipole and overall conformational variability during nucleotide release.

  19. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  20. X-ray, NMR, and Mutational Studies of the Catalytic Cycle of the GDP-Mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabelli,S.; Azurmendi, H.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildva, A.

    2006-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis with inversion of GDP-{alpha}-D-hexose to GDP and {beta}-D-hexose by nucleophilic substitution by water at C1 of the sugar. Two new crystal structures (free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex), NMR, and site-directed mutagenesis data, combined with the structure of the enzyme-product complex reported earlier, suggest a four-stage catalytic cycle. An important loop (L6, residues 119-125) contains a ligand to the essential Mg{sup 2+} (Gln-123), the catalytic base (His-124), and three anionic residues. This loop is not ordered in the X-ray structure of the free enzyme due to dynamic disorder, as indicated by the two-dimensional 1H-15N HMQC spectrum, which shows selective exchange broadening of the imidazole nitrogen resonances of His-124 (k{sub ex} = 6.6 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP-mannose substrate complex of the less active Y103F mutant shows loop L6 in an open conformation, while the structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP product complex showed loop L6 in a closed, 'active' conformation. 1H-15N HMQC spectra show the imidazole N of His-124 to be unprotonated, appropriate for general base catalysis. Substituting Mg{sup 2+} with the more electrophilic metal ions Mn{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} decreases the pK{sub a} in the pH versus k{sub cat} rate profiles, showing that deprotonation of a metal-bound water is partially rate-limiting. The H124Q mutation, which decreases k{sub cat} 103.4-fold and largely abolishes its pH dependence, is rescued by the Y103F mutation, which increases k{sub cat} 23-fold and restores its pH dependence. The structural basis of the rescue is the fact that the Y103F mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium to the open form moving loop L6 out of the active site, thus permitting direct access of the specific base hydroxide from the solvent. In the proposed dissociative transition state, which occurs in the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, the partial negative charge of the GDP leaving group is compensated by the Mg2+, and by the closing of loop L2 that brings Arg-37 closer to the -phosphate. The development of a positive charge at mannosyl C1, as the oxocarbenium-like transition state is approached, is compensated by closing the anionic loop, L6, onto the active site, further stabilizing the transition state.

  1. The Structure of the MUR1 GDP-mannose 4,67-deydratase from A. thaliana: Implications for Ligand Binding Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulichak, A.M.; Bonin, C.P.; Reiter, W.-D.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of GDP-L-fucose, the activated form of L-fucose, which is a component of glycoconjugates in plants known to be important to the development and strength of stem tissues. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the MUR1 dehydratase isoform from Arabidopsis thaliana complexed with its NADPH cofactor as well as with the ligands GDP and GDP-D-rhamnose. MUR1 is a member of the nucleoside-diphosphosugar modifying subclass of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme family, having homologous structures and a conserved catalytic triad of Lys, Tyr, and Ser/Thr residues. MUR1 is the first member of this subfamily to be observed as a tetramer, the interface of which reveals a close and intimate overlap of neighboring NADP{sup +}-binding sites. The GDP moiety of the substrate also binds in an unusual syn conformation. The protein-ligand interactions around the hexose moiety of the substrate support the importance of the conserved triad residues and an additional Glu side chain serving as a general base for catalysis. Phe and Arg side chains close to the hexose ring may serve to confer substrate specificity at the O2 position. In the MUR1/GDP-D-rhamnose complex, a single unique monomer within the protein tetramer that has an unoccupied substrate site highlights the conformational changes that accompany substrate binding and may suggest the existence of negative cooperativity in MUR1 function.

  2. Novel protein and Mg[superscript 2+] configurations in the Mg[superscript 2+] GDP Complex of the SRP GTPase ffh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focia, Pamela J.; Alam, Hena; Lu, Thanh; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2010-03-05

    Ffh is the signal sequence recognition and targeting subunit of the prokaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP). Previous structural studies of the NG GTPase domain of Ffh demonstrated magnesium-dependent and magnesium-independent binding conformations for GDP and GMPPNP that are believed to reflect novel mechanisms for exchange and activation in this member of the GTPase superfamily. The current study of the NG GTPase bound to Mg{sup 2+} GDP reveals two new binding conformations - in the first the magnesium interactions are similar to those seen previously, however, the protein undergoes a conformational change that brings a conserved aspartate into its second coordination sphere. In the second, the protein conformation is similar to that seen previously, but the magnesium coordination sphere is disrupted so that only five oxygen ligands are present. The loss of the coordinating water molecule, at the position that would be occupied by the oxygen of the {gamma}-phosphate of GTP, is consistent with that position being privileged for exchange during phosphate release. The available structures of the GDP-bound protein provide a series of structural snapshots that illuminate steps along the pathway of GDP release following GTP hydrolysis.

  3. Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

  4. Senegal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 76 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0...

  5. Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects: Units II and III Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Environmental Science Associates Published Environmental Impact Report, prepared for Energy Management...

  6. Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.

  7. GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, John B. (3125 Bolgos Cir., Ann Arbor, MI 48105); Lennon, Gregory (8309 Norris Canyon, Castro Valley, CA 94552); Rouquier, Sylvie (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Giorgi, Dominique (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Kelly, Robert J. (3164 Concord, Trenton, MI 48183)

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

  8. GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

  9. The R6A-1 peptide binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1} but is not a GDP-dissociation inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Francis S. . E-mail: fwillard@med.unc.edu; Siderovski, David P.

    2006-01-27

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that convert signals from membrane receptors into changes in intracellular physiology. Recently, several peptides that bind heterotrimeric G-protein {alpha} subunits have been isolated including the novel G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP binding peptides R6A and KB-752. The R6A peptide and its minimized derivative R6A-1 interact with G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP. Based on spectroscopic analysis of BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S binding to G{alpha}{sub i1}, it has been reported that R6A-1 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity against G{alpha}{sub i1} [W.W. Ja, R.W. Roberts, Biochemistry 43 (28) (2004) 9265-9275]. Using radioligand binding, we show that R6A-1 is not a GDI for G{alpha}{sub i1} subunits. Furthermore, we demonstrate that R6A-1 reduces the fluorescence quantum yield of the G{alpha}{sub i1}-BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S complex, thus explaining the previously reported GDI activity as a fluorescence artifact. We further show that R6A-1 has significant sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor peptide KB-752 that binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1}. We use competitive binding analysis to show that R6A-1 also binds to switch II of G{alpha} subunits.

  10. China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

    2011-09-30

    Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

  11. Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Subir K. Sanyal Conference Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford,...

  12. Mammoth Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: Mammoth Geothermal Project Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Ben Holt and Richard G. Campbell Published Journal Geo-Heat Center Quarterly Bulletin, 1984 DOI Not...

  13. EERE Success Story-Competition Provides Students with Real-World...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The competition's 30 national sponsors also provide expert guidance and mentoring, as well as access to compo-nents and systems that might otherwise be unavailable or too ...

  14. Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Update on Mammoth Pacific, LP Operations Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Charlene L. Wardlow Published Publisher Not Provided, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  15. Hydrology of the Geothermal System in Long Valley Caldera, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System in Long Valley Caldera, California Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Michael L. Sorey Published Unpublished report for the Long Valley Hydrologic Advisory Committee,...

  16. Hydrologic Monitoring Summary Long Valley Caldera, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary Long Valley Caldera, California Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Michael L. Sorey Published ORMAT internal report, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  17. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 3. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those...

  18. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 4. Denominators represent the value of production for the...

  19. Tectonic analysis of the Rio Grande Rift Zone, central Colorado...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rift Zone, central ColoradoThesisDissertation Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author D.H. Knepper Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1974...

  20. Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Abstract Abstract unavailable....

  1. Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV;...

  2. Resurgent cauldrons | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    library Journal Article: Resurgent cauldrons Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors R L Smith and R A Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoir 116, 1968 DOI...

  3. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 20030901 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check...

  4. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Abstract Abstract unavailable....

  5. Principal Types of Volcanoes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Types of Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Principal Types of Volcanoes Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author John Watson...

  6. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors J.L. Smith and R.W. Rex Published American Nuclear Society, 1977 Report Number Energy and Mineral Resource Recovery DOI Not Provided...

  7. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing...

  8. The Shallow Hydrothermal System of Long Valley Caldera, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Gene A. Suemnicht, Michael L. Sorey, Joseph N. Moore and Robert Sullivan Conference Stanford, CaliforniaThirty-Second Workshop on...

  9. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Presentation Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Colin F. Williams and Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson Conference Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir...

  10. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of...

  11. Low-Pressure Solubility of Gases in Liquid Water | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Emmerich Wilhelm, Rubin Battino and Robert J. Wilcock Published Journal Chemical reviews, 1977 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  12. An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    area, Chaffee County, ColoradoThesisDissertation Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author J.S. Crompton Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1976...

  13. Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published...

  14. Land Use History of Coso Hot Springs, Inyo County California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County California Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Cecil R. Brooks, W. M. Clements, J. A. Kantner and G. Y. Poirier Published Iroquois Research Institute, 1979 DOI Not...

  15. NV Energy (Southern)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: As of January 2016, programs for pool pump rebates, refrigerator recycling, and LED lighting discounts are unavailable in NV Energy's southern territory. See website for more information.

  16. A Preliminary Study of the Waters of the Jemez Plateau, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Jemez Plateau, New Mexico Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors Clyde Kelly and E.V. Anspach Published Journal University of New Mexico Bulletin, Chemistry Series, 1913 DOI...

  17. Resource Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    600 average megawatts of generation could be available to the region from concentrated solar power plants in Nevada, but facilities to transmit this power are unavailable until...

  18. The Thermal Conductivity of Rocks and Its Dependence Upon Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    unavailable. Authors F. Birch and H. Clark Published Journal American Journal of Science, 1940 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    would not reach consuming countries until December or later. In addition, due to maintenance, some oil production from the United Arab Emirates was unavailable during much of...

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which is often limited or unavailable," said Dr. Evgueni Kassianov, PNNL atmospheric scientist and lead author of the paper, which appears in the journal Atmosphere. "Our...

  1. EIA Report 9/16/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... However, since compression at the Henry Hub complex remains unavailable, nominations with ... & Energy Reliability STEO Hurricane Analysis (pdf) Hurricane Ikes Path as of 0700 ...

  2. EIA Report 9/18/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Compression at the Henry Hub complex remains unavailable at this time and Sabine advises ... & Energy Reliability STEO Hurricane Analysis (pdf) Hurricane Ikes Path as of 0700 ...

  3. EIA Report 9/17/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Compression at the Henry Hub complex remains unavailable at this time and Sabine advises ... & Energy Reliability STEO Hurricane Analysis (pdf) Hurricane Ikes Path as of 0700 ...

  4. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Power Plant Retirements Slower Normal Faster New Generation Technologies Unavailable: Coal with CCS New Nuclear New Biomass Available: IGCC Coal with CCS New Nuclear New Biomass ...

  5. Energy Department Authorizes Alaska LNG Project, LLC to Export...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North Slope gas has been a stranded resource unavailable to commercial markets. The project proposed by Alaska LNG includes a pipeline intended to make North Slope gas accessible ...

  6. Vendor Information | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database. This database provides buyers an opportunity to search for potential suppliers for upcoming requirements. The Vendor Information Database is currently unavailable....

  7. Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 October 31, 2014 by Francesca Verdier There will be a major NERSC maintenance on Tuesday, November 11, from 08:00 until 18:00 PST. Several systems and services will be unavailable during this time. Edison, Hopper, Data Transfer nodes, and Science Gateway (data portal) nodes will be unavailable 08:00 - 13:00. Carver/Dirac, PDSF, and Genepool will be unavailable 08:00 - 18:00. HPSS and web servers

  8. U-232: Xen p2m_teardown() Bug Lets Local Guest OS Users Deny...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    unavailable and may cause the domain 0 kernel to panic. There is no requirement for memory sharing to be in use. Impact: A guest kernel can cause the host to become unresponsive...

  9. Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive Email Announcements Archive Subject Date Author Edison will be unavailable this Thursday, 172016 8:00-17:00 PST 2016-01-05 15:37:04 Zhengji Zhao...

  10. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provide...

  11. Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Roy A. Bailey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1984 Report Number Open File Report 84-939 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability:...

  12. Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

  13. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau...

  14. Web Page Error 404.1 Page Cannot be Found

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Us Media Center Contact Us Site Map The page you are looking for cannot be found. The Web site you are looking for is unavailable due to its identification configuration...

  15. Benin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 100 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 1,133,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 97 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  16. 2007 Annual Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7 Annual Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: 2007 Annual Report Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Enel Organization Enel S.p.A....

  17. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: NV Energy's Second Refrigerator or Freezer Recycling program is currently unavailable. Check the website or contact the program at recycle@nvenergy.com for updates and more information.

  18. Alarm guided critical function and success path monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    The use of alarm indication on the overview (IPSO) display to initiate diagnosis of challenges to critical functions or unavailability of success paths, and further alarm-based guidance toward ultimate diagnosis.

  19. DARPA looks beyond GPS for positioning, navigating, and timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2014-10-01

    Cold-atom interferometry, microelectromechanical systems, signals of opportunity, and atomic clocks are some of the technologies the defense agency is pursuing to provide precise navigation when GPS is unavailable.

  20. Present Day Kinematics of the Eastern California Shear Zone from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract unavailable. Authors S.C. McClusky, S.C. Bjomstad, B. H. Hager, R. W. King, B. J. Meade, M. M. Miller, F. C. Monastero and B. J. Souter Published Journal Geophysical...

  1. The Magma Energy Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: The Magma Energy Program Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors T.Y. Chu, J.C. Dunn, John T. Finger, John B. Rundle and H.R. Westrich Published Journal Geothermal...

  2. Ghana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 73 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 22,650,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 76 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  3. Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors R.F. Marvin and S.W. Dobson Published New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, 1979 Report Number IsochronWest no. 26 DOI Not...

  4. Guinea-Bissau: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 Area(km) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 116 1990 NREL Solar Potential 93,662,158 MWhyear 132 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas...

  5. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2011 pdsfdtn1 maintenance 3211, 0900-1700 PT February 28, 2011 by Eric Hjort During the maintenance pdsfdtn1 will be down and unavailable. Read the full post eliza5...

  6. Denmark: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 143 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 61,300,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 62 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  7. Netherlands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWhyear 151 2008 NREL Coal Reserves Unavailable Million Short Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 1,416,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 24 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  8. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42611: eliza18 emergency maintenance 9am-3pm April 25, 2011 by Eric Hjort | 0 Comments The Eliza18 filesystem will be unavailable from 9AM - 3PM tomorrow (0426) for emergency...

  9. Web Page Error 404.1 Page Cannot be Found

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... About ORISE Safety Careers Working with Us Media Center Contact Us Site Map The page you are looking for cannot be found. The Web site you are looking for is unavailable due to its ...

  10. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Category C: Make funding unavailable this year, pushing it to future years (e.g., NNSA Pension funds) * Program Office: Program Offices, to track and manage what work is to be done...

  11. PDSF User Meeting 07-07-15.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 7 , 2 015 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past Outages * 6315 (12 hour): NX unavailable * 7415 (6 hours): System wide outage due to global common i ssues * 7515 (1...

  12. Request to Cancel DOE G 481.1-1, Department of Energy Work for Others Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-11-23

    By Cancelling this directive DOE is reducing duplicative publications of program related information and recognizing the effects of DOE/contractor working groups and the use of previously unavailable electronic communication systems.

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Reasons that Made Electricity Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million kWh. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Electricity Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel Electricity Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Reasons that Made Natural Gas Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Billion cubic feet. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Natural Gas Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed as a FueNatural Gas Fuel Use Another Fuel the

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million short tons. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Coal Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel Coal Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products Fuel

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million barrels. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS LPG Consumed Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry as a Fuel LPG Fuel Use Another Fuel the Products Fuel

  17. Table 10.24 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million barrels. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable Distillate Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed as a Fue Fuel Oil Fuel Use

  18. Table 10.25 Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Million barrels. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable ResiduaCapable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmental Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed as a Fue Fuel Oil Fuel Use

  19. Notices

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8557 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 68 / Thursday, April 8, 2004 / Notices We must acknowledge and confirm these periods of unavailability before granting you an extension. To request this extension or to confirm our acknowledgement of any system unavailability, you may contact either (1) the persons listed elsewhere in this notice under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT (see VII. Agency Contacts) or (2) the e-GRANTS help desk at 1-888- 336-8930. You may access the electronic grant application

  20. Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-27

    FRANTIC-3 was developed to evaluate system unreliability using time-dependent techniques. The code provides two major options: to evaluate standby system unavailability or, in addition to the unavailability to calculate the total system failure probability by including both the unavailability of the system on demand as well as the probability that it will operate for an arbitrary time period following the demand. The FRANTIC-3 time dependent reliability models provide a large selection of repair and testingmore » policies applicable to standby or continously operating systems consisting of periodically tested, monitored, and non-repairable (non-testable) components. Time-dependent and test frequency dependent failures, as well as demand stress related failure, test-caused degradation and wear-out, test associated human errors, test deficiencies, test override, unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, component renewal and replacement policies, and test strategies can be prescribed. The conditional system unavailabilities associated with the downtimes of the user specified failed component are also evaluated. Optionally, the code can perform a sensitivity study for system unavailability or total failure probability to the failure characteristics of the standby components.« less

  1. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  2. Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive Email Announcements Archive Subject Date Author Edison will be unavailable on 3/16/2016 8:00am-17:00pm PDT. 2016-03-07 16:18:27 Zhengji Zhao <zzhao_at_lbl.gov> A shorter purging period will be implemented on Edison starting 4/1/2016 2016-03-03 14:39:29 Zhengji Zhao <zzhao_at_lbl.gov> Edison will be unavailable next Wednesday, 2/3/2016 8:00-17:00 PST 2016-01-27 13:47:38 Zhengji Zhao <zzhao_at_lbl.gov> Edison will be unavailable this Thursday, 1/7/2016

  3. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2011 pdsfdtn1 maintenance 3/2/11, 0900-1700 PT February 28, 2011 by Eric Hjort During the maintenance pdsfdtn1 will be down and unavailable. Read the full post /eliza5 maintenance 2/23/11, 9am-4pm February 17, 2011 by Eric Hjort The Eliza5 filesystem will be unavailable on Wed, Feb 23, 2011 from 9AM - 4PM for maintenance work. Read the full post /eliza4 emergency maintenance 2/7/11 10am-12noon February 4, 2011 by Eric Hjort There will be an emergency downtime for eliza4 on Monday Feb 7,

  4. Genepool Quarterly Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genepool Quarterly Maintenance Genepool Quarterly Maintenance November 7, 2012 by Kirsten Fagnan The Genepool cluster will be offline for maintenance next Tuesday, November 13th from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm (PST). During this time staff will upgrade the Genepool compute nodes to Debian 6. Also, the firmware for /projectb and /house will be updated. /projectb will be unavailable from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm (PST) and /house will be unavailable from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm (PST). Any webservices or workflows

  5. Released: June 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of

  6. Released: June 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","LPG Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of

  7. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2011 4/26/11: eliza18 emergency maintenance 9am-3pm April 25, 2011 by Eric Hjort The Eliza18 filesystem will be unavailable from 9AM - 3PM tomorrow (04/26) for emergency hardware maintenance. All running jobs and processes using the filesystem will be terminated at that time. We apologize for the inconvenience

  8. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running on Carver Running on Carver The Daya Bay software is installed on PDSF on /common so is therefore unavailable on Carver. At this point there has been no effort to port the code to /project for use on Carver. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:13

  9. Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2014 Major NERSC Maintenance Tuesday November 11 October 31, 2014 by Francesca Verdier There will be a major NERSC maintenance on Tuesday, November 11, from 08:00 until 18:00 PST. Several systems and services will be unavailable during this time

  10. Proven Performance of Seven Cold Climate Deep Retrofit Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osser, R.; Neuhauser, K.; Ueno, K.

    2012-06-01

    Seven test homes located in Massachusetts are examined within this report. The retrofit strategies of each home are presented along with a comparison of the pre- and post-retrofit airtightness achieved by the group. Pre- and post-retrofit utility bills were collected; energy models were used to estimate pre-retrofit energy use when bills were unavailable.

  11. Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project. Final design availability assessment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulvihill, R.J.; Reny, D.A.; Geumlek, J.M.; Purohit, G.P.

    1983-02-01

    An availability assessment of the principal systems of the Heber Geothermal Power Plant has been carried out based on the final issue of the process descriptions, process flow diagrams, and the approved for design P and IDs prepared by Fluor Power Services, Inc. (FPS). The principal systems are those which contribute most to plant unavailability. The plant equivalent availability, considering forced and deferred corrective maintenance outages, was computed using a 91 state Markov model to represent the 29 principal system failure configurations and their significant combinations. The failure configurations and associated failure and repair rates were defined from system/subsystem availability assessments that were conducted using the availability assessments based on the EPRI GO methodology and availability block diagram models. The availability and unavailability ranking of the systems and major equipment is presented.

  12. Rate Of Oxidation Of Plasma Polymer (GDP or CH) (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Based on this result we believe the NIF capsule specification for O can safely be lowered to 0.2 atom %, and this level should be used in future design calculations. Authors: Cook, ...

  13. CCSM is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi-Program Multi-Data (MPMD) mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concurrent Single-Executable CCSM with MPH Library Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding Computational Research Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 2006 Abstract Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi-Program Multi-Data (MPMD) mechanism. Each component is compiled into a separate executable. MPMD is normally cumbersome in usage and vendor support is sometimes limited or completely unavailable, such as on BlueGene/L. Also smaller

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F: Performance/Reliability/Costs Moderators: Tom Key, Charlie Hanley April 30, 2013 Session Topics - What is a failure, acceptable rates, repair/replace strategy, allowable output reductions, availability and un-availability planned vs breakdown and risks to bottom line. Key Takeaway's and Questions: 1. Review of O&M and system aspects of reliability, from breakout A. 2. Design objectives for PV "availability" showed some high numbers:  large plants (100 MW) at 99.7%,

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-020.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 SECTION A. Project Title: Interim Storage Area for Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) SECTION B. Project Description: Currently, dedicated space is unavailable for above-grade storage of Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) containing 55-gal drums of remote handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU). In the past this waste was packaged in specially constructed liners and placed into the RSWF. When ready for transfer this waste would then be removed from

  16. STR/ITS: Instrument Selection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A. Cortés Concepción, Robert J. Lascola, William A. Spencer May 6, 2015 Tritium Focus Group Meeting SRNL-STI-2015-00248 What is the challenge? Tritium Facilities is critically reliant on dated analytical technologies Low-mass, high-resolution mass spectrometer issues: * Near end-of-life (30+ years old) * Spare parts not available from vendor * Vendor support is difficult or unavailable Need for alternative, accessible analytical technologies within DP for: * Complement current analytical

  17. STR/ITS: Instrument Selection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laura Tovo September 24, 2014 Tritium Focus Group Meeting SRNS-STI-2014-00423 What is the challenge? Tritium Facilities is critically reliant on dated analytical technologies Low-mass, high-resolution mass spectrometer issues: * Near end-of-life (30+ years old) * Spare parts not available from vendor * Vendor support is difficult or unavailable Need for alternative, accessible analytical technologies within DP for: * Complement current analytical methods * Greater ability to troubleshoot process

  18. Tritium Instrument Demonstration Station (TIDS)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cortés Concepción, Laura Tovo April 22, 2014 Tritium Focus Group Meeting SRNL-STI-2014-00172 What is the challenge? Tritium Facilities is critically reliant on dated analytical technologies Low-mass, high-resolution mass spectrometer issues: * Near end-of-life (30+ years old) * Spare parts not available from vendor * Vendor support is difficult or unavailable Need for alternative, accessible analytical technologies within DP for: * Complement current analytical methods * Greater ability to

  19. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  20. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  1. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  2. Mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)â‚‚]: The return of the "blue dimer"

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Concepcion, Javier J.; Zhong, Diane K.; Szalda, David J.; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-05

    We describe here a combined solution-surface-DFT calculations study for complexes of the type [Ru(bda)(L)â‚‚] including X-ray structure of intermediates, their reactivity, as well as pH-dependent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry. These studies shed light on the mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)â‚‚], revealing key features unavailable from solution studies with sacrificial oxidants.

  3. Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Backup Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Backup Power Overview Fuel cells convert the chemical energy in hydrogen to electricity with only water and heat as byproducts and are commercially available today for certain applications. One of these is emergency backup power. Today's commercially available fuel cell backup power (BUP) systems are particularly appropriate for low-power applications (generally up to 10 kW) requiring intermittent backup power when electricity is unavailable from a primary source, such as an electric grid power

  4. Microsoft Word - OUO Template

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SNL 2001a, has been classified as Official Use Only material; and therefore is unavailable for public use because of its sensitive nature. The Office of Health, Safety and Security provides information on DOE's agency-wide Official Use Only (OUO) program, accessible online at: http://www.hss.doe.gov/classification/QualityMgt/ouo.html and is included in this file. Information regarding the DOE's OUO program is located on Page 2, for convenience. If you have questions regarding the DOE's OUO

  5. U

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Effective September 26, 2008 NMMSS operations will have officially been transitioned from NAC International in Norcross, Georgia to the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), DOE, Germantown, Maryland. DOE Savannah River, the NMMSS upgrade developer and the continuity of operations backup site, will help HSS with the transition and play a vital role in providing the current level of support to both DOE and NRC stakeholders. The NMMSS database will be unavailable to operate or process

  6. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharrey, Sean; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  7. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  8. Tips & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights Images: (optional) Only images in JPEG, BMP, GIF, or PNG can be accepted up to 10 Mb. The image caption is limited to 500 characters. Tip: For comparisons, lay multiple images out side by side, vertically or in a grid formation to create a single image file for uploading on the Research Highlight Submittal Form. Trick: If image editing soft ware is unavailable, the task can be accomplished using Microsoft (MS) Word as follows: 1. Insert

  9. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2012 Hopper scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be unavailable from 8am Wednesday, Sept 19 until

  10. COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: Cyg OB2 8A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Destree, Joshua D.; Burgh, Eric B.; Ferguson, Ryan M.; Danforth, Charles W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado at Boulder, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Cordiner, Martin, E-mail: tsnow@casa.colorado.ed, E-mail: destree@colorado.ed, E-mail: eric.burgh@colorado.ed, E-mail: ryan.m.ferguson@colorado.ed, E-mail: danforth@casa.colorado.ed, E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.go [The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-09-10

    Data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) are presented for the first highly reddened target (Cyg OB2 8A) under the COS Science Team's guaranteed time allocation. Column densities of ionic, atomic, and molecular species are reported and implications are discussed. Data from Cyg OB2 8A demonstrate the ability to analyze highly reddened interstellar sight lines with the COS that were unavailable to previous UV instruments. Measured column densities indicate that the Cyg OB2 8A line of sight contains multiple diffuse clouds rather than a dominant translucent cloud.

  11. Effects of nickel on biological methane generation from a laboratory poultry waste digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.M.; Shih, J.C.H.; Spears, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Nickel added in concentrations as low as 10..mu..M significantly increased biogas production in a laboratory poultry waste digester utilizing excreta from laying hens as the organic energy source. It was shown that the initial rate of biogas production increased as early as 4 h after the addition of nickel to the laboratory cultures. Analysis of the excreta for nickel content prior to addition of exogenous NiCl/sub 2/ showed appreciable amounts of nickel present. The data indicate that nickel naturally present in layer excreta is suboptimal or unavailable to the bacteria for biogas production purposes.

  12. Inclusive electron scattering at high Q/sup 2/ in the region 1 < x < 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, D.

    1987-01-01

    New inclusive electron scattering data at high Q/sup 2/ from nuclei taken in the x range unavailable to the free nucleon are presented. The ratios of cross section per nucleon, (4/56)d sigma/sup Fe//d sigma/sup He/, show a plateau for 1.3 < x < 2.0 which has been suggested as a signature of quark clusters in nuclei. The subtraction of the quasielastic cross section from the inclusive spectra reveals that the data scale in x at low momentum transfer. A proposal for a new experiment is discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Daya Bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bay Daya Bay Basics The basics of Daya Bay computing at PDSF. Read More » Data Management All Daya Bay raw data is transferred to PDSF. Read More » File Systems Daya Bay has space on 2 elizas: 6TB on /eliza7 and 35TB on /eliza16. Read More » Running on Carver The Daya Bay software is installed on PDSF on /common so is therefore unavailable on Carver. At this point there has been no effort to port the code to /project for use on... Read More » Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:11

  14. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V CTHS System Operation Procedures Front Matter C.S.O. 1: Target Fabrication (unavailable pending review) C.S.O. 2: Moving Cryostat Transfer Cart C.S.O. 3: Tritium Fill Station Room Temperature Fill C.S.O. 5: DT High-Pressure System-1 (Obsolete DD fill procedure. Superceeded by CSO 12) C.S.O. 6: High-Pressure System-2 C.S.O. 7: Fill/Transfer Station-1 C.S.O. 8: Fill/Transfer Station-2 C.S.O. 9: DT Target Transfer Operations C.S.O. 10: DD Target Transfer Operations C.S.O. 11: Characterization

  15. June 21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 June 21 Attending: Eric, Elizabeth, Craig, Andrei Utilization: Cluster has been full - a bit surprising since QM has passed. Recent Outages: None. Upcoming Downtimes: 7/13 project will be unavailable so a PDSF kernal and GPFS update is being consider. This would be SWO for a day probably but the final decision has not been made yet. Procurements: Got a bunch of disks for STAR - these are local disks and and are being mounted in 5 racks. Torque: Carver will get NERSC site license for MOAB and

  16. Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2012-09-01

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

  17. Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 Edison Down for About One Month Starting June 24 June 4, 2013 by Francesca Verdier The Edison Phase II system arrives at NERSC in June, and will boost the Phase I core count by more than a factor of 10. In order to integrate the new components and upgrade existing ones, the entire Edison system will be unavailable for about one month beginning June 24. This includes the login nodes and the scratch file system. Please plan your work accordingly.

  18. Hanford.gov Site Maintenance - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford.gov will be undergoing scheduled upgrades and will be unavailable from 7:00 am Saturday, March 19th, 2016 until 5:00pm Sunday, March 20th, 2016. Questions and inquiries regarding this maintenance outage please email Anel Suarez MSA Information Management. Thank you for your patience. If you need

  19. Method of applying coatings to substrates and the novel coatings produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1987-09-15

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of a multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hitherto unavailable compositions, are provided. 2 figs.

  20. Office of Health, Safety and Security: Page Not Found

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Health, Safety and Security SEARCH TOOLS HOME ABOUT US FUNCTIONS RESOURCES NEWSFEEDS VIDEOS EVENTS warning icon Page Not Found Sorry, the page you are looking for can't be found! The page you are looking for might have been removed, has had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable. Please try the following: If you typed the page address in the Address bar, make sure that it is spelled correctly. Try seeking the required page from our home page. Use the Back button to try another link.

  1. Microsoft Word - DOE EISs unavilable Electronically Template

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE, 2001a, is unavailable to the public in an electronic format due to security sensitivity of some of the information within the document. DOE will continue to provide hard copies as available of all its NEPA documents to people upon request. If you would like to request the document, you may do so by e-mail to denise.freeman@hq.doe.gov or by leaving a message on the toll-free information line at 1-800-472-2756. Your request will be directed to the responsible DOE office. For additional

  2. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, V.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

  3. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

  4. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual H and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.

  5. Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J. Franklin; Wellman, Gerald William; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

  6. OpenMPI Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-30

    A large number of MPI implementations are currently available, each of which emphasize different aspects of high-performance computing or are intended to solve a specific research problem. The result is a myriad of incompatible MPI implementations, all of which require separate installation, and the combination of which present significant logistical challenges for end users. Building upon prior research, and influenced by experience gained from the code bases of the LAMIMPI. LA-MPI, and FT-MPI projects, OpenMPImore »is an all-new, production-quality MPI-2 implementation that is fundamentally centered around component concepts. OpenMPI provides a unique combination of novel features previously unavailable in an open-source, production-quality implementation of MPI. Its component architecture provides both a stable platform for third-party research as well as enabling the run-time composition of independent software add-ons.« less

  7. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN

    2013-11-22

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual Hmore » and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.« less

  8. A generating set direct search augmented Lagrangian algorithm for optimization with a combination of general and linear constraints.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Robert Michael (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Torczon, Virginia Joanne (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-08-01

    We consider the solution of nonlinear programs in the case where derivatives of the objective function and nonlinear constraints are unavailable. To solve such problems, we propose an adaptation of a method due to Conn, Gould, Sartenaer, and Toint that proceeds by approximately minimizing a succession of linearly constrained augmented Lagrangians. Our modification is to use a derivative-free generating set direct search algorithm to solve the linearly constrained subproblems. The stopping criterion proposed by Conn, Gould, Sartenaer and Toint for the approximate solution of the subproblems requires explicit knowledge of derivatives. Such information is presumed absent in the generating set search method we employ. Instead, we show that stationarity results for linearly constrained generating set search methods provide a derivative-free stopping criterion, based on a step-length control parameter, that is sufficient to preserve the convergence properties of the original augmented Lagrangian algorithm.

  9. dose request form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full name: First, middle, and last (also indicate maiden name and aliases if applicable): Social Security Number of the monitored person (or other employee ID number if SSN is unavailable): Date of birth of the monitored person: R E Q U E S T F O R R E P O R T O F R A D I A T I O N E X P O S U R E H I S T O R Y UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY D E P A R T M E NT O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A Employed by or associated with the following organization: At the following

  10. Quantitative analysis of the local phase transitions induced by the laser heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levlev, Anton V.; Susner, Michael A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-11-04

    Functional imaging enabled by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) allows investigations of nanoscale material properties under a wide range of external conditions, including temperature. However, a number of shortcomings preclude the use of the most common material heating techniques, thereby limiting precise temperature measurements. Here we discuss an approach to local laser heating on the micron scale and its applicability for SPM. We applied local heating coupled with piezoresponse force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy for nanoscale investigations of a ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition in the copper indium thiophosphate layered ferroelectric. Bayesian linear unmixing applied to experimental results allowed extraction of themore » Raman spectra of different material phases and enabled temperature calibration in the heated region. Lastly, the obtained results enable a systematic approach for studying temperature-dependent material functionalities in heretofore unavailable temperature regimes.« less

  11. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 4. Seismic response analysis. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, S.C.; Ma, S.M.; Larder, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    This volume of the report gives a detailed account of the seismic response analysis of the primary coolant loop piping of Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Station. Because the purpose of this work was to perform a realistic simulation, best estimate loads and material properties were used for the calculation whenever possible. When such data were unavailable, conservative values were used. The calculation procedure included the generation of seismic input, the determination of dynamic soil properties, a three-part soil-structure-piping interaction analysis, and the post-response data procession. A large number of variables considered in the analysis can affect the seismic response stresses. This volume therefore describes a sensitivity study, as well as the method of analysis. The sensitivity study is included to establish confidence in the computed response stresses. 19 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 4: seismic response analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, S.C.; Ma, S.M.; Larder, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    This volume of the report gives a detailed account of the seismic response analysis of the primary coolant loop piping of Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Station. Because the purpose of this work was to perform a realistic simulation, best estimate loads and material properties were used for the calculation whenever possible. When such data were unavailable, conservative values were used. The calculation procedure included the generation of seismic input, the determination of dynamic soil properties, a three-part soil-structure-piping interaction analysis, and the post-response data procession. A large number of variables considered in the analysis can affect the seismic response stresses. This volume therefore describes a sensitivity study, as well as the method of analysis. The sensitivity study is included to establish confidence in the computed response stresses.

  13. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  14. Automatic Labeling for Entity Extraction in Cyber Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, Robert A; Jones, Corinne L; Iannacone, Michael D; Testa, Kelly M; Goodall, John R

    2014-01-01

    Timely analysis of cyber-security information necessitates automated information extraction from unstructured text. While state-of-the-art extraction methods produce extremely accurate results, they require ample training data, which is generally unavailable for specialized applications, such as detecting security related entities; moreover, manual annotation of corpora is very costly and often not a viable solution. In response, we develop a very precise method to automatically label text from several data sources by leveraging related, domain-specific, structured data and provide public access to a corpus annotated with cyber-security entities. Next, we implement a Maximum Entropy Model trained with the average perceptron on a portion of our corpus (~750,000 words) and achieve near perfect precision, recall, and accuracy, with training times under 17 seconds.

  15. Interim progress report addendun - environmental geophysics: Building E5032 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground, January 1994 resurvey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Benson, M.A.; Borden, H.M.; Padar, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Geophysical surveying around Building E5032 using three new continuously recording geophysical instruments - two types of electromagnetic induction instruments and a cesium vapor magnetometer that were unavailable at the time of the original survey - has provided additional information for defining the location of buried debris, vaults, tanks, and the drainage/sump system near the building. The dominant geophysical signature around Building E5032 consists of a complex pattern of linear magnetic, electrical-conductivity, and electromagnetic field anomalies that appear to be associated with drainage/sewer systems, ditches, past railway activity, the location for Building T5033 (old number 99A), and the probable location of Building 91. Integrated analysis of data acquired using the three techniques, plus a review of the existing ground-penetrating-radar data, allow a more thorough definition of the sources for the observed anomalies.

  16. Report on Preliminary Engineering Study for Installation of an Air Cooled Steam Condenser at Brawley Geothermal Plant, Unit No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-03-01

    The Brawley Geothermal Project comprises a single 10 MW nominal geothermal steam turbine-generator unit which has been constructed and operated by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). Geothermal steam for the unit is supplied through contract by Union Oil Company which requires the return of all condensate. Irrigation District (IID) purchases the electric power generated and provides irrigation water for cooling tower make-up to the plant for the first-five years of operation, commencing mid-1980. Because of the unavailability of irrigation water from IID in the future, SCE is investigating the application and installation of air cooled heat exchangers in conjunction with the existing wet (evaporative) cooling tower with make-up based on use of 180 gpm (nominal) of the geothermal condensate which may be made available by the steam supplier.

  17. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  18. Development and field evaluation of revenue metering device for HVDC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, E.O.; Aliga, A.; Ando, M.; Baker, R.A.; Seamans, D.A.

    1985-02-01

    A prototype dc revenue metering device was developed under sponsorship of the Electrical Power Research Institute. The device was installed at the Sylmar Converter Station of the Pacific HVDC Intertie, owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (host utility) in November 1981, and has been operating satisfactorily for over two years. It uses voltage and current measurements from existing voltage dividers, current transductors, and a current shunt. The energy-computation algorithms are implemented using signal processing principles in a single eight-bit microprocessor. The algorithms accommodate the different characteristics of the sensors, and tolerate the unavailability of some of the sensors, with some loss in accuracy. Comparisons of the dc revenue meter energy measurements with the ac revenue meter measurements plus the station losses (estimated by the host utility) reveal a 0.1 percent difference in one pole and a one percent difference in the other pole, for a net difference of about one-half percent.

  19. Reconfigureable network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderveen, Keith B. (Tracy, CA); Talbot, Edward B. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Laurence E. (Davis, CA)

    2008-04-08

    Nodes in a network having a plurality of nodes establish communication links with other nodes using available transmission media, as the ability to establish such links becomes available and desirable. The nodes predict when existing communications links will fail, become overloaded or otherwise degrade network effectiveness and act to establish substitute or additional links before the node's ability to communicate with the other nodes on the network is adversely affected. A node stores network topology information and programmed link establishment rules and criteria. The node evaluates characteristics that predict existing links with other nodes becoming unavailable or degraded. The node then determines whether it can form a communication link with a substitute node, in order to maintain connectivity with the network. When changing its communication links, a node broadcasts that information to the network. Other nodes update their stored topology information and consider the updated topology when establishing new communications links for themselves.

  20. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiles, David C. (Ames, IA); Sipahi, Levent B. (Ames, IA)

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  1. Statistical analysis of cascading failures in power grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael; Pfitzner, Rene; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a new microscopic model of cascading failures in transmission power grids. This model accounts for automatic response of the grid to load fluctuations that take place on the scale of minutes, when optimum power flow adjustments and load shedding controls are unavailable. We describe extreme events, caused by load fluctuations, which cause cascading failures of loads, generators and lines. Our model is quasi-static in the causal, discrete time and sequential resolution of individual failures. The model, in its simplest realization based on the Directed Current description of the power flow problem, is tested on three standard IEEE systems consisting of 30, 39 and 118 buses. Our statistical analysis suggests a straightforward classification of cascading and islanding phases in terms of the ratios between average number of removed loads, generators and links. The analysis also demonstrates sensitivity to variations in line capacities. Future research challenges in modeling and control of cascading outages over real-world power networks are discussed.

  2. Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

  3. Estimation of the Alpha Factor Parameters for the Emergency Diesel Generators of Ulchin Unit 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dae Il Kang; Sang Hoon Han

    2006-07-01

    Up to the present, the generic values of the Common cause failure (CCF) event parameters have been used in most PSA projects for the Korean NPPs. However, the CCF analysis should be performed with plant specific information to meet Category II of the ASME PRA Standard. Therefore, we estimated the Alpha factor parameters of the emergency diesel generator (EDG) for Ulchin Unit 3 by using the International Common-Cause Failure data Exchange (ICDE) database. The ICDE database provides the member countries with only the information needed for an estimation of the CCF parameters. The Ulchin Unit A3, pressurized water reactor, has two onsite EDGs and one alternate AC (AAC) diesel generator. The onsite EDGs of Unit 3 and 4 and the AAC are manufactured by the same company, but they are designed differently. The estimation procedure of the Alpha factor used in this study follows the approach of the NUREG/CR-5485. Since we did not find any qualitative difference between the target systems (two EDGs of Ulchin Unit 3) and the original systems (ICDE database), the applicability factor of each CCF event in the ICDE database was assumed to be 1. For the case of three EDGs including the AAC, five CCF events for the EDGs in the ICDE database were identified to be screened out. However, the detailed information for the independent events in the ICDE database is not presented. Thus, we assumed that the applicability factors for the CCF events to be screened out were, to be conservative, 0.5 and those of the other CCF events were 1. The study results show that the estimated Alpha parameters by using the ICDE database are lower than the generic values of the NUREG/CR-5497. The EDG system unavailability of the 1 out of 3 success criterion except for the supporting systems was calculated as 2.76 E-3. Compared with the system unavailability estimated by using the data of NUREG/CR-5497, it is decreased by 31.2%. (authors)

  4. Word Pro - S1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    value of gross domestic product (GDP) plus the value of intermediate inputs used to produce GDP. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlysummary. Source: Table 1.7

  5. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  6. A DISLOCATION-BASED CLEAVAGE INITIATION MODEL FOR PRESSURE VESSEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Kristine B; Erickson, Marjorie A; Williams, Paul T; Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2012-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a theoretical, multi-scale model for the prediction of fracture toughness of ferritic steels in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) region that accounts for temperature, irradiation, strain rate, and material condition (chemistry and heat treatment) effects. This new model is intended to address difficulties associated with existing empirically-derived models of the DBTT region that cannot be extrapolated to conditions for which data are unavailable. Dislocation distribution equations, derived from the theories of Yokobori et al., are incorporated to account for the local stress state prior to and following initiation of a microcrack from a second-phase particle. The new model is the basis for the DISlocation-based FRACture (DISFRAC) computer code being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of this code is to permit fracture safety assessments of ferritic structures with only tensile properties required as input. The primary motivation for the code is to assist in the prediction of radiation effects on nuclear reactor pressure vessels, in parallel with the EURATOM PERFORM 60 project.

  7. Interfacial Modification of Silica Surfaces Through gamma-Isocyanatopropyl Triethoxy Silane-Amine Coupling Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel,B.; DeLongchamp, D.; Mahoney, C.; Lucas, L.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2008-01-01

    The development of robust, cost-effective methods to modify surfaces and interfaces without the specialized synthesis of unique coupling agents could provide readily accessible routes to optimize and tailor interfacial properties. We demonstrate that -isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (ISO) provides a convenient route to functionalize silica surfaces through coupling reactions with readily available reagents. ISO coupling agents layers (CALs) can be prepared from toluene with triethylamine (TEA), but the coupling reaction of an amine to the ISO CAL does not proceed. We use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and sessile drop contact angle to demonstrate the isocyanate layer is not degraded under coupling conditions. Access to silanes with chemical functionality is possible with ISO by performing the coupling reaction in solution and then depositing the product onto the surface. Two model CAL surfaces are prepared to demonstrate the ease and robust nature of this procedure. The surfaces prepared using this method are the ISO reacted with octadecylamine to produce a hydrocarbon surface of similar quality to octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS) CALs and with 9-aminofluorene (AFL), an aromatic amine functionality whose silane is otherwise unavailable commercially.

  8. 1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.

    1989-07-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

  9. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.; Ali, Randall A.

    2014-02-18

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using 'radiation hardened' sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  10. Synergistic Smart Fuel For Microstructure Mediated Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using “radiation hardened” sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  11. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Information Needs, 1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charlie; Kinney, William J.; Rowe, Mike

    1993-05-01

    Successful application of adaptive management to rebuilding the Columbia Basin`s anadromous fish resources requires that available information and experience be organized and shared between numerous organizations and individuals. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin`s collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases and recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognize these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project is now completing the process of scoping and identification of information needs. Construction of prototype systems will begin in 1992. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information on System scoping and needs identification phase.

  12. Enhanced Component Performance Study: Emergency Diesel Generators 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2014-11-01

    This report presents an enhanced performance evaluation of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This report evaluates component performance over time using Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES) data from 1998 through 2013 and maintenance unavailability (UA) performance data using Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) Basis Document data from 2002 through 2013. The objective is to present an analysis of factors that could influence the system and component trends in addition to annual performance trends of failure rates and probabilities. The factors analyzed for the EDG component are the differences in failures between all demands and actual unplanned engineered safety feature (ESF) demands, differences among manufacturers, and differences among EDG ratings. Statistical analyses of these differences are performed and results showing whether pooling is acceptable across these factors. In addition, engineering analyses were performed with respect to time period and failure mode. The factors analyzed are: sub-component, failure cause, detection method, recovery, manufacturer, and EDG rating.

  13. COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-03-30

    Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

  14. The application of Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRINS) to CANDU reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, S. W.; Lim, Y. H.; Park, H. C.

    2012-07-01

    As risk-informed applications (RIAs) are actively implanted in the nuclear industry, an issue associated with technical adequacy of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) arises in its modeling and data sourcing. In Korea, PSA for all Korean NPPs has been completed and KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Plant Company) developed the database called the Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRinS). It has several characteristics that distinguish it from other database system such as NPRDs (INPO,1994), PRIS (IAEA), and SRDF (EdF). This database has the function of systematic data management such as automatic data-gathering, periodic data deposition and updating, statistical analysis including Bayesian method, and trend analysis of failure rate or unavailability. In recent PSA for CANDU reactor, the component failure data of EPRI ALWR URD and Component Reliability Database were preferentially used as generic data set. The error factor for most component failure data was estimated by using the information NUREG/CR-4550 and NUREG/CR-4639. Also, annual trend analysis was performed for the functional losses of components using the statistical analysis and chart module of PRinS. Furthermore, the database has been updated regularly and maintained as a living program to reflect the current status. This paper presents the failure data analysis using PRinS which provides Bayesian analysis on main components in the CANDU reactor. (authors)

  15. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keifer, Sharon; Rowe, Mike; Hatch, Keith

    1993-05-01

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  16. Application of Standard Maintenance Windows in PHWR Outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuming Jiang [Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company, Ltd. (China)

    2006-07-01

    The concept of Standard Maintenance Windows has been widely used in the planned outage of light water reactor in the world. However, due to the specific feature of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), it has not come to a consensus for the PHWR owners to adopt Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage aiming at the optimization of outage duration. Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC), with their experience gained in the previous outages and with reference to other PHWR power plants, has identified a set of Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage. It can be applied to similar PHWR plants and with a few windows that are specific to Qinshan Phase III NPP. The use of these Standard Maintenance Windows in planned outage has been proved to be effective in control shutdown nuclear safety, minimize the unavailability of safety system, improve the efficient utilization of outage duration, and improved the flexibility of outage schedule in the case of emergency issue, which forced the revision of outage schedule. It has also formed a solid foundation for benchmarking. The identification of Standard Maintenance Windows and its application will be discussed with relevant cases for the common improvement of outage duration. (author)

  17. Lidar-measured winds from space: A key component for weather and climate prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.E.; Emmitt, G.D.; Robertson, F.

    1995-06-01

    The deployment of a space-based Doppler lidar would provide information that is fundamental to advancing the understanding and prediction of weather and climate. This paper reviews the concepts of wind measurement by Doppler lidar, highlights the results of some observing system simulation experiments with lidar winds, and discusses the important advances in earth system science anticipated with lidar winds. Observing system simulation experiments, conducted using two different general circulation models, have shown (1) that there is a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy over the Southern Hemisphere and tropical oceans resulting from the assimilation of simulated satellite wind data, and (2) that wind data are significantly more effective than temperature or moisture data in controlling analysis error. Because accurate wind observations are currently almost entirely unavailable for the vast majority of tropical cyclones worldwide, lidar winds have the potential to substantially improve tropical cyclone forecasts. Similarly, to improve water vapor flux divergence calculations, a direct measure of the ageostrophic wind is needed since the present level of uncertainty cannot be reduced with better temperature and moisture soundings alone. 99 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Wray, Craig

    2010-05-19

    A substantial fraction of HVAC energy use in large commercial buildings is due to fan operation. Fan energy use depends in part on the relationship between system pressure drop and flow through the fan, which is commonly called a "system curve." As a step toward enabling better selections of air-handling system components and analyses of common energy efficiency measures such as duct static pressure reset and duct leakage sealing, this paper shows that a simple four-parameter physical model can be used to define system curves. Our model depends on the square of the fan flow, as is commonly considered. It also includes terms that account for linear-like flow resistances such as filters and coils, and for supply duct leakage when damper positions are fixed or are changed independently of static pressure or fan flow. Only two parameters are needed for systems with variable-position supply dampers (e.g., VAV box dampers modulating to control flow). For these systems, reducing or eliminating supply duct leakage does not change the system curve. The parametric system curve may be most useful when applied to field data. Non-linear techniques could be used to fit the curve to fan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design, when measurements are unavailable, one could use duct design calculation tools instead to determine the coefficients.

  19. Extending RISMC Capabilities for Real-Time Diagnostics and Prognostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    curtis smith; Mandelli, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Quick and effective accident management is essential in any industry in order to limit and contain possible threats to both people and environment/assets. This is in particular relevant in the nuclear industry where accidents may have major impacts from an economic, health and societal point of view. As an example, the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident highlighted the importance of the ability of plant operators and plant staff to react quickly and effectively in accident conditions. This particular event showed the importance of being able to: • Determine/estimate the actual status of the plant (i.e., diagnosis) when the monitoring system is corrupted or partially unavailable, and, • Forecast its future evolution (i.e., prognosis). In this paper we want to describe a research direction geared toward the development of a new set of advanced diagnosis and prognosis tools. We employ innovative data mining and machine learning techniques that are able to infer plant status and mimic the plant’s full temporal behavior in order to assist the reactor operators during an accident scenario.

  20. Indonesia: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prawiraatmadja, W.; Yamaguchi, N.; Breazeale, K.; Basari, S.R.

    1991-04-01

    As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy have covered Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report covers Indonesia. 37 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

  1. Pakistan: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdar, M.N.

    1992-03-01

    As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report summarizes the energy and economic situation in Pakistan.

  2. Analysis of the MSIV closure ATWS in a BWR/6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Chin; Chen, Genshun; Hsiue, J.K.; Liaw, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) has received much attention since the beginning of the last decade. It has been recognized as a dominant accident sequence for possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR) power plant. In the literature, a great deal of study has been reported on the investigation of BWR behavior during an ATWS, especially for BWR/2 and BWR/4. The objective of this study is to assess reactor behavior during a main steam isolation valve (MSIV) closure ATWS for the Kuosheng nuclear power plant of Taiwan Power Company, which has two units of BWR/6 with Mark-III containment. The analyses were performed using RETRAN-02/MOD3, which solves a one-dimensional homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase mixture. The relative motion between two phases is treated by the dynamic slip model. Due to the unavailability of appropriate three-dimensional neutronic codes, such as SIMULATE-E, in this country, the option of point kinetics has been adopted for calculations. This approach is not expected to give the exact power shape variation during the transient, but is believed to be appropriate for providing the accurate overall power level, which is the major concern for core and containment integrity.

  3. The Effect of the Presence of 2 wt% Hafnium in T-111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Miller, Roger G.

    2006-01-20

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W), and reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the RTG's working environment. Due to the commercial unavailability of the tantalum alloy T-111, Ta-10%W is a possible candidate replacement material because of its high melting point (3037 deg. C), high elastic modulus (207 GPa), high yield, ultimate tensile strengths at both ambient and elevated temperatures, excellent ductility, and exceptional creep properties. Ta-10%W is also attractive due its commercial availability and low cost when compared to T-111. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast Ta-10%W and T-111 for high-temperature nuclear based power conversion applications and to document research that must be conducted to fully characterize both materials.

  4. Design considerations for 100 MJ class flux compression pulse power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1993-10-01

    With the cost of high performance, capacitor-discharge, pulse power systems continuing around $1--2 per joule and with energy requirements for experiments such as fast compression of magnetized plasmas ranging to 100 MJ and beyond, the need for economical, super-energy pulse power systems is being recognized. Explosively powered flux compressors, capable of delivering 100 MJ to a plasma physics experiment, can be designed, fabricated, and fielded at costs of less than $0.01J per shot. While less economical than laboratory pulsed power systems, if system life exceeds a few hundred full-energy shots, explosive pulse power techniques allow initial experiments to be performed quickly and economically at energies that are prohibitively costly, and hence unavailable, using conventional techniques. A variety of configurations for flux compressors suitable for 100-MJ operation can be considered. Among these, the disk configuration, pioneered by researchers at the All Russian Institute of Experimental Physics has demonstrated both high current and high energy capabilities.

  5. Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

  6. Ab Initio and Kinetic Rate Theory Modeling of 316SS with Oversized Solute Additions on Radiation-Induced Segregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, Micah J.; Was, Gary S.

    2008-07-01

    Deleterious effects of radiation in nuclear reactor systems cause material degradation and the potential for component failure. Radiation damage is fundamentally due to freely migrating point defects produced in collision cascades. A reduction in the freely migrating point defect population should, then, reduce radiation damage and increase component lifetime. The addition of oversized solute atoms such as Zr or Hf to 316SS, a common structural material in reactors, is expected to reduce point defect population through a trapping mechanism that enhances recombination. The mechanism, however, requires a strong binding energy between the oversized solute atom and vacancies in order for the mechanism to significantly reduce the defect population. Experimental measurements of this binding energy are unavailable, but can be determined with atomistic calculations. Ab initio methods are used here to determine binding energies and atomic volumes of either Hf or Zr oversized solutes with vacancies in a face-centered cubic Fe matrix. The binding energies are then used to parameterize a kinetic rate-theory model, which is used here to calculate radiation-induced segregation (RIS). The calculated values of RIS are then compared to experimental measurements to benchmark the calculations and offer insight into the proposed point defect trapping mechanism. (author)

  7. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  8. Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2011-10-15

    Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

  9. Nanoparticle-based immunosensor with apoferritin templated metallic phosphate label for quantification of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Dan; Chen, Aiqiong; Xie, Yunying; Zhang, Aidong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-15

    A new sandwich-like electrochemical immunosensor has been developed for quantification of organophosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (OP-AChE), an exposure biomarker of organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. Zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were anchored on a screen printed electrode (SPE) to preferably capture OP-AChE adducts by metal chelation with phospho-moieties, which was selectively recognized by lead phosphate-apoferritin labeled anti-AChE antibody (LPA-anti-AChE). The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among ZrO2 NPs, OP-AChE and LPA-anti-AChE to form ZrO2/OP-AChE/LPA-anti-AChE complex and the released lead ions were detected on a disposable SPE. The binding affinity was investigated by both square wave voltammetry (SWV) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The proposed immunosensor yielded a linear response current over a broad OP-AChE concentrations range from 0.05 nM to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM, which has enough sensitivity for monitoring of low-dose exposure to OPs. This method avoids the drawback of unavailability of commercial OP-specific antibody as well as amplifies detection signal by using apoferritin encoded metallic phosphate nanoparticle tags. This nanoparticle-based immunosensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive quantification of phosphorylated adducts for monitoring of OP pesticides and nerve agents exposures.

  10. Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

  11. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  12. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  13. Calculated Performance Of The Variable-Polarization Undulator Upgrade To The Daresbury SRS Soft X-Ray Undulator Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roper, Mark D.; Bird, Daniel T.

    2004-05-12

    The soft x-ray beamline 5U1 on the Daresbury Laboratory SRS currently uses a planar undulator, producing linearly polarized radiation in the range 100 to 1000 eV. The undulator is soon to be replaced by a variable-polarization device of the Apple II design. The aim is to produce circularly polarized light in the energy range 265 to 1000 eV, covering the K-edges of C, N and O, and the first row transition element L-edges. This will greatly enhance the provision of circularly polarized soft-x-rays on the SRS and open up new opportunities for experimenters. The device will also produce linear polarization with a selectable angle of polarization with respect to the orbit plane, which is currently unavailable on the SRS. In order to provide the coverage over this energy range, we are exploiting the relatively large emittance of the SRS to allow us to use the second and third harmonics even in circular polarization mode. This paper presents the expected beamline output in various polarization modes and the predicted degree of polarization.

  14. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  15. Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

    1999-04-27

    There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

  16. Solar-powered electrodialysis. Part 2. Design of a solar-powered, electrodialysis system for desalting remote, brackish water sources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundstrom, J.E.; Socha, M.M.; Lynch, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    The critical components in the design of a solar-powered, electrodialysis (SPED) plant have been evaluated and technology developed to combine ED equipment with a photovoltaic (PV) array. The plant design developed in Part II is simplified from the Part I design in three areas. First, the system uses a flat-panel PV aray rather than PV concentrators. Second, the system voltage is maintained at the voltage corresponding to the peak power output of the array which is essentially independent of the level of solar insolation. The third simplification is in the flow diagram for the plant where the number of pumps and variable flow valves has been reduced to two of each. The proposed system is expected to provide a reliable supply of fresh water from a brackish water source with minimum maintenance. In certain applications where grid power is unavailable and fuel costs exceed $.40 per liter, the solar-powered plant is expected to provide lower cost water today.

  17. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  18. Inkjet Deposition of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andres, C. M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-09-23

    Layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) can create advanced composites with exceptional properties unavailable by other means, but the laborious deposition process and multiple dipping cycles hamper their utilization in microtechnologies and electronics. Multiple rinse steps provide both structural control and thermodynamic stability to LBL multilayers, but they significantly limit their practical applications and contribute significantly to the processing time and waste. Here we demonstrate that by employing inkjet technology one can deliver the necessary quantities of LBL components required for film buildup without excess, eliminating the need for repetitive rinsing steps. This feature differentiates this approach from all other recognized LBL modalities. Using a model system of negatively charged gold nanoparticles and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the material stability, nanoscale control over thickness, and particle coverage offered by the inkjet LBL technique are shown to be equal or better than the case of multilayers made with traditional dipping cycles. The opportunity for fast deposition of complex metallic patterns using a simple inkjet printer is also shown. The additive nature of LBL deposition based on the formation of insoluble nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte complexes of various compositions provides an excellent opportunity for versatile, multicomponent, and noncontact patterning for the simple production of stratified patterns that are much needed in advanced devices.

  19. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m{sup 3} of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  20. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  1. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has beenmore » unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.« less

  2. Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database : wind plant reliability benchmark.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

    2013-09-01

    To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems' ORAPWind%C2%AE (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREW's reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

  3. Regulatory/backfit analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1988-06-01

    Station blackout is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for USI A-44. It includes (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the recommended technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements, and (7) a backfit analysis demonstrating that the resolution of USI A-44 complies with the backfit rule (10 CFR 50.109).

  4. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    ''Station Blackout'' is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory analysis for USI A-44. It includes: (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the proposed technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, and (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements.

  5. Revenue-metering device for HVDC systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, E.O. III; Ando, M.; Aliaga, A.; Baker, R.; Seamans, D.

    1984-05-01

    This final report describes a digital dc revenue metering device for HVDC systems developed by Washington State University researchers under a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute. The device was installed at the Sylmar Converter Station of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power in November 1981, and has been operating satisfactorily for over 20 months. It uses voltage and current measurements from existing voltage dividers, current transductors, and a current shunt. The energy-computation algorithms are implemented using digital signal processing principles in a single eight-bit microprocessor (Motorola MC6809). The algorithms accommodate the different characteristics of the sensors, and tolerate the unavailability of some of the sensors, with some loss in accuracy. Comparisons of the dc Revenue Meter energy measurements with the ac revenue meter measurements plus the station losses reveal a 0.1 percent difference in one pole and a one percent difference in the other pole, for a net difference of about one-half percent.

  6. Assessment of the possibility of forecasting future natural gas curtailments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemont, S.

    1980-01-01

    This study provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for determining probabilities of future natural-gas-supply interruptions by combining long-range weather forecasts and natural-gas supply/demand projections. An illustrative example which measures the probability of occurrence of heating-season natural-gas curtailments for industrial users in the southeastern US is analyzed. Based on the information on existing long-range weather forecasting techniques and natural gas supply/demand projections enumerated above, especially the high uncertainties involved in weather forecasting and the unavailability of adequate, reliable natural-gas projections that take account of seasonal weather variations and uncertainties in the nation's energy-economic system, it must be concluded that there is little possibility, at the present time, of combining the two to yield useful, believable probabilities of heating-season gas curtailments in a form useful for corporate and government decision makers and planners. Possible remedial actions are suggested that might render such data more useful for the desired purpose in the future. The task may simply require the adequate incorporation of uncertainty and seasonal weather trends into modeling systems and the courage to report projected data, so that realistic natural gas supply/demand scenarios and the probabilities of their occurrence will be available to decision makers during a time when such information is greatly needed.

  7. Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Mee, Robert; Wang, Peng; Romanova, Anna V; Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-10-01

    Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

  8. Summer food habits of juvenile Arctic foxes in northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrott, R.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Hanson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The absence of garbage in fox scats collected in the Colville Delta area was expected because garbage was unavailable to these foxes. Foxes from Prudhoe Bay, however, had access to quantities of garbage as a result of petroleum development activities. Most occupied dens in the Prudhoe Bay area were littered with garbage. Telemetry investigations conducted in conjunction with our study of food habits indicated that foxes frequented areas of human activity to solicit handouts and forage garbage disposal sites. The reason for the low occurrence of garbage in Prudhoe Bay scats is undoubtedly related to the lack of undigestible matter in most forms of garbage. The small number of scats that were classified as containing garbage typically contained only packaging materials associated with processed food such as plastic wrap and aluminum foil. The highly digestible nature of most forms of garbage made it impossible to quantify its importance in the diet of foxes. Prudhoe Bay foxes undoubtedly use garbage; however, the diversity and abundance of natural prey in the scat indicates that these foxes only supplement their summer diet with garbage. Dependence on this food resource may increase during the winter when foxes must rely almost exclusively on the fluctuating lemming poulations for sustenance. 11 references, 2 tables.

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu

  10. Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fezzler, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    Currently, interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors with rare-earth (RE) magnets are almost universally used for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) because of their superior properties, particularly power density. However, there is now a distinct possibility of limited supply or very high cost of RE magnets that could make IPM motors unavailable or too expensive. Because development of electric motors is a critical part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Power Electronics and Motors activity, DOE needs to determine which options should be investigated and what barriers should be addressed. Therefore, in order to provide a basis for deciding which research topics should be pursued, an assessment of various motor technologies was conducted to determine which, if any, is potentially capable of meeting FreedomCAR 2015 and 2020 targets. Highest priority was given to IPM, surface mounted permanent magnet (SPM), induction, and switched reluctance (SR) motors. Also of interest, but with lesser emphasis, were wheel motors, multiple-rotor motors, motors with external excitation, and several others that emerged from the assessment. Cost and power density (from a design perspective, the power density criterion translates to torque density) are emerging as the two most important properties of motors for traction drives in hybrid and EVs, although efficiency and specific power also are very important. The primary approach for this assessment involved interviews with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), their suppliers, and other technical experts. For each technology, the following issues were discussed: (1) The current state-of-the-art performance and cost; (2) Recent trends in the technology; (3) Inherent characteristics of the motor - which ones limit the ability of the technology to meet the targets and which ones aid in meeting the target; (4) What research and development (R&D) would be needed to meet the targets; and (5) The potential for the technology to meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

  11. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  12. Remote power systems with advanced storage technologies for Alaskan villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isherwood, W.; Smith, R.; Aceves, S.; Berry, G.; Clark, W.; Johnson, R.; Das, D.; Goering, D.; Seifert, R.

    1997-12-01

    Remote Alaskan communities pay economic and environmental penalties for electricity, because they must import diesel as their primary fuel for electric power production, paying heavy transportation costs and potentially causing environmental damage with empty drums, leakage, and spills. For these reasons, remote villages offer a viable niche market where sustainable energy systems based on renewable resources and advanced energy storage technologies can compete favorably on purely economic grounds, while providing environmental benefits. These villages can also serve as a robust proving ground for systematic analysis, study, improvement, and optimization of sustainable energy systems with advanced technologies. This paper presents an analytical optimization of a remote power system for a hypothetical Alaskan village. The analysis considers the potential of generating renewable energy (e.g., wind and solar), along with the possibility of using energy storage to take full advantage of the intermittent renewable sources available to these villages. Storage in the form of either compressed hydrogen or zinc pellets can then provide electricity from hydrogen or zinc-air fuel cells when renewable sources are unavailable.The analytical results show a great potential to reduce fossil fuel consumption and costs basing renewable energy combined with advanced energy storage devices. The best solution for our hypothetical village appears to be a hybrid energy system, which can reduce consumption of diesel fuel by over 50% with annualized cost savings by over 30% by adding wind turbines to the existing diesel generators. When energy storage devices are added, diesel fuel consumption and costs can be reduced substantially more. With optimized energy storage, use of the diesel generatorss can be reduced to almost zero, with the existing equipment only maintained for added reliability. However about one quarter of the original diesel consumption is still used for heating purposes. (We use the term diesel to encompass the fuel, often called heating or fuel oil, of similar or identical properties.)

  13. UPC++

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    UPC++ is a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) extension for C++, with three main objectives: 1) to provide an object-oriented PGAS programming model in the context of the popular C++ language; 2) to add useful parallel programming idioms unavailable in UPC, such as asynchronous remote function invocation and multidimensional arrays, to support complex scientific applications; 3) to offer an easy on-ramp to PGAS programming through interoperability with other existing parallel programming systems (e.g., MPI, OpenMP, CUDA). UPC++ includes two main features beyond UPC: 1) One of the major limitations of UPC in the context of DOE application is the relatively weak notion of multidimensional arrays, which it inherited from C. To remedy this problem in UPC++, we included a multidimensional domain and array library based on that of Titanium. Titanium?s library is similar to Chapel?s dense and strided domains, as both were inspired by the dense and strided regions and arrays in ZPL. 2) Another feature provided by UPC++ but not by UPC is remote function invocation, which is inspired by Phalanx, X10, Habanero-C, and C++11. The user may start an asynchronous remote function invocation with the following syntax: "async(place)(function, args...);". UPC++ provides two programming constructs for specifying dynamic dependencies among tasks: 1) event-driven execution as in Phalanx and Habanero-C; 2) finish-async as in X10. We implemented UPC++ with a ?compiler-free? approach using C++ templates and runtime libraries. The UPC++ front-end consists of a set of C++ header files that enables the C++ compiler to ?translate? UPC++ features in a user program to runtime library calls. In particular, we use templates and operator overloading to customize the behavior of UPC++ types.

  14. FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond L. Mazza

    2004-11-30

    These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

  15. UPC++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    UPC++ is a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) extension for C++, with three main objectives: 1) to provide an object-oriented PGAS programming model in the context of the popular C++ language; 2) to add useful parallel programming idioms unavailable in UPC, such as asynchronous remote function invocation and multidimensional arrays, to support complex scientific applications; 3) to offer an easy on-ramp to PGAS programming through interoperability with other existing parallel programming systems (e.g., MPI, OpenMP,more »CUDA). UPC++ includes two main features beyond UPC: 1) One of the major limitations of UPC in the context of DOE application is the relatively weak notion of multidimensional arrays, which it inherited from C. To remedy this problem in UPC++, we included a multidimensional domain and array library based on that of Titanium. Titanium?s library is similar to Chapel?s dense and strided domains, as both were inspired by the dense and strided regions and arrays in ZPL. 2) Another feature provided by UPC++ but not by UPC is remote function invocation, which is inspired by Phalanx, X10, Habanero-C, and C++11. The user may start an asynchronous remote function invocation with the following syntax: "async(place)(function, args...);". UPC++ provides two programming constructs for specifying dynamic dependencies among tasks: 1) event-driven execution as in Phalanx and Habanero-C; 2) finish-async as in X10. We implemented UPC++ with a ?compiler-free? approach using C++ templates and runtime libraries. The UPC++ front-end consists of a set of C++ header files that enables the C++ compiler to ?translate? UPC++ features in a user program to runtime library calls. In particular, we use templates and operator overloading to customize the behavior of UPC++ types.« less

  16. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  17. UPC++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    UPC++ is a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) extension for C++, with three main objectives: 1) to provide an object-oriented PGAS programming model in the context of the popular C++ language; 2) to add useful parallel programming idioms unavailable in UPC, such as asynchronous remote function invocation and multidimensional arrays, to support complex scientific applications; 3) to offer an easy on-ramp to PGAS programming through interoperability with other existing parallel programming systems (e.g., MPI, OpenMP,more » CUDA). UPC++ includes two main features beyond UPC: 1) One of the major limitations of UPC in the context of DOE application is the relatively weak notion of multidimensional arrays, which it inherited from C. To remedy this problem in UPC++, we included a multidimensional domain and array library based on that of Titanium. Titanium’s library is similar to Chapel’s dense and strided domains, as both were inspired by the dense and strided regions and arrays in ZPL. 2) Another feature provided by UPC++ but not by UPC is remote function invocation, which is inspired by Phalanx, X10, Habanero-C, and C++11. The user may start an asynchronous remote function invocation with the following syntax: "async(place)(function, args...);". UPC++ provides two programming constructs for specifying dynamic dependencies among tasks: 1) event-driven execution as in Phalanx and Habanero-C; 2) finish-async as in X10. We implemented UPC++ with a “compiler-free” approach using C++ templates and runtime libraries. The UPC++ front-end consists of a set of C++ header files that enables the C++ compiler to “translate” UPC++ features in a user program to runtime library calls. In particular, we use templates and operator overloading to customize the behavior of UPC++ types.« less

  18. NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betteridge, William J

    2006-02-28

    The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the sensor.

  19. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume II; Oregon Subbasins Above Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige; Hatch, Keith

    1993-05-01

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fixtion of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and fedend fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions am based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CM project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CM project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

  20. Calcium accumulated by sickle cell anemia red cells does not affect their potassium (86Rb+) flux components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, O.E.; Lew, V.L.; Bookchin, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We investigate here the hypothesis that the high Ca content of sickle cell anemia (SS) red cells may produce a sustained activation of the Ca2+-dependent K+ permeability (Gardos effect) and that the particularly high Ca levels in the dense SS cell fraction rich in irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) might account for the Na pump inhibition observed in these cells. We measured active and passive 86Rb+ influx (as a marker for K+) in density-fractionated SS cells before and after extraction of their excess Ca by exposure to the Ca ionophore (A23187) and ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid and with or without adenosine triphosphate depletion or addition of quinine. None of these maneuvers revealed any evidence of a Ca2+-dependent K leak in SS discocytes or dense cells. Na pump inhibition in the dense SS cells was associated with normal activation by external K+ and a low Vmax that persisted after Ca extraction from the cells. These results are consistent with our recent findings that the excess Ca in these cells is compartmentalized in intracellular inside-out vesicles and unavailable as free Ca2+ to the inner membrane surface. Although the steady-state free cytoplasmic Ca2+ in oxygenated SS cells must be below the levels needed to activate the K+ channel, possible brief activation of the channels of some SS cells resulting from transient elevations of cell Ca2+ during deoxygenation-induced sickling cannot be excluded. The dense, ISC-rich SS cell fraction showed a Ca2+-independent increase in the ouabain-resistant, nonsaturable component of 86Rb+ influx that, if uncompensated by Na+ gain, could contribute to the dehydration of these cells.

  1. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  2. Preparation, characterization of Fe3O4 at TiO2 magnetic nanoparticles and their application for immunoassay of biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Hongbo; Yang, Chunming; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-03-15

    Novel Fe3O4 at TiO2 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and developed for a new nanoparticle-based immunosensor for electrochemical quantification of organophosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma, a specific biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) agents. The Fe3O4 at TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate on the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanospheres, and characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectra, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The functional Fe3O4 at TiO2 nanoparticles were performed as capture antibody to selectively enrich phosphorylated moiety instead of phosphoserine antibody in the traditional sandwich immunoassays. The secondary recognition was served by quantum dots (QDs)-tagged anti-BChE antibody (QDs-anti-BChE). With the help of a magnet, the resulting sandwich-like complex, Fe3O4 at TiO2/OP-BChE/QDs-anti-BChE, was easily isolated from sample solutions and the released cadmium ions were detected on a disposable screen-printed electrode (SPE). The binding affinities were investigated by both surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and square wave voltammetry (SWV). This method not only avoids the drawback of unavailability of commercial OP-specific antibody but also amplifies detection signal by QDs-tags together with easy separation of samples by magnetic forces. The proposed immunosensor yields a linear response over a broad OP-BChE concentrations range from 0.02 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.01 nM. Moreover, the disposable nanoparticle-based immunosensor has been validated with human plasma samples. It offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive screening/evaluating exposure to OP pesticides.

  3. REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

    2008-08-15

    The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

  4. Proceedings of the DOE standards managers workshop, Gaithersburg, Maryland, October 26--28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    On May 19, 1992, the Secretary of Energy signed the revised DOE Order 1300.2A, Department of Energy Technical Standards Program, which set the policy and assigned responsibility for activities within the program. The purpose of the revision to the order was to place greater emphasis on the use of technical standards for design, construction, testing, modification, operation, decommissioning, decontamination, and remediation of DOE`s facilities and activities. Within the context of this order, Standards Managers have been assigned for each DOE Secretarial office, each DOE Field Office, and each management and operating (M&O) contractor or site manager to be responsible for and provide the appropriate amount of emphasis on consistent use of standards at DOE facilities. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119 also stresses the importance of the use of standards within Government facilities and directs that activities first attempt to locate and adopt non-Government standards (NGSs) for DOE use. If an NGS is not complete enough for the intended application, it should be adopted for the activity and tailored for the need by development of a Government (DOE) standard. When these NGS documents are unavailable, DOE components will develop an appropriate Government standard to satisfy the need. This expanded DOE program will provide all the information necessary to adopt, tailor, or develop these standards and track the activities. A key to the proper implementation of technical standards and governing requirements is establishing a culture of knowledge and commitment. The workshop provided an in-depth orientation on the Technical Standards Program to participating DOE and M&O Standards Managers.

  5. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  6. FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

    2003-06-01

    In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology developed in this program.

  7. A quantitative approach to the characterization of cumulative and average solvent exposure in paint manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.P.; Schwartz, B.S.; Powell, S.; Nelson, T.; Keller, L.; Sides, S.; Agnew, J.; Bolla, K.; Bleecker, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous reports have attributed a range of neurobehavioral effects to low-level, occupational solvent exposure. These studies have generally been limited in their exposure assessments and have specifically lacked good estimates of exposure intensity. In the present study, the authors describe the development of two exposure variables that quantitatively integrate industrial hygiene sampling data with estimates of exposure duration--a cumulative exposure (CE) estimate and a lifetime weighted average exposure (LWAE) estimate. Detailed occupational histories were obtained from 187 workers at two paint manufacturing plants. Historic industrial hygiene sampling data for total hydrocarbons (a composite variable of the major neurotoxic solvents present) were grouped according to 20 uniform, temporally stable exposure zones, which had been defined during plant walk-through surveys. Sampling at the time of the study was used to characterize the few zones for which historic data were limited or unavailable. For each participant, the geometric mean total hydrocarbon level for each exposure zone worked in was multiplied by the duration of employment in that zone; the resulting products were summed over the working lifetime to create the CE variable. The CE variable was divided by the total duration of employment in solvent-exposed jobs to create the LWAE variable. The explanatory value of each participant's LWAE estimate in the regression of simple visual reaction time (a neurobehavioral test previously shown to be affected by chronic solvent exposure) on exposure was compared with that of several other exposure variables, including exposure duration and an exposure variable based on an ordinal ranking of the exposure zones.

  8. Thermodynamic model for calorimetric and phase coexistence properties of coal derived fluids. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The work on this project was initiated on September 1, 1989. The project consisted of three different tasks. 1. A thermodynamic model to predict VLE and calorimetric properties of coal liquids. 2. VLE measurements at high temperature and high pressure for coal model compounds and 3. Chromatographic characterization of coal liquids for distribution of heteroatoms. The thermodynamic model developed is an extension of the previous model developed for VLE of coal derived fluids (DOE Grant no. FG22-86PC90541). The model uses the modified UNIFAC correlation for the liquid phase. Some unavailable UNIFAC interactions parameters have been regressed from experimental VLE and excess enthalpy data. The model is successful in predicting binary VLE and excess enthalpy data. Further refinements of the model are suggested. An apparatus for the high pressure high temperature VLE data measurements has been built and tested. Tetralin-Quinoline is the first binary system selected for data measurements. The equipment was tested by measuring 325{degree}C isotherm for this system and comparing it with literature data. Additional isotherms at 350{degree}C and 370{degree}C have been measured. The framework for a characterization procedure for coal derived liquids has been developed. A coal liquid is defined by a true molecular weight distribution and distribution of heteroatoms as a function of molecular weights. Size exclusions liquid chromatography, elemental analysis and FTIR spectroscopy methods are used to obtain the molecular weight and hetroatom distributions. Further work in this area should include refinements of the characterization procedure, high temperature high pressure VLE data measurements for selective model compound binary systems, and improvement of the thermodynamic model using the new measured data and consistent with the developments in the characterization procedure.

  9. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Eugene; Rowe, Emmanuel; Buliga, Vladimir M.; Burger, Arnold

    2013-10-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ?eh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  10. Avian study protocols and wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, K.

    1995-12-01

    This paper identifies the need to develop and use standardized avian study protocols to determine avian impacts at new and existing wind energy facilities. This will allow data collected from various sites to be correlated for better understanding wind energy related avian impacts. Factors contributing to an increased interest in wind energy facilities by electric utilities include: (1) Increased demand for electricity;(2) increased constraints on traditional electrical generating facilities (i.e. hydroelectric and nuclear power plants);(3) improved wind turbine technology. During the 1980`s generous tax credits spawned the development of wind energy facilities, known as wind farms, in California. Commercial scale wind farm proposals are being actively considered in states across the country - Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Wisconsin, Texas, and Vermont to name a few. From the wind farms in California the unexpected issue of avian impacts, especially to birds-of-prey, or raptor, surfaced and continues to plague the wind industry. However, most of the avian studies did not followed a standardized protocol or methodology and, therefore, data is unavailable to analyze and compare impacts at different sites or with differing technologies and configurations. Effective mitigation can not be designed and applied until these differences are understood. The Bonneville Power Administration is using comparable avian study protocols to collect data for two environmental impact statements being prepared for two separate wind farm proposals. Similar protocol will be required for any other avian impact analysis performed by the agency on proposed or existing wind farms. The knowledge gained from these studies should contribute to a better understanding of avian interactions with wind energy facilities and the identification of effective mitigation measures.

  11. Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

    2012-07-31

    This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

  12. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

  13. Normetex Pump Alternatives Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2013-04-25

    A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying resistances to ionizing radiation - aromatic polymers such as polyimide Vespel (TM) and the elastomer EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) have been found to be more resistant to degradation in tritium than other polymers. This report presents information to help select replacement pumps for Normetex pumps in tritium systems. Several pumps being considered as Normetex replacement pumps are discussed.

  14. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.; Dietrich, J.; Carroll, C.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. • Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. • In the UK in 2010, ?143,750 appliances were reused. • Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. • Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into “reuse parks” would enhance both their profile and their products. Reuse parks would also improve consumer confidence in and subsequently sales of the products. Further, it is advocated that industrial networking opportunities for the exchange of by-products resulting from the organisations’ activities should be investigated. The findings make two significant contributions to the current literature. One, they provide a detailed insight into the reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. Previously unavailable data has been presented and analysed. Secondly, new evidence about the by-products/materials resulting from socio-economic enterprises’ reuse activities has been obtained. These contributions add substantially to our understanding of the important role of reuse organisations.

  15. Evaluation of the Non-Transient Hydrologic Source Term from the CAMBRIC Underground Nuclear Test in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A B; Maxwell, R M; Carle, S F; Zavarin, M; Pawloski, G A; Shumaker, D E

    2005-08-05

    Hydrologic Source Term (HST) calculations completed in 1998 at the CAMBRIC underground nuclear test site were LLNL's first attempt to simulate a hydrologic source term at the NTS by linking groundwater flow and transport modeling with geochemical modeling (Tompson et al., 1999). Significant effort was applied to develop a framework that modeled in detail the flow regime and captured all appropriate chemical processes that occurred over time. However, portions of the calculations were simplified because of data limitations and a perceived need for generalization of the results. For example: (1) Transient effects arising from a 16 years of pumping at the site for a radionuclide migration study were not incorporated. (2) Radionuclide fluxes across the water table, as derived from infiltration from a ditch to which pumping effluent was discharged, were not addressed. (3) Hydrothermal effects arising from residual heat of the test were not considered. (4) Background data on the ambient groundwater flow direction were uncertain and not represented. (5) Unclassified information on the Radiologic Source Term (RST) inventory, as tabulated recently by Bowen et al. (2001), was unavailable; instead, only a limited set of derived data were available (see Tompson et al., 1999). (6) Only a small number of radionuclides and geochemical reactions were incorporated in the work. (7) Data and interpretation of the RNM-2S multiple well aquifer test (MWAT) were not available. As a result, the current Transient CAMBRIC Hydrologic Source Term project was initiated as part of a broader Phase 2 Frenchman Flat CAU flow and transport modeling effort. The source term will be calculated under two scenarios: (1) A more specific representation of the transient flow and radionuclide release behavior at the site, reflecting the influence of the background hydraulic gradient, residual test heat, pumping experiment, and ditch recharge, and taking into account improved data sources and modeling approaches acquired or developed since the previous work (as in Pawloski et al., 2001, at the CHESHIRE site). This will be referred to as the transient CAMBRIC source term. (2) A generic release model made under steady-state flow conditions, in the absence of any transient effect, at the same site with the same RST for use in the development of simple release models at the other nine underground test sites in the Frenchman Flat CAU. This will be referred to as the steady state (non-transient) source term. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of our steady state source term simulations. Additional details pertaining to these results, the transient model results, and the overall strategy, rationale, and assumptions used in the models will be documented in a separate report.

  16. Excited-State Relaxation in PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, J. M.; Califano, M.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    In solids the phonon-assisted, nonradiative decay from high-energy electronic excited states to low-energy electronic excited states is picosecond fast. It was hoped that electron and hole relaxation could be slowed down in quantum dots, due to the unavailability of phonons energy matched to the large energy-level spacings ('phonon-bottleneck'). However, excited-state relaxation was observed to be rather fast ({le}1 ps) in InP, CdSe, and ZnO dots, and explained by an efficient Auger mechanism, whereby the excess energy of electrons is nonradiatively transferred to holes, which can then rapidly decay by phonon emission, by virtue of the densely spaced valence-band levels. The recent emergence of PbSe as a novel quantum-dot material has rekindled the hope for a slow down of excited-state relaxation because hole relaxation was deemed to be ineffective on account of the widely spaced hole levels. The assumption of sparse hole energy levels in PbSe was based on an effective-mass argument based on the light effective mass of the hole. Surprisingly, fast intraband relaxation times of 1-7 ps were observed in PbSe quantum dots and have been considered contradictory with the Auger cooling mechanism because of the assumed sparsity of the hole energy levels. Our pseudopotential calculations, however, do not support the scenario of sparse hole levels in PbSe: Because of the existence of three valence-band maxima in the bulk PbSe band structure, hole energy levels are densely spaced, in contradiction with simple effective-mass models. The remaining question is whether the Auger decay channel is sufficiently fast to account for the fast intraband relaxation. Using the atomistic pseudopotential wave functions of Pb{sub 2046}Se{sub 2117} and Pb{sub 260}Se{sub 249} quantum dots, we explicitly calculated the electron-hole Coulomb integrals and the P {yields} S electron Auger relaxation rate. We find that the Auger mechanism can explain the experimentally observed P {yields} S intraband decay time scale without the need to invoke any exotic relaxation mechanisms.

  17. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skliar, Mikhail

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested with a 100 kW pilot scale down flow oxyfuel combustor, capturing in real time temperature changes during all relevant combustion process changes. The ultrasound measurements have excellent agreement with thermo- couple measurements, and appear to be more sensitive to temperature changes before the thermocouples response, which is believed to be the first demonstration of ultrasound measurements segmental temperature distribution across refractories.

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Validation of High-Resolution 3D Patient QA for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning and IMPT by Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardin, A; Avery, S; Ding, X; Kassaee, A; Lin, L; Maryanski, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Validation of high-resolution 3D patient QA for proton pencil beam scanning and IMPT by polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: Four BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeters (manufactured by MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) were used for patient QA at the Robert's Proton Therapy Center (RPTC, Philadelphia, PA). All dosimeters were sealed in identical thin-wall Pyrex glass spheres. Each dosimeter contained a set of markers for 3D registration purposes. The dosimeters were mounted in a consistent and reproducible manner using a custom build holder. Two proton pencil beam scanning plans were designed using Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system: 1) A two-field intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan and 2) one single field uniform dose (SFUD) plan. The IMPT fields were evaluated as a composite plan and individual fields, the SFUD plan was delivered as a single field plan.Laser CT scanning was performed using the manufacturer's OCTOPUS-IQ axial transmission laser CT scanner using a 1 mm slice thickness. 3D registration, analysis, and OD/cm to absorbed dose calibrations were perfomed using DICOM RT-Dose and CT files, and software developed by the manufacturer. 3D delta index, a metric equivalent to the gamma tool, was used for dose comparison. Results: Very good agreement with single IMPT fields and with SFUD was obtained. Composite IMPT fields had a less satisfactory agreement. The single fields had 3D delta index passing rates (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA) of 98.98% and 94.91%. The composite 3D delta index passing rate was 80.80%. The SFUD passing rate was 93.77%. Required shifts of the dose distributions were less than 4 mm. Conclusion: A formulation of the BANG3Pro polymer gel dosimeter, suitable for 3D QA of proton patient plans is established and validated. Likewise, the mailed QA analysis service provided by the manufacturer is a practical option when required resources are unavailable. We fully disclose that the subject of this research regards a production of MGS Research, Inc.

  19. Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

    2011-04-11

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

  20. Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, RL

    2002-10-21

    The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for unattended or covert operation and in remote or inaccessible locations where the unavailability of LN{sub 2} and signal degradation from existing mechanical coolers prevent its use at the present time.

  1. Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2012-06-01

    Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

  2. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2011-07-26

    A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

  3. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

  4. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2014-03-25

    The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; • Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and • Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

  5. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  6. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and reconnaissance, part inspection, geometric modeling, laser-based 3D volumetric imaging, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), aiding first responders, and supporting soldiers with helmet-mounted LADAR for 3D mapping in urban-environment scenarios. The technology developed in this LDRD overcomes the limitations of current laser-based 3D sensors and contributes to the realization of intelligent machine systems reducing manpower need.

  7. Sodium laser guide star system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: System description and experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avicola, K.; Brase, J.; Morris, J.

    1994-03-02

    The architecture and major system components of the sodium-layer kw guide star system at LLNL will be described, and experimental results reported. The subsystems include the laser system, the beam delivery system including a pulse stretcher and beam pointing control, the beam director, and the telescope with its adaptive-optics package. The laser system is one developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program. This laser system can be configured in various ways in support of the AVLIS program objectives, and was made available to the guide star program at intermittent times on a non-interference basis. The first light transmitted into the sky was in July of 1992, at a power level of 1. 1 kW. The laser pulse width is about 32 ns, and the pulse repetition rate was 26 kHz for the 1. 1 kW configuration and 13 kHz for a 400 W configuration. The laser linewidth is tailored to match the sodium D{sub 2} absorption line, and the laser system has active control of beam pointing and wavefront quality. Because of the short pulse length the sodium transition is saturated and the laser power is not efficiently utilized. For this reason a pulse stretcher was developed, and the results of this effort will be reported. The beam is delivered via an evacuated pipe from the laser building to the guide star site, a distance of about 100 meters, and then launched vertically. A beam director provides the means to track the sky in the full AO system, but was not used in the experiments reported here. The return signal is collected by a 1/2 meter telescope with the AO package. This telescope is located 5 meters from the km launch tube. Smaller packages for photometry, wavefront measurement, and spot image and motion analysis have been used. Although the unavailability of the AVLIS laser precluded a full AO system demonstration, data supporting feasibility and providing input to the system design for a Lick Observatory AO system was obtained.

  8. ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W.

    2012-07-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event. Beyond 7 days, only a few simple actions are needed to cope with the SBO for an indefinite amount of time. The operation of the ICS as the primary success path for mitigation of an SBO, allows for near immediate plant restart once power is restored. (authors)

  9. Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (GDP) Decommissioning | Department of Energy Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA

  10. Future Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future Use Future Use Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their

  11. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report Real values derived using the GDP...

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission intensity index, 20051 Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case History Projections 2013 Carbon dioxide emissions per 2009 dollar GDP Energy use per 2009...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equivalents FY - Fiscal Year GAO - Government Accountability Office GDP- Gaseous ... He agreed that the perception of a radiological waste or hazmat truck parked in a public ...

  14. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. Topics Discussed: Real GDP ...

  15. Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons energy-related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  16. Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a combination of source reduction and recycling. To the extent that source reduction strategies are successful, they will likely alter the basic relationship between GDP and...

  17. Renewable Fuels Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a combination of source reduction and recycling. To the extent that source reduction strategies are successful, they will likely alter the basic relationship between GDP and...

  18. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption Estimates, Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption Estimates per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Total Energy Consumption Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2009) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar 1 Texas 12,944.1 California 2,055.2 Louisiana 18.1 2 California 7,684.1 Texas 1,395.4 Wyoming 15.0 3 Florida 4,077.9 New York 1,248.4

  19. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0073-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. 8292013- uploaded DNA and corrected lease number, incorrect on DNA form should be...

  20. Development Impact Assessment (DIA) Case Study: South Africa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Social impacts may include health (mortality and morbidity), poverty reduction, education, ... impacts and certain development impacts including GDP, employment, and povertywelfare. ...

  1. International Energy Outlook 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 1, 2015 | Palo Alto, CA by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Improvements in energy intensity largely offset impact of growth in GDP leading to slow growth in energy...

  2. Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

  3. "Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO

  4. Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate. During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8% per year from 1973 to 2008. In the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9% from 2008 to 2035.

  5. Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.; Young, J.K.; Berkowitz, J.B.; DeVine, Jr.J.C.; Sutter, H.G.

    2008-07-01

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F and H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Desk-book. The TRA consists of three parts: - Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. - Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. - Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy. (authors)

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-10-25

    ABSTRACT One of U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents – approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes – are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC’s ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates – WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: • Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. • Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. • Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  7. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-03-18

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: (1) Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. (2) Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. (3) Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  8. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of both systematic and statistical uncertainties, including correlations, are critical to the assessment of both the experimental measurements (due to variations between experimental techniques, irradiation conditions, calibration procedures, etc.), and the evaluation of those experiments to extract fundamental nuclear data. A clear example of the importance of uncertainty analysis is in the justification for energy-dependent {sup 147}Nd fission product yield, where the magnitude of the effect is comparable to the uncertainties of the individual fission product yield measurements. Both LANL and LLNL are committed to the inclusion of full uncertainty analysis in their evaluations. (6) The Panel reviewed in detail two methods for determining/evaluating fission product yields from which fission assessments can be made: the K factor method and high-resolution gamma spectroscopy (both described more fully in Sections 3 and 4). The panel concluded that fission product yields, and thus fission assessments, derived using either approach are equally valid, provided that the data were obtained from well understood, direct fission measurements and that the key underlying calibrations and/or data are valid for each technique. (7) The Panel found the process of peer review of the two complementary but independent methods to be an extremely useful exercise. Although work is still ongoing and the numbers presented to the Panel may change slightly, both groups are now in much better agreement on not just one, but four key fission product yields. The groups also have a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of each other's methods.

  9. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelon, William B.

    2013-05-13

    The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace should make it a very valuable resource for the study of oxides being considered for application to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in that materials can be studied at potential operating temperatures in both reducing and oxidizing environments to determine their stoichiometry, and lattice parameters. Our research, which was predicated, in part, on the use of hydrogenous samples (as opposed to deuteration), demonstrated that such studies are feasible and can yield high quality, refinable data. The precision of the refined hydrogen positions appears to be more than adequate for theory calculations (molecular modeling-thermodynamics) and the uncertainty is certainly less than that achieved by attempting to extrapolate the hydrogen positions from refined deuterium positions. In fact the 2008 annual report from the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), the world's premier neutron scattering laboratory, highlights: Another trend is the increasing interest in hydrogen. This defies the widespread assumption that neutron diffraction experiments need to be done at deuterated samples. In situ experiments on phase transitions involving hydrogen and in particular on the real time behaviour of hydrogen-storage systems increase in number and scope. Our work in this area predates the ILL efforts be several years. Unfortunately, the productivity of our program was significantly curtailed by the unavailability of the MURR powder diffractometer for almost all of the second years of the project. The diffractometer was disassembled to allow partial extraction of the beam tube and replacement of the graphite element that is penetrated by the beam tube. Re-commissioning of the instrument was substantially delayed by errors of the MURR engineering staff, which failed to properly reinstall the sapphire filter that conditions the beam prior to the neutron monochromator, and reduces the radiological background to acceptable levels.

  10. Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

    2009-06-18

    The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as well as the benefits in expanding the range over which individual control mechanisms are effective for cycle control. However, a combination of mechanisms is still required for control of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle between 0 and 100 % load. An effort is underway to partially validate the Argonne models and codes by means of comparison with data from tests carried out using the small-scale Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL) recuperated gas closed Brayton cycle facility. The centrifugal compressor model has been compared with data from the SBL operating with nitrogen gas and good agreement is obtained between calculations and the measured data for the compressor outlet pressure versus flow rate, although it is necessary to assume values for certain model parameters which require information about the configuration or dimensions of the compressor components that is unavailable. Unfortunately, the compressor efficiency cannot be compared with experiment data due to the lack of outlet temperature data. A radial inflow turbine model has been developed to enable further comparison of calculations with data from the SBL which incorporates both a radial inflow turbine as well as a radial compressor. Preliminary calculations of pressure ratio and efficiency versus flow rate have been carried out using the radial inflow turbine model.

  11. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  12. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Volkamer, Rainer; de Foy, Benjamin; Lei, Wenfang; Zavaka, Miguel; Velasco, Erik

    2008-10-31

    This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a com

  13. Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

    2011-06-21

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al diffusion from the coating into the substrate. An effective diffusion barrier interlayer coating was developed to prevent inward Al diffusion. The fire-side corrosion test results showed that the nanocrystalline coatings with a minimum number of defects have a great potential in providing corrosion protection. The coating tested in the most aggressive environment showed no evidence of coating spallation and/or corrosion attack after 1050 hours exposure. In contrast, evidence of coating spallation in isolated areas and corrosion attack of the base metal in the spalled areas were observed after 500 hours. These contrasting results after 500 and 1050 hours exposure suggest that the premature coating spallation in isolated areas may be related to the variation of defects in the coating between the samples. It is suspected that the cauliflower-type defects in the coating were presumably responsible for coating spallation in isolated areas. Thus, a defect free good quality coating is the key for the long-term durability of nanocrystalline coatings in corrosive environments. Thus, additional process optimization work is required to produce defect-free coatings prior to development of a coating application method for production parts.

  14. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility parameter variations resulting from air content variation throughout respiration is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion is a major challenge in lung cancer radiotherapy, especially with external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion may lead to areas of radiation overdosage for normal tissue. Given the unavailability of imaging modality that can be used effectively for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer assisted approach based on tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. This approach involves lung biomechanical model where its fidelity depends on input tissue properties. This investigation shows that considering variable tissue incompressibility parameter is very important for predicting tumor motion accurately, hence improving the lung radiotherapy outcome. Methods: First, an in silico lung phantom study was conducted to demonstrate the importance of employing variable Poisson's ratio for tumor motion predication. After it was established that modeling this variability is critical for accurate tumor motion prediction, an optimization based technique was developed to estimate lung tissue Poisson's ratio as a function of respiration cycle time. In this technique, the Poisson's ratio and lung pressure value were varied systematically until optimal values were obtained, leading to maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT lung images. This technique was applied in an ex vivo porcine lung study where simulated images were constructed using the end exhale CT image and deformation fields obtained from the lung's FE modeling of each respiration time increment. To model the tissue, linear elastic and Marlow hyperelastic material models in conjunction with variable Poisson's ratio were used. Results: The phantom study showed that the tumor motion trajectory and its final locations obtained from simulations with and without considering tissue incompressibility variation were very different. For example, tumor displacements in the z direction were -11.23 and -38.10 mm obtained with the Marlow hyperelastic material model in conjunction with constant and variable Poisson's ratio, respectively. By comparing the acquired 4D-CT image sequence of the porcine lung with their image sequence counterparts obtained from the hyperelastic model with constant and variable Poisson's ratio, it was shown that using variable tissue incompressibility reduced errors significantly in tumor motion prediction. Conclusions: This investigation demonstrates the importance of incompressibility variation estimation and utilization for accurate tumor tracking in computer assisted lung external beam radiation therapy. An optimization framework was developed to estimate a Poisson's ratio function in terms of respiration cycle time using experimental image data of the lung. Utilizing this function along with respiratory system FE modeling may lead to more effective tumor targeting, hence potentially improving the outcome of lung external beam radiation therapy techniques. This is particularly true for stereotactic body radiation therapy where only one or a few fraction treatments are applied, precluding the possibility of averaging out dosimetric deviations introduced by the respiratory motion.

  15. Epidemilogical Simulation System, Version 2.4

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-30

    EpiSims uses a detailed simulation of disease spread to evaluate demographically and geographically targeted biological threat reduction strategies. Abstract: EpiSims simulates the spread of disease and analyzes the consequences of intervention strategies in a large urban area at the level of individuals. The simulation combines models of three dynamical systems: urban social networks, disease transmission, and within-host progression of a disease. Validated population mobility and activity generation technology provides the social network models, Disease modelsmore » are based on fusion of expert opinion and available data. EpiSims provides a previously unavailable detailed representation of the course of an outbreak in urban area. A letter of August 16, 2002 from the Office of Homeland Security states: "Ability of EpiSims to provide comprehensive data on daily activity patterns of individuals makes it far superior to traditional SIR models — clearly had an impact on pre-attack smallpox vaccination policy." EpiSims leverages a unique Los Alamos National Laboratory resource — the population mobility and activity data developed by TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and SiMulation System) — to create epidemiological analyses at an unprecedented level of detail. We create models of microscopic (individual-level) physical and biological processes from which, through simulation, emerge the macroscopic (urban regional level) quantities that are the inputs to alternative models. For example, the contact patterns of individuals in different demographic groups determine the overall mixing rates those groups. The characteristics of a person-to-person transmission together with their contact patterns determine the reproductive numbers — how many people will be infected on average by each case. Mixing rates and reproductive numbers are the basic parameters of other epidemiological models. Because interventions — and people’s reactions to them — are ultimately applied at the individual level, EpiSims is uniquely suited to evaluate their macroscopic consequences. For example, the debate over the logistics of targeted vaccination for smallpox, and thus the magnitude of the threat it poses, can best be resolved through an individual- based approach. EpiSims is the only available analytical tool using the individual-based approach that can scale to populations of a million or more without introducing ad-hoc assumptions about the nature of the social network. Impact: The first study commissioned for the EpiSims project was to analyze the effectiveness of targeted vaccination and isolation strategies in the aftermath of a covert release of smallpox at a crowded urban location. In particular we compared casualties and resources required for targeted strategies with those in the case of large-scale quarantine and/or mass vaccination campaigns. We produced this analysis in a sixty-day effort, while prototype software was still under development and delivered it to the Office of Homeland Security in June 2002. More recently, EpiSims provided casualty estimates and cost/benefit analyses for various proposed responses to an attack with pneumonic plague during the TOPOFF-2 exercise. Capabilities: EpiSims is designed to simulate human-human transmissible disease, but it is part of a suite of tools that naturally allow it to estimate individual exposures to air-borne or water-borne spread. Combined with data on animal density and mobility, EpiSims could simulate diseases spread by non-human vectors. EpiSims incorporates reactions of individuals, and is particularly powerful if those reactions are correlated with demographics. It provides a standard for modeling scenarios that cuts across agencies.« less

  16. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, April Z; Wan, Kai-tak

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

  17. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

    2011-03-31

    Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

  18. APS Science 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. M; Mills, D. M.; Gerig, R.

    2010-05-01

    It is my pleasure to introduce the 2009 annual report of the Advanced Photon Source. This was a very good year for us. We operated with high reliability and availability, despite growing problems with obsolete systems, and our users produced a record output of publications. The number of user experiments increased by 14% from 2008 to more than 3600. We congratulate the recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry-Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (Cambridge Institute for Medical Research), Thomas Steitz (Yale University), and Ada Yonath (Weizmann Institute) - who did a substantial amount of this work at APS beamlines. Thanks to the efforts of our users and staff, and the ongoing counsel of the APS Scientific Advisory Committee, we made major progress in advancing our planning for the upgrade of the APS (APS-U), producing a proposal that was positively reviewed. We hope to get formal approval in 2010 to begin the upgrade. With advocacy from our users and the support of our sponsor, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, our operating budgets have grown to the level needed to more adequately staff our beamlines. We were also extremely fortunate to have received $7.9 M in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ('stimulus') funding to acquire new detectors and improve several of our beamlines. The success of the new Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, the world's first x-ray free-electron laser, made us particularly proud since the undulators were designed and built by the APS. Among other highlights, we note that more than one-quarter of the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, funded competitively across the U.S. in 2009 by the DOE, included the Advanced Photon Source in their proposed work, which shows that synchrotron radiation, and the APS in particular, are central to energy research. While APS research covers everything from fundamental to applied science (reflected by the highlights in this report), the challenge of sustainable energy provides an opportunity for expanded involvement with industrial research. We were privileged to recruit several outstanding new leaders at the APS. Linda Young, from Argonne's Chemical Sciences Division, became the new Director of the X-ray Science Division (XSD). Chris Jacobsen (from Stony Brook University) has been added to Linda's team as an XSD Associate Division Director, joining George Srajer. Alexander (Sasha) Zholents (formerly of Berkeley Lab) became Director of the Accelerator Systems Division. Sasha is the inventor of the short-pulse x-ray scheme that we plan to implement in the APS-U to obtain very high average brightness, broadband, 1-ps x-ray pulses. Walter Lowe (formerly of Howard University) has taken a new position as senior advisor for outreach and development of the user community. Walter's role is to increase the diversity of the user community (with diversity read broadly to include users, institutions, and technical disciplines that are underrepresented at APS). Walter is also leading an effort to increase access for industrial users. I am confident that we have in place a great team to help our users and the APS take fullest advantage of the APS-U opportunity. In planning with users for the proposed APS-U, we focused on the need to study 'real materials under real conditions in real time' on spatial and temporal scales unavailable today. Only by studying materials as they are made-or as they perform-in difficult environments can we solve the grand challenge of higher-performance, sustainable materials for energy and health. The proposed APS-U will improve the brightness of penetrating x-rays produced by the APS over 100 times, and support our efforts in developing state-of-the-art instruments to address these challenges.

  19. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  20. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  1. Development of an Advanced Fine Coal Suspension Dewatering Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. K. Parekh; D. P. Patil

    2008-04-30

    With the advancement in fine coal cleaning technology, recovery of fine coal (minus 28 mesh) has become an attractive route for the U.S. coal industry. The clean coal recovered using the advanced flotation technology i.e. column flotation, contains on average 20% solids and 80% water, with an average particle size of 35 microns. Fine coal slurry is usually dewatered using a vacuum dewatering technique, providing a material with about 25 to 30 percent moisture. The process developed in this project will improve dewatering of fine (0.6mm) coal slurry to less than 20 percent moisture. Thus, thermal drying of dewatered wet coal will be eliminated. This will provide significant energy savings for the coal industry along with some environmental benefits. A 1% increase in recovery of coal and producing a filter cake material of less than 20 % moisture will amount to energy savings of 1900 trillion Btu/yr/unit. In terms of the amount of coal it will be about 0.8% of the total coal being used in the USA for electric power generation. It is difficult to dewater the fine clean coal slurry to about 20% moisture level using the conventional dewatering techniques. The finer the particle, the larger the surface area and thus, it retains large amounts of moisture on the surface. The coal industry has shown some reluctance in using the advanced coal recovery techniques, because of unavailability of an economical dewatering technique which can provide a product containing less than 20% moisture. The U.S.DOE and Industry has identified the dewatering of coal fines as a high priority problem. The goal of the proposed program is to develop and evaluate a novel two stage dewatering process developed at the University of Kentucky, which involves utilization of two forces, namely, vacuum and pressure for dewatering of fine coal slurries. It has been observed that a fine coal filter cake formed under vacuum has a porous structure with water trapped in the capillaries. When this porous cake is subjected to pressure for a short time, the free water present is released from the filter cake. Laboratory studies have shown that depending on the coal type a filter cake containing about 15% moisture could be obtained using the two-stage filtration technique. It was also noted that applying intermittent breaks in vacuum force during cake formation, which disturbed the cake structure, helped in removing moisture from the filter cakes. In this project a novel approach of cleaning coal using column flotation was also developed. With this approach the feed capacity of the column is increased significantly, and the column was also able to recover coarser size coal which usually gets lost in the process. The outcome of the research benefits the coal industry, utility industry, and indirectly the general public. The benefits can be counted in terms of clean energy, cleaner environment, and lower cost power.

  2. Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Killian

    2009-09-30

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

  3. A Historical Evaluation of the U15 Complex, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Holz, Barbara A; Bullard, Thomas F; Goldenberg, nancy G; Ashbaough, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2014-01-09

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U15 Complex on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Three underground nuclear tests and two underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were conducted at the complex. The nuclear tests were Hard Hat in 1962, Tiny Tot in 1965, and Pile Driver in 1966. The Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests involved different types of experiment sections in test drifts at various distances from the explosion in order to determine which sections could best survive in order to design underground command centers. The Tiny Tot nuclear test involved an underground cavity in which the nuclear test was executed. It also provided data in designing underground structures and facilities to withstand a nuclear attack. The underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were Heater Test 1 from 1977 to 1978 and Spent Fuel Test - Climax from 1978 to 1985. Heater Test 1 was used to design the later Spent Fuel Test - Climax experiment. The latter experiment was a model of a larger underground storage facility and primarily involved recording the conditions of the spent fuel and the surrounding granite medium. Fieldwork was performed intermittently in the summers of 2011 and 2013, totaling 17 days. Access to the underground tunnel complex is sealed and unavailable. Restricted to the surface, four buildings, four structures, and 92 features associated with nuclear testing and fuel storage experiment activities at the U15 Complex have been recorded. Most of these are along the west side of the complex and next to the primary access road and are characteristic of an industrial mining site, albeit one with scientific interests. The geomorphological fieldwork was conducted over three days in the summer of 2011. It was discovered that major modifications to the terrain have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to the tests and experiments, and construction of drill pads and retention ponds. Six large trenches for exploring across the Boundary geologic fault are also present. The U15 Complex, designated historic district 143 and site 26NY15177, is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under Criteria A, C, and D of 36 CFR Part 60.4. As a historic district and archaeological site eligible to the National Register of Historic Places, the Desert Research Institute recommends that the area defined for the U15 Complex, historic district 143 and site 26NY15117, be left in place in its current condition. The U15 Complex should also be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations.

  4. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor streams can be especially challenging to identify. The super cooled detectors have a marked improvement in energy resolution, allowing the possibility of deconvolution of mixtures of gamma rays that was unavailable with high purity germanium detectors. Isotopic analysis codes require libraries of gamma rays. In certain situations, isotope identification can be made in the field, sometimes with a short turnaround time, depending on the choice of detector and software analysis package. Sodium iodide and high purity germanium detectors have been successfully used in field scenarios. The newer super cooled detectors offer dramatically increased resolution, but they have lower efficiency and so can require longer collection times. The different peak shapes require software development for the specific detector type and field application. Libraries can be tailored to specific scenarios; by eliminating isotopes that are certainly not present, the analysis time may be shortened and the accuracy may be increased. The intent of this project was to create one accurate library of gamma rays emitted from isotopes of interest to be used as a reliable reference in safeguards work. All simulation and spectroscopy analysis codes can draw upon this best library to improve accuracy and cross-code consistency. Modeling codes may include MCNP and COG. Gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis codes may include MGA, MGAU, U235 and FRAM. The intent is to give developers and users the tools to use in nuclear energy safeguards work. In this project, the library created was limited to a selection of actinide isotopes of immediate interest to reactor technology. These isotopes included {sup 234-238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238-242}Pu, {sup 241,243}Am and {sup 244}Cm. These isotopes were examined, and the best of gamma-ray data, including line energies and relative strengths were selected.

  5. Summary of Booster Development and Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, Elizabeth G.; Harry, Herbert H.; Hartline, Ernest L.; Hooks, Daniel E.; Johnson, Carl E.; Morris, John S.; Novak, Alan M.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Sanders, Victor E.; Scovel, Christina A.; Lorenz, Thomas; Wright, Mark; Botcher, Tod; Marx, Erin; Gibson, Kevin

    2012-06-21

    This report outlines booster development work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2007 to present. The booster is a critical link in the initiation train of explosive assemblies, from complex devices like nuclear weapons to conventional munitions. The booster bridges the gap from a small, relatively sensitive detonator to an insensitive, but massive, main charge. The movement throughout the explosives development community is to use more and more insensitive explosive components. With that, more energy is needed out of the booster. It has to initiate reliably, promptly, powerfully and safely. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides a summary of a collaborative effort between LANL, LLNL, and AWE to identify candidate materials and uniformly develop a testing plan for new boosters. Important parameters and the tests required to measure them were defined. The nature of the collaboration and the specific goals of the participating partners has changed over time, but the booster development plan stands on its own merit as a complete description of the test protocol necessary to compare and qualify booster materials, and is discussed in its entirety in this report. The second section describes a project, which began in 2009 with the Department of Defense to develop replacement booster formulations for PBXN-7. Replacement of PBXN-7 was necessary because it contained Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), which was becoming unavailable to the DoD and because it contained Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), which was sensitive and toxic. A LANL-developed explosive, Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF), was an important candidate. This project required any replacement formulation be a drop-in replacement in existing munitions. This project was timely, in that it made use of the collaborative booster development project, and had the additional constraint of matching shock sensitivity. Additionally it needed to be a safety improvement, and a performance improvement, especially at cold temperatures. The requirements of this project necessitated novel test development and a different approach to ranking booster qualities. Results of this project have been documented to the DoD and the relevant portions are included within. The third section of this booster report outlines testing related to main charge initiation merit. Initiability can be evaluated by looking at critical diameter, run distance, and shock sensitivity. Once a booster is initiated, it needs to be powerful enough to initiate the main charge symmetrically and evenly. Main charge initiability is evaluated directly by observing detonation wave symmetry, curvature, and first break out over the surface of a charge. Furthermore it must be insensitive to accidents and insults, and safe and reliable across a range of temperatures. These effects, tests, and results will be discussed individually in the context of DAAF and other explosives similarly tested. The last section provides a conclusion and summary of our experimental work and recommendations for the path forward. References and additional supporting documentation and results are provided in the appendices at the end of this report.

  6. The Panama Canal: It's all about connectivity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Panama Canal: It's all about connectivity Panama at a glance GDP growth rate - last 10 years 7.5% GDP estimated- 2013 (dollars) 38,6b GDP per capita - 2013 estimated (in dollars) 13,032 Population (million) 3.5 Unemployment rate (in %) 4.0 Inflation rate - 2013 (in %) 4.08 It's all about Connectivity * 144 trade routes * 1,700 ports * 160 countries The Panama Canal's value added service The Panama Canal Service Package Reliability Sustainability Connectivity Economies of Scale * Opens 24 hours a

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 The real gross domestic product (GDP) data used in the U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data System (SEDS) to calculate total energy consumed per chained (2009) dollar of output are shown in Tables D1 and D2. The data are the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), real GDP estimates by state, beginning in 1997. The estimates are released in June of each year. For the United States, the national real GDP series from the National In- come and Product

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 The current-dollar gross domestic product (GDP) data used in the U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data System (SEDS) to calculate total energy consumed per current dollar of output are shown in Tables B1 and B2. The data are the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, current-dollar GDP estimates by state, beginning in 1997. The estimates are released June of each year. For the United States, the national current-dollar GDP series from the National Income

  9. Surface oxygen micropatterns on glow discharge polymer targets by photo irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reynolds, Hannah; Baxamusa, Salmaan; Haan, Steven W.; Fitzsimmons, Paul; Carlson, Lane; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Watson, Brian J.

    2016-02-24

    Recent simulations predict surface oxygen may be a significant source of disruptive perturbations in the implosion process of glow-discharge polymers (GDP) ablators at the National Ignition Facility. GDP material held in ambient atmospheric conditions showed an increase in mass when stored in light transparent containers, which suggests that photo exposure is a driving force for oxygen absorption. To investigate if surface oxygen is a contributing factor of disruptive perturbations during implosion, we developed a method to imprint a periodic micropattern of oxygen on the surface of GDP and used it to fabricate a flat sample for empirical testing.

  10. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2010 1 May 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 11, 2010 Release Highlights  EIA projects U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) will grow by 3.0 percent and world real oil-consumption-weighted GDP will increase by 3.6 percent in 2010, both of which are 0.2 percent higher than in the previous Outlook. The 2011 forecast for real GDP growth is at 2.9 percent and 3.7 percent for the United States and the world, respectively.  The more optimistic economic growth forecasts lead to an increase

  11. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over 50% of the global market share. Automotive oils sector is further segmented into hydraulic oil, engine oil, and gear oil. Improving GDP in developing nations such as India and...

  12. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    W W - - - Wyoming Iowa 12.31 12.03 W W W - No deliveries reported W Data Withheld Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report Real values derived using the GDP...

  13. Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PADUCAH, Ky. - While EM's Paducah Site is preparing its gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) ... Currently, electricity consumption at the site is only about 0.5 percent of what was used ...

  14. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - International...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3.2. The GDP growth rate assumptions for non-U.S. countriesregions are taken from Oxford Economic Model (October, 2012). The values for growth in total liquids demand in the...

  15. Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GDP and VMT Trends, 1960-2015 Graph showing gross national product and vehicle travel trends during 2015. Note: Data for the last quarter of 2015 were not available and were ...

  16. If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

  17. Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah GDP http:www.emcbc.doe.g ovSEBPGDP%20Deac tivation EMCBC Multiple award IDIQ contract holders Cost Plus Award Fee with Fixed Price CLINS 600M- 680M 512013 529...

  18. Solomon Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Solomon Islands Population 523,000 GDP 840,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SB 3-letter ISO code SLB Numeric ISO...

  19. Madagascar: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Madagascar Population 12,238,914 GDP 10,025,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.05 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MG 3-letter ISO code MDG Numeric ISO...

  20. Mauritius: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Mauritius Population 1,236,817 GDP 14 Energy Consumption 0.06 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MU 3-letter ISO code MUS Numeric ISO...

  1. Senegal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Senegal Population 13,508,715 GDP 13,864,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.09 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SN 3-letter ISO code SEN Numeric ISO...

  2. Maldives: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Maldives Population 393,500 GDP 1,944,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MV 3-letter ISO code MDV Numeric ISO...

  3. Tanzania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Tanzania Population 44,928,923 GDP 37 Energy Consumption 0.12 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TZ 3-letter ISO code TZA Numeric ISO...

  4. Saint Lucia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Saint Lucia Population 173,765 GDP 1,239,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LC 3-letter ISO code LCA Numeric ISO...

  5. Yemen: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Yemen Population 19,685,000 GDP 36,700,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.31 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code YE 3-letter ISO code YEM Numeric ISO...

  6. Seychelles: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Seychelles Population 84,000 GDP 2,760,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SC 3-letter ISO code SYC Numeric ISO...

  7. Guyana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guyana Population 747,884 GDP 2,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GY 3-letter ISO code GUY Numeric ISO...

  8. Albania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Albania Population 2,821,977 GDP 14,000,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.11 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AL 3-letter ISO code ALB Numeric ISO...

  9. Romania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Romania Population 20,121,641 GDP 191,581,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.68 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code RO 3-letter ISO code ROU Numeric ISO...

  10. Morocco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Morocco Population 33,250,000 GDP 114,700,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.56 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MA 3-letter ISO code MAR Numeric ISO...

  11. Dominica: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Dominica Population 72,301 GDP 497,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code DM 3-letter ISO code DMA Numeric ISO...

  12. Tonga: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tonga Population 103,036 GDP 439,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TO 3-letter ISO code TON Numeric ISO...

  13. Antigua and Barbuda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Antigua and Barbuda Population 81,799 GDP 1,176,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AG 3-letter ISO code ATG Numeric ISO...

  14. Cape Verde: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Cape Verde Population 512,096 GDP 2,071,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CV 3-letter ISO code CPV Numeric ISO...

  15. Burundi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Burundi Population 8,053,574 GDP 3,037,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BI 3-letter ISO code BDI Numeric ISO...

  16. Ethiopia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Ethiopia Population 73,750,932 GDP 51,000,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.12 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code ET 3-letter ISO code ETH Numeric ISO...

  17. Faroe Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Faroe Islands Population 48,351 GDP 2,450,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FO 3-letter ISO code FRO Numeric ISO...

  18. Panama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Panama Population 3,608,431 GDP 49,142,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.24 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PA 3-letter ISO code PAN Numeric ISO...

  19. Iran: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Iran Population 77,176,930 GDP 402,700,000,000 Energy Consumption 8.12 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code IR 3-letter ISO code IRN Numeric ISO...

  20. Guinea: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guinea Population 10,628,972 GDP 5,212,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GN 3-letter ISO code GIN Numeric ISO...

  1. Tunisia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tunisia Population 10,982,754 GDP 45,611,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.35 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TN 3-letter ISO code TUN Numeric ISO...

  2. Lithuania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Lithuania Population 3,043,429 GDP 51,002,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.39 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LT 3-letter ISO code LTU Numeric ISO...

  3. Cambodia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Cambodia Population 13,388,910 GDP 17,250,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.07 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KH 3-letter ISO code KHM Numeric ISO...

  4. Kosovo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kosovo Population 1,733,842 GDP 7,813,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code XK 3-letter ISO code XKX Numeric ISO code N...

  5. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 5,337,000 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  6. Guinea-Bissau: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guinea-Bissau Population 1,345,479 GDP 870,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GW 3-letter ISO code GNB Numeric ISO...

  7. Uruguay: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Uruguay Population 3,286,314 GDP 58,283,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.17 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code UY 3-letter ISO code URY Numeric ISO...

  8. Rwanda: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Rwanda Population 10,515,973 GDP 7,431,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code RW 3-letter ISO code RWA Numeric ISO...

  9. Grenada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Grenada Population 109,590 GDP 790,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GD 3-letter ISO code GRD Numeric ISO...

  10. Burkina Faso: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Burkina Faso Population 14,017,262 GDP 13,000,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BF 3-letter ISO code BFA Numeric ISO...

  11. Iraq: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Iraq Population 36,004,552 GDP 164,600,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.36 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code IQ 3-letter ISO code IRQ Numeric ISO...

  12. Benin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Benin Population 9,983,884 GDP 7,429,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.05 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BJ 3-letter ISO code BEN Numeric ISO...

  13. Oman: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Oman Population 2,773,479 GDP 78,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.71 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code OM 3-letter ISO code OMN Numeric ISO...

  14. Angola: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Angola Population 18,498,000 GDP 129,785,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.20 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AO 3-letter ISO code AGO Numeric ISO...

  15. Lebanon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Lebanon Population 4,965,914 GDP 44,967,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.20 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LB 3-letter ISO code LBN Numeric ISO...

  16. Belize: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Belize Population 324,528 GDP 1,554,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BZ 3-letter ISO code BLZ Numeric ISO...

  17. Comoros: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Comoros Population 798,000 GDP 655,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KM 3-letter ISO code COM Numeric ISO...

  18. Finland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Finland Population 5,180,000 GDP 276,275,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.29 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FI 3-letter ISO code FIN Numeric ISO...

  19. Latvia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Latvia Population 2,070,371 GDP 34,118,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.16 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LV 3-letter ISO code LVA Numeric ISO...

  20. Cuba: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Cuba Population 11,210,064 GDP 78,694,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.42 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CU 3-letter ISO code CUB Numeric ISO...

  1. Barbados: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Barbados Population 277,821 GDP 4,490,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BB 3-letter ISO code BRB Numeric ISO...

  2. Cyprus: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Cyprus Population 838,897 GDP 23,006,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.13 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CY 3-letter ISO code CYP Numeric ISO...

  3. Kiribati: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kiribati Population 103,500 GDP 167,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KI 3-letter ISO code KIR Numeric ISO...

  4. Brunei: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Brunei Population 415,717 GDP 17,092,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.19 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BN 3-letter ISO code BRN Numeric ISO...

  5. Kuwait: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kuwait Population 2,213,403 GDP 173,438,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.19 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KW 3-letter ISO code KWT Numeric ISO...

  6. Zimbabwe: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Zimbabwe Population 13,061,239 GDP 11 Energy Consumption 0.16 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code ZW 3-letter ISO code ZWE Numeric ISO...

  7. Togo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Togo Population 7,154,237 GDP 3,685,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TG 3-letter ISO code TGO Numeric ISO...

  8. Estonia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Estonia Population 1,294,486 GDP 27,410,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.24 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code EE 3-letter ISO code EST Numeric ISO...

  9. Suriname: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Suriname Population 492,829 GDP 5,273,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SR 3-letter ISO code SUR Numeric ISO...

  10. Bulgaria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Bulgaria Population 7,364,570 GDP 57,596,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.83 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BG 3-letter ISO code BGR Numeric ISO...

  11. Switzerland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Switzerland Population 7,954,700 GDP 679,028,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.32 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CH 3-letter ISO code CHE Numeric ISO...

  12. Jordan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Jordan Population 5,611,202 GDP 33,516,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.31 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code JO 3-letter ISO code JOR Numeric ISO...

  13. Costa Rica: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Costa Rica Population 4,586,353 GDP 52,968,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.20 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CR 3-letter ISO code CRI Numeric ISO...

  14. Guatemala: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guatemala Population 15,806,675 GDP 49,880,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.21 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GT 3-letter ISO code GTM Numeric ISO...

  15. Liechtenstein: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Liechtenstein Population 37,132 GDP 5,155,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LI 3-letter ISO code LIE Numeric ISO code...

  16. Gabon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Gabon Population 1,475,000 GDP 20,664,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.05 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GA 3-letter ISO code GAB Numeric ISO...

  17. Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Niger Population 17,138,707 GDP 6,022,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NE 3-letter ISO code NER Numeric ISO...

  18. Singapore: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Singapore Population 5,469,700 GDP 298 Energy Consumption 2.38 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SG 3-letter ISO code SGP Numeric ISO...

  19. Cameroon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Cameroon Population 17,463,836 GDP 30,000,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.10 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CM 3-letter ISO code CMR Numeric ISO...

  20. Honduras: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Honduras Population 7,529,403 GDP 19,567,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.13 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code HN 3-letter ISO code HND Numeric ISO...

  1. Federated States of Micronesia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profile Name Federated States of Micronesia Population 106,104 GDP 277,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FM 3-letter ISO code FSM Numeric ISO code...

  2. Jamaica: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Jamaica Population 2,889,187 GDP 15,569,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.17 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code JM 3-letter ISO code JAM Numeric ISO...

  3. Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Hungary Population 9,937,628 GDP 145,153,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.11 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code HU 3-letter ISO code HUN Numeric ISO...

  4. Paraguay: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Paraguay Population 6,800,284 GDP 30,558,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.44 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PY 3-letter ISO code PRY Numeric ISO...

  5. Algeria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Algeria Population 37,900,000 GDP 227,802,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.71 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code DZ 3-letter ISO code DZA Numeric ISO...

  6. Nigeria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Nigeria Population 140,431,790 GDP 594,257,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.09 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NG 3-letter ISO code NGA Numeric ISO...

  7. Chad: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Chad Population 6,279,921 GDP 15,986,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TD 3-letter ISO code TCD Numeric ISO...

  8. Eritrea: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Eritrea Population 6,380,803 GDP 3,881,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code ER 3-letter ISO code ERI Numeric ISO...

  9. Bolivia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Bolivia Population 10,556,102 GDP 29,802 Energy Consumption 0.25 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BO 3-letter ISO code BOL Numeric ISO...

  10. Andorra: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Andorra Population 85,458 GDP 4,510,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AD 3-letter ISO code AND Numeric ISO code...

  11. Liberia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Liberia Population 3,476,608 GDP 1,735,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LR 3-letter ISO code LBR Numeric ISO...

  12. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name The Bahamas Population 254,685 GDP 8,043,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BS 3-letter ISO code BHS Numeric ISO code...

  13. Ivory Coast: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Ivory Coast Population 15,366,672 GDP 32,000,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code CI 3-letter ISO code CIV Numeric ISO code...

  14. Mauritania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Mauritania Population 3,537,368 GDP 4,547,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MR 3-letter ISO code MRT Numeric ISO...

  15. Dominican Republic: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Dominican Republic Population 9,378,818 GDP 62,484,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.30 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code DO 3-letter ISO code DOM Numeric ISO...

  16. Laos: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Laos Population 4,574,848 GDP 11 Energy Consumption 0.04 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LA 3-letter ISO code LAO Numeric ISO...

  17. Qatar: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Qatar Population 1,699,435 GDP 213,784,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code QA 3-letter ISO code QAT Numeric ISO...

  18. Lesotho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Lesotho Population 2,031,348 GDP 2,616,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LS 3-letter ISO code LSO Numeric ISO...

  19. Vanuatu: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Vanuatu Population 243,304 GDP 743,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code VU 3-letter ISO code VUT Numeric ISO...

  20. MARVIN S. FERTEL President and Chief Executive Officer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    facilities, the industry has twice paid its share of the funds necessary to clean-up the GDP facilities - payment was received as part of the price for DOE uranium enrichment...

  1. Afghanistan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Afghanistan Population 15,500,000 GDP 21,747,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AF 3-letter...

  2. Oil and gas outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 non-OECD consumption growth non-OECD GDP growth* Prices and economic growth are important, but policy, preferences, and technology may have a bigger...

  3. Advanced Manufacturing Office in DOE Multimaterial Joining Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steve Sikirica Multi-Material Joining Workshop Rosemount, IL July 23, 2012 Advanced ... added * 11% of U.S. GDP * 12 million U.S. jobs * 60% of U.S. engineering and science jobs ...

  4. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0019-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0019-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  5. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0068-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0068-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  6. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0016-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0016-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  7. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0048-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0048-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  8. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0058-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0058-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  9. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0046-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0046-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  10. DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2012-0011-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DNA R&C Doc FINAL DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2012-0011-DNA.pdf...

  11. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0023-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0023-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  12. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0007-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. 942013: DNA file uploaded Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0007-DNA....

  13. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0020-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0020-DNA.pdf Retrieved from "http:...

  14. DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0020-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    info. GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0020-DN...

  15. DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    info. GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DN...

  16. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0020-DNA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GDP from BLM's Grass Wells Database, LR2000 SRPs, or State Mineral Commissions Databases. 8292013: DNA uploaded Documents DNA Worksheet: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0020-DNA.pdf...

  17. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Results on Understanding U.S. Real GDP fluctuations ... Changes in relative factor prices? n n Oil as a financial ... 1973 oil he eve of the 1973 oil crisis. In this high crisis. ...

  18. Azerbaijan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Azerbaijan Population 9,494,600 GDP 73,537,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.68 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AZ 3-letter ISO code AZE Numeric ISO...

  19. Mongolia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Mongolia Population 3,000,000 GDP 11,516,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.09 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MN 3-letter ISO code MNG Numeric ISO...

  20. Sierra Leone: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Sierra Leone Population 6,190,280 GDP 3,777,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SL 3-letter ISO code SLE Numeric ISO...

  1. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic Product, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation plays a major role in the U.S. economy. About 10% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only...

  2. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of lower year-over-year growth. Weak GDP growth in these emerging markets has a greater impact on global distillate demand, which is used primarily in the transportation of goods...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    liquid fuels consumers, annual GDP growth since 2005 averaged only 1.5 percent for Germany, 1.3 percent for the United States, and 0.6 percent for Japan. In the June 2013 STEO,...

  4. Argonne National Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth-Paducah Program Office Ohio Kentucky Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Challenge The decommissioning of GDP facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to several factors, including; lack of available

  5. Executive summaries of reports leading to the construction of the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.; Westermeier, J.F.; Giroux, H.D.; Lowe, G.D.; Nienberg, M.W.

    1980-05-01

    Executive summaries have been written for 61 reports and compilations of data which, in part, have led to the construction of the Baca 50 MW Geothermal Demonstration Project (GDP). The reports and data include environmental research, reservoir and feasibility studies, the project proposal to DOE and the Final Environmental Impact Statement. These executive summaries are intended to give the reader a general overview of each report prior to requesting the report from the GDP Data Manager.

  6. Executive summaries of reports leading to the construction of the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.; Westermeier, J.F.; Giroux, H.D.; Lowe, G.D.; Nienberg, M.W.

    1980-05-01

    Executive summaries have been written for 61 reports and compilations of data which in part, have led to the construction of the Baca 50 MW Geothermal Demonstration Project (GDP). The reports and data include environmental research, reservoir and feasibility studies, the project proposal to DOE and the Final Environmental Impact Statement. These executive summaries are intended to give the reader a general overview of each report prior to requesting the report from the GDP Data Manager.

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Economic Assumptions Recent Economic Indicators The Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that real GDP increased at an annual rate of 1.0% in the fourth quarter of 2015, up from the initial estimate of 0.7%. The increase in real GDP in the fourth quarter reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures, residential fixed investment, and federal government spending. EIA used the February 2016 version of the IHS macroeconomic model with EIA's energy price forecasts as model

  8. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Transition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaseous Diffusion Plant Transition Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Transition GDP Shutdown Paducah site_map-USEC_lease.jpg The Energy Policy Act of 1992 transferred operational responsibility for the site's uranium enrichment operations to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), originally a government corporation that became a publicly held company in 1998. USEC assumed responsibility for enrichment operations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) and leased property from DOE.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Estimated Value of All U.S. Construction Relative to the GDP ($2010) - 2007 estimated value of all U.S. construction was $1.82 trillion (including renovation; heavy construction; public works; residential, commercial, and industrial new construction; and non-contract work). - Compared to the $14.6 trillion 2007 U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), all construction held a 12.4% share. - In 2007, residential and commercial building renovation (valued at $496 billion) and new building construction

  10. Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest IndustrialEnterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming EnterpriseProgram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

    2007-06-01

    Between 1980 and 2000, China's energy efficiency policiesresulted in a decoupling of the traditionally linked relationship betweenenergy use and gross domestic product (GDP) growth, realizing a four-foldincrease in GDP with only a doubling of energy use. However, during Chinas transition to a market-based economy in the 1990s, many of thecountry's energy efficiency programs were dismantled and between 2001 and2005 China's energy use increased significantly, growing at about thesame rate as GDP. Continuation of this one-to-one ratio of energyconsumption to GDP given China's stated goal of again quadrupling GDPbetween 2000 and 2020 will lead to significant demand for energy, most ofwhich is coal-based. The resulting local, national, and globalenvironmental impacts could be substantial.In 2005, realizing thesignificance of this situation, the Chinese government announced anambitious goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20percent between 2005 and 2010. One of the key initiatives for realizingthis goal is the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises program. Thecomprehensive energy consumption of these 1000 enterprises accounted for33 percent of national and 47 percent of industrial energy usage in 2004.Under the Top-1000 program, 2010 energy consumption targets wereannounced for each enterprise. Activities to be undertaken includebenchmarking, energy audits, development of energy saving action plans,information and training workshops, and annual reporting of energyconsumption. This paper will describe the program in detail, includingthe types of enterprises included and the program activities, and willprovide an analysis of the progress and lessons learned todate.

  11. Structural Evidence for a Sequential Release Mechanism for Activation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Menon, Santosh T.; Chauhan, Radha; Sachdev, Pallavi; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-12

    Heptahelical G-protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors couple to heterotrimeric G proteins to relay extracellular signals to intracellular signaling networks, but the molecular mechanism underlying guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) release by the G protein {alpha}-subunit is not well understood. Amino acid substitutions in the conserved {alpha}5 helix of Gi, which extends from the C-terminal region to the nucleotide-binding pocket, cause dramatic increases in basal (receptor-independent) GDP release rates. For example, mutant G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A shows an 18-fold increase in basal GDP release rate and, when expressed in culture, it causes a significant decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The crystal structure of G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A {center_dot} GDP shows substantial conformational rearrangement of the switch I region and additional striking alterations of side chains lining the catalytic pocket that disrupt the Mg{sup +2} coordination sphere and dislodge bound Mg{sup +2}. We propose a 'sequential release' mechanism whereby a transient conformational change in the {alpha}5 helix alters switch I to induce GDP release. Interestingly, this mechanistic model for heterotrimeric G protein activation is similar to that suggested for the activation of the plant small G protein Rop4 by RopGEF8.

  12. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first structural information of human Rab3B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of Rab3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The charge distribution of Rab3B indicates its unique roles in vesicular trafficking. -- Abstract: Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 A resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  13. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Value of New Building Construction Relative to GDP, by Year ($2010 Billion) Value of New Construction Put in Place Bldgs. Percent of Residential Commercial (1) All Bldgs. (1) GDP Total U.S. GDP 1980 5.0% 1985 5.8% 1990 4.9% 1995 4.4% 2000 5.2% 2005 6.0% 2006 5.9% 2007 5.2% 2008 4.4% 2009 3.3% 2010 2.6% Note(s): Source(s): 129.8 247.7 377.4 14,660 1) New buildings construction differs from Table 1.3.2 by excluding industrial building construction. DOC, Current Construction Reports: Value of New

  15. apr01

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2001 Overview Signs of continued slowing in the U.S. economy have resulted once again in a reduction in our base case assumptions concerning real GDP growth in 2001 and 2002. We now expect the economy to expand at a rate of 1.9 percent this year and by 3.4 percent in 2002. These lower estimates imply a cumulative reduction in the level of GDP in 2002 of 1.1 percent compared to our

  16. Center for Advanced Separation Technology (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Center for Advanced Separation Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Center for Advanced Separation Technology The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation's GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry

  17. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-06-28

    Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the plant Rho protein ROP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Christoph Berken, Antje

    2007-12-01

    Crystals of the plant Rho protein ROP5 from A. thaliana have been obtained that diffract to 1.53 Å resolution. The small G protein ROP5 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. ROP5 crystals were obtained using PEG 3000 as precipitant and belong to space group P2{sub 1}. A data set was collected to 1.53 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. A clear molecular-replacement solution was found using ROP4–GDP of the ROP4–GDP–PRONE8 complex as the search model.

  19. The Industrial Technologies Program: Meeting the Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Technologies Program: Meeting the Challenge STEAB Meeting October 17, 2007 Douglas E. Kaempf Program Manager Industry: Critical to U.S. Energy Security & Economy The U.S. manufacturing sector * Consumes more energy than any sector of the economy * Makes highest contribution to GDP (12%) * Produces nearly 1/4 th of world manufacturing output * Supplies >60% of US exports, worth $50 billion/month 2004 Nominal GDP, $ Billions 15,000 Ranks as 12,000 eighth largest 9,000 economy

  20. Center for Advanced Separation Technology (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connect Center for Advanced Separation Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Center for Advanced Separation Technology The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation's GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well

  1. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 1 February 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 10, 2009 Release Highlights U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to decline by 2.7 percent in 2009, triggering decreases in domestic energy consumption for all major fuels. Economic recovery is projected to begin in 2010, with 2.2 percent year-over- year growth in GDP. Accompanying the projected economic recovery should be a mild rebound in energy consumption for all the major fuels in 2010. Over the past 6 months, the monthly

  2. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 1 February 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 8, 2011 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of WTI crude oil to average about $93 per barrel in 2011, $14 higher than the average price last year. For 2012, EIA projects that WTI prices will continue to rise, averaging $98 per barrel. EIA's forecast assumes U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows 3.0 percent in 2011 and 2.8 percent in 2012, while world real GDP (weighted by oil consumption) grows by 3.9 percent and 4.0 percent,

  3. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2010 1 September 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 8, 2010 Release Highlights  These projections reflect updated expectations for economic activity, with forecasted U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 2.8 percent in 2010 and 2.3 percent in 2011, down from the previous Outlook's growth projections of 3.1 and 2.7 percent for 2010 and 2011, respectively. The 2011 world oil-consumption-weighted real GDP growth rate is also lowered, to 3.3 percent from the 3.6 percent

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Value of Building Improvements and Repairs Relative to GDP, by Year ($2010 Billion) (1) GDP 1980 N.A. 1985 (2) 4.2% 1990 (3) 3.9% 1995 3.5% 2000 3.0% 2006 3.6% 2007 3.7% Note(s): Source(s): 235.7 259.8 495.5 13,354.9 1) Improvements includes additions, alterations, reconstruction, and major replacements. Repairs include maintenance. 2) 1986. 3) 1989. DOC, Expenditures for Residential Improvements and Repairs by Property Type, Quarterly, May 2005 for 1980-1990; DOC, Expenditures for Residential

  5. COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

  6. Disaggregated analysis of US energy consumption in the 1990s: Evidence of the effects of the internet and rapid economic growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Schipper, Lee

    2001-07-01

    This paper decomposes US energy use from 1988 to 1998 and attributes the changes in energy use to three underlying factors: activity, structure, and intensity. For this study we use a bottom-up methodology, by separately decomposing delivered energy use in six sectors: travel, freight, manufacturing industries, non-manufacturing industries, residential, and services. The most commonly used indicator of energy efficiency in the total economy, the ratio of energy consumed to unit of GDP (E/GDP) created can often be misleading. The rapid decline in the E/GDP ratio in recent years has been used to support assertions that the Internet and information technologies in general have enabled improvements in energy efficiencies. However, our disaggregate analysis suggests that energy intensities on average are falling more slowly than ever before while actual energy use increased faster than at any time since 1970. The decline in the E/GDP ratio in the mid-to late 1990s owes much more to structural changes in the demand for energy services than to falling energy intensities.

  7. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  8. Correcting incompatible DN values and geometric errors in nighttime lights time series images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Zhou, Yuyu; Samson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime lights imagery has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor urbanization and assess socioeconomic activities at large scales. However, the existence of incompatible digital number (DN) values and geometric errors severely limit application of nighttime light image data on multi-year quantitative research. In this study we extend and improve previous studies on inter-calibrating nighttime lights image data to obtain more compatible and reliable nighttime lights time series (NLT) image data for China and the United States (US) through four steps: inter-calibration, geometric correction, steady increase adjustment, and population data correction. We then use gross domestic product (GDP) data to test the processed NLT image data indirectly and find that sum light (summed DN value of pixels in a nighttime light image) maintains apparent increase trends with relatively large GDP growth rates but does not increase or decrease with relatively small GDP growth rates. As nighttime light is a sensitive indicator for economic activity, the temporally consistent trends between sum light and GDP growth rate imply that brightness of nighttime lights on the ground is correctly represented by the processed NLT image data. Finally, through analyzing the corrected NLT image data from 1992 to 2008, we find that China experienced apparent nighttime lights development in 1992-1997 and 2001-2008 respectively and the US suffered from nighttime lights decay in large areas after 2001.

  9. Structures of G [alpha [superscript i1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Willard, Francis S.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Fredericks, Zoey; Bodor, Erik T.; Jones, Miller B.; Blaesius, Rainer; Watts, Val J.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John; Ramer, J. Kevin; Siderovski, David P.

    2010-07-19

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are molecular switches that regulate numerous signaling pathways involved in cellular physiology. This characteristic is achieved by the adoption of two principal states: an inactive, GDP bound state and an active, GTP bound state. Under basal conditions, G proteins exist in the inactive, GDP bound state; thus, nucleotide exchange is crucial to the onset of signaling. Despite our understanding of G protein signaling pathways, the mechanism of nucleotide exchange remains elusive. We employed phage display technology to identify nucleotide state-dependent G{alpha} binding peptides. Herein, we report a GDP-selective G{alpha} binding peptide, KB-752, that enhances spontaneous nucleotide exchange of G{alpha}{sub i} subunits. Structural determination of the G{alpha}{sub i1}/peptide complex reveals unique changes in the G{alpha} switch regions predicted to enhance nucleotide exchange by creating a GDP dissociation route. Our results cast light onto a potential mechanism by which G{alpha} subunits adopt a conformation suitable for nucleotide exchange.

  10. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,DG; CASTILLO,ER; PONTELANDOLFO,JM

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 {micro}m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 {micro}m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, {approx} 1.5 {micro}m thick, 900 {micro}m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 {micro}m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition.

  11. Economic Effects of High Oil Prices (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 projections of future energy market conditions reflect the effects of oil prices on the macroeconomic variables that affect oil demand, in particular, and energy demand in general. The variables include real gross domestic product (GDP) growth, inflation, employment, exports and imports, and interest rates.

  12. Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, Ky. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a Task Order under the Nationwide Environmental Management ID/IQ Unrestricted Contract to Fluor Federal Services, Inc. for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, which is currently leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC).

  13. PGDP Deactivation Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GDP Transition » PGDP Deactivation Project PGDP Deactivation Project PGDP Deactivation Project scope major activities: Site Optimization Studies include: - Steam, Air, Nitrogen and Chilled Water Optimization Study - Water Treatment Facility Optimization Study - C-100 Optimization Study - Sewer Evaluation Study Facility Stabilization Preparation and/or removal of nuclear materials and contaminants from facilities. Stabilization activities are performed during early stages of facility

  14. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: ... KinBot software at the UCCSD(T)-F12bcc-pVQZ-F12M06-2X6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. ...

  15. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  16. Structural Insights into the Mechanism of PEPCK Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holyoak,T.; Sullivan, S.; Nowak, T.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase catalyzes the reversible decarboxylation of oxaloacetic acid with the concomitant transfer of the {gamma}-phosphate of GTP to form PEP and GDP as the first committed step of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. The three structures of the mitochondrial isoform of PEPCK reported are complexed with Mn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}-PEP, or Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP and provide the first observations of the structure of the mitochondrial isoform and insight into the mechanism of catalysis mediated by this enzyme. The structures show the involvement of the hyper-reactive cysteine (C307) in the coordination of the active site Mn{sup 2+}. Upon formation of the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-PEP or PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complexes, C307 coordination is lost as the P-loop in which it resides adopts a different conformation. The structures suggest that stabilization of the cysteine-coordinated metal geometry holds the enzyme as a catalytically incompetent metal complex and may represent a previously unappreciated mechanism of regulation. A third conformation of the mobile P-loop in the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complex demonstrates the participation of a previously unrecognized, conserved serine residue (S305) in mediating phosphoryl transfer. The ordering of the mobile active site lid in the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complex yields the first observation of this structural feature and provides additional insight into the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer.

  17. Coastal Ohio Wind Project for Reduced Barriers to Deployment of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Carroll, Michael

    2014-04-09

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project was created to establish the viability of wind turbines on the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project’s main goal was to improve operational unit strategies used for environmental impact assessment of offshore turbines on lake wildlife by optimizing and fusing data from the multi-instrument surveillance system and providing an engineering analysis of potential design/operational alternatives for offshore wind turbines. The project also developed a general economic model for offshore WTG deployment to quantify potential revenue losses due to wind turbine shutdown related to ice and avian issues. In a previous phase of this project (Award Number: DE-FG36-06GO86096), we developed a surveillance system that was used to collect different parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directions, and flight altitudes of nocturnal migrating species, movements of birds and bats, and bird calls for assessing patterns and peak passage rates during migration. To derive such parameters we used thermal IR imaging cameras, acoustic recorders, and marine radar Furuno (XANK250), which was coupled with a XIR3000B digitizing card from Russell Technologies and open source radR processing software. The integration yielded a development of different computational techniques and methods, which we further developed and optimized as a combined surveillance system. To accomplish this task we implemented marine radar calibration, optimization of processing parameters, and fusion of the multi-sensor data in order to make inferences about the potential avian targets. The main goal of the data fusion from the multi-sensor environment was aimed at reduction of uncertainties while providing acceptable confidence levels with detailed information about the migration patterns. Another component comprised of an assessment of wind resources in a near lake environment and an investigation of the effectiveness of ice coating materials to mitigate adverse effects of ice formation on wind turbine structures. Firstly, a Zephir LiDAR system was acquired and installed at Woodlands School in Huron, Ohio, which is located near Lake Erie. Wind resource data were obtained at ten measurement heights, 200m, 150m, 100m, 80m, 60m, 40m, 38m, 30m, 20m, and 10m. The Woodlands School’s wind turbine anemometer also measured the wind speed at the hub height. These data were collected for approximately one year. The hub anemometer data correlated well with the LiDAR wind speed measurements at the same height. The data also showed that on several days different power levels were recorded by the turbine at the same wind speed as indicated by the hub anemometer. The corresponding LiDAR data showed that this difference can be attributed to variability in the wind over the turbine rotor swept area, which the hub anemometer could not detect. The observation suggests that single point hub wind velocity measurements are inadequate to accurately estimate the power generated by a turbine at all times since the hub wind speed is not a good indicator of the wind speed over the turbine rotor swept area when winds are changing rapidly. To assess the effectiveness of ice coatings to mitigate the impact of ice on turbine structures, a closed-loop icing research tunnel (IRT) was designed and constructed. By controlling the temperature, air speed, water content and liquid droplet size, the tunnel enabled consistent and repeatable ice accretion under a variety of conditions with temperatures between approximately 0°C and -20°C and wind speeds up to 40 miles per hour in the tunnel’s test section. The tunnel’s cooling unit maintained the tunnel temperature within ±0.2°C. The coatings evaluated in the study were Boyd Coatings Research Company’s CRC6040R3, MicroPhase Coatings Inc.’s PhaseBreak TP, ESL and Flex coatings. Similar overall performance was observed in all coatings tested in that water droplets form on the test articles beginning at the stagnation region and spreading in the downstream direction in time. When comparing ice accumulation characteristics for the four coatings tested, for ice thickness during accumulation the CRC6040R3 had the least, followed by the ESL, Flex, and TP. However, when comparing the coatings’ ability to reduce ice adhesion, the Flex showed the highest adhesion reduction, followed by the ESL, TP and CRC 6040R3 coatings. The ice accumulated on the Flex coated surface shed under gravity when rotated 90 degrees following the tests while the other coatings required application of varying degrees of force to remove the ice. In conclusion, the ice coatings tested were not sufficient in preventing ice accumulation on all surfaces. However, Flex coating shows promise in mitigating ice on the rotor blades under the gravitational and centrifugal forces. Only the effect of gravity in shedding the ice was considered in this study. Further research will be needed to evaluate this coating on rotating blades in the icing tunnel to characterize its effectiveness. Lastly, the development of economic feasibility models used existing approaches adapted for offshore deployment in marine settings to one more suitable for Lake Erie deployment. Two different wind turbine models were tested and dynamic return on investment (ROI) model scenarios were generated. For the purpose of estimating power generation three bladed wind turbines of 3 MW capacity were selected including Model1- Leitwind LTW101-3.000-kW and Model2-Vostro V90-3.0 MW. The analysis were based on the revenue aspect of decision making of deploying wind turbines in the Ohio coastal region. The installation cost, maintenance and operational aspects were disregarded due to unavailability of data. The adjusted varying price (residential and industrial sector) and projected future price of electricity in different years suggested that the Leitwind model could generate $32.4 million of revenue in 25 years if the supply electricity is in the residential sector, while it would be $14.7million if the supply is in the industrial sector. For the Vostro model these figures are $28.6 million for residential sector and $12.9 million for industrial sector for 25 years.

  18. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  19. Energy savings and structural changes in the U.S. economy: Evidence from disaggregated data using decomposition techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Schipper, Lee

    2001-12-01

    During the period 1973 to 1985, the U.S. economy saved energy in virtually every sector. Much of this period of energy saving was also marked by a significant drop in the ratio of energy use to GDP. However, since 1985 there has been a slowdown in the rate of energy saving, as key energy intensities (space heating, automobile driving, etc.) have declined less rapidly since 1985 than before. This paper examines delivered (or final) energy consumption trends from the early 1970s to 1994 and provides a framework for measuring key changes that affect U.S. energy use. Starting with estimates of outputs or activity levels for thirty major energy end uses, and energy intensities of each end use, we use the Adaptive Weighted Divisia decomposition to measure the impact of changes in the structure of the U.S. economy. In contrast to many similar decomposition studies, we define measures of structural changes for both households and branches of transportation. We find that between 1973 and 1985, lower energy intensities (corrected to average winter heating demand) reduced U.S. energy uses by about 1.7% per year, while structural changes reduced energy uses by 0.4% per year. After 1985, when oil prices declined markedly, intensities fell by only 0.8% per year and structural changes actually increased energy use by 0.4% per year. In the 1990s energy intensities in some industries have even edged upward. Changes in the ratio of energy to GDP (E/GDP) are affected both by intensities and the changes in the demand for energy services relative to GDP. During the first period, from 1973 to 1985, GDP increased faster than the growth in key structural and activity parameters that determine demand for energy services (such as home area, appliance ownership, and motor vehicle use) by 1.5% per year. From 1985 to 1994 the difference dropped to less than 0.3% per year, largely due to the reversal of structural trends. Thus, the sharp fall in the rate of decline in E/GDP from -3.1% to -1.1% per year was due almost as much to structural changes as it was to the slowdown in energy intensity reduction. The analysis presented here shows why the E/GDP is an increasingly unreliable yardstick for making measurements of how the energy-economy relationship is changing: effects not related to energy efficiency per se may have roughly the same impact on that ratio as energy saving itself. Since these effects have different causes, and potentially different impacts over the long run, looking at them in the aggregate by considering only the ratio of energy use to GDP is misleading.

  20. Removal of CDP Mandrels from Sputter Coated Beryllium Capsules for NIF Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2006-12-22

    Ablative targets for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) have been fabricated by sputter coating spherical mandrels made of glow discharge polymer (GDP) with graded copper doped beryllium (Be) layers. The inner mandrel must be completely removed to meet specific ignition design requirements. The process of removing the mandrel requires elevated temperature in the presence of oxygen. However, elevating the temperature in air also oxidizes the Be and can cause blistering on the inner surface of the Be shell. This paper will discuss a refined technique, which removes the GDP mandrel without compromising the integrity of the inner Be surface. The oxygen gradient that develops during the mandrel removal and the impact of its presence will also be discussed.