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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Effect of condition monitoring on unavailability of a steam turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forced unavailability of E-production plants and the dominant components with regard to unavailability are well known if the organization involved gathers and analyses failure information for some time. For example, in the Netherlands failure information is gathered since 1976. Since 1988 until 1996 failure information was improved by discussions with personnel at the plants involved. However, the relation between forced (unplanned) unavailability and overhauls of systems and components (planned unavailability) is generally not well known. This relation in quantitative form is extremely important in order to optimize for overhauls as well as optimizing condition monitoring systems. By analysis of the cumulative number of failures as a function of time one is able to arrive at a statistical model such as a Weibull model or a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the stated conventional failure information . This model should be valid for a repairable system and should describe either infant mortality or a wear out behavior, preferably both. The model will describe the cumulative number of failures taking into account the effects of past overhauls. Overhauls may be well regarded of as opportunities to remove potential failures before they become critical.

Wels, H.C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Abstract--The unavailability of a flexible system for real-time testing of decision-support algorithms in a pre-hospital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and showed that the platform can support a quick development cycle for real-time decision-support algorithms1 Abstract--The unavailability of a flexible system for real- time testing of decision for life-saving interventions and immediate evacuation, and advises on appropriate therapeutic actions [1

3

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts.

4

EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTIN...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

111111111111111111111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTING OPTIONS This document is approved f()i puolic release per review by: er "-...

5

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 11111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT TERMINATION PROVISIONS AND CONSEQUENCES I JULY 1995 B. J. Kirby Power Systems Technology Program...

7

The effects of energy policies in China on GDP, industrial output and new energy profits1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The effects of energy policies in China on GDP, industrial output and new energy profits1 Ming-Jie Lu, C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Song Chen Abstract This paper examines the effects of energy policies and the profits of new energy companies using instruments to address the potential endogeneity of the policies

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

8

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies HF REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

9

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policies have significant impacts on diesel oil, gasoline and natural gas consumption. However, some energy The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1 Ming-Jie Lu, C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Song Chen Abstract This paper examines the effects of energy policies in China on energy

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

10

Multiple Structural Breaks in India's GDP: Evidence from India's Service Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of economists and policy makers. India was designated as an agricultural country with a highest share1 Multiple Structural Breaks in India's GDP: Evidence from India's Service Sector Purba Roy Choudhury1 Abstract: This paper takes a comprehensive investigation into India's service sector, the main

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

11

Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world -A case study on India Cline Guivarcha,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world - A case study on India Céline Guivarcha best world ­ A case study on India. Climatic Change, Volume 113, Number 2, pages 339­ 356. Abstract India, energy intensity, second-best world, power sector, reference scenario. Introduction Reference

Boyer, Edmond

12

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Bryn Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 104 WHAM WHAM Thinning Thinning Hafod Fawr TYPE Species Est Vol m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT

13

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Thinning Thinning Cgobs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 105 WHAM Thinning Cg-Radnor 01/09/13 28

14

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Thinning Clearfell Cwrt m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT

15

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 1.01 1.02 WEST ARGYLL WEST ARGYLL SALE TYPE Species Est Vol m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 1.05 NORTH HIGHLAND Thinning Morangie 5

16

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Bowling Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 103 104 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Clearfell Cc SALE TYPE Species Est Vol m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT

17

All bids must be made via the Forestry Commission's online e-sales system ( www.esales.eforestry.gov.uk ) as detailed in the general conditions of sale at the front of this catalogue. In the event that the Forestry Commission's systems are unavailable for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT) 101 102 WHAM WHAM Clearfell Thinning Bryn TYPE Species Est Vol m3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT3obs Number of Trees Mean tree size dbh Tariff Method SUPPLY PERIOD AMOUNT OFFERED (EXCLUDING VAT

18

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP from 2006 toEnergy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Achieving Chinas goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

20

The Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 to 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that structural breaks may be important. Since the economy depends heavily on oil revenue, oil price shocks haveThe Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 and the price level in the Venezuelan economy. We apply time-series econometric techniques to annual data

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Helix Dipole Movement and Conformational Variability Contribute to Allosteric GDP Release in G[alpha] Subunits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterotrimeric G proteins (Galphabetagamma) transmit signals from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream effectors through a guanine nucleotide signaling cycle. Numerous studies indicate that the carboxy-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha subunits participates in Galpha-receptor binding, and previous EPR studies suggest this receptor-mediated interaction induces a rotation and translation of the alpha5 helix of the Galpha subunit [Oldham, W. M., et al. (2006) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13, 772-777]. On the basis of this result, an engineered disulfide bond was designed to constrain the alpha5 helix of Galpha(i1) into its EPR-measured receptor-associated conformation through the introduction of cysteines at position 56 in the alpha1 helix and position 333 in the alpha5 helix (I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1)). A functional mimetic of the EPR-measured alpha5 helix dipole movement upon receptor association was additionally created by introduction of a positive charge at the amino terminus of this helix, D328R Galpha(i1). Both proteins exhibit a dramatically elevated level of basal nucleotide exchange. The 2.9 A resolution crystal structure of I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) in complex with GDP-AlF(4)(-) reveals the shift of the alpha5 helix toward the guanine nucleotide binding site that is anticipated by EPR measurements. The structure of the I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) subunit further revealed altered positions for the switch regions and throughout the Galpha(i1) subunit, accompanied by significantly elevated crystallographic temperature factors. Combined with previous evidence in the literature, the structural analysis supports the critical role of electrostatics of the alpha5 helix dipole and overall conformational variability during nucleotide release.

Preininger, Anita M.; Funk, Michael A.; Oldham, William M.; Meier, Scott M.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Adhikary, Suraj; Kimple, Adam J.; Siderovski, David P.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, Tina M.; (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. Thecommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Problem Formulations for Simulation-based Design Optimization ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 19, 2014 ... Abstract: Typical challenges of simulation-based design optimization include unavailable gradients and unreliable approximations thereof,...

Bastien Talgorn

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

CITI Program Website Downtime for Software Upgrade Starting Monday 29 July at 11 a.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight Time, the CITI Program website will be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Eastern Daylight Time, the CITI Program website will be unavailable for approximately two to three days

25

Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

Lowe, John B. (3125 Bolgos Cir., Ann Arbor, MI 48105); Lennon, Gregory (8309 Norris Canyon, Castro Valley, CA 94552); Rouquier, Sylvie (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Giorgi, Dominique (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Kelly, Robert J. (3164 Concord, Trenton, MI 48183)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving Chinas goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Thermal Conductivity of Rocks and Its Dependence Upon Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unavailable. Authors F. Birch and H. Clark Published Journal American Journal of Science, 1940 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

30

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

constraints are unavailable, or if only vertical deformation is known. The deformation source must be capable of causing broad vertical deformation with comparatively smaller...

31

An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author J.S. Crompton Organization Colorado School of Mines Published Publisher Not Provided, 1976 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrazine runoff leaching Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, lakes, or aquifers) are scant or unavailable. Surface Runoff Whenever the rate at which rainwater Source: Fridlind, Ann - Earth Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center...

33

affect business environment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

test environment configuration and utilization, lack of automation and comprehensive tooling, and the unavailability of test environments can impact the quality of testing and...

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travel restrictions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 36 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travel behavior Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 7 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travelers switzerland Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 11 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travel life-style Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 10 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 5 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - air travel business Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Program Collection: Renewable Energy ; Engineering 3 Department of Contracts and Grants Certification of Unavailability of Summary: Carrier If air travel is to be paid for...

40

The pursuit of missing information in negotiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more complete sets of information leads to better negotiatedfor unavailable information leads to better outcomes. Studyfor missing information about an issue ca n lead to higher

Young, Maia J; Bauman, Christopher W; Chen, Ning; Bastardi, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV;...

42

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

effects of fuel composition are unavailable for PM emissions from LTC modes. Assess nano-particles from LTC by comparison of particle sizes measured by scanning mobility...

43

Because It's Not There: Verbal Visuality and the Threat of Graphics in Interactive Fiction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the power of computer graphics, text still has access tothat are unavailable in graphics including visual effects.Visuality and the Threat of Graphics in Interactive Fiction

Kashtan, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Microsoft Word - Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 Table 2-3. Configuration results for the example given one pump train is unavailable. ... 24 Table 3-1. Cut set generation results...

45

Campus Profile The University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--life is their laboratory. UC San Diego is an academic powerhouse and economic engine, recognized as one of the top 10 living in San Diego (38%) 18% live in the U.S. (non-CA 1% live abroad 15% address data unavailable degree 4% degree data unavailable Private Support The UC San Diego Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3

Wang, Deli

46

Campus Profile The University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--life is their laboratory. UC San Diego is an academic powerhouse and economic engine, recognized as one of the top 10 6% address data unavailable Gender 52% men 48% women Degrees Awarded 51% received a B.A. 28% received a B.S. 20% received a graduate degree 1% degree data unavailable Private Support The UC San

Gleeson, Joseph G.

47

Monthly Planner Printed by Calendar Creator for Windows on 3/23/2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 Oracle Production Unavailable ODS Unavailable 2 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On Oracle Production Available @ 7AM ODS Available @ 7AM 3 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On 4 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On 5 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On 6 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On 7 ALL HR/ Payroll Resp. On 8 ALL HR/ Payroll

Acton, Scott

48

Renewable Energy Powered Membrane Technology. 1. Development and Characterization of a Photovoltaic Hybrid Membrane System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the unavailability of power in many such situations, renewable energy is an obvious solution to power such systems. However, renewable energy is an intermittent power supply and with regards to the performance of intermittently operated desalination systems, only...

Schfer, Andrea; Broeckmann, Andreas; Richards, Bryce

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

FRANTIC 5 (a version of FRANTIC II) : a computer code for evaluating system aging effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The FRANTIC 5 code is a modification of the FRANTIC II code for time dependent unavailability analysis. FRANTIC 5 is specially adapted for modeling the aging effects on system and component performance. The FRANTIC 5 code ...

Dimitrijevic, Vesna B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Design of a lightweight camping cot using carbon fiber tent poles and ripstop nylon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lightweight camping cot is currently unavailable in the backpacking market. Although camping cots do exist, they are not competitive in weight and size with sleeping pads typically used by campers. On average, sleeping ...

Ward, Walton (Walton Henry)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Case No. VBD-0063  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

prior complaints to NREL had been unavailing. In May 2000, Field sent three items of electronic mail to NREL officials alleging waste, fraud, and abuse on the part of Glaser...

52

PDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 9, 2010 ... techniques (see [4, 6]) while more standard technology using ...... expensive function for which derivatives are unavailable, leading in ..... elling and Optimization Proceedings of the 13th IFIP Conference, Tokyo, Japan, Aug.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Surrogate modeling for large-scale black-box systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research introduces a systematic method to reduce the complexity of large-scale blackbox systems for which the governing equations are unavailable. For such systems, surrogate models are critical for many applications, ...

Liem, Rhea Patricia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Achieving Superior Plant Energy Performance Utilizing Real-time Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. With the right Best Practices, however, using new methodologies and technologies unavailable only a few years ago, enterprises can achieve dramatic energy reductions and their resulting cost savings. These Best Practices are founded on 1) application of a...

Subramanya, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not...

57

Development of an efficient off-grid pumping system and evaporation reduction strategies to increase access to irrigation for smallholder farmers in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to the unavailability of electricity, about 85% of groundwater irrigation in eastern India employs fuel-powered surface pumps, which can have system efficiencies as low as 5%. As fuel prices continue to rise, impoverished ...

Gorbaty, Emily

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

anexo 5e produccion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

missing from the sample, because of unavailability of data, are: Afghanistan, Albania, Bosnia 198 Eyx''i5e'vyQsw...ve''syxpy'''riEsxs9P33D'ytig'' F.Arqueros 1 ,...

59

Environemental Health and Safety www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with immediate needs. There are public and private utility crews, who work to restore electricity, telephone, such as electricity, water, gas and telephone, may be unavailable for hours or weeks. You need to know how to cope

Pawlowski, Wojtek

60

A field-based study of alternative microbial indicator tests for drinking water quality in Northern Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe drinking water is essential for human survival, yet it is unavailable to over 1 billion of the world's people living in poverty (World Bank, 2009). The current methods used to identify drinking water sources are ...

O'Keefe, Samantha F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heat Balance Analysis to Validate the Heat Dissipation Rate of a Man-Made Lake as a Heat Rejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power plants were originally designed to use convenient bodies of water and cooling towers due to unavailability of these sources. Though the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has been pushing regulation that requires all new generation created...

Song, L.; Hayes, T.; Dawson, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bearings-only tracking automation for a single unmanned underwater vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unmanned underwater vehicles have various missions within civilian, military and academic sectors. They have the ability to explore areas unavailable to manned assets and to perform duties that are risky to humans. In ...

Middlebrook, Danica Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DARPA looks beyond GPS for positioning, navigating, and timing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold-atom interferometry, microelectromechanical systems, signals of opportunity, and atomic clocks are some of the technologies the defense agency is pursuing to provide precise navigation when GPS is unavailable.

Kramer, David

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

1455.ps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 14, 2006 ... Note that all calls car-. ried by a group are lost upon reassignment of the group and that the group. radio channels are unavailable during the...

65

The Motor of Growth? Parental Investment and per capita GDP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ estimates from the CIA Factbook for the percent ofsource. Sources: (a) CIA: The World Factbook (https://

Eff, E. Anthon; Rionero, Giuseppe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Between a Rock and a Soft Place: Investigating prima facie irrationality and farmers' decision-making in the cotton region of south-western Chad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

access to inputs and credit that are systemically unavailable via other crops. It will also show that social factors such as inedibility of cotton or applied informal peer-pressure to grow cotton form irrefutable elements of farmers agricultural decision...

Schnier, Matthias

2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 10: Laser Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 10: Laser Safety Laser Service Subcontractor Work is unavailable), and the subcontractor. 2 Procedures The LSO will review the work plans, provide safety oversight that on-site work will be done that requires Site-specific safety plan (SSSP) and job safety analysis

Wechsler, Risa H.

68

Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

Proven Performance of Seven Cold Climate Deep Retrofit Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven test homes located in Massachusetts are examined within this report. The retrofit strategies of each home are presented along with a comparison of the pre- and post-retrofit airtightness achieved by the group. Pre- and post-retrofit utility bills were collected; energy models were used to estimate pre-retrofit energy use when bills were unavailable.

Osser, R.; Neuhauser, K.; Ueno, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

76 Scientific AmericAn June 2009 georgeretseck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and online libraries of songs, movies, books and photo- graphs--were unavailable just a few years ago. We owe-speed communications, data processing and--perhaps most important of all but least ap- preciated--digital data storage. Each type of data storage has its Achilles' heel, however, which is why computers use several types

Robins, Gabriel

71

Are You Ready? A Texas Hurricane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dangerous than hurricanes, still can be deadly, particularly from the heavy rains, flooding and tornadoes or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks Weather Service office can also supply flood-stage data for area streams and bayous and information about

72

Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

Carlos Hojvat et al.

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

The variable and conserved interfaces of modeled olfactory receptor proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the odorants' contact residues in OR proteins remained unavailable. Due to the lack of X-ray crystallographicThe variable and conserved interfaces of modeled olfactory receptor proteins YITZHAK PILPEL models of other G-protein-coupled receptors, allows us to analyze the OR amino acid variability patterns

Church, George M.

74

Materiel Command and the Materiality of Commands: An Historical Examination of the US Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materiel Command and the Materiality of Commands: An Historical Examination of the US Air Force, University of Minnesota Abstract: In the late 1960s the US Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) engaged unavailable CDC documents, and documentation and an oral history from a leading external Air Force advisor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Administration and Finance Financial Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration and Finance Financial Services P.O. Box 6808, Fullerton, CA 92834 / T 657. Jenkins Associate Vice President of Finance SUBJECT: Finance System Oracle Upgrade The CSUF Finance System is scheduled for an Oracle upgrade in September 2009. The CMS Finance System will be unavailable beginning

de Lijser, Peter

76

Wake-on-WLAN Nilesh Mishra, Kameswari Chebrolu, Bhaskaran Raman, Abhinav Pathak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is available from the grid or through solar panels [10,11]. However since power can be unavailable from the grid for several days at a stretch, and large solar panels for extended operation can be an expen- sive of Technology, Kanpur ABSTRACT In bridging the digital divide, two important criteria are cost

Raman, Bhaskaran

77

TREE -RING RESEARCH, Vol. 59(2), 2003, pp. 63 -79 A MANUAL AND TUTORIAL FOR THE PROPER USE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. 1999). When dead trees are unavailable, timbers from historic structures can be sampled® (made in Sweden), Suunto® (Fin- land), Mattson® (United Kingdom), and Timber- line® (China). High -quality increment borers were once manufactured in Sweden by two companies, Djos® and Sandvik ®, neither

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

78

Energy and Water Flux during Terrestrial Estivation and Overland Movement in a Freshwater Turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distance gained in this energy "trade-off" fits our previous observations that more tur- tles estivate when, energy allocated to one function is typically unavailable for others. Owing to these trade of energy trade-offs are for reproductive effort, where individuals may cease foraging and expend variable

Canberra, University of

79

Percolated water can leach undesirable chemical compounds below the rooting zone of plants and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the collection of rainstorm-generated runoff from a par- ticular area (a catchment) in order to provide water, lakes, or aquifers) are scant or unavailable. Surface Runoff Whenever the rate at which rainwater over the surface. Where the surface is not perfectly flat and smooth, the excess water collects

80

Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving Minkyong Kim, Jeffrey J. Fielding the actual locations are often unavailable, they use estimated locations from war driving estimated through war driving. War driving is the process of collecting Wi-Fi beacons by driving or walking

Kotz, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Precise Enforcement of Progress-Sensitive Security Scott Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise Enforcement of Progress-Sensitive Security Scott Moore Harvard University Aslan Askarov-security (e.g., public or trusted) information. Our system is parameterized on a termination oracle of a program, then an attacker may be able to make a system unavail- able, by causing a server loop to exit (e

Chong, Stephen

82

Not Quickly, Just in Time: Improving the Timeliness and Reliability of Control Traffic in Utility Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

networks, that interconnect the CI facil- ities (e.g., transformation substations). This communication company (e.g., transformation substations), but in a distributed way with systems and applications often] and unavailability may become even more frequent due to denial-of-service attacks (DoS), e.g., ex- ecuted as cyber

Correia, Miguel

83

Closed-form Solutions to a Subclass of Continuous Stochastic Games via Symbolic Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a continuous state generalisation of matching pennies, binary option valuation and robust energy production optimisation, a problem for which closed- form solutions are generally unavailable. We present an exact closed stochastic games provide a convenient framework with which to model robust sequential optimisation in ad

Sanner, Scott

84

Volume 8, Number 2, Fall 2011 RE S E A R C H  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there are a lot of poor people in India. We can improve life and even save lives by providing a low cost power solu- tion for the masses in rural areas where grid power is unreliable and frequently unavailable this February between SFU, the City of Surrey and Luminous Power Technologies, a leading power solutions pro

85

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Child Care Programs for Contractor NIH Back-up Care Program NIH has contracted with Bright Horizons to offer the NIH Community access to back-up care when they need to be at work and their regular child or adult/elder care is unavailable. The NIH Community has access to the following back-up care

Baker, Chris I.

86

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Child Care Programs For Fellow/Trainee NIH Back-up Care Program NIH has contracted with Bright Horizons to offer the NIH Community access to back-up care when they need to be at work and their regular child or adult/elder care is unavailable. The NIH Community has access to the following back-up care

Baker, Chris I.

87

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Child Care Programs For Other Employment Status NIH Back-up Care Program NIH has contracted with Bright Horizons to offer the NIH Community access to back-up care when they need to be at work and their regular child or adult/elder care is unavailable. The NIH Community has access to the following back

Baker, Chris I.

88

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Child Care Programs for Federal Employee NIH Back-up Care Program NIH has contracted with Bright Horizons to offer the NIH Community access to back-up care when they need to be at work and their regular child or adult/elder care is unavailable. The NIH Community has access to the following back-up care

Baker, Chris I.

89

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services Child Care Programs For Volunteer NIH Back-up Care Program NIH has contracted with Bright Horizons to offer the NIH Community access to back-up care when they need to be at work and their regular child or adult/elder care is unavailable. The NIH Community has access to the following back-up care programs

Baker, Chris I.

90

Towards an Evaluation Framework for Business Process Integration and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the unavailability of an evaluation frame- work which provides methods for the economic-oriented assessmentTowards an Evaluation Framework for Business Process Integration and Management Bela Mutschler is the accomplishment of economic-oriented assessments of such approaches. Currently, there exists no suitable eval

Ulm, Universitt

91

FLASH: A rapid method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices Andres W. Martinez, Scott T. Phillips, Benjamin J. Wiley, Malancha Gupta and George M. Whitesides*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-defined hydro- phobic barriers of photoresist (as small as 200 mm); the hydro- phobic barriers extend through and hotplate are unavailable). The method provides channels in paper with dimensions as small as 200 mm). The method is compatible with small pieces of paper (i.e., 0.5 in2 ) as well as large (8.5 in ? 11 in

Prentiss, Mara

92

CORBA-JS: An Open-Standards Framework for Distributed Object Computing over the Web Tejal B. Parulekar1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORBA-JS: An Open-Standards Framework for Distributed Object Computing over the Web Tejal B technological limitations, DOC was traditionally unavailable in Web-based applications (i.e., stateful applications that communicate over HTTP, and are accessible via a Web browser) without the use of proprietary

Zhou, Yaoqi

93

Performance-directed site selection system of AADMLSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as long response time and service unavailability. The utilization of multiple servers can be used to reduce adverse impacts. The challenge is to identify a good resource site to allocate to the user given a group of servers from which to select...

Prajugo, Mieke

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Approximations for Explanations of Inconsistency in Partially Known Multi-Context Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology Favoritenstrasse 11, A-1040 Vienna, Austria {eiter,fink,schueller}@kr.tuwien.ac.at Abstract. Multi such systems useless. In addition, it is likely that complete knowledge about all system parts is unavailable renders an MCS useless. To make bridge rules defeasible, similarly as in [5], may help to avoid inconsis

Fink, Michael

95

Improved ITO thin lms with a thin ZnO buffer layer by sputtering X.W. Suna,*, L.D. Wangb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

semiconductor. It is ubiquitous in all kinds of ¯at panel displays and solar cells, and it is commercially. With the progress of ¯at panel display technology, much lower resistivity (more ®ne lines) is needed to decrease, at least for the time being, all these crystalline substrates are expensive in price, are unavailable

Kwok, Hoi S.

96

Please print your full name exactly as it appears on your passport or birth certificate. We cannot issue your immigration document (I-20 or DS-2019) until we receive this form from you. Please complete both sides of the form and attach all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please print your full name exactly as it appears on your passport or birth certificate. We cannot passport identification page or if your passport is unavailable, a copy of your birth certificate. Are you identification page or birth certificate. Please complete: I plan to come alone. I plan to bring the following

97

Pandemic Flu: What To Know and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cough or sneeze Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it Ifor sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. If a tissue is unavailable, cough or sneeze into your shoulder or elbow instead sick children at home. ­ If you have flu-like symptoms (fever with cough or sore throat), stay home

Tipple, Brett

98

IDENTITY GUIDELINES Natural Environment Research Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-colour reproduction is unavailable. A reverse version can be used on dark backgrounds or images where colour a dark background image or pattern you will need a mono-negative version.These need to be custom: www.nerc.ac.uk/about/enquiries/logos/web/guidelines/ #12;Logo files NERC logo files should

Brierley, Andrew

99

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling's personal copy Doped sulfone electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cell applications Xiaoguang Sun, C. Austen unavailable as solvents for ambient temperature electrochemistry because of their high melting points

Angell, C. Austen

100

Development of a High Efficiency Ceiling Fan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of ceiling fans to improve comfort during the cooling season is well documented (Rohles et al.. 1983; Fairey et al.. 1986). There are at least two cases: In the first where air conditioning is unavailable, adding ceiling fans may...

Parker, D. S.; Callahan, M. P.; Sonne, J. K.; Su, G. H.; Hibbs, B. D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu, Qinghua Zheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Learning Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, qhzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Abstract. Deep web refers to the hidden part of the Web that remains unavailable for standard Web crawlers. To obtain content of Deep Web is challenging and has been acknowledged

Shamos, Michael I.

102

Centre International de Recherches sur l'Environnement et le Dveloppement ENPC & CNRS (UMR 8568) / EHESS / AGROPARISTECH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

show that when the risk that the CO2 price drops to zero and the political unavailability of a CO2 tax an additional instrument encouraging the reduction of emissions, for instance a renewable energy subsidy. Our uncertainty on energy demand and focus on instruments for emission reduction. · We analyze the economic

Boyer, Edmond

103

The Lack of Long Range Correlations is a Necessary Condition for a Functional Biologically Active Protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study random heteropolymer chain with gaussian distribution of kinds of monomers. The long-range correlations between kinds of monomers were introduce. The mean-field analysis of such heteropolymer indicates the existence of infinite energetic barrier between heteropolymer random coil and frozen states. Thus, the frozen state is kinetically unavailable for the random heteropolymer with power-law correlations in monomers' sequence. The relationship between our results and some early obtained results for the DNA intrones sequences are discussed.

E. Sh. Mamasakhlisov; V. F. Morozov; M. S. Shahinian

1998-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Page 1 of 4 Soil pH; What Is the Big Deal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deficiencies. The availability of #12;Page 2 of 4 our major nutrients, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous is considered optimum at a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. At pH below 6.0 phosphorous can bond with aluminum and iron and at pH above 7.5 it can bond with calcium; both situations can lead to phosphorous being unavailable

Watson, Craig A.

105

Amikacin pharmacokinetics and the effects of ambient temperature on the dosage regimen in ball pythons (Python reguis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

administered intramuscularly in ball pythons and housed at 37'C. (Peak to trough therapeutic range for amikacin is 25 to 2 p. g/ml) 20 Figure 4. Time-elimination curve for amikacin administered intramuscularly (IM) in ball pythons housed at 25'C . 21..., pharmacokinetic studies with exotic species of animals are seldom funded, and animals often are unavailable. This makes the collection of information very difficult. Therapeutic antimicrobial regimens for snakes are important because of the impact of bacterial...

Johnson, James Harvey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

The effects of source of supplemental protein on intake and digestibility in calves grazing bermudagrass pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION The Bovine, a ruminant, has the ability to largely obtain its nutrients from forages. The presence of a large reticulo-rumen inhabited by microbes allows the ruminant to fermentatively obtain energy from plant cells otherwise unavailable... to the animal. This microbial digestion, coupled with extensive resident time in the reticulo-rumen, allows the animal to efficiently digest forages of high cell wall content. However, a forage diet of high cell wall content is not conducive to high animal...

Martin, Steven David

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressures )( p by conventional well tests due to very low permeabilities. Decline curves for conventional gas, when applied on shale gas reservoirs, can not be validated by material balance due to unavailability of average reservoir pressure. However...* variable rate gas BDF including adsorbed gas exhibiting exponential decline (b = 1)................. 25 4.6 Plot of [m(pi )? m(pwf )] / qg(t) vs material balance pseudo time tca*, xii FIGURE...

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Globalization and Developing Countries - a Shrinking Tax Base ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VAT/GDP Seigniorage/GDP Tariff/GDP Repression/GDP Total Tax/S.D. Min Max Correlations: Taxes VAT Seign. Tariff RepressSeigniorage/GDP Tariff/GDP Repression/GDP Total Tax/GDP

Aizenman, Joshua; Jinjarak, Yothin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality...

110

Beyond GDP: Measuring and achieving global genuine progress Ida Kubiszewski a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Public Policy, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia b Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA, United States c Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia d Center for Sustainable Economy

Vermont, University of

111

Newsfront 4-10 February 2008, Issue 52  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coupled with shortage of diesel, has already compelled some hotels in the capital to warn their guests that they may not be able to serve running hot water as the temperature in the capital threatens to touch the zero Celsius. The grim power situation... others, across the country, have cut down their produc- tion hours and targets, as a result of the power shortage. The alternative source of power, diesel, has become unavailable for ordinary consumers. Moreover, having to run generator on diesel is more...

Ghimire, Yubaraj

112

Modeling of air currents in the Gulf Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability modeled the wind flow in the Gulf Region in order to make projections of the Kuwait oil fires pollution dispersion. Extensive meteorological models incorporating explicit terrain influences to the flow fields were routinely employed through a six month international assessment support effort organized by the World Meteorological Organization and US scientific research agencies. Results show generally close agreement with visible imagery of the smoke plumes as detected by meteorological satellites. However, there are some examples of significant disagreement or failure of the meteorological models. These failures are most likely directly linked to missing or unavailable weather observations.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Foster, C.S.; Foster, K.T.; Baskett, R.L.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

Leigh, Richard J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Bus transfer analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An analog analysis of transient heat flow by radiation and conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, called a varistor, exhibits the following voltage-current relation- ship: e =at where a and b are constants. According to Ohm's law e 1 R Then Equation [11] can be expressed as b e=a( ? ) e R or 1 b-1 R = (a) (e) [12] Comparing Equations [10..., in order to satisfy Equation [10]. The resistance R can then be deter- f mined as 4 -3 Rf=a es [1 5] 23 A varistor for which the constant b was exactly 0. 25 was unavail- able, so the circuit of Figure 8 was used for R, . The value of the linear 1...

Gorman, David N

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Expert opinion in risk analysis; The NUREG-1150 methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk analysis of nuclear power generation often requires the use of expert opinion to provide probabilistic inputs where other sources of information are unavailable or are not cost effective. In the Reactor Rise Reference Document (NUREG-1150), a methodology for the collection of expert opinion was developed. The resulting methodology presented by the author involves a ten-step process: selection of experts, selection of issues, preparation of issue statements, elicitation training, preparation of expert analyses by panel members, discussion of analyses, elicitation, recomposition and aggregation, and review by the panel members. These steps were implemented in a multiple meeting format that brought together experts from a variety of work places.

Hora, S.C.; Iman, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method for reliability analysis of complex reactor systems. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and a computer code for efficient and accurate reliability analyses of complex reactor systems are described and illustrated through an example. The method permits realistic analyses through its ability to accurately model and evaluate instantaneous and average unavailabilities for large systems with dependencies. The component models can include continuously monitored, non-repairable, and periodically tested components which are subject to failures resulting from components which are subject to failures resulting from component demands, stand-by conditions, human errors associated with testing and repair, as well as failures during actual operation. The numerical process used is efficient and allows analysis of general system configurations with arbitrary scheduling of maintenance operations.

Elerath, J.G.; Vaurio, J.K.; Wood, A.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Multi-Scale Conservation in an Altered Landscape: The Case of the Endangered Arroyo Toad in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Maxie Richmond, Adam Siade, Colleen Wisinski, and Dustin Wood also became good friends during my time in California. My doctoral work would not have been possible without extensive financial support. I owe great thanks to the Applied Biodiversity.../pseudoabsence data (e.g., Hernandez et al. 2008, Senay et al. 2013). Pseudoabsences are used when true absence data are unavailable, and they are acquired by sampling locations from the study region that lack locality records (Peterson et al. 2011). In my models I...

Treglia, Michael Louis

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Updated radiological dose assessment of Bikini and Eneu Islands at Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a continuing effort to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Radionuclide concentration data developed at Bikini Atoll since 1977 have been used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to develop the annual dose rate and 30- and 50-y integral doses presented here for Bikini and Eneu Island living patterns. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant exposure pathway--it contributes more than 50% of the total dose--and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation. Cesium-137 produces more than 85% of the predicted dose; /sup 90/Sr is the second most significant radionuclide; /sup 60/Co contributes to the external gamma exposure in varying degrees, but is a small part of the total predicted dose; the transuranic radionuclides contribute a small portion of the total predicted lung and bone doses but do present a long-term source of exposure. Maximum annual dose rates for Bikini Island are about 1 rem/y for the whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and about 1.9 rem/y when imports are unavailable. Maximum annual dose rates for Eneu Island when imports are available are 130 mrem/y for the whole body and 136 mrem/y for bone marrow. Similar doses when imported foods are unavailable are 245 and 263 mrem/y, respectively. The 30-y integral doses for Bikini Island are about 23 rem for whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and more than 40 rem when imports are unavailable. The Eneu Island 30-y integral doses for whole body and bone marrow are about 3 rem when imports are available and 5.5 and 6.1 rem, respectively, when imports are unavailable. Doses from living patterns involving some combination of Bikini and Eneu Islands fall between the doses listed above for each island separately.

Robison, W.L.; Mount, M.E.; Phillips, W.A.; Stuart, M.L.; Thompson, S.E.; Conrado, C.L.; Stoker, A.C.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Price discrimination and limits to arbitrage: An analysis of global LNG markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ful?lling properties. 2 large-scale emergence of shale gas over the last few years has put strong downward pressure on US natural gas prices. Second, the US at present only has very limited LNG export capability; its infrastructure still re?ects the assumption... -seller pairings, but information on such individual transactions is generally unavailable. Also widely reported is an LNG price based on the Japanese Crude Cocktail (JCC); this re?ects oil-linked pric- ing formulae that underlie long-term supply contracts? rather...

Ritz, Robert A.

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Azygos Tip Placement for Hemodialysis Catheters in Patients with Superior Vena Cava Occlusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic central venous access is necessary for numerous life-saving therapies. Repeated access is complicated by thrombosis and occlusion of the major veins, such as the superior vena cava (SVC), which then require novel vascular approaches if therapy is to be continued. We present two cases of catheterization of the azygos system in the presence of an SVC obstruction. We conclude that the azygos vein may be used for long-term vascular access when other conduits are unavailable and that imaging studies such as magnetic resonance venography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography or conventional venography can be employed prior to the procedure to aid with planning and prevent unforeseen complications.

Wong, Jeffrey J.; Kinney, Thomas B. [University of California, Department of Radiology (United States)], E-mail: tbkinney@ucsd.edu

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

Leung, V.T.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

TAUOVERSUPERMON: LOW-OVERHEAD ONLINE PARALLEL PERFORMANCE MONITORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Online or Real-time application performance monitoring allows tracking performance characteristics during execution as opposed to doing so post-mortem. This opens up several possibilities otherwise unavailable such as real-time visualization and application performance steering that can be useful in the context of long-running applications. Two fundamental components that constitute such a performance monitor are the measurement and transport systems. The former captures performance metrics of individual contexts (processes, threads). The latter enables querying the parallel/distributed state from the different contexts and also allows measurement control. As HPC systems grow in size and complexity, the key challenge is to keep the online performance monitor scalable and low overhead while still providing a useful performance reporting capability. We adapt and combine two existing, mature systems - Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) and Supermon - to address this problem. Tau performs the measurement while Supermon is used to collect the distributed measurement state. Our experiments show that this novel approach of using a cluster-monitor, Supermon, as the transport for online performance data from Tau leads to very low-overhead application monitoring as well as other beneits unavailable from using a traditional transport such as NFS.

SOTTILE, MATTHEW JOSEPH [Los Alamos National Laboratory; NATARAJ, AROON [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MALONY, ALLEN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MORRIS, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SHENDE, SAMEER [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Compactness of Urban Growth, the Environment, and the Quality of Life: Evidence from China, 2000-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY gdp Energy Consumption per GDP unit ton standardthe declining of per-GDP-unit energy consumption and carbonenergy consumption per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) unit,

Yuan, Quan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final energy per GDP decreased considerably inper unit of GDP. Final energy per GDP decreased considerablysubstantial decline in final energy demand per unit of GDP.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, aged to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs Ambient conditions of still air at 50F (10C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70F (21C), 60F (16C), and 40F (4C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80F (27C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Statistical analysis of cascading failures in power grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a new microscopic model of cascading failures in transmission power grids. This model accounts for automatic response of the grid to load fluctuations that take place on the scale of minutes, when optimum power flow adjustments and load shedding controls are unavailable. We describe extreme events, caused by load fluctuations, which cause cascading failures of loads, generators and lines. Our model is quasi-static in the causal, discrete time and sequential resolution of individual failures. The model, in its simplest realization based on the Directed Current description of the power flow problem, is tested on three standard IEEE systems consisting of 30, 39 and 118 buses. Our statistical analysis suggests a straightforward classification of cascading and islanding phases in terms of the ratios between average number of removed loads, generators and links. The analysis also demonstrates sensitivity to variations in line capacities. Future research challenges in modeling and control of cascading outages over real-world power networks are discussed.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pfitzner, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

aMCfast: automation of fast NLO computations for PDF fits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the interface between MadGraph5_aMC@NLO, a self-contained program that calculates cross sections up to next-to-leading order accuracy in an automated manner, and APPLgrid, a code that parametrises such cross sections in the form of look-up tables which can be used for the fast computations needed in the context of PDF fits. The main characteristic of this interface, which we dub aMCfast, is its being fully automated as well, which removes the need to extract manually the process-specific information for additional physics processes, as is the case with other matrix element calculators, and renders it straightforward to include any new process in the PDF fits. We demonstrate this by studying several cases which are easily measured at the LHC, have a good constraining power on PDFs, and some of which were previously unavailable in the form of a fast interface.

Valerio Bertone; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Juan Rojo; Mark Sutton

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Application of probabilistic safety assessment models to risk-based inspection of piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the beginning, one of the most useful applications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is its use in evaluating the risk importance of changes to plant design, operations, or other plant conditions. Risk importance measures the impact of a change on the risk. Risk is defined as a combination of the likelihood of failure and consequence of the failure. The consequence can be safety system unavailability, core melt frequency, early release, or various other consequence measures. The goal in this PSA application is to evaluate the risk importance of an ISI process, as applied to plant piping systems. Two approaches can be taken in this evaluation: Current PSA Approach or the Blended Approach. Both are discussed here.

Chapman, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Distributed video coding for arrays of remote sensing nodes : final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the Sandia National Laboratory funded Student Fellowship position at New Mexico State University (NMSU) from 2008 to 2010. Ivan Mecimore, the PhD student in Electrical Engineering at NMSU, was conducting research into image and video processing techniques to identify features and correlations within images without requiring the decoding of the data compression. Such an analysis technique would operate on the encoded bit stream, potentially saving considerable processing time when operating on a platform that has limited computational resources. Unfortunately, the student has elected in mid-year not to continue with his research or the fellowship position. The student is unavailable to provide any details of his research for inclusion in this final report. As such, this final report serves solely to document the information provided in the previous end of year summary.

Mecimore, Ivan (New Mexico State University); Creusere, Chuck D. (New Mexico State University); Merchant, Bion John

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Second Law Comparisons of Volumetric and Flame Combustion in an Ideal Engine with Exhaust Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We summarize the results of a theoretical second law (exergy) analysis of an idealized internal combustion engine operating in flame versus volumetric (e.g., HCCI-like) combustion modes. We also consider the impact of exhaust heat recovery. Our primary objective is to better understand the fundamental differences (if any) in thermodynamic irreversibility among these different combustion modes and the resulting impact on engine work output. By combustion irreversibility, we mean that portion of the fuel energy that becomes unavailable for producing useful work due to entropy generation in the combustion process, exclusive of all other heat and friction losses. A key question is whether or not volumetric combustion offers any significant irreversibility advantage over conventional flame combustion. Another key issue is how exhaust heat recovery would be expected to change the net work output of an ideal piston engine. Based on these results, we recommend specific research directions for improving the fuel efficiency of advanced engines.

Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Graves, Ronald L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Office of the Registrar The University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS/EDUCATION AREA *4.324 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.326 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.328 69 CWS/LM/Wb *4.330 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.332 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.336 16 Bb/MC/SEM/TBL *4.338 20 BbLM/MC/SEM/TBL *4.340 20 Bb/LM/MC/SEM/TBL 4.342 20 Bb/LM/MC/SEM/TBL 4.344 40 LM/MC/TBL/Wb 4.346 16 Bb/MC/SEM/TBL 4.348 56 LM/MC/TBL/Wb * Unavailable

Johnston, Daniel

137

Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-17, Ookayama, Meguro-ku 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

138

Bent-housing turbodrills improve hard-formation directional drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in the design of turbine-powered downhole motors allowed steerable drilling in a hard formation at a high rate of penetration (ROP). Drilling in this dolomite formation with the rotary or with positive-displacement motors (PDMs) was slow during steering operations. Shell's solution to the steering penetration rate problems was to change the well plans if suitable directional drilling tools weren't available. Where possible, the wells were designed with the Zechstein interval drilled as a tangent section with non-steerable turbodrills. However, a better solution was the use of a steerable turbodrill-a tool unavailable on the market at that time. The paper describes motor development, a field test, and the design and operation of the motor.

Koot, L.; Koole, K. (Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, Lowestoft (United Kingdom)); Gaynor, T. (Neyrfor-Weir Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Theoretical studies of the atomic transitions in boron-like ions: Mg VIII, Si X and S XII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we have carried out the calculations of the weighted oscillator strengths and the transition probabilities for a few low-lying transitions of boron-like ions: Mg VIII, Si X and S XII which are astrophysically important, particularly, in the atmospheres of the solar corona. We have employed an all-order relativistic many-body theory called the relativistic coupled-cluster theory to calculate very precisely these atomic quantities of astrophysical interest. We have reported for the first time the transition probabilities for some forbidden transitions which are unavailable in the literature; either theoretically or experimentally. We also discuss the physical effects associated with these transitions. Our data can be used for the identification of spectral lines arising from the coronal atmospheres of Sun and Sun-like stars having an extended corona.

H. S. Nataraj; B. K. Sahoo; B. P. Das; R. K. Chaudhuri; D. Mukherjee

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

A RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability) analysis of Consolidated Edison's Gowanus and Narrows gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented which accurately assesses the ability of gas turbine generating stations to perform their intended function (reliability) while operating in a peaking duty mode. The developed methodology alloys the RAM modeler to calculate the probability that a peaking unit will produce the energy demanded and in turn calculate the total energy lost during a given time period due to unavailability of individual components. The methodology was applied to Consolidated Edison's Narrows site which has 16 barge-mounted General Electric Frame 5 gas turbines operating under a peaking duty mode. The resulting RAM model was quantified using the Narrows site power demand and failure rate data. The model was also quantified using generic failure data from the Operational Reliability Analysis Program (ORAP) for General Electric Frame 5 peaking gas turbines. A problem description list and counter measures are offered for components contributing more than one percent to gas turbine energy loss. 3 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.

Johnson, B.W.; Whitehead, T.J.; Derenthal, P.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO[sub 3]/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Predicting viscosities of aqueous salt mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viscosity plays an important role in quantifying heat and mass transfer rates as depicted in theoretical and semi-empirical correlations. In practical problems where extreme temperatures and solute concentrations are encountered, viscosity data is usually unavailable. At these conditions, no dependable correlation appears to exist in the literature. This paper uses the hole type model to predict the viscosity of aqueous electrolytes containing single and mixed salts up to the molten salt regime. This model needs two parameters which can be evaluated from sparse data. For LiBr/water and (Li, K, na) NO{sub 3}/water mixtures, it is shown that the agreement between predicted and experimental values is very good over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The deviation between these two values was found to be less than 9%.

Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace.

Bucci, R.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

Ball, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy policy in Iran: domestic choices and international implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book assesses energy-demand patterns, evaluates major energy supply sources, and recommends policy guidelines intended to comprise an integrated national energy plan for Iran. The book also provides some insights for other developing countries facing similar energy options and serves as a reminder that Iran, in addition to the strategic importance of its geography, remains a potential force in international energy markets. The general policy guidelines the author proposes are: (1) to expand domestic natural gas consumption; (2) promote the use of liquefied-petroleum gas where natural gas is unavailable; (3) cancel the nuclear power program; (4) develop hydropower resources; (5) prepare an inventory of oil and gas resources; (6) hold natural gas until world prices justify exporting surpluses; (7) encourage conservation; (8) expand electric power systems; (9) coordinate national planning; (10) monitor advanced energy-technology development; (11) expand manpower training; and (12) limit petrochemical programs until they are fully assessed. 41 tables.

Mossavar-Rahjmani, B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Automatic Labeling for Entity Extraction in Cyber Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Timely analysis of cyber-security information necessitates automated information extraction from unstructured text. While state-of-the-art extraction methods produce extremely accurate results, they require ample training data, which is generally unavailable for specialized applications, such as detecting security related entities; moreover, manual annotation of corpora is very costly and often not a viable solution. In response, we develop a very precise method to automatically label text from several data sources by leveraging related, domain-specific, structured data and provide public access to a corpus annotated with cyber-security entities. Next, we implement a Maximum Entropy Model trained with the average perceptron on a portion of our corpus (~750,000 words) and achieve near perfect precision, recall, and accuracy, with training times under 17 seconds.

Bridges, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Jones, Corinne L [ORNL] [ORNL; Iannacone, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Testa, Kelly M [ORNL] [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRICAL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM TO SELECTED PORTIONS OF THE NUCLEAR HVAC SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design requirement probability of 0.01 or less in a 4-hour period ensures that the nuclear heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in the primary confinement areas of the Dry Transfer Facilities (DTFs) and Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) is working during a Category 1 drop event involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) assemblies (BSC 2004a , Section 5.1.1.48). This corresponds to an hourly HVAC failure rate of 2.5E-3 per hour or less, which is contributed to by two dominant causes: equipment failure and loss of electrical power. Meeting this minimum threshold ensures that a Category 1 initiating event followed by the failure of HVAC is a Category 2 event sequence. The two causes for the loss of electrical power include the loss of offsite power and the loss of onsite power distribution. Thus, in order to meet the threshold requirement aforementioned, the failure rate of mechanical equipment, loss of offsite power, and loss of onsite power distribution must be less than or equal to 2.5E-3 per hour for the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF. The loss of offsite power occurs at a frequency of 1.1E-5 per hour (BSC 2004a, Section 5.1.1.48). The purpose of this analysis is to determine the probability of occurrence of the unavailability of the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF due to loss of electrical power. In addition, this analysis provides insights on the contribution to the unavailability of the HVAC system due to equipment failure. The scope of this analysis is limited to finding the frequency of loss of electrical power to the nuclear HVAC system in the primary confinement areas of the DTFs and FHF.

N. Ramirez

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Scenario E3 Max Tech Wind Power Nuclear Power NG Fired CCcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GWcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GW

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation Growth Demand Side Management Industrial Sectortechnology and demand side management. For electricity

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring theand improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring thethe coal share of total electricity generation will drop to

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heater Residential CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) 2020 ResidentialEnergy Industrial Sector CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) IndustrialFigure 5. Power Sector CO2 Emissions by Scenario E3 Max Tech

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) % of Installed Capacity Decarbonization (Fuel Switching) & Coal Tech Switching Demand Reduction

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (MER*) (2009) *Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (PPP**) **PurchasingNorth West China's Energy Consumption per Unit of GDP Energy

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

final energy per /industrial share of regional GDP (NBSfinal energy use per unit of industrial GDP produced. Evenbuildings, energy use per unit of industrial GDP, and CO 2

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Historical Primary Energy Per GDP and Per11 Historical Primary Energy per GDP and perHistorical Primary Energy Per GDP and Per capita Population

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Causes of Trade Globalization: A Political-Economy and World-Systems Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per

Kwon, Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (???Announcement of Energy Consumption per Unit GDP and OtherSystem for Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP, November 11,

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

targets over their energy per GDP intensity. However, littleefficiency. Only total energy per GDP was available for useintensities (Energy Consumption per $ GDP or $ PPP), are

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity of GDP (energy per unit GDP) and the carbonand per- capita GDP, but also by unanticipated global increases in the energyg = G/P is per-capita GDP, e = E/G is energy intensity of

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D P ) inhowever, primary energy supply per GDP decelerated a declineattention to primary energy supply per GDP, per capita GDP

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inof 2008 Primary Energy Consumption and GDP Per Capita Canadause and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% bygrowth (GDP per capita). Base case unit energy consumption (

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in China, energy intensity per GDP decreased steeply betweenterms of energy consumption per unit of GDP, by 20% between

Haya, Barbara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The causes and consequences of tax policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state capacity. GDP per energy unit: Economic activityCorrelation (p-value) GDP per energy unit Forest Area

Weller, Nicholas William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Tax Man Cometh: Income Taxation as a Measure of State Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state capacity. GDP per energy unit: Economic activityvalue) Indicator GDP per energy unit Average Correlation (p-

Weller, Nick; Ziegler, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Where can I find free economic forecasts? Economic forecasts have become an integral part of business and individual investment decisions. Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Conference Board provides short term (quarterly and annual) forecasts for real GDP, real consumer spending include (among others): GDP and real GDP, price indices for GDP and consumer spending, unemployment are projections of economic activity including GDP growth. These reports can be found on-line at: http

Johnson, Eric E.

168

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activity, 2005-06 8India's GDP, with 54% in 2005-06 (MOSPI, 2007b) and is alsoby Economic Activity, 2005-06 GDP Share AAGR (billion of GDP

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fiscal fragility: what the past may say about the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real interest rates and GDP growth rate. For a given future projectedit with the projected debt to GDP ratio. Real rates forit with the projected debt to GDP ratio. Real rates for

Aizenman, Joshua; Pasricha, Gurnain Kaur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use CO 2 /GDP Primary Energy Consumption/capita Final Energylevel indicators Primary Energy Consumption/GDP Final Energyavg-unweighted Primary Energy Consumption/GDP kgce/RMB

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations over Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Procyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP MonetaryProcyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP PC of MI & ERSFiscal Procyclicality Oil Shock Total Reserve/GDP Monetary

Aizenman, Joshua; Chinn, Menzie David; Ito, Hiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Key China Energy Statistics 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (2008) tce/thousandTotal Primary Energy Production per GDP (PPP*) tce/thousand2008) Energy-Related CO 2 Emissions per GDP (2008) kg CO 2 /

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i.e. , overall energy or CO2 per unit GDP, city greenhouseenergy use per unit of manufacturing value added GDP ?energy use and CO 2 emissions per unit of manufacturing GDP

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steel, or M J of energy per dollar of GDP. The currentCommercial sector energy per dollar of GDP declinedmeasured by energy use per unit of GDP, is an intensive

Harris, Jeff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators ( ???Statistics on Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP. 2006,tce/10,000 RMB Energy Consumption per unit of GDP (tonne of

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between energy use per capita and GDP per capita, theof production of energy per capita to GDP per capita was .26Decoupling of energy use and GDP per capita has occurred in

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial Energy Consumed per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 5. TotalCommercial Energy Consumption per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 * 1.Commercial Energy Consumption per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 * (

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy intensity (energy per unit GDP) in the 11 th FYP. Forintensity (total energy per unit GDP)  industrial energyof total (primary) energy per unit GDP in fixed 2005 RMB [

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily, 2007. Energy consumption per unit GDP down 1.23%increase in energy use per unit of GDP after 2002 following2006, the energy consumption per unit of GDP declined 1.23%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 per unit GDP, CO2 per capita, energy structure, etc.Aggregated: energy or CO 2 per unit GDP, energy or CO 2 perper unit GDP Introduction Local level action and leadership are crucial for saving energy and

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ton of steel, or MJ of energy per dollar of GDP. The current2 Commercial sector energy per dollar of GDP declinedmeasured by energy use per unit of GDP, is an intensive

Harris, Jeffrey; Diamond, Rick; Iyer, Maithili; Payne, Christopher; Blumstein, Carl; Siderius, Hans-Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Primary energy supply per unit of GDP (excluding biomass;is defined as energy use per unit of GDP and is an aggregateenergy sector. Much of the variations of CO 2 emissions per unit of GDP

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with4: International trends in energy and GDP per capita, with38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% between20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010. China'sincrease in energy use per unit of GDP after 2002 following

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result, energy use per unit of GDP (energy intensity)a rebound in energy use per unit of GDP after 2001, afterresidual energy use in industry per unit of GDP (economic

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily. 2007. Energy consumption per unit GDP down 1.23% inintensity: the amount of energy consumed per unit GDP. IPCC:2006, the energy consumption per unit of GDP declined 1.23%

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 4B.11. Energy Intensity per GDP Unit Table 4B.12.Table 4B.11. Energy Intensity per GDP Unit Table 4B.12.Xinjiang Energy Consumption per GDP Value Changes (%) (

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research Institutes energy demand model (CERI, 2009): GDP growth, persons perenergy-environment modeling. 1 Major drivers are economic activity (household income, GDP growth and GDP per

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial Sector ? Primary energy per unit GDP ? CO 2indicators ? Primary energy per unit GDP ? CO 2 per unitper unit GDP ? Primary energy per capita ? CO 2 per capita

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decrease in energy consumption per unit GDP in the "Eleventh40-50% reduction in energy consumption per unit GDP by 2020measured by energy consumption per unit GDP in the The 11th

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years if amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inyears if amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inin the amount of energy consumed per unit GDP; on the other

Levine, Mark D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reducing its energy use per unit of GDP by 20% betweenreduce energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP)as energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP), by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP by...

194

Electric Propulsion for Cars: New Directions for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4 5 · freight;Oil Use vs GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4 5 consumption #12;Oil Use vs GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4

Firestone, Jeremy

195

DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m{sup 3} of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Accelerator Sources for THz science: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free Electron Lasers have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of FELs and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FELs are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the millimeter region to the hard x-ray using direct current and rf linear accelerators or storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Operation of FELs in the far infrared to terahertz regime poses special challenges which have been and are being addressed at a number of facilities around the world. This paper will review a number of former and existing FELs operating in this regime and discuss future efforts. Broadband collective radiation from relativistic electrons also plays a significant role in the production of FIR/THz radiation and several groups are taking advantage of this source for users. Applications for use of the radiation have evolved from simple imaging to complex pump probe tests of insulator/metal transitions and energy flow in organic molecules. We will discuss the technologies for generating the IR/FIR/THz radiation and cover some of the unique applications of such sources.

Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Prediction of heat of melting and heat capacity of inorganic liquids by the method of group contributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex salts and salt/oxide combinations are being considered for the immobilization and storage or disposal of hazardous or radioactive wastes. There is very little information concerning such fundamental properties as heat of fusion and heat capacities for many of these inorganic materials. This work focuses on the use of elements or simple functional groups to estimate some of these fundamental thermodynamic properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for which some ancillary information may be easily measured, but which may be very difficult to measure directly. An example of such a property is the heat of fusion (or melting). The melting temperature for most pure materials is relatively easy to measure. However, the actual amount of energy required to liquefy, or conversely, the amount of energy which must be removed to solidify those same materials has not been measured. Similarly, important properties such as heat capacities of liquids are unavailable for many compounds. Such information is essential in the chemical industry and are paramount for chemical engineers if they are to design, build and operate plants and facilities in an economical and efficient manner.

Williams, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Eakman, J.M. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Montoya, M.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

My Struggles with the Block Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document is the second installment of three in the Cerro Grande Fire Series. Like its predecessor arXiv:quant-ph/0105039, "Notes on a Paulian Idea," it is a collection of letters written to various friends and colleagues, most of whom regularly circuit this archive. The unifying theme of all the letters is that each has something to do with the quantum. Particularly, the collection chronicles the emergence of Quantum Bayesianism as a robust view of quantum theory, eventually evolving into the still-more-radical "QBism" (with the B standing for no particular designation anymore), as it took its most distinctive turn away from various Copenhagen Interpretations. Included are many anecdotes from the history of quantum information theory: for instance, the story of the origin of the terms "qubit" and "quantum information" from their originator's own mouth, a copy of a rejection letter written by E. T. Jaynes for one of Rolf Landauer's original erasure-cost principle papers, and much more. Specialized indices are devoted to historical, technical, and philosophical matters. More roundly, the document is an attempt to provide an essential ingredient, unavailable anywhere else, for turning QBism into a live option within the vast spectrum of quantum foundational thought.

Christopher A. Fuchs; Maximilian Schlosshauer; Blake C. Stacey

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T. [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, Wroclaw 50-372 (Poland); Grabiec, P.; Janus, P.; Sierakowski, A. [Division of Silicon Microsystem and Nanostructure Technology, Institute of Electron Technology, Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw 02-668 (Poland)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database : wind plant reliability benchmark.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems' ORAPWind%C2%AE (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREW's reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

212

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pakistan: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report summarizes the energy and economic situation in Pakistan.

Gazdar, M.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

TBM tunnel friction values for the Grizzly Powerhouse Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tunnel boring machine (TBM) driven water conveyance tunnels are becoming increasingly more common. Despite advances in tunnel engineering and construction technology, hydraulic performance data for TBM driven tunnels remains relatively unavailable. At the Grizzly Powerhouse Project, the TBM driven water conveyance tunnel was designed using friction coefficients developed from a previous PG&E project. A range of coefficients were selected to bound the possible hydraulic performance variations of the water conveyance system. These friction coefficients, along with the water conveyance systems characteristics, and expected turbine characteristics, were used in a hydraulic transient analysis to determine the expected system pressure fluctuations, and surge chamber performance. During startup test data, these performance characteristics were measured to allow comparison to the original design assumptions. During construction of the tunnel, plaster casts were made of the actual excavated tunnel unlined and fiber reinforced shotcrete lined surfaces. These castings were used to measure absolute roughness of the surfaces so that a friction coefficient could be developed using the Moody diagram and compare them against the design values. This paper compares the assumed frictional coefficient with computed coefficients from headlosses measured during startup testing, and plaster cast measurement calculations. In addition, a comparison of coefficients will be presented for an other TBM driven water conveyance tunnel constructed in the 1980`s.

Stutsman, R.D. [Ensign & Buckley Consulting Engineers, Larkspur, CA (United States); Rothfuss, B.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

Backus, George A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Procedures for the external event core damage frequency analyses for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents methods which can be used to perform the assessment of risk due to external events at nuclear power plants. These methods were used to perform the external events risk assessments for the Surry and Peach Bottom nuclear power plants as part of the NRC-sponsored NUREG-1150 risk assessments. These methods apply to the full range of hazards such as earthquakes, fires, floods, etc. which are collectively known as external events. The methods described in this report have been developed under NRC sponsorship and represent, in many cases, both advancements and simplifications over techniques that have been used in past years. They also include the most up-to-date data bases on equipment seismic fragilities, fire occurrence frequencies and fire damageability thresholds. The methods described here are based on making full utilization of the power plant systems logic models developed in the internal events analyses. By making full use of the internal events models one obtains an external event analysis that is consistent both in nomenclature and in level of detail with the internal events analyses, and in addition, automatically includes all the appropriate random and tests/maintenance unavailabilities as appropriate. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Bohn, M.P.; Lambright, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Methyl viologen mediated oxidation-reduction across dihexadecylphosphate vesicles involves transmembrane diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous reports have appeared describing oxidation-reduction across bilayer membranes. Mechanisms proposed for specific systems include the following: (i) electron tunneling across the hydrocarbon barrier between interfacially bound redox partners, (ii) molecular diffusion of bound redox components across the barrier, and (iii) formation of barrier-penetrating aggregates, or electron-conducting channels, across the bilayer. Nonetheless, the actual reaction mechanisms remain obscure due to the general unavailability of transverse diffusion rates, possible loss of compartmentation of reactants, particularly in photochemical systems, and the ambiguities inherent in deducing reaction mechanisms from rate data, which form the primary evidence in most systems studied. The reactions of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP) vesicle-bound methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) describes in this report are unique in allowing deduction of molecular details of a transmembrane redox event from the product composition and microphase distribution. Specifically, they have found that MV/sup 2 +/ bound at the outer vesicle interface mediates reduction of inner-localized MV/sup 2 +/ by dithionite ion in bulk solution in a manner that requires comigration of MV/sup +/ with the electron transferred across the membrane barrier.

Patterson, B.C.; Thompson, D.H.; Hurst, J.K.

1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall, this project is on schedule and proceeding as planned. Two approach changes are recommended. One is to rely on commercially developed software, in particular that developed by OLI Systems, Inc., and now being expanded in a collaborative effort between OLI Systems, Inc. and IPST to provide a simulation package for the pulp and paper industry and to integrate it with existing process simulation tools used by that industry. The second is the development of a detailed brownstock/bleached fiber washer model as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. Both of these are discussed in more detail in the Approach Changes section of this report. Two tasks are behind schedule. They are Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), and Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97). The reasons and expected completion dates for these tasks are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section of this report. All other tasks are either completed, or on or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Energy efficiency choice in the purchase of residential appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a quantitative analysis of the behavior of the market for the purchase of energy efficiency in residential appliances and heating and cooling equipment. We examine the historical efficiency choices over the period 1972 to 1980 for eight consumer products: gas central space heaters, oil central space heaters, room air conditioners, central air conditioners, electric water heaters, gas water heaters, refrigerators, and freezers. We characterize the behavior of the market for these products by an aggregate market discount rate. Except for air conditioners, the observed discount rates are much higher than real interest rates or the discount rates commonly used in life-cycle cost analysis of consumer choice. They appear to be relatively constant, even though fuel prices escalated rapidly over the time period. We conclude from these results that the market for energy efficiency is not performing well. Several explanations of the under investment in efficiency are proposed: (1) lack of information about the costs and benefits of energy efficiency; (2) prevalence of third party purchasers; (3) unavailability of highly efficient equipment without other features; (4) long manufacturing lead times; and (5) other marketing strategies.

Ruderman, H.; Levine, M.D.; McMahon, J.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Keifer, Sharon (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Reliability Results of NERSC Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to address the needs of future scientific applications for storing and accessing large amounts of data in an efficient way, one needs to understand the limitations of current technologies and how they may cause systeminstability or unavailability. A number of factors can impact system availability ranging from facility-wide power outage to a single point of failure such as network switches or global file systems. In addition, individual component failure in a system can degrade the performance of that system. This paper focuses on analyzing both of these factors and their impacts on the computational and storage systems at NERSC. Component failure data presented in this report primarily focuses on disk drive in on of the computational system and tape drive failure in HPSS. NERSC collected available component failure data and system-wide outages for its computational and storage systems over a six-year period and made them available to the HPC community through the Petascale Data Storage Institute.

Petascale Data Storage Institute (PDSI); Mokhtarani, Akbar; Mokhtarani, Akbar; Kramer, William; Hick, Jason

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Los Alamos PWR feed-and-bleed studies summary results and conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adequacy of shutdown decay heat removal in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is currently under investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One part of this effort is review of feed-and-bleed procedures that could be used if the normal cooling mode through the steam generators was unavailable. Feed-and-bleed cooling is effected by manually activating the high-pressure injection (HPI) system and opening the power-operated relief valves (PORVs) to release the core decay energy. The feasibility of the feed-and-bleed concept as a diverse mode of heat removal has been evaluated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TRAC-PF1 code has been used to predict the expected performances of the Oconee-1 and Calvert Cliffs-1 reactors of Babcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering, respectively, and the Zion-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 plants of Westinghouse. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in each of the four plants studied, provided it was initiated no later than the time of loss-of-secondary heat sink.

Boyack, B.E.; Henninger, R.J.; Lime, J.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Novel fluctuations at constrained interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study we try to answer the qustion : What happens when explicit constraints are introduced such that the low energy, long wavelength modes of a system are unavailable ? This question has assumed some importance in recent years due to the advent of nano technology and the growing use of nanometer scale devices and structures. In a small system, the size limits the scale of the fluctuations and makes it imperative for us to understand how the response of the system is altered in such a situation. In this thesis, this question is answered for the special case of interfacial fluctuations in two dimensions (2d). The energy of an interface between two phases in equilibrium is invariant with respect to translations perpendicular to the plane (or line in 2d) of the interface. We study the consequence of breaking this symmetry explicity using an external field gradient. One expects that since low energy excitations are suppressed, the interface would be flat and inert at all times. We show that surprisingly there are novel fluctuations and phenomena associated with such constrained interfaces which have static as well as dynamic consequences. The Ising interface on a square lattice is shown to undergo a multitude of structural transitions as a function of velocity and the orientation. Liquid solid interfaces show coherent addition and removal of atomic layers providing novel mechanisms of stress relaxation in a nanosized single crystal without defects. We study momentum and energy transfer across the liquid solid interface in the presence of this ``layering'' transition.

Abhishek Chaudhuri

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

227

Jet Vetoes Interfering with H->WW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far off-shell Higgs production in $H \\rightarrow WW,ZZ$, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements require an understanding of the cross section in the far off-shell region in the presence of realistic experimental cuts. We analytically study the effect of a $p_T$ jet veto on far off-shell cross sections, including signal-background interference, by utilizing hard functions in the soft collinear effective theory that are differential in the decay products of the $W/Z$. Summing large logarithms of $\\sqrt{\\hat s}/p_T^{veto}$, we find that the jet veto induces a strong dependence on the partonic centre of mass energy, $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$, and modifies distributions in $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$ or $M_T$. The example of $gg\\rightarrow H \\rightarrow WW$ is used to demonstrate these effects at next to leading log order. We also discuss the importance of jet vetoes and jet binning for the recent program to extract Higgs couplings and widths from far off-shell cross sections.

Ian Moult; Iain W. Stewart

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

228

The application of Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRINS) to CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As risk-informed applications (RIAs) are actively implanted in the nuclear industry, an issue associated with technical adequacy of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) arises in its modeling and data sourcing. In Korea, PSA for all Korean NPPs has been completed and KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Plant Company) developed the database called the Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRinS). It has several characteristics that distinguish it from other database system such as NPRDs (INPO,1994), PRIS (IAEA), and SRDF (EdF). This database has the function of systematic data management such as automatic data-gathering, periodic data deposition and updating, statistical analysis including Bayesian method, and trend analysis of failure rate or unavailability. In recent PSA for CANDU reactor, the component failure data of EPRI ALWR URD and Component Reliability Database were preferentially used as generic data set. The error factor for most component failure data was estimated by using the information NUREG/CR-4550 and NUREG/CR-4639. Also, annual trend analysis was performed for the functional losses of components using the statistical analysis and chart module of PRinS. Furthermore, the database has been updated regularly and maintained as a living program to reflect the current status. This paper presents the failure data analysis using PRinS which provides Bayesian analysis on main components in the CANDU reactor. (authors)

Hwang, S. W.; Lim, Y. H.; Park, H. C. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Naah-ri 260, Yangnam-myun, Gyeongju-si, Gyeong Buk (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Effect of the Presence of 2 wt% Hafnium in T-111  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W), and reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the RTG's working environment. Due to the commercial unavailability of the tantalum alloy T-111, Ta-10%W is a possible candidate replacement material because of its high melting point (3037 deg. C), high elastic modulus (207 GPa), high yield, ultimate tensile strengths at both ambient and elevated temperatures, excellent ductility, and exceptional creep properties. Ta-10%W is also attractive due its commercial availability and low cost when compared to T-111. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast Ta-10%W and T-111 for high-temperature nuclear based power conversion applications and to document research that must be conducted to fully characterize both materials.

Barklay, Chadwick D. [University of Dayton, 300 College Park Dayton OH 45469-0240 (United States); Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Argonne National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83403-2528 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Infrared Emission from Interstellar Dust. I. Stochastic Heating of Small Grains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method for calculating the infrared emission from a population of dust grains heated by starlight, including very small grains for which stochastic heating by starlight photons results in high temperature transients. Because state-to-state transition rates are generally unavailable for complex molecules, we consider model PAH, graphitic, and silicate grains with realistic vibrational mode spectra and realistic radiative properties. The vibrational density of states is used in a statistical-mechanical description of the emission process. Unlike previous treatments, our approach fully incorporates multiphoton heating effects, important for large grains or strong radiation fields. We discuss how the "temperature" of the grain is related to its vibrational energy. By comparing with an "exact" statistical calculation of the emission process, we determine the conditions under which the "thermal" and the "continuous cooling" approximations can be used to calculate the emission spectrum. We present results for the infrared emission spectra of PAH grains of various sizes heated by starlight. We show how the relative strengths of the 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3um features depend on grain size, starlight spectrum and intensity, and grain charging conditions. We show results for grains in the "cold neutral medium", "warm ionized medium", and representative conditions in photodissociation regions. Our model results are compared to observed ratios of emission features for reflection nebulae and photodissociation regions, the Milky Way, normal spiral galaxies, and starburst galaxies.

B. T. Draine; Aigen Li

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBRs SB Cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

Putman, Valerie Lee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Using a complete spectroscopic survey to find red quasars and test the KX method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an investigation of quasar colour-redshift parameter space in order to search for radio-quiet red quasars and to test the ability of a variant of the KX quasar selection method to detect quasars over a full range of colour without bias. This is achieved by combining IRIS2 imaging with the complete Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey to probe parameter space unavailable to other surveys. We construct a new sample of 69 quasars with measured bJ - K colours. We show that the colour distribution of these quasars is significantly different from that of the Large Bright Quasar Survey's quasars at a 99.9% confidence level. We find 11 of our sample of 69 quasars have signifcantly red colours (bJ - K >= 3.5) and from this, we estimate the red quasar fraction of the K KX method variant used here is more effective than the UVX selection method, and has less colour bias than optical colour-colour selection methods.

Russell J. Jurek; Michael J. Drinkwater; Paul J. Francis; Kevin A. Pimbblet

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Interfacial Modification of Silica Surfaces Through gamma-Isocyanatopropyl Triethoxy Silane-Amine Coupling Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of robust, cost-effective methods to modify surfaces and interfaces without the specialized synthesis of unique coupling agents could provide readily accessible routes to optimize and tailor interfacial properties. We demonstrate that -isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (ISO) provides a convenient route to functionalize silica surfaces through coupling reactions with readily available reagents. ISO coupling agents layers (CALs) can be prepared from toluene with triethylamine (TEA), but the coupling reaction of an amine to the ISO CAL does not proceed. We use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and sessile drop contact angle to demonstrate the isocyanate layer is not degraded under coupling conditions. Access to silanes with chemical functionality is possible with ISO by performing the coupling reaction in solution and then depositing the product onto the surface. Two model CAL surfaces are prepared to demonstrate the ease and robust nature of this procedure. The surfaces prepared using this method are the ISO reacted with octadecylamine to produce a hydrocarbon surface of similar quality to octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS) CALs and with 9-aminofluorene (AFL), an aromatic amine functionality whose silane is otherwise unavailable commercially.

Vogel,B.; DeLongchamp, D.; Mahoney, C.; Lucas, L.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Drift design methodology and preliminary application for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excavation stability in an underground nuclear waste repository is required during construction, emplacement, retrieval (if required), and closure phases to ensure worker health and safety, and to prevent development of potential pathways for radionuclide migration in the post-closure period. Stable excavations are developed by appropriate excavation procedures, design of the room shape, design and installation of rock support reinforcement systems, and implementation of appropriate monitoring and maintenance programs. In addition to the loads imposed by the in situ stress field, the repository drifts will be impacted by thermal loads developed after waste emplacement and, periodically, by seismic loads from naturally occurring earthquakes and underground nuclear events. A priori evaluation of stability is required for design of the ground support system, to confirm that the thermal loads are reasonable, and to support the license application process. In this report, a design methodology for assessing drift stability is presented. This is based on site conditions, together with empirical and analytical methods. Analytical numerical methods are emphasized at this time because empirical data are unavailable for excavations in welded tuff either at elevated temperatures or under seismic loads. The analytical methodology incorporates analysis of rock masses that are systematically jointed, randomly jointed, and sparsely jointed. In situ thermal and seismic loads are considered. Methods of evaluating the analytical results and estimating ground support requirements for all the full range of expected ground conditions are outlines. The results of a preliminary application of the methodology using the limited available data are presented. 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Hardy, M.P. [Agapito (J.F.T.) and Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Bauer, S.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Searching for Smoking Gun Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clear methods to differentiate between decaying and annihilating dark matter (DM) scenarios are still by and large unavailable. In this note, we study the potential astrophysical signatures of a new class of hidden sector decaying DM models, which can address the recent cosmic ray measurements. Such models may produce primary photons and/or neutrinos at large rates, correlated with the leptonic production. The photon and neutrino spectra will then contain sharp features at the TeV scale. We demonstrate the discovery potential for upcoming and future measurements by FERMI, HESS, AGIS and IceCube/DeepCore. We show that these models may be discovered in the near future. Specifically, measurements of diffuse gamma rays by FERMI can detect the start of a hard photon feature. We argue that these hard spectra can be produced by decaying dark matter and be consistent with current constraints, but are difficult to reconcile with models of annihilating DM. Consequently the measurement of a hard spectral feature, in correlation with the current cosmic ray measurements, will strongly favor decaying DM models. Finally we comment on the preliminary results from the Inner Galaxy presented by the FERMI collaboration.

Joshua T. Ruderman; Tomer Volansky

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

49 new T dwarfs identified using methane imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of 49 new photometrically classified T dwarfs from the combination of large infrared and optical surveys combined with follow-up TNG photometry. We used multi-band infrared and optical photometry from the UKIRT and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to identify possible brown dwarf candidates, which were then confirmed using methane filter photometry. We have defined a new photometric conversion between CH4s - CH4l colour and spectral type for T4 to T8 brown dwarfs based on a part of the sample that has been followed up using methane photometry and spectroscopy. Using methane differential photometry as a proxy for spectral type for T dwarfs has proved to be a very efficient technique. Of a subset of 45 methane selected brown dwarfs that were observed spectroscopically, 100% were confirmed as T dwarfs. Future deep imaging surveys will produce large samples of faint brown dwarf candidates, for which spectroscopy will not be feasible. When broad wavelength coverage is unavailable, methane imaging...

Cardoso, C V; Smart, R L; van Spaandonk, L; Baker, D; Smith, L C; Andrei, A H; Bucciarelli, B; Dhital, S; Jones, H R A; Lattanzi, M G; Magazzu, A; Pinfield, D J; Tinney, C G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Extending RISMC Capabilities for Real-Time Diagnostics and Prognostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quick and effective accident management is essential in any industry in order to limit and contain possible threats to both people and environment/assets. This is in particular relevant in the nuclear industry where accidents may have major impacts from an economic, health and societal point of view. As an example, the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident highlighted the importance of the ability of plant operators and plant staff to react quickly and effectively in accident conditions. This particular event showed the importance of being able to: Determine/estimate the actual status of the plant (i.e., diagnosis) when the monitoring system is corrupted or partially unavailable, and, Forecast its future evolution (i.e., prognosis). In this paper we want to describe a research direction geared toward the development of a new set of advanced diagnosis and prognosis tools. We employ innovative data mining and machine learning techniques that are able to infer plant status and mimic the plants full temporal behavior in order to assist the reactor operators during an accident scenario.

curtis smith; Mandelli, Diego

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Micronized Coal Reburning (MCR) Demonstration for NO{sub x} Control, as described in a report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1999). The need to meet strict emissions requirements at a minimum cost prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), in conjunction with Fuller Company, Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), and Fluor Daniel, to submit the proposal for this project to be sited at TVA's Shawnee Fossil Plant. In July 1992, TVA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. However, because of operational and environmental compliance strategy changes, the Shawnee site became unavailable.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Indonesia: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy have covered Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report covers Indonesia. 37 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Prawiraatmadja, W.; Yamaguchi, N.; Breazeale, K.; Basari, S.R.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D.K.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Mee, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); Wang, Peng [ORNL; Romanova, Anna V [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and h = F/G is carbon intensity of world GDP. Where denotedintensity of world GDP, f = F/E is carbon intensity of

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - airlines tegi viimase Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance and Equity in Ground Delay Programs Summary: and Cancellation (Airlines Response to GDP) . . . . . 27 2.1.4 Compression (GDP Response to Dynamic Information... Slot...

248

Chapter 2: Sustainable and Unsustainable Developments in the U.S. Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006, energy and carbon intensity of GDP continued favorableemissions are divided by GDP to calculate carbon intensity.While carbon intensity does not portray changes in absolute

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios Carbon EmissionsEnergy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios .. 37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% betweena 20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010 (Price

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

252

Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to have a lower energy use per unit of GDP (6.2 9.9 MJ/US$shows Income per capita (GDP ppp /Pop), Energy Intensity (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply per Capita Primary Energy Supply per GDP ElectricityGeneration per GDP Primary Energy Supply Shares, APPGDP (kg CO2 per 2000 US$) Sources: International Energy

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Price, Lynn; Kumar, Satish; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Warfield, Corina; Padmanabhan, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

China's Approaches to Financing Sustainable Development: Policies, Practices, and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity (energy consumption per unit of GDP) by an annualper unit of GDP from 2010 level) target of 17 percent, an energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Greening of the Middle Kingdom: The Story of Energy Efficiency in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined as energy use per unit of GDP) from 2005 levels. Tomeasured as energy consumption per RMB 5 of GDP). The

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of declining energy use per unit GDP. Within this reform-and the energy use in agriculture per unit of GDP (economic

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP per capita Transport Future outlook Drivers of Transport Energyenergy demand per passenger-km. Figure 20. Car Ownership and GDP

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - airline business models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State... and Cancellation (Airlines Response to GDP) . . . . . 27 2.1.4 Compression (GDP Response to Dynamic Information... Slot Allocation Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

259

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) byas energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result, energy use per unit of GDP (energy intensity) 1a rebound in energy use per unit of GDP after 2001, after

Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GEO Down Under The Ground Source Industry in Australia and New Zealand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 22.2 million § GDP: $987 billion § Per capita GDP: $43 300 per capita § Popula8on: 4.4 million § GDP: $134 billion § Per capita GDP: $30 200 rocks and energy genera8on to most § North side of house has greatest solar

262

IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 4 (2009) 024010 (7pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/4/2/024010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide emissions per unit GDP is represented by the product of energy intensity, which represented in terms of GDP, and changes in technology, typically represented as carbon dioxide emissions per-factors. GDP growth (or contraction) is comprised of changes in population and in per capita GDP. Carbon

Colorado at Boulder, University of

263

CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are population increase, per capita GDP (also known as ``affluence level''), the energy intensity of the economy by the gross domestic product, GDP), energy production, E, carbon-based fuels used for energy production, C (E/GDP) and the carbon intensity of the energy system (C/E). The term E/GDP reflects the sectorial

264

Nicolas Gruber Environmental Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! DRIVERS! foss = P · g · e · f = P · · · ! Population! Per capita gross domestic product (GDP/P)! Energy required per unit GDP (E/GDP)! Carbon intensity of energy (foss/E)! GDP! P! E! GDP! foss! E! #12 per year!! CH-Average: !ca 6 tons of CO2 per year! To reach the 2°C stabilization target, the global

Fischlin, Andreas

265

Finial Scientific/Technical Report: Application of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Process for the Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion is a novel combustion technology for the inherent separation of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}. In 1983, Richter and Knoche proposed reversible combustion, which utilized both the oxidation and reduction of metal. Metal associated with its oxidized form as an oxygen carrier was circulated between two reactors--oxidizer and reducer. In the reducer, the solid oxygen carrier reacts with the fuel to produce CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and elemental metal only. Pure CO{sub 2} will be obtained in the exit gas stream from the reducer after H{sub 2}O is condensed. The pure CO{sub 2} is ready for subsequent sequestration. In the oxidizer, the elemental metal reacts with air to form metal oxide and separate oxygen from nitrogen. Only nitrogen and some unused oxygen are emitted from the oxidizer. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that CO{sub 2} is not diluted with nitrogen but obtained in a relatively pure form without any energy needed for separation. In addition to the energy-free purification of CO{sub 2}, the CLC process also provides two other benefits. First, NO{sub x} formation can be largely eliminated. Secondly, the thermal efficiency of a CLC system is very high. Presently, the CLC process has only been used with natural gas. An oxygen carrier based on an energy balance analysis and thermodynamics analysis was selected. Copper (Cu) seems to be the best choice for the CLC system for solid fuels. From this project, the mechanisms of CuO reduction by solid fuels may be as follows: (1) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are available, reduction of CuO could start at about 400 C or less. (2) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is lower, reduction of CuO could occur at an onset temperature of about 500 C, char gasification reactivity in CO{sub 2} was lower at lower temperatures. (3) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is higher than 750 C, all reaction reactivities were improved, especially the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of char. Thus, the reduction of CuO by the gasification product CO could proceed quickly. Based on the results obtained, the following coal characteristics would be desirable for the Chemical Looping Combustion process: high volatile matter with a high reactivity of the char produced. PRB coal meets these criteria while being comparatively less expensive and also very abundant. The high moisture content present in PRB coal might also increase the reactivity for char gasification through the development of pore structure and specific surface area in the char during pyrolysis. Biomass materials are also suitable, considering the reaction mechanism of CLC system of solid fuels. The feasibility of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels was verified by focusing on PRB coal and biomass. Based on PRB coal as the preferred solid fuel in the development of the CLC system, the mass, energy and system in a dual reactor recirculation system has been determined. In the Cu oxidation tests, it was confirmed that the heating rate is the most important effect on the Cu oxidation process. Lower heating rates and lower operational temperatures would result in incomplete conversion of Cu to CuO. Cu{sub 2}O may be the intermediate product. The operating temperature did not affect the reaction rate of the oxidation process. Under any operating conditions, the exothermic properties are clearly shown.

Dr. Wei-Ping Pan; Dr. John T. Riley

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Subcontract Report: Final Report on Assessment of Motor Technologies for Traction Drives of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (Subcontract #4000080341)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors with rare-earth (RE) magnets are almost universally used for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) because of their superior properties, particularly power density. However, there is now a distinct possibility of limited supply or very high cost of RE magnets that could make IPM motors unavailable or too expensive. Because development of electric motors is a critical part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Power Electronics and Motors activity, DOE needs to determine which options should be investigated and what barriers should be addressed. Therefore, in order to provide a basis for deciding which research topics should be pursued, an assessment of various motor technologies was conducted to determine which, if any, is potentially capable of meeting FreedomCAR 2015 and 2020 targets. Highest priority was given to IPM, surface mounted permanent magnet (SPM), induction, and switched reluctance (SR) motors. Also of interest, but with lesser emphasis, were wheel motors, multiple-rotor motors, motors with external excitation, and several others that emerged from the assessment. Cost and power density (from a design perspective, the power density criterion translates to torque density) are emerging as the two most important properties of motors for traction drives in hybrid and EVs, although efficiency and specific power also are very important. The primary approach for this assessment involved interviews with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), their suppliers, and other technical experts. For each technology, the following issues were discussed: (1) The current state-of-the-art performance and cost; (2) Recent trends in the technology; (3) Inherent characteristics of the motor - which ones limit the ability of the technology to meet the targets and which ones aid in meeting the target; (4) What research and development (R&D) would be needed to meet the targets; and (5) The potential for the technology to meet the targets. The interviews were supplemented with information from past Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports, previous assessments that were conducted in 2004, and literature on magnet technology. The results of the assessment validated the DOE strategy involving three parallel paths: (1) there is enough of a possibility that RE magnets will continue to be available, either from sources outside China or from increased production in China, that development of IPM motors using RE magnets should be continued with emphasis on meeting the cost target. (2) yet the possibility that RE magnets may become unavailable or too expensive justifies efforts to develop innovative designs for permanent magnet (PM) motors that do not use RE magnets. Possible other magnets that may be substituted for RE magnets include samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co), Alnico, and ferrites. Alternatively, efforts to develop motors that do not use PMs but offer attributes similar to IPM motors also are encouraged. (3) New magnet materials using new alloys or processing techniques that would be less expensive or have comparable or superior properties to existing materials should be developed if possible. IPM motors are by far the most popular choice for hybrid and EVs because of their high power density, specific power, and constant power-speed ratio (CPSR). Performance of these motors is optimized when the strongest possible magnets - i.e., RE neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets - are used.

Fezzler, Raymond [BIZTEK Consulting, Inc.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for a HLMC reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small (300 MWt) reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100%+ natural circulation heat removal from the low power density/low pressure drop ultra-long lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the Reactor Exterior Cooling System (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

268

Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for an HLMC reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small [300-MW(thermal)] reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100% + natural-circulation heat removal from the low-power-density/low-pressure-drop ultralong lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the reactor exterior cooling system (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology developed in this program.

Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

Chen, Guo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcmahon, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tung, Chang - Shung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Preliminary prediction of inflow into the D-holes at the Stripa Mine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is contracted by the US Department of Energy to provide an auxiliary modeling effort for the Stripa Project. Within this effort, we are making calculations of inflow to the Simulated Drift Experiment (SDE), i.e. inflow to six parallel, closely spaced D-holes, using a preliminary set of data collected in five other holes, the N- and W-holes during Stages 1 and 2 of the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) project. Our approach has been to focus on the fracture zones rather than the general set of ubiquitous fractures. Approximately 90% of all the water flowing in the rock is flowing in fracture zones which are neither uniformly conductive nor are they infinitely extensive. Our approach has been to adopt the fracture zone locations as they have been identified with geophysics. We use geologic sense and the original geophysical data to add one zone where significant water inflow has been observed that can not be explained with the other geophysical zones. This report covers LBL's preliminary prediction of flow into the D-holes. Care should be taken in interpreting the results given in this report. As explained below, the approach that LBL has designed for developing a fracture hydrology model requires cross-hole hydrologic data. Cross-hole tests are planned for Stage 3 but were unavailable in Stage 1. As such, we have inferred from available data what a cross-hole test might show and used this synthetic data to make a preliminary calculation of the inflow into the D-holes. Then using all the Stage 3 data we will calculate flow into the Validation Drift itself. The report mainly demonstrates the use of our methodology and the simulated results should be considered preliminary.

Long, J.C.S.; Karasaki, K.; Davey, A.; Peterson, J.; Landsfeld, M.; Kemeny, J.; Martel, S.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The relationship of angiosperms and oleanane in petroleum through geologic time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological marker oleanane has been suggested as an indicator of angiosperm (flowering plant) input into source rocks and their derived oils. Parallels should therefore be evident between the angiosperm fossil record and oleanane occurrence and abundance. A global selection of more than 50 core samples from marine rocks of different ages and from different locations was quantitatively analyzed for oleanane to determine its abundance over geologic time relative to the bacterial marker hopane. Oleanane was recognized using Metastable Reaction Monitoring (MRM) GC-MS. A parallel was observed between the oleanane/hopane ratio and angiosperm diversity in the fossil record through time. The first fossil evidence of angiosperms is during the Early Cretaceous with radiation during the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Occurrences of oleanane are confirmed throughout the Cretaceous system. Early-to-middle Cretaceous (Berriasian-Cenomanian) occurrences are sporadic and oleanan/hopane ratios are less than 0.07. Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) oleanane/hopane ratios range up to 0.15 with higher ratios in many Tertiary samples. It appears that oleanane/hopane ratios of oils can restrict the age of their unavailable or unknown source rocks. High ratios indicate Tertiary age and lower ratios can indicate Cretaceous or Tertiary age, depending on depositional environment. While these data do not rule out pre-Cretaceous oleanane, preliminary data show that oleanane/hopane ratios for Jurassic and older rock extracts are typically below our detection limits (<0.03). While oleanane precursors are abundant in angiosperms, they also occur, rarely, in other modern plant groups. We identified oleanane in low abundances in three Early Cretaceous fossil benettitialeans, an extinct plant group (Late Triassic to Late Cretaceous) thought to be related to angiosperms. These findings suggest that oleanane could be present in low abundance in some pre-Cretaceous rocks and oils.

Moldowan, J.M.; Dahl, J.E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Jacobson, S.R.; Taylor, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recent improvements to the DIII-D neutral beam instrumentation and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIII-D neutral beam (NB) instrumentation and control (I and C) system provides for operational control and synchronization of the eight DIII-D neutral beam injection systems, as well as for pertinent data acquisition and safety interlocking. Recently, improvements were made to the I and C system. With the replacement of the NB control computers, new signal interfacing was required to accommodate the elimination of physical operator panels, in favor of graphical user interface control pages on computer terminal screens. The program in the mode control (MC) programmable logic controller (PLC), which serves as a logic-processing interface between the NB control computers and system hardware, was modified to improve the availability of NB heating of DIII-D plasmas in the event that one or more individual beam systems suddenly become unavailable while preparing for a tokamak experimental shot sequences. An upgraded computer platform was adopted for the NB control system operator interface and new graphical user interface pages were developed to more efficiently display system status data. A failure mode of the armor tile infrared thermometers (pyrometers), which serve to terminate beam pulsing if beam shine-through overheats wall thermal shielding inside the DIII-D tokamak, was characterized such that impending failures can be detected and repairs effected to mitigate beam system down-time. The hardware that controls gas flow to the beamline neutralizer cells was upgraded to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and interlocking was provided to terminate beam pulsing in the event of insufficient neutralizer gas flow. Motivation, implementation, and results of these improvements are presented.

Kellman, D.H.; Hong, R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume 1; Oregon Subbasins Below Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CIS project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

Bradley, D.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

Matthews, H.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases'' is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases. Initial studies, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project ``Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases`` is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

Raymond L. Mazza

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

An assessment of the core degradation frequency in a typical large LMFBR design for internal accident initiators-a comparison with PWR predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of the core degradation frequency due to internal accident initiators between a typical large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) design and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been performed. For the PWR system, existing analyses have been utilized. For the reference LMFBR, an extensive analysis has been performed for two accident initiators, i.e., loss of off-site power and loss of main feedwater. Based on this analysis an estimate of about1 X 10/sup -6//reactor X yr has been obtained for the core degradation frequency of the reference LMFBR. This estimate is significantly smaller than the PWR core degradation frequency ( about 6 X 10/sup -5//yr). A sensitivity analysis shows that the parameters having the largest impact on the unavailability of decay heat removal are (a) for the ''loss of off-site power'' initiator: human error and failure to restore off-site power, and (b) for the ''loss of main feedwater'' initiator: the leakage rates of the passive decay heat removal system and the adoption of the policy to repair the Na-NaK heat exchanger only during normal shutdowns. The results indicate that the LMFBR system has the potential of higher resistance than the PWR system to the accident initiators considered. The lower core degradation frequency estimated for the LMFBR system is due to the presence of two redundant and diverse reactor shutdown systems, with a self-actuated feature included in one of them, the incorporation of a passive decay heat removal system, and the significantly lower sensitivity of the reference LMFBR to primary system pipe breaks.

Tzanos, C.P.; Adamantiades, A.G.; Hanan, N.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 9 (July 1--September 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two approach changes that were discussed and recommended in the Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998) progress report have been implemented in the current project plan. The OLI software has been used to develop a preliminary process model for predicting the distribution of NPE`s in a two stage brownstock washer, and the OLI database has been upgraded to include improved chemical equilibrium data for metal-organic interactions. This exercise served as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. The Weyerhaeuser-NAELS software has also been applied to predicting inorganic solubility behavior. Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97), has been combined with Task D-2.1, Evaluation of the estimation procedure (scheduled completion date: 3/99) with a new scheduled completion date of 8/99. A model for the adsorption of metal ions on wood pulp fibers will include transport effects as well as adsorption equilibrium, and will be combined with a brownstock washer model to evaluate its predictive capability in comparison with mill data, and to demonstrate the applicability of the results obtained in this project. Three tasks are behind schedule: Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), Task B-2.1, Measure metal adsorption isotherms on wood pulp (scheduled completion date: 9/97), and Task B-2.3, Measure metal ion adsorption kinetics for strongly adsorbing metal species (scheduled completion date: 3/98). The reasons and expected completion dates are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section. All other tasks are either completed, on, or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Iron optimization for Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) was accomplished through the addition of iron (Fe) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) (15.9 g/L; pH 3). The GAC used was URV, a bituminous-coal based carbon. The Fe concentration in GAC was incrementally varied (1020-25 660 mg/kg) by the addition of increasing concentrations of Fe solution (FeSO4{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O). MTBE degradation in Fe-amended GAC increased by an order of magnitude over Fe-unamended GAC and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was predominantly (99%) attributed to GAC-bound Fe within the porous structure of the GAC. Imaging and microanalysis of GAC particles indicated limited penetration of Fe into GAC. The optimal Fe concentration was 6710 mg/kg (1020 mg/kg background; 5690 mg/kg amended Fe) and resulted in the greatest MTBE removal and maximum Fe loading oxidation efficiency (MTBE oxidized (g)/Fe loaded to GAC(mg/Kg)). At lower Fe concentrations, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was Fe limited. At higher Fe concentrations, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction was not entirely Fe limited, and reductions in GAC surface area, GAC pore volume, MTBE adsorption, and Fe loading oxidation efficiency were measured. Results are consistent with nonuniform distribution of Fe, pore blockage in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} transport, unavailable Fe, and limitations in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} diffusive transport, and emphasize the importance of optimal Fe loading. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Scott G. Huling; Patrick K. Jones; Tony R. Lee [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, OK (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Use of High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Percutaneous Tumor Ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PurposeTo report feasibility and potential benefits of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in tumor ablations techniques in liver, kidney, and lung lesions.MethodsThis prospective study included 51 patients (14 women, mean age 66years) bearing 66 tumors (56 hepatic, 5 pulmonary, 5 renal tumors) with a median size of 168.7mm, referred for tumor ablation in an intention-to-treat fashion before preoperative anesthesiology visit. Cancellation and complications of HFJV were prospectively recorded. Anesthesia and procedure duration, as well as mean CO{sub 2} capnea, were recorded. When computed tomography guidance was used, 3D spacial coordinates of an anatomical target <2mm in diameter on 8 slabs of 4 slices of 3.75-mm slice thickness were registered.ResultsHFJV was used in 41 of 51 patients. Of the ten patients who were not candidate for HFJV, two patients had contraindication to HFJV (severe COPD), three had lesions invisible under HFJV requiring deep inspiration apnea for tumor targeting, and five patients could not have HFJV because of unavailability of a trained anesthetic team. No specific complication or hypercapnia related to HFJV were observed despite a mean anesthetic duration of 2h and ventilation performed in procubitus (n=4) or lateral decubitus (n=6). Measured internal target movement was 0.3mm in x- and y-axis and below the slice thickness of 3.75mm in the z-axis in 11 patients.ConclusionsHFJV is feasible in 80% of patients allowing for near immobility of internal organs during liver, kidney, and lung tumor ablation.

Denys, Alban, E-mail: alban.denys@chuv.ch; Lachenal, Yann; Duran, Rafael [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (Switzerland); Bize, Pierre [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Preliminary results of the radiological survey at the former Dow Chemical Company site, Madison, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the former Dow Chemical Company plant, now owned and operated by Spectrulite Consortium Inc., supplied materials and provided services for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) under purchase orders issued by the Mallinckrodt Chemical Company, a primary AEC contractor. Information indicates that research and development work involving gamma-phase extrusion of uranium metal was conducted at the Dow Chemical plant. Because documentation establishing the current radiological condition of the property was unavailable, a radiological survey was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1989. The survey included: measurement of indoor gamma exposure rates; collection and radionuclide analysis of dust and debris samples; and measurements to determine alpha and beta-gamma surface contamination. The results of the survey demonstrate that Building 6, the area uranium extrusion and rod-straightening work occurred, is generally free of radioactive residuals originating from former DOE-sponsored activities. However, {sup 238}U- and {sup 232}Th-contaminated dust was found on overhead beams at the south end of Building 6. These findings suggest that past DOE-supported operations were responsible for uranium-contaminated beam dust in excess of guidelines in Building 6. However, the contamination is localized and limited in extent, rendering it highly unlikely that under present use an individual working in or frequenting these remote areas would receive a significant radiation exposure. We recommend that additional scoping survey measurements and sampling be performed to further define the extent of indoor uranium contamination southward to include Building 4 and northward throughout Building 6. 5 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Cottrell, W.D.; Williams, J.K.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measurement of the elastic scattering cross section of neutrons from argon and neon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: The most significant source of background in direct dark matter searches are neutrons that scatter elastically from nuclei in the detector's sensitive volume. Experimental data for the elastic scattering cross section of neutrons from argon and neon, which are target materials of interest to the dark matter community, were previously unavailable. Purpose: Measure the differential cross section for elastic scattering of neutrons from argon and neon in the energy range relevant to backgrounds from (alpha,n) reactions in direct dark matter searches. Method: Cross-section data were taken at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) using the neutron time-of-flight technique. These data were fit using the spherical optical model. Results: The differential cross section for elastic scatting of neutrons from neon at 5.0 and 8.0 MeV and argon at 6.0 MeV was measured. Optical-model parameters for the elastic scattering reactions were determined from the best fit to these data. The total elastic scattering cross section for neon was found to differ by 6% at 5.0 MeV and 13% at 8.0 MeV from global optical-model predictions. Compared to a local optical-model for 40Ar, the elastic scattering cross section was found to differ from the data by 8% at 6.0 MeV. Conclusions: These new data are important for improving Monte-Carlo simulations and background estimates for direct dark matter searches and for benchmarking optical models of neutron elastic scattering from these nuclei.

S. MacMullin; M. Kidd; R. Henning; W. Tornow; C. R. Howell; M. Brown

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of April 1, 1992 through June 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The raw oil shale sample for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored this quarter. The shale that was chosen was from the high-grade zone of the Devonian Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The shale was mined and then transported to the contractor's crushing facility where it was crushed, double-screened, and loaded into 85 55-gal barrels. The barrels, containing a total of 25-30 tons of shale, were transported to the (CAER) Center for Applied Energy Research where the shale was double-screened, analyzed and stored. A major objective of the program is the study of solid-induced secondary coking and cracking reactions. A valved fluidized bed reactor has been the primary apparatus used for this study prior to this quarter, but two additional techniques have been initiated this quarter for the study of other aspects of this issue. First, the two-stage hydropyrolysis reactor at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, was used to study the coking tendency of shale oil vapors under a wide range of pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis conditions. This work enabled us to examine secondary reactions under high pressure conditions (up to 150 bar) which were previously unavailable. Second, the development of a fixed bed reactor system was initiated at the CAER to study the coking and cracking characteristics of model compounds. A fixed bed apparatus was necessary because the conversion of model compounds was too low in the fluidized bed apparatus.

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Robl, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. Technical report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of April 1, 1992 through June 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The raw oil shale sample for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored this quarter. The shale that was chosen was from the high-grade zone of the Devonian Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The shale was mined and then transported to the contractor`s crushing facility where it was crushed, double-screened, and loaded into 85 55-gal barrels. The barrels, containing a total of 25-30 tons of shale, were transported to the (CAER) Center for Applied Energy Research where the shale was double-screened, analyzed and stored. A major objective of the program is the study of solid-induced secondary coking and cracking reactions. A valved fluidized bed reactor has been the primary apparatus used for this study prior to this quarter, but two additional techniques have been initiated this quarter for the study of other aspects of this issue. First, the two-stage hydropyrolysis reactor at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, was used to study the coking tendency of shale oil vapors under a wide range of pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis conditions. This work enabled us to examine secondary reactions under high pressure conditions (up to 150 bar) which were previously unavailable. Second, the development of a fixed bed reactor system was initiated at the CAER to study the coking and cracking characteristics of model compounds. A fixed bed apparatus was necessary because the conversion of model compounds was too low in the fluidized bed apparatus.

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Robl, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Platform Chemicals from an Oilseed Biorefinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US chemical industry is $460 billion in size where a $150 billion segment of which is non-oxygenated chemicals that is sourced today via petroleum but is addressable by a renewable feedstock if one considers a more chemically reduced feedstock such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oil, due to its chemical functionality, provides a largely untapped opportunity as a renewable chemical source to replace petroleum-derived chemicals and produce platform chemicals unavailable today. This project examined the fertile intersection between the rich building blocks provided by vegetable oils and the enhanced chemical modification capability provided by metathesis chemistry. The technology advanced in this study is the process of ethylene cross-metathesis (referred to as ethenolysis) with vegetable oil and vegetable oil derivatives to manufacture the platform-chemical 9-decenoic acid (or 9DA) and olefin co-products. The project team meet its goals of demonstrating improved catalyst efficiencies of several multiples, deepening the mechanistic understanding of metathesis, synthesis and screening of dozens of new catalysts, designing and modeling commercial processes, and estimating production costs. One demonstrable result of the study was a step change improvement in catalyst turnover number in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate as reported here. We met our key measurable of producing 100 lbs of 9DA at the pilot-scale, which demonstrated ability to scale-up ethenolysis. DOE Project funding had significant positive impact on development of metathetically modified vegetable oils more broadly as the Cargill/Materia partnership, that was able to initiate primarily due to DOE funding, has succeeded in commercializing products, validating metathesis as a platform technology, and expanding a diverse products portfolio in high value and in large volume markets. Opportunities have expanded and business development has gained considerable momentum and enabled further expansion of the Materia/Cargill relationship. This project exceeded expectations and is having immediate impact on DOE success by replacing petroleum products with renewables in a large volume application today.

Tupy, Mike; Schrodi Yann

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Uncertainty and variability in updated estimates of potential dose and risk at a US Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty and interindividual variability were assessed in estimated doses for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island would be treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Doses were estimated for ingested {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, external gamma-exposure, and inhalation+ingestion of {sup 241}Am + {sup 239+240}Pu. Two dietary scenarios were considered: imported foods are available (IA); imported foods are unavailable with only local foods consumed (IUA). After {approximately}5 y of Bikini residence under either IA or IUA assumptions, upper and lower 95% confidence limits on interindividual variability in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a {approximately}threefold factor of its in population-average value; upper and lower 95% confidence limits on uncertainty in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a {approximately}twofold factor of its expected value. For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 y were estimated to be 16 and 52 mSv under IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively. Under the most likely dietary scenario, involving access to imported foods, this analysis indicates that it is most likely that no additional cancer fatalities (above those normally expected) would arise from the increased radiation exposures considered. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Uncertainty analysis for an updated dose assessment for a US nuclear test site: Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of uncertainty and interindividual variability in estimated doses was conducted for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island is treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Predicted doses were considered for the following fallout-related exposure pathways: ingested Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, external gamma exposure, and inhalation and ingestion of Americium-241 + Plutonium-239+240. Two dietary scenarios were considered: (1) imported foods are available (IA), and (2) imported foods are unavailable (only local foods are consumed) (IUA). Corresponding calculations of uncertainty in estimated population-average dose showed that after {approximately}5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to uncertainty in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its population-average value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). Corresponding calculations of interindividual variability in the expected value of dose with respect to uncertainty showed that after {approximately}5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to interindividual variability in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its expected value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 were estimated to be 1.6 and 5.2 cSv under the IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively.

Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The rate of growth in real GDP depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.7 percent per year due to a...

298

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

gross domestic product (GDP) depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.7 percent per year due to a...

299

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 2.1 indicates, real GDP growth slows...

300

Media Freedom, Bureaucratic Incentives, and the Resource Curse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP per capita, PPP Log oil reserves Democracy Log land areaGDP per capita PPP, Log oil reserves, Log land area, and Logfrom Polity IV, and oil reserves and oil production from BP.

Egorov, Georgy; Guriev, Sergei; Sonin, Konstantin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of Chinas Largestone-to-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP given Chinagoal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy use (production, imports, exports, and consumption), GDP per capita, and carbon dioxide emissionscarbon-dioxide emissions are being generated for both GDP and energy consumption all on a per

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

he 2007 UN Climate Conference in Bali set the world on a two-year path to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; economic activity (gross domestic product or GDP) per capita; energy intensity (primary energy consump- tion per unit of GDP); and carbon intensity (carbon of all the energy efficiency improve- ments and decarbonization of energy supply required to sta- bilize

Colorado at Boulder, University of

304

Outsourcing CO2 within China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per GDP) due to the prevalence of heavy industry and/or energyGDP per capita ( per person) greatest in provinces of the Central, Northwest, and Southwest regions where coal use and energy-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Outsourcing CO2 within China.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per GDP) due to the prevalence of heavy industry and/or energyGDP per capita ( per person) greatest in provinces of the Central, Northwest, and Southwest regions where coal use and energy-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

ENERGY USE AND CONSERVATION IN INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratio 2 1 9 6 7 Energy per capita 2 1 7 5 9 GDP per capita 1Energy prices (1owest prices = 1) 1 2 4 5 9 Passenger mi1es per unit GDP

Schipper, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

share spent on services rises mainly as a result of increasing expenditures on health care. The share of GDP devoted to business fixed investment ranges from 10% to 16% of GDP...

308

The Greening of the Middle Kingdom: The Story of Energy Efficiency in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Consumption FIGURE 2 Actual energy demand in China isvery much lower than energy demand at constant energyGDP Energy FIGURE 3a Energy demand grew twice as fast as GDP

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gross world product, E is global energy consumption, Authorworld GDP, f = F/E is carbon intensity of energy consumption,

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Millenium Development Goals and Tobacco Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projected population from the United Nations World Population Prospects (2000 Revision), and an average annual growth rate of real GDP

World Health Organization

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the total primary energy consumption in 2000. Furthermore,The Commercial Primary Energy Consumption by Sector GDP

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Trade and institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Non-Discriminatory Liberalisation to FTAs, The WorldMarket Protection GDP Liberalisation Intensity Labor Market

Mahakitsiri, Doungdao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Second Order draft Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III Do Not Cite or Quote 1 Summary for Policy Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decreases in energy use per unit of GDP, while carbon intensity of energy did not change much (Figure SPM.2) (Figure SPM.1). This has occurred because increases in population and10 GDP per capita have outweighed-2003 Decade GtCO2 CO2/Energy Energy/GDP(PPP) GDP(PPP)/POP POP Net change -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 1973

314

Mudanas Climticas Globais Desafios e Oportunudades de Pesquisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries consumption pattern. #12;Energy per Capita ( E / Pop = E / GDP x GDP / Pop ) Data ­ years 1980, 85,5 1 1,5 2 2,5 3 3,5 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 GDP/Pop (1000 US$ / Head) Energy/GDP(MBTU/100US;Emission of CO2 per capita from energy consumption C / Pop = C / E x E / P 1980, 85, 90, 85, 2000 and 2002

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

315

1 ICS 614 Projects (v.1) STRUCTURAL ISSUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ICS 614 Projects (v.1) STRUCTURAL ISSUES: 1. PATIENT IDENTIFICATION The bedeviling problem" and "information technology" in medicine? PROJECTS WITH AN INTERNATIONAL TWIST: 6. FINANCE Corruption in health Macro-health economics: How much should a country spend on health? 3% of GDP, 6% of GDP, 14% of GDP

Reed, Nancy E.

316

Multicriteria Analysis of Economic Activity for Two Groups of European Countries by Decision Support System MKA-1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Five macro-economic criteria have been considered in the analysis: GDP per capita; Exports (% of GDP); Imports (% of GDP); Inflation rate (consumer prices); Unemployment rate. Keywords: multicriteria analysis of multicriteria sorting. Many real life problems in management practice may be formulated as problems of choice

Borissova, Daniela

317

Economic Forces Driving Agriculture and the Seed Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980-2012 with projections until 2030 #12;World map weighted by GDP in 1960 #12;Real Gross Domestic;Population and real per capita GDP in `000 2005 dollars, 2012 and 2030 projections (US per capita income in 2050 Total population (est.) = 9.07 billion 11 #12;U.S. and world real per capita GDP in 2005 dollars

California at Davis, University of

318

Starting your career in United States of America Country Guide for International Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is rather gloomy at present.The US real gross domestic product (GDP) declined by 6.2% in the fourth quarter,which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP,also continued to decline. KEY FACTS:The US economy GDP real growth 2008.According to National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) projections, employers have revised their original

Neirotti, Juan Pablo

319

Energy Policy, Volume 39, Issue 4, April 2011, Pages 2165-2178 Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). With a dramatic reversal reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth, energy use per unit of GDP of this historic relationship, energy intensity increased 5% per year during 2002-2005. China`s 11th Five Year Plan

320

The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parity) Energy demand and GDP per capita (1980-2002) As GDP increases, so does the demand's population is in the Fast- developing regions. Primaryenergypercapita(GJ) GDP per capita (purchasing power;Introduction Top Ten problems of Humanity for next 50 years 1. Energy 2. Water 3

Crawford, T. Daniel

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321

Energy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDPannualgrowthrate 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 PercapitaGDP GDP Per capita GDP (index 1997=100) Source: CepalEnergy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing Conference on Energy Trading and Risk Management 21 - 22 November 2005, City University, London

Dixon, Juan

322

STATEMENT OF JOSEPH ROMM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in energy consumed per dollar of gross domestic product (GDP) declined (i.e., improved) by less than 1.2 percent a year, while energy demand grew 2.4 percent a year. In the Internet era (1996- 2000), GDP growth change ­ higher GDP growth and lower energy growth. From the point of view of greenhouse gases

323

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Star, the highest correlation is with metropolitan area GDP perEnergy Star buildings in total building stock as dependent variable, only GDP perEnergy Star LEED I II III I II III rentable building area number of stories year built classA classB GDP per

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Aid Effectiveness Literature: The Sad Results of 40 Years of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

covering every aspect of aid one can think of. Two points should be evident from the start: E1: Aid agencies aim at social rates of return of approximately 10% in feasibility studies of their projects. If this is realized, an aid share of 1% (of GDP... , the real rate of growth of gdp, that is, GDP per capita. Aid, h, as the share of development aid (ODA), H, of GDP/GNI, so that h = H/GDP. The model, g = g(h), may be uncontrolled or controlled for country heterogeneity, which we term absolute...

Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

325

ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and reconnaissance, part inspection, geometric modeling, laser-based 3D volumetric imaging, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), aiding first responders, and supporting soldiers with helmet-mounted LADAR for 3D mapping in urban-environment scenarios. The technology developed in this LDRD overcomes the limitations of current laser-based 3D sensors and contributes to the realization of intelligent machine systems reducing manpower need.

Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr. (.; .); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

LSST Charge-Coupled Device Calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prototype charge-coupled device created at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope must be tested to check its functionality and performance. It was installed into the Calypso telescope in Arizona in November of 2008 for this purpose. Since then it has taken many images of various astronomical objects. By doing photometry on standard stars in these images, we can compare our magnitude results to the known magnitudes of these stars. This comparison allows us to then determine the chip's performance and functional capabilities. Expecting to see first light in 2016, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an extremely large ground based telescope that anticipates funding and will be built in Chile. Described as 'Wide-Fast-Deep', the LSST will have an unprecedented wide field of view (ten square degrees for surveys), short exposures (fifteen to thirty seconds and still see faint objects), and the largest digital camera in the world. One of the goals hoped to be achieved with this camera is the measurement of dark matter using strong and weak gravitational lensing. Gravitational lensing occurs when a large cluster of galaxies distorts the light from a galaxy behind this cluster. This causes an arc of light to form around the cluster. By measuring the length of this arc, one can calculate how much matter should be present in the cluster. Since the amount that should be present is vastly greater than the amount of visible matter that can be seen, it is postulated that the difference between these two numbers is made up of dark matter. This is a direct way of measuring the amount of dark matter in the universe. Thousands of galaxy clusters will be seen with LSST, allowing precise measurements of strong lensing effects. Weak lensing is a much smaller effect, distorting the shape of galaxies by only a few percent. The scale of LSST will allow these small effects to be measured with a precision unavailable with current smaller surveys. Some of the other uses for the LSST will be cataloging the entire sky, observing exploding supernovae and near Earth objects, and probing into the nature of dark energy. Since the LSST is such a large project, one organization alone cannot build it. Therefore many organizations have come together, each one working on a specific part of the telescope's construction. Here at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) the camera is being designed.

Stout, Tiarra Johannas; /Idaho State U. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND2010-0714.

Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Application of Gaussian Process Modeling to Analysis of Functional Unreliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper applies Gaussian Process (GP) modeling to analysis of the functional unreliability of a passive system. GPs have been used widely in many ways [1]. The present application uses a GP for emulation of a system simulation code. Such an emulator can be applied in several distinct ways, discussed below. All applications illustrated in this paper have precedents in the literature; the present paper is an application of GP technology to a problem that was originally analyzed [2] using neural networks (NN), and later [3, 4] by a method called Alternating Conditional Expectations (ACE). This exercise enables a multifaceted comparison of both the processes and the results. Given knowledge of the range of possible values of key system variables, one could, in principle, quantify functional unreliability by sampling from their joint probability distribution, and performing a system simulation for each sample to determine whether the function succeeded for that particular setting of the variables. Using previously available system simulation codes, such an approach is generally impractical for a plant-scale problem. It has long been recognized, however, that a well-trained code emulator or surrogate could be used in a sampling process to quantify certain performance metrics, even for plant-scale problems. Response surfaces were used for this many years ago. But response surfaces are at their best for smoothly varying functions; in regions of parameter space where key system performance metrics may behave in complex ways, or even exhibit discontinuities, response surfaces are not the best available tool. This consideration was one of several that drove the work in [2]. In the present paper, (1) the original quantification of functional unreliability using NN [2], and later ACE [3], is reprised using GP; (2) additional information provided by the GP about uncertainty in the limit surface, generally unavailable in other representations, is discussed; (3) a simple forensic exercise is performed, analogous to the inverse problem of code calibration, but with an accident management spin: given an observation about containment pressure, what can we say about the system variables? References 1. For an introduction to GPs, see (for example) Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning, C. E. Rasmussen and C. K. I. Williams (MIT, 2006). 2. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Reactor Passive Safety Systems, J. J. Vandenkieboom, PhD Thesis (University of Michigan, 1996). 3. Z. Cui, J. C. Lee, J. J. Vandenkieboom, and R. W. Youngblood, Unreliability Quantification of a Containment Cooling System through ACE and ANN Algorithms, Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 85, 178 (2001). 4. Risk and Safety Analysis of Nuclear Systems, J. C. Lee and N. J. McCormick (Wiley, 2011). See especially 11.2.4.

R. Youngblood

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, big data). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this behavior analytics. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, Insights from Smart Meters, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

335

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for unattended or covert operation and in remote or inaccessible locations where the unavailability of LN{sub 2} and signal degradation from existing mechanical coolers prevent its use at the present time.

Coleman, RL

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain in effect, although deeper powder beds (up to 2 inches) also yielded temperatures of greater than 950 C for longer than 2 hours.

COMPTON, J.A.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

CFD SIMULATION OF PROPOSED VALIDATION DATA FOR A FLOW PROBLEM RECONFIGURED TO ELIMINATE AN UNDESIRABLE FLOW INSTABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting the development of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), which will be based on a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design. The VHTR is a single-phase helium-cooled reactor wherein the helium will be heated initially to 750 C and later to temperatures approaching 1000 C. The high temperatures are desired to increase reactor efficiency and to provide a heat source for the manufacture of hydrogen and other applications. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used in the past to design or license nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is expected that CFD will be used in the design and safety analysis of forthcoming designs. This is partly because of the maturity of CFD and partly because detailed information is desired of the flow and heat transfer inside the reactor to avoid hot spots and other conditions that might compromise reactor safety. Numerical computations of turbulent flow should be validated against experimental data for flow conditions that contain some or all of the physics expected in the thermal fluid machinery of interest. To this end, a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of the prismatic VHTR was constructed and installed in the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) matched index of refraction (MIR) test facility and data were taken. The data were then studied and compared to CFD calculations to help determine their suitability for validation data. One of the main findings was that the inlet data, which were measured and controlled by calibrated mass flow rotameters and were also measured using detailed stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) showed considerable discrepancies in mass flow rate between the two methods. The other finding was that a randomly unstable recirculation zone occurs in the flow. This instability has a very significant effect on the flow field in the vicinity of the inlet jets. Because its time scale is long and because it is apparently a random instability, it was deemed undesirable for a validation data set. It was predicted using CFD that by eliminating the first of the four jets, the recirculation zone could be stabilized. The present paper reports detailed results for the three-jet case with comparisons to the four-jet data inasmuch as three-jet data are still unavailable. Hence, the present simulations are true or blind predictions.

Richard W. Johnson; Hugh M. McIlroy

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within {+-} 4.5 mm coordinates shifting. IGRT using XVIcbs is critical to IMRT for prostate and H and N, especially SRT, SRS, and SBRT. To optimize this modality of IGRT, a vigilant QA program is indispensable. Prostate IGRT reveals treatment accuracy as subject to coordinates' adjustments; otherwise a 4.5-mm margin is required to allow for full dose coverage of the clinical target volume, notwithstanding toxicity to normal tissues.

Tsai, Jen-San, E-mail: jen-san.tsai@verizon.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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341

ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event. Beyond 7 days, only a few simple actions are needed to cope with the SBO for an indefinite amount of time. The operation of the ICS as the primary success path for mitigation of an SBO, allows for near immediate plant restart once power is restored. (authors)

Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W. [New Plants Engineering, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, M/CA 75, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28402 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Normetex Pump Alternatives Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying resistances to ionizing radiation - aromatic polymers such as polyimide Vespel (TM) and the elastomer EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) have been found to be more resistant to degradation in tritium than other polymers. This report presents information to help select replacement pumps for Normetex pumps in tritium systems. Several pumps being considered as Normetex replacement pumps are discussed.

Clark, E.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Second Quarter 2014 Volume 7, number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5% in Q2, 4.1% in Q3, and 2.6% in Q4. March projections for annual average real GDP provided. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reports U.S. real GDP expanded at an annual rate of 1.1% in Q1 2013, 2 coincides with positive signals from the market--accelerating GDP growth, employment gains, and rebounding

345

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mean Energy Efficiency, Carbon Intensity, Carbon Efficiency,GDP/CO 2 ) or carbon intensity (CO 2 /energy) are common2009). Moreover, the carbon intensity of countries CO 2

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Chapter 2: Sustainable and Unsustainable Developments in the U.S. Energy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Combustion by Sector (MtCO2/$ GDP Source: EIA, AER 2006; IEA, Carbon Emissions from Fossil Fuel Combustion;

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Theory and Practice of Decoupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sales on costs. customer (SPC).2 This regression yields thei::i:i:::::! ::::! :! ::!.. Intercept % A SPC - Expected %A SPC- Unexpected % A Customers % A Capital % A GDP % A

Eto, J.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP Unit Year Total Energy Consumption (tce/thousand yuan)Textile printing, total energy consumption Viscose fiber (refining (cane), total energy consumption Sugar refining (

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency GDP - Gross domestic product NGL - Natural gas liquids NHTSA -...

350

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soviet Union (Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Russia),kg CO 2 /$GDP FSS Ukraine Kazakhstan Iran East Asia BelarusAsia China South Africa Kazakhstan Malaysia Russia Thailand

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP Effect to Support Renewables Deployment. SPRU Workingmitigation provided by renewables by comparing natural gasthe impact that increased renewables penetration might be

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development and analysis of a sustainable, low energy house in a hot and humid climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product (GDP) was 23. 35 trillion US$, averaging 4, 212 US$ per capita. In the United States, the GDP was 6. 14 trillion US$ (26. 33'/o of the world' s GDP), averaging 23, 380 US$ per capita, whereas Thailand's GDP was 0. 12 trillion US$ (0. 55'/o... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by I . Haberl (Chair Committee) Keith E. Sylvester Member) Lan O. Dege man (Member) Phi lip J. Tabb (Head of Department) August 2002 Major Subject Architecture...

Chulsukon, Pattarayut

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (???and Evaluation of Energy Intensity Reduction and Pollutionto improve its energy intensity. In China, industrial energy

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A1 scenario forecasts GDP energy intensity to continue toby activity levels and the energy intensity of the specificDemand Activity x Energy Intensity Additional information on

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the end user while primary energy consumption includes finalWEC 2001). GDP Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) natural gasHistorical Primary Energy Consumption by sector Energy Use

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

PPPO Annual Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAREERS PPPO Careers USA Jobs LINKS DOE Links ProcurementSolicitations Paducah GDP Deactivation PPPO Contractors Contractor Employee Concerns External Regulators Glossary of Terms...

357

Binding Facility Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Lease Pursuant to the Lease Agreement Between the United States Department of Energy...

358

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Industrial and commercial... Renewable sources... Transportation uses... U.S. average energy use per person and per dollar of GDP declines through 2035 Growth in energy use is...

359

EIA-An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case - Preface...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

using the exogenous variables, such as population, exchange rates, trading countries' GDP, marginal tax rates, full-employment unemployment rate, some categories of government...

360

Microsoft PowerPoint - Georgetown lecture 3-29-10 final for distributi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for profit. Market opportunities are structured by policy. Strong policies drive clean energy investment Watts of renewable electricity per 1,000 GDP 31 Carbon cap Green Bank...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

Energy Policy ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption on a per capita or per productivity basis (e.g. kWh/capita, kWh/GDP), are widely usedEnergy Policy ] (

Jacobson, Arne

362

PPPO Official Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAREERS PPPO Careers USA Jobs LINKS DOE Links ProcurementSolicitations Paducah GDP Deactivation PPPO Contractors Contractor Employee Concerns External Regulators Glossary of Terms...

363

Technical Fact Sheets | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Workshop Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Sustainability Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with...

364

Binding Facility Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Lease Pursuant to the Lease Agreement Between the United States Department oEnergy...

365

Portsmouth Paducah Project Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAREERS PPPO Careers USA Jobs LINKS DOE Links ProcurementSolicitations Paducah GDP Deactivation PPPO Contractors Contractor Employee Concerns External Regulators Glossary of Terms...

366

Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

infrastructure Education and training Policy EEREAMO Focus * Manufacturing in the US * GDP and employment enhancement * Energy efficiency and clean energy industry * Energy...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - asphalt technology test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ti R h... change 12;Asphalt Industry Background & Challengesg g Approximately 68% of GDP utilizes our Source: Iowa State University, Office of Biorenewables Programs...

368

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the monitoring of energy intensity developments in theSchaeffer. 1997. Energy intensity in the iron and steelParity Internationally, Energy Intensity of GDP or subsector

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

--No Title--  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium Disposition Services' (UDS) contract has ended and BWCS assumed operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) facilities at the Portsmouth GDP, and the Paducah...

370

Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters) Total Export Profits ($) HDI Rank GDP/ cap Corrupt Rank FDI

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

371

The Labor Market Four Years Into the Crisis: Assessing Structural Explanations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey and Current Employment Statistics. Notes: All figuresStatistics, Current Employment Statistics. Notes: December-employment and GDP releases from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

Rothstein, Jesse

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Annex I Differentiation Proposals: Implications for Welfare, Equity and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capita, per GDP or specific economic structures or fuel mixes) will rapidly lead towards special pleading to suggest definitions that favor their own particular circumstances. Those with particularly energy-efficient economies propose carbon intensity of gross domestic product (GDP) as a criterion, poorer countries suggest

373

Jack Eskin & Jessica Page Economic Development II (Assignment 1) Professor Drucker 10-year study shows creative class city, business recruitment city have had  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strength through the use of four variables: per capita personal income, regional GDP, average annual, per capita income, GDP, and total employment were weighted closely in value in this index. Having successfully built upon their foundation as a leader in aerospace and energy production

Illinois at Chicago, University of

374

The tropics may be defined as the region between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of1 Capricorn (i.e., within 23.5E N and S latitude), or according to ecozone, based on temperature,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transiting from socialism. Among the top1 30 countries ranked by 1994 per capita GDP, only four small million in 1994. Of these, 27 are outside of Europe. The richest of these are Turkemenistan (1994 GDP per income levels to natural resources, energy in the cases of Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan, and diamonds

375

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 509527 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 73% for Brazil, and 92% for Russia. While GDP per capita has the usual northern industrialized-marketed economic value from two classified satellite images with global coverage at 1 km2 resolution. GDP (a measure of marketed economic output) is correlated with the amount of light energy (LE) emitted

Vermont, University of

376

MODELLING AND FORECASTING THE NUMBER OF ELVS IN 25 EU MEMBER STATES ANDERSEN Frits Mller, LARSEN Helge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vehicles per capita with data for the age distribution of the car fleet and the statistical lifetime are reported in the literature, mainly focusing on effects related to congestion of traffic or energy. In Dargey and Gately (1997), a GDP-dependent Gompertz function where the vehicle density depends on the GDP

377

Economists' Voice www.bepress.com/ev January, 2009 The Berkeley Electronic Press Eurozone: The High Cost of Complacency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators (in- flation, interest rates, fiscal balance) and far better real ones (GDP per capita growth, un- employment, labour productivity). GDP per capita growth has actually de- creased in Eurozone countries in the Eurozone, as it does more generally in the European Union. The reason it absorbs so much time and energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Too Little, Too Late? Oops? 19 June 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, modernizes infrastructure and saves 13,000 lives per year via improved air quality. GDP increases, with fee-and-dividend causing a cumulative GDP increase of $1.375 trillion. Why do these results differ from previous studies performance, #12;energy independence, and national security ­ making it much easier for the President

Hansen, James E.

379

Growth Versus Government Management Improvement During  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we find that the growth rate of GDP per capita, g, decreases with p, and increases with DGCI. Further 33% of govern- ment employees has increased its GDP per capita by approximately 4% (corrected and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physical Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 200092, Shanghai

Podobnik, Boris

380

WORKING PAPER N 2011 -6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these two components and estimate their e ect on the growth and the international di erences in GDP per that continue to preoccupy economists. Besides the traditional inputs - labor, capital, energy and other to explain comovements in an- nual GDP series of 5 Latin American countries over a 50-year period

Boyer, Edmond

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381

Reflections on the topic of the polemics of Mr. Illarionov from a specialist in the field of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(no more than 2.5% per year). It is not difficult to figure out that for every 1% increase in GDP, according to our calculations, and based on data from the Ministry of Energy and the Russian State Statistical Agency (GosKomStat), in 2003, emissions in Russia have not exceeded 72% of emissions in 1990. GDP

Fischlin, Andreas

382

CRT MONTREAL FEBRUARY 27, 2004 HYBRID OPERATIONAL STRATEGIES for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CRT MONTREAL FEBRUARY 27, 2004 HYBRID OPERATIONAL STRATEGIES for REAL-TIME FLEET MANAGEMENT 5% GDP, accounts for 81 % shipping cost International trade has grown from the equivalent of 13 percent of the GDP in 1990 to 27 percent today. Freight will double in the next 20 years, straining our

Marcotte, Patrice

383

Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two decades [26]. Some researchers project that the share of health care spending in GDP of US 17% of the GDP and provides jobs to 11% of the workforce [26]. Increasing spending due to aging pop that are not sustainable. The rate of growth in US health care spending (5% annually in real terms) for the last decade

Yanikoglu, Berrin

384

DETERMINANTS OF CROSS-BORDER MERGERS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Stein (1991)) Generally, projects in the country with depreciating currency become more profitable #12;DATA: COUNTRY/FIRM VARIABLES Country-level Valuation: real exchange rate returns, real market income tax rates Trade: maximum of bilateral import and export Development: GDP per capita, GDP growth

Lin, Xiaodong

385

Visualizing Multivariate Network Using GeoSOM and Spherical Disk Layout School of Information Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Connections in the network describe relationships/activities between the data points. Many real world data countries are repre- sented as nodes, each country has properties like gross domestic product (GDP), GDP Previously, we treat each graph node as a point in high-dimensional space and use GeoSOM to project the nodes

Hong,Seokhee

386

DO COUNTRIES FALSIFY ECONOMIC DATA STRATEGICALLY? SOME EVIDENCE THAT THEY DO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are recording the real situation in cooperation with the Bank of Greece. To put a final end to the obscurity for helpful comments. All remaining errors are ours. This research was carried out within the INRIA project its GDP growth numbers. Even the United States came under scrutiny of the market after GDP growth

387

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-13-01 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dollars and "real" dollars. Dividing the current dollars by the real dollars yields the GDP Implicit Price and other systems are relevant to magnetic fusion energy (MFE). In the mid 90's, the ARIES Project6 began, such as the U.S. Commerce Department Gross Domestic Product8 (GDP), which is a measure of the output of goods

California at San Diego, University of

388

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-out, by quarter, of each broad category. To estimate the likely impact of the fiscal stimulus package on real GDP, as projects swing into action, the government will gather actual data on reported job creation. This report and professional forecasters. Our particular multipliers for an increase in government purchases of 1% of GDP

389

Globalization and Emerging Stock Market Integration: Evidence from a FIVECM-MGARCH Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-third of all humanity, India and China have averaged real GDP growth of 9 percent and 6 percent per year over & international asset valuation, project analysis and political risk. He is also extensively involved in PPP-adjusted GDP terms, according to the World Bank. The world's largest communist state (China

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

390

The Long-Term Economic Impacts of Implementing the Energy Security Leadership Council's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. First, higher real GDP and income levels mean that the consumption of energy and oil will be higher, all flows in the economy, such as energy use, with macroeconomic aggregates, such as GDP, consumption, the LIFT model was used to simulate the impact of its policies compared to a LIFT baseline projection

Hill, Wendell T.

391

METROPOLITAN REPORT Economic Indicators for the New Orleans Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the real GDP advance estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) in early August. After a disappointing first quarter, when the real GDP declined by 2%, the US economy bounced back at the end of June a disappointing first quarter when the real output declined by 2%, the US economy bounced back at the end of June

Li, X. Rong

392

UHERO FORECAST PROJECT DECEMBER 5, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deficits. After solid 3% growth this year, real GDP growth will recede a bit for the next two years. New household spending. Real GDP will firm above 3% in 2015. · The pace of growth in China has continuedUHERO FORECAST PROJECT DECEMBER 5, 2014 Asia-Pacific Forecast: Press Version: Embargoed Until 2

393

NDIAYE Gora 2nd year student in Networks & Telecommunications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· FRANCE Presentation ISITV · INTERNSHIP Project #12;Where find the good & best life? SENEGAL #12 · Population: 14 million · Area: 192712 km ² · GDP / H: $ 1 900 · Currency: CFA franc 1 = 655.957CFA $ 1 = 530 · Capital: Paris · Population: 65 million · Area: 675417km ² · GDP / H: $ 41018 · Currency: Euro 1 = 1

Trajkovic, Ljiljana

394

Perspectives on the Current State Of the Milwaukee Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years in real metro GDP growth ­a measure of total economic activity in a region--compared to a group: Real GDP Growth: 1978-2010 Selected Metropolitan Areas (in billions market has become increasingly segmented (along racial and gender lines) and polarized, with projections

Saldin, Dilano

395

The Influence of Education on Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regression we analyze the comparative differences in growth in GDP/capita as measured by Angus Maddisons historical GDP dataset among the nations of the world between 1870 and 1950. Education data comes from the recently published educational attainment...

Garcia, Julia

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

ORNL/TM-2005/45 COSTS OF U.S. OIL DEPENDENCE: 2005 UPDATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................29 5.2 CASE 1A: OIL PRICE ELASTICITY OF GDP VARIES WITH OIL COST SHARE .......................................................................................................36 5.3 CASE 1B: OIL PRICE ELASTICITY OF GDP CONSTANT OVER TIME ......37 5.4 CASE 2: STOCHASTIC ....................................................................................40 5.6 THE IMPACT OF CONTINUED HIGH OIL PRICES IN 2005..........................42 6. CONCLUSIONS

397

NCCR North-South Dialogue, no. 38 India and the Millennium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including women and young people 21 3.1 Indicator 4: GDP per person employed 21 3.2 Indicator 5: Employment in India, 1977-78 to 2004-05, in per cent 12 Figure 3: GDP per person employed, India, 1980 to 2008: Proportion of population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption 34 5 The Policy Approach

Richner, Heinz

398

Energy Efficiency Supporting Policy and Heat Pumping Technology in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% improvement energy consumption per real GDP of Japan> Ref: METI/ Energy Data Modeling Centre, which results from taking various countermeasures for energy conservation. energy supply per, comprehensive energy statistics *Total consumption of primary energy (tons in crude oil equivalent) / real GDP

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

399

Fusion Power, Who Needs it -An Updated Assessment !!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disparity in the per capita energy consumption of nations with developed and developing economies. As the latter economies become stronger, they need more energy for GDP growth and for improving the quality 511 1380 ~ 1/6 of World Average India 280 440 1990 2003 #12;GDP vs Energy Consumption in Japan #12

400

Energy Policy, Volume 38: Issue 11. November 2010 Overview of Current Energy Efficiency Policies in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the period 2002-2005 saw energy use per unit of GDP increase an average of 3.8% per year. To stem this out to significantly limit energy demand growth through aggressive energy efficiency programs. Energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) declined by approximately 5% per year during this period. However

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401

Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Energy efficiency improvements) · Per capita income increases · Industrialized regions GDP from 20 by IIASA. (Ecological and Energy efficiency improvements) · Per capita income increases #12;Energy demand improvements) · Per capita income increases · Industrialized regions GDP from 20,000 USD/yr to 50,000 USD

402

Extractive Economies, Growth, and the Poor Graham A. Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, poverty, or per capita gross domestic product (GDP) relative to the level of that same indicator in a group of peer economies; and their growth in human devel- opment, poverty, or per capita GDP relative development. Some stud- ies find that mineral- and energy-intensive economies have higher levels of develop

403

VOL 5, ISSUE 4 Greenhouse Gas Emmissions in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total emissions in the West is emphasized by examining emissions per capita or per dollar of GDP equivalent Emissions per $ million of GDP(constant $2007) 1 About 80% of the emissions are actually carbon). With their energy-intensive economies, Saskatchewan and Alberta together account for nearly one-half of the 2012 GHG

Peak, Derek

404

UT-Battelle Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Battelle Department of Energy CO2 emissions and GDP per capita (1980­2004) United States Australia Brazil China India,000 40,000 GDP per capita (PPP, $2000) CO2emissionspercapita(tCO2) Russia Japan FranceGreece SourceUT-Battelle Department of Energy Welcome to Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented to Fusion Power

405

Modeling Energy Market Volatility Using REMI October 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources: WTI prices from EIA, Short Term Energy Outlook, Table 2 and GDP deflator from Bureau of Economic ($2005) Henry Hub Spot Price Sources: WTI prices from EIA, Short Term Energy Outlook, Table 2 and GDP Percent Change In Real Coal Price ($2005 Per short ton) Sources: Coal prices from EIA, Annual Energy

Johnson, Eric E.

406

Energy saving policy and emission decreasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,9648,2787,4016,6985,9Electricity consumption E (TWh)3 13,8510,858,1085,7814,32GDP (bill. LVL)2 56765GDP grows (% per year)1Energy saving policy and emission decreasing Latvian experienceLatvian experience Dr. A. Davis, M of fuelNr. Table1. Primary energy consumption in Latvia #12;Introduction Table 2. Formation of pollutants

407

GROUPE D'ANALYSE ET DE THORIE CONOMIQUE LYON -ST TIENNE W P 1232  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per head, energy intensity (energy-to-GDP ratio) and carbon intensity (carbon-to-energy ratio identity expresses carbon dioxide emissions of a country according to economic, demographic and energy factors. From this equation, several studies decompose into periods, the effects of the population, GDP

Boyer, Edmond

408

2 APRIL 2010 VOL 328 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org50 POLICYFORUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has aimed to lower energy consump- tion per unit of GDP by 20% between 2006 and 2010 (8) through economic restructuring and closing outdated factories. Furthermore, China plans to reduce CO2 emissions per unit of GDP by 40 to 45% from its 2005 level by 2020 through developing a low-carbon econ- omy and more

409

IDEAS from IBM 23 July 2007 IDEAS from IBM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Care in Australia The Children's Hospital at Westmead (PDF, 397K) Melbourne Health (PDF, 34.8K of health in Australia · Total health expenditure in 2004/05 (latest figures) was $87.3 billion or $4,319 per person and 9.8% of GDP 2 · 11th highest health expenditure to GDP percentage for OECD countries2

410

Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate. During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8% per year from 1973 to 2008. In the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9% from 2008 to 2035.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Non-nuclear power sources for deep space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Final Scientific/Technical Report, USDOE Award DE-FG-02ER54684, Recipient: CompX, Project Title: Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole radial plasma cross-section. The actual EBW experiment will cost several million dollars, and remains in the proposal stage. The HHFW current drive system has been experimentally implemented on NSTX, and successfully drives substantial current. The understanding of the experiment is to be accomplished in terms of general concepts of rf current drive, and also detailed modeling of the experiment which can discern the various competing processes which necessarily occur simultaneously in the experiment. An early discovery of the CompX codes, GENRAY and CQL3D, was that there could be significant interference between the neutral beam injection fast ions in the machine (injected for plasma heating) and the HHFW energy. Under many NSTX experimental conditions, power which could go to the fast ions would then be unavailable for current drive by the desired HHFW interaction with electrons. This result has been born out by experiments; the modeling helps in understanding difficulties with HHFW current drive, and has enabled adjustment of the experiment to avoid interaction with neutral beam injected fast ions thereby achieving stronger HHFW current drive. The detailed physics modeling of the various competing processes is almost always required in fusion energy plasma physics, to ensure a reasonably accurate and certain interpretation of the experiment, enabling the confident design of future, more advanced experiments and ultimately a commercial fusion reactor. More recent work entails detailed investigation of the interaction of the HHFW radiation for fast ions, accounting for the particularly large radius orbits in NSTX, and correlations between multiple HHFW-ion interactions. The spherical aspect of the NSTX experiment emphasized particular physics such as the large orbits which are present to some degree in all tokamaks, but gives clearer clues on the resulting physics phenomena since competing physics effects are reduced.

R.W. Harvey, CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Innovative Approach to Prevent Acid Drainage from Uranium Mill Tailings Based on the Application of Na-Ferrate (VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of uranium mining and milling plants gives rise to huge amounts of wastes from both mining and milling operations. When pyrite is present in these materials, the generation of acid drainage can take place and result in the contamination of underground and surface waters through the leaching of heavy metals and radionuclides. To solve this problem, many studies have been conducted to find cost-effective solutions to manage acid mine drainage; however, no adequate strategy to deal with sulfide-ric h wastes is currently available. Ferrate (VI) is a powerful oxidizing agent in aqueous media. Under acidic conditions, the redox potential of the Ferrate (VI) ion is the highest of any other oxidant used in wastewater treatment processes. The standard half cell reduction potential of ferrate (VI) has been determined as +2.20 V to + 0.72 V in acidic and basic solutions, respectively. Ferrate (VI) exhibits a multitude of advantageous properties, including higher reactivity and selectivity than traditional oxidant alternatives, as well as disinfectant, flocculating, and coagulant properties. Despite numerous beneficial properties in environmental applications, ferrate (VI) has remained commercially unavailable. Starting in 1953, different methods for producing a high purity, powdered ferrate (VI) product were developed. However, producing this dry, stabilized ferrate (VI) product required numerous process steps which led to excessive synthesis costs (over $20/lb) thereby preventing bulk industrial use. Recently a novel synthesis method for the production of a liquid ferrate (VI) based on hypochlorite oxidation of ferric ion in strongly alkaline solutions has been discovered (USPTO 6,790,428; September 14, 2004). This on-site synthesis process dramatically reduces manufacturing cost for the production of ferrate (VI) by utilizing common commodity feedstocks. This breakthrough means that for the first time ferrate (VI) can be an economical alternative to treating acid mining drainage generating materials. The objective of the present study was to investigate a methodology of preventing the generation of acid drainage by applying ferrate (VI) to acid generating materials prior to the disposal in impoundments or piles. Oxidizing the pyritic material in mining waste could diminish the potential for acid generation and its related environmental risks and long-term costs at disposal sites. The effectiveness of toxic metals removal from acid mine drainage by applying ferrate (VI) is also examined. Preliminary results presented in this paper show that the oxidation of pyrite by ferrate is a first-order rate reaction in Fe(VI) with a half-life of about six hours. The stability of Fe(VI) in water solutions will not influence the reaction rate in a significant manner. New low-cost production methods for making liquid ferrate on-site makes this technology a very attractive option to mitigate one of the most pressing environmental problems in the mining industry. (authors)

Fernandes, H.M.; Reinhart, D.; Lettie, L.; Franklin, M.R. [University of Central Florida, P.O. Box. 162450, Orlando, FL, 32816-2450 (United States); Fernandes, H.M.; Franklin, M.R. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende s/n - Recreio - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - 22795-090 (Brazil); Sharma, V. [Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Daly, L.J. [Ferrate Treatment Technologies, LLC, 6432 Pine Castle Blvd. Unit 2C, Orlando, FL, 32809 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Computational Approach to Understanding Aerosol Formation and Oxidant Chemistry in the Troposphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of aerosol formation and ozone production in the troposphere is currently a high priority because these phenomena are recognized as two major effects of energy-related air pollution. Atmospheric aerosols are of concern because of their effect on visibility, climate, and human health. Equally important, aerosols can change the chemistry of the atmosphere, in dramatic fashion, by providing new chemical pathways (in the condensed phase) unavailable in the gas phase. The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and inorganic compounds (e.g., sulfuric acid, ammonia, nitric acid, ions, and mineral) can produce precursor molecules that act as nucleation seeds. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) has identified the need to evaluate the causes of variations in tropospheric aerosol chemical composition and concentrations, including determining the sources of aerosol particles and the fraction of such that are of primary and secondary origin. In particular, the ACP has called for a deeper understanding into aerosol formation because nucleation creates substantial concentrations of fresh particles that, via growth and coagulation, influence the Earth's radiation budget. Tropospheric ozone is also of concern primarily because of its impact on human health. Ozone levels are controlled by NOx and by VOCs in the lower troposphere. The VOCs can be either from natural emissions from such sources as vegetation and phytoplankton or from anthropogenic sources such as automobiles and oil-fueled power production plants. The major oxidant for VOCs in the atmosphere is the OH radical. With the increase in VOC emissions, there is rising concern regarding the available abundance of HOx species needed to initiate oxidation. Over the last five years, there have been four field studies aimed at initial measurements of HOx species (OH and HO? radicals). These measurements revealed HOx levels that are two to four times higher than expected from the commonly assumed primary sources. Such elevated abundances of HOx imply a more photochemically active troposphere than previously thought. This implies that rates of ozone formation in the lower region of the atmosphere and the oxidation of SO? can be enhanced, thus promoting the formation of new aerosol properties. Central to unraveling this chemistry is the ability to assess the photochemical product distributions resulting from the photodissociation of by-products of VOC oxidation. We propose to use state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of aerosol formation in multicomponent (mixed chemical) systems and the photochemistry of atmospheric organic species. The aerosol studies involve an approach that determines homogeneous gas-particle nucleation rates from knowledge of the molecular interactions that are used to define properties of molecular clusters. Over the past several years we developed Dynamical Nucleation Theory (DNT), a novel advance in the theoretical description of homogeneous gas-liquid nucleation, and applied it to gas-liquid nucleation of a single component system (e.g., water). The goal of the present research is to build upon these advances by extending the theory to multicomponent systems important in the atmosphere (such as clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ions, ammonia, and organics). In addition, high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations will be used to unravel the chemical reactivity of the OH radical and water clusters.

Francisco, Joseph S.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Du, Shiyu; Dixon, David A.; Bianco, Roberto; Wang, Shuzhi; Hynes, James T.; Morita, Akihiro; Peterson, Kirk A.

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of both systematic and statistical uncertainties, including correlations, are critical to the assessment of both the experimental measurements (due to variations between experimental techniques, irradiation conditions, calibration procedures, etc.), and the evaluation of those experiments to extract fundamental nuclear data. A clear example of the importance of uncertainty analysis is in the justification for energy-dependent {sup 147}Nd fission product yield, where the magnitude of the effect is comparable to the uncertainties of the individual fission product yield measurements. Both LANL and LLNL are committed to the inclusion of full uncertainty analysis in their evaluations. (6) The Panel reviewed in detail two methods for determining/evaluating fission product yields from which fission assessments can be made: the K factor method and high-resolution gamma spectroscopy (both described more fully in Sections 3 and 4). The panel concluded that fission product yields, and thus fission assessments, derived using either approach are equally valid, provided that the data were obtained from well understood, direct fission measurements and that the key underlying calibrations and/or data are valid for each technique. (7) The Panel found the process of peer review of the two complementary but independent methods to be an extremely useful exercise. Although work is still ongoing and the numbers presented to the Panel may change slightly, both groups are now in much better agreement on not just one, but four key fission product yields. The groups also have a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of each other's methods.

Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

Summary of Booster Development and Qualification Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines booster development work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2007 to present. The booster is a critical link in the initiation train of explosive assemblies, from complex devices like nuclear weapons to conventional munitions. The booster bridges the gap from a small, relatively sensitive detonator to an insensitive, but massive, main charge. The movement throughout the explosives development community is to use more and more insensitive explosive components. With that, more energy is needed out of the booster. It has to initiate reliably, promptly, powerfully and safely. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides a summary of a collaborative effort between LANL, LLNL, and AWE to identify candidate materials and uniformly develop a testing plan for new boosters. Important parameters and the tests required to measure them were defined. The nature of the collaboration and the specific goals of the participating partners has changed over time, but the booster development plan stands on its own merit as a complete description of the test protocol necessary to compare and qualify booster materials, and is discussed in its entirety in this report. The second section describes a project, which began in 2009 with the Department of Defense to develop replacement booster formulations for PBXN-7. Replacement of PBXN-7 was necessary because it contained Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), which was becoming unavailable to the DoD and because it contained Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), which was sensitive and toxic. A LANL-developed explosive, Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF), was an important candidate. This project required any replacement formulation be a drop-in replacement in existing munitions. This project was timely, in that it made use of the collaborative booster development project, and had the additional constraint of matching shock sensitivity. Additionally it needed to be a safety improvement, and a performance improvement, especially at cold temperatures. The requirements of this project necessitated novel test development and a different approach to ranking booster qualities. Results of this project have been documented to the DoD and the relevant portions are included within. The third section of this booster report outlines testing related to main charge initiation merit. Initiability can be evaluated by looking at critical diameter, run distance, and shock sensitivity. Once a booster is initiated, it needs to be powerful enough to initiate the main charge symmetrically and evenly. Main charge initiability is evaluated directly by observing detonation wave symmetry, curvature, and first break out over the surface of a charge. Furthermore it must be insensitive to accidents and insults, and safe and reliable across a range of temperatures. These effects, tests, and results will be discussed individually in the context of DAAF and other explosives similarly tested. The last section provides a conclusion and summary of our experimental work and recommendations for the path forward. References and additional supporting documentation and results are provided in the appendices at the end of this report.

Francois, Elizabeth G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harry, Herbert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartline, Ernest L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, Kyle J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanders, Victor E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, Christina A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorenz, Thomas [LLNL; Wright, Mark [AWE; Botcher, Tod [PANTEX; Marx, Erin [NSWC-IHDIV; Gibson, Kevin [NSWC-IHDIV

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOEs contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

Gu, April Z [Northeastern University; Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univeristy

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as well as the benefits in expanding the range over which individual control mechanisms are effective for cycle control. However, a combination of mechanisms is still required for control of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle between 0 and 100 % load. An effort is underway to partially validate the Argonne models and codes by means of comparison with data from tests carried out using the small-scale Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL) recuperated gas closed Brayton cycle facility. The centrifugal compressor model has been compared with data from the SBL operating with nitrogen gas and good agreement is obtained between calculations and the measured data for the compressor outlet pressure versus flow rate, although it is necessary to assume values for certain model parameters which require information about the configuration or dimensions of the compressor components that is unavailable. Unfortunately, the compressor efficiency cannot be compared with experiment data due to the lack of outlet temperature data. A radial inflow turbine model has been developed to enable further comparison of calculations with data from the SBL which incorporates both a radial inflow turbine as well as a radial compressor. Preliminary calculations of pressure ratio and efficiency versus flow rate have been carried out using the radial inflow turbine model.

Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require regular review and comparison. The annual reports discussed here are the primary sources for these reviews. The pathways of interest are air and groundwater for both operational and post-closure conditions at the LLBG, with groundwater considered to be the most significant long-term exposure pathway. Constituents that contributed at least 0.1% of the total relative hazard were selected as target analytes for monitoring. These are technetium-99, uranium, and iodine-129. Because of its environmental unavailability, carbon 14 was removed from the list of constituents. Given the potential uncertainties in inventories at the 200 Area LLBG and the usefulness of tritium as a contaminant indicator, tritium will be monitored as a constituent of concern at all burial grounds. Preexisting contamination plumes in groundwater beneath low-level waste management areas are attributed to other past-practice liquid waste disposal sites. Groundwater and air will be sampled and analyzed for radiogenic components. Subsidence monitoring will also be performed on a regular basis. The existing near-facility and surveillance air monitoring programs are sufficient to satisfy the performance assessment monitoring. Groundwater monitoring will utilize the existing network of wells at the LLBG, and co-sampling with RCRA groundwater monitoring, to be sampled semiannually. Installation of additional wells is currently underway to replace wells that have gone dry.

None

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Historical Evaluation of the U15 Complex, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U15 Complex on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Three underground nuclear tests and two underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were conducted at the complex. The nuclear tests were Hard Hat in 1962, Tiny Tot in 1965, and Pile Driver in 1966. The Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests involved different types of experiment sections in test drifts at various distances from the explosion in order to determine which sections could best survive in order to design underground command centers. The Tiny Tot nuclear test involved an underground cavity in which the nuclear test was executed. It also provided data in designing underground structures and facilities to withstand a nuclear attack. The underground nuclear fuel storage experiments were Heater Test 1 from 1977 to 1978 and Spent Fuel Test - Climax from 1978 to 1985. Heater Test 1 was used to design the later Spent Fuel Test - Climax experiment. The latter experiment was a model of a larger underground storage facility and primarily involved recording the conditions of the spent fuel and the surrounding granite medium. Fieldwork was performed intermittently in the summers of 2011 and 2013, totaling 17 days. Access to the underground tunnel complex is sealed and unavailable. Restricted to the surface, four buildings, four structures, and 92 features associated with nuclear testing and fuel storage experiment activities at the U15 Complex have been recorded. Most of these are along the west side of the complex and next to the primary access road and are characteristic of an industrial mining site, albeit one with scientific interests. The geomorphological fieldwork was conducted over three days in the summer of 2011. It was discovered that major modifications to the terrain have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to the tests and experiments, and construction of drill pads and retention ponds. Six large trenches for exploring across the Boundary geologic fault are also present. The U15 Complex, designated historic district 143 and site 26NY15177, is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under Criteria A, C, and D of 36 CFR Part 60.4. As a historic district and archaeological site eligible to the National Register of Historic Places, the Desert Research Institute recommends that the area defined for the U15 Complex, historic district 143 and site 26NY15117, be left in place in its current condition. The U15 Complex should also be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations.

Drollinger, Harold [DRI; Holz, Barbara A [DRI; Bullard, Thomas F [DRI; Goldenberg, Nancy G [Carey & Co; Ashbaugh, Laurence J [DRI; Griffin, Wayne R [DRI

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pressurized Oxidative Recovery of Energy from Biomass Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the technical feasibility of using pressurized oxyfuel, the ThermoEnergy Integrated Power System (TIPS), to recover energy from biomass. The study was focused on two frontscomputer simulation of the TIPS plant and corrosion testing to determine the best materials of construction for the critical heat exchanger components of the process. The goals were to demonstrate that a successful strategy of applying the TIPS process to wood waste could be achieved. To fully investigate the technical and economic benefits of using TIPS, it was necessary to model a conventional air-fired biomass power plant for comparison purposes. The TIPS process recovers and utilizes the latent heat of vaporization of water entrained in the fuel or produced during combustion. This latent heat energy is unavailable in the ambient processes. An average composition of wood waste based on data from the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Southwest, and the South was used for the study. The high moisture content of wood waste is a major advantage of the TIPS process. The process can utilize the higher heating value of the fuel by condensing most of the water vapor in the flue gas and making the flue gas a useful source of heat. This is a considerable thermal efficiency gain over conventional power plants which use the lower heating value of the fuel. The elevated pressure also allows TIPS the option of recovering CO2 at near ambient temperatures with high purity oxygen used in combustion. Unlike ambient pressure processes which need high energy multi-stage CO2 compression to supply pipeline quality product, TIPS is able to simply pump the CO2 liquid using very little auxiliary power. In this study, a 15.0 MWe net biomass power plant was modeled, and when a CO2 pump was included it only used 0.1 MWe auxiliary power. The need for refrigeration is eliminated at such pressures resulting in significant energy, capital, and operating and maintenance savings. Since wood waste is a fuel with a high moisture and hydrogen content, it is one of the best applications for TIPS. The only way to fully utilize the latent heat is by using a pressurized system and the oxy-fuel approach allows for carbon capture and easier emission control. Pressurized operation also allows for easier emission control than atmospheric oxyfuel because presence of infiltration air in the atmospheric case. For the case of wood waste as the fuel however, the ability of TIPS to fully utilize the heat of condensation is the most valuable advantage of the process. The project research showed that titanium alloys were the best materials of construction for the heat exchangers. All other materials tested failed to withstand even brief periods in the harsh environment (high temperature, acidic, and oxidizing conditions). Titanium was able to survive due to the formation of a stable TiO2 passivation layer.

M. Misra

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

APS Science 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is my pleasure to introduce the 2009 annual report of the Advanced Photon Source. This was a very good year for us. We operated with high reliability and availability, despite growing problems with obsolete systems, and our users produced a record output of publications. The number of user experiments increased by 14% from 2008 to more than 3600. We congratulate the recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry-Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (Cambridge Institute for Medical Research), Thomas Steitz (Yale University), and Ada Yonath (Weizmann Institute) - who did a substantial amount of this work at APS beamlines. Thanks to the efforts of our users and staff, and the ongoing counsel of the APS Scientific Advisory Committee, we made major progress in advancing our planning for the upgrade of the APS (APS-U), producing a proposal that was positively reviewed. We hope to get formal approval in 2010 to begin the upgrade. With advocacy from our users and the support of our sponsor, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, our operating budgets have grown to the level needed to more adequately staff our beamlines. We were also extremely fortunate to have received $7.9 M in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ('stimulus') funding to acquire new detectors and improve several of our beamlines. The success of the new Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, the world's first x-ray free-electron laser, made us particularly proud since the undulators were designed and built by the APS. Among other highlights, we note that more than one-quarter of the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, funded competitively across the U.S. in 2009 by the DOE, included the Advanced Photon Source in their proposed work, which shows that synchrotron radiation, and the APS in particular, are central to energy research. While APS research covers everything from fundamental to applied science (reflected by the highlights in this report), the challenge of sustainable energy provides an opportunity for expanded involvement with industrial research. We were privileged to recruit several outstanding new leaders at the APS. Linda Young, from Argonne's Chemical Sciences Division, became the new Director of the X-ray Science Division (XSD). Chris Jacobsen (from Stony Brook University) has been added to Linda's team as an XSD Associate Division Director, joining George Srajer. Alexander (Sasha) Zholents (formerly of Berkeley Lab) became Director of the Accelerator Systems Division. Sasha is the inventor of the short-pulse x-ray scheme that we plan to implement in the APS-U to obtain very high average brightness, broadband, 1-ps x-ray pulses. Walter Lowe (formerly of Howard University) has taken a new position as senior advisor for outreach and development of the user community. Walter's role is to increase the diversity of the user community (with diversity read broadly to include users, institutions, and technical disciplines that are underrepresented at APS). Walter is also leading an effort to increase access for industrial users. I am confident that we have in place a great team to help our users and the APS take fullest advantage of the APS-U opportunity. In planning with users for the proposed APS-U, we focused on the need to study 'real materials under real conditions in real time' on spatial and temporal scales unavailable today. Only by studying materials as they are made-or as they perform-in difficult environments can we solve the grand challenge of higher-performance, sustainable materials for energy and health. The proposed APS-U will improve the brightness of penetrating x-rays produced by the APS over 100 times, and support our efforts in developing state-of-the-art instruments to address these challenges.

Gibson, J. M; Mills, D. M.; Gerig, R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al diffusion from the coating into the substrate. An effective diffusion barrier interlayer coating was developed to prevent inward Al diffusion. The fire-side corrosion test results showed that the nanocrystalline coatings with a minimum number of defects have a great potential in providing corrosion protection. The coating tested in the most aggressive environment showed no evidence of coating spallation and/or corrosion attack after 1050 hours exposure. In contrast, evidence of coating spallation in isolated areas and corrosion attack of the base metal in the spalled areas were observed after 500 hours. These contrasting results after 500 and 1050 hours exposure suggest that the premature coating spallation in isolated areas may be related to the variation of defects in the coating between the samples. It is suspected that the cauliflower-type defects in the coating were presumably responsible for coating spallation in isolated areas. Thus, a defect free good quality coating is the key for the long-term durability of nanocrystalline coatings in corrosive environments. Thus, additional process optimization work is required to produce defect-free coatings prior to development of a coating application method for production parts.

J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Dense, Lighweight, Durable, Systems for Storage and Delivery of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this report summarizes the current state-of-the-art in on-board storage on compressed gaseous hydrogen as well as the development of analysis tools, methods, and theoretical data for devising high performance design configurations for hydrogen storage. The state-of-the-art in the area of compressed hydrogen storage reveals that the current configuration of the hydrogen storage tank is a seamless cylindrical part with two end domes. The tank is composed of an aluminum liner overwrapped with carbon fibers. Such a configuration was proved to sustain internal pressures up to 350 bars (5,000 psi). Finite-element stress analyses were performed on filament-wound hydrogen storage cylindrical tanks under the effect of internal pressure of 700 bars (10,000 psi). Tank deformations, stress fields, and intensities induced at the tank wall were examined. The results indicated that the aluminum liner can not sustain such a high pressure and initiate the tank failure. Thus, hydrogen tanks ought to be built entirely out of composite materials based on carbon fibers or other innovative composite materials. A spherical hydrogen storage tank was suggested within the scope of this project. A stress reduction was achieved by this change of the tank geometry, which allows for increasing the amount of the stored hydrogen and storage energy density. The finite element modeling of both cylindrical and spherical tank design configurations indicate that the formation of stress concentration zones in the vicinity of the valve inlet as well as the presence of high shear stresses in this area. Therefore, it is highly recommended to tailor the tank wall design to be thicker in this region and tapered to the required thickness in the rest of the tank shell. Innovative layout configurations of multiple tanks for enhanced conformability in limited space have been proposed and theoretically modeled using 3D finite element analysis. Optimum tailoring of fiber orientations and lay-ups are needed to relieve the high stress in regions of high stress concentrations between intersecting tanks/ tank sections. Filament winding process is the most suitable way for producing both cylindrical and spherical hydrogen storage tanks with high industrial quality. However, due to the unavailability of such equipment at West Virginia University and limited funding, the composite structures within this work were produced by hand layup and bag molding techniques. More advanced manufacturing processes can significantly increase the structural strength of the tank and enhances its performance and also further increase weight saving capabilities. The concept of using a carbon composite liner seems to be promising in overcoming the low strength of the aluminum liner at internal high pressures. This could be further enhanced by using MetPreg filament winding to produce such a liner. Innovative designs for the polar boss of the storage tanks and the valve connections are still needed to reduce the high stress formed in these zones to allow for the tank to accommodate higher internal pressures. The Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) approach was applied for fault-tolerant design and efficient maintenance of lightweight automotive structures made of composite materials. Potential effects of damage initiation and accumulation are formulated for various design configurations, with emphasis on lightweight fiber-reinforced composites. The CDM model considers damage associated with plasticity and fatigue.

Jacky Pruez; Samir Shoukry; Gergis William; Thomas Evans; Hermann Alcazar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

Michael Killian

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Development of an Advanced Fine Coal Suspension Dewatering Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advancement in fine coal cleaning technology, recovery of fine coal (minus 28 mesh) has become an attractive route for the U.S. coal industry. The clean coal recovered using the advanced flotation technology i.e. column flotation, contains on average 20% solids and 80% water, with an average particle size of 35 microns. Fine coal slurry is usually dewatered using a vacuum dewatering technique, providing a material with about 25 to 30 percent moisture. The process developed in this project will improve dewatering of fine (0.6mm) coal slurry to less than 20 percent moisture. Thus, thermal drying of dewatered wet coal will be eliminated. This will provide significant energy savings for the coal industry along with some environmental benefits. A 1% increase in recovery of coal and producing a filter cake material of less than 20 % moisture will amount to energy savings of 1900 trillion Btu/yr/unit. In terms of the amount of coal it will be about 0.8% of the total coal being used in the USA for electric power generation. It is difficult to dewater the fine clean coal slurry to about 20% moisture level using the conventional dewatering techniques. The finer the particle, the larger the surface area and thus, it retains large amounts of moisture on the surface. The coal industry has shown some reluctance in using the advanced coal recovery techniques, because of unavailability of an economical dewatering technique which can provide a product containing less than 20% moisture. The U.S.DOE and Industry has identified the dewatering of coal fines as a high priority problem. The goal of the proposed program is to develop and evaluate a novel two stage dewatering process developed at the University of Kentucky, which involves utilization of two forces, namely, vacuum and pressure for dewatering of fine coal slurries. It has been observed that a fine coal filter cake formed under vacuum has a porous structure with water trapped in the capillaries. When this porous cake is subjected to pressure for a short time, the free water present is released from the filter cake. Laboratory studies have shown that depending on the coal type a filter cake containing about 15% moisture could be obtained using the two-stage filtration technique. It was also noted that applying intermittent breaks in vacuum force during cake formation, which disturbed the cake structure, helped in removing moisture from the filter cakes. In this project a novel approach of cleaning coal using column flotation was also developed. With this approach the feed capacity of the column is increased significantly, and the column was also able to recover coarser size coal which usually gets lost in the process. The outcome of the research benefits the coal industry, utility industry, and indirectly the general public. The benefits can be counted in terms of clean energy, cleaner environment, and lower cost power.

B. K. Parekh; D. P. Patil

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace should make it a very valuable resource for the study of oxides being considered for application to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in that materials can be studied at potential operating temperatures in both reducing and oxidizing environments to determine their stoichiometry, and lattice parameters. Our research, which was predicated, in part, on the use of hydrogenous samples (as opposed to deuteration), demonstrated that such studies are feasible and can yield high quality, refinable data. The precision of the refined hydrogen positions appears to be more than adequate for theory calculations (molecular modeling-thermodynamics) and the uncertainty is certainly less than that achieved by attempting to extrapolate the hydrogen positions from refined deuterium positions. In fact the 2008 annual report from the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), the world's premier neutron scattering laboratory, highlights: Another trend is the increasing interest in hydrogen. This defies the widespread assumption that neutron diffraction experiments need to be done at deuterated samples. In situ experiments on phase transitions involving hydrogen and in particular on the real time behaviour of hydrogen-storage systems increase in number and scope. Our work in this area predates the ILL efforts be several years. Unfortunately, the productivity of our program was significantly curtailed by the unavailability of the MURR powder diffractometer for almost all of the second years of the project. The diffractometer was disassembled to allow partial extraction of the beam tube and replacement of the graphite element that is penetrated by the beam tube. Re-commissioning of the instrument was substantially delayed by errors of the MURR engineering staff, which failed to properly reinstall the sapphire filter that conditions the beam prior to the neutron monochromator, and reduces the radiological background to acceptable levels.

Yelon, William B.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

An Overview of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 U.S. OECD Europe Japan South Korea China India Brazil Middle East Africa Russia Energy Intensity GDP per capita Population Howard Gruenspecht, The Central Role of...

433

Essays on the stock market's reaction to macroeconomic news  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

topapadakis (2002) use a GARCH model of daily equity returnsGDP announcements using a simple GARCH framework for dailybe able to account for GARCH-type behavior of condi- tional

Cenesizoglu, Tolga

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The development of the contested city form of Shenzhen, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The population of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone has exploded, within twenty-three years, from thirty thousand to 4.7 million with average 28 percent annual per capita GDP increase. What city forms have been sustaining ...

Tian, Hao, 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Offshore Mineral Resources · Tourism and Recreation When to Use: Use Ocean Economy statistics to describe Counties were considered as an individual country, they would rank #3 in global GDP (behind only the U

436

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Strategic Environmental Assessment of the Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Objective 1 Regions in the European Union (those whose average per capita GDP is less than 75% of the EU, transport, tourism, energy, urbanization, etc.) and have played a key role in the economic development

Oñate, Juan J.

437

Ecological Development and Global Climate Change: A Cross-National Study of Kyoto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) output per unit of energy input, CO2 emissions per capita, and record of international cooperation and Cox proportional hazards regression tests show that democratic openness, gross domestic product (GDP

Lubell, Mark

438

COLUMBIA TALK OCTOBER 26, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-comparison. Will per capita GDP grow fast enough to help us solve internal problems? Will US cultural, political Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Atomic Energy Commission, were created. They

Shepard, Kenneth

439

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Intensity, Carbon Efficiency, 1973-2008, by World-Carbon Intensity, Carbon Efficiency, 1973-2008, by World-carbon intensity of countries CO 2 emissions per unit of GDP, were found to vary across the world-

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

MEASURING THE GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE CIRCULATION WITH SATELLITE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

topography. Using the GDP, along with long time series current meter moorings and numerous ship acoustic, ocean yachting, search and rescue, pollution monitoring, etc.) This paper describes the state

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Partisanship and Economic Policies in Developing Countries during Dismal Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

161 Figure 5.28. Uruguay: Fiscal Deficits as % GDP (1980-164 Figure 5.29. Uruguay: Social Protection vs. Education2006)165 Figure 5.30. Uruguay: Ratio of Social Protection

Kim, Julia Hyeyong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lessons for China from a comparison of logistics in the U.S. and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logistics efficiency is low in China. In 2008, total logistics costs accounted for 18.1% of gross domestic product (GDP) in China, which was almost twice that of the United States. Increasing logistics efficiency can save ...

Xiong, Ming, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 2.1 indicates, in the Reference case,...

444

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 2.1 indicates, in the Reference case,...

445

Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

term trend of a declining carbon intensity of energy supplyper capita (GDPppp/Pop) Carbon Intensity (CO2/TPES) EnergyTPES/GDP ppp ), Carbon Intensity of energy supply (CO 2 /

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rethinking wedges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expected decreases in the carbon intensity of GDP by ?1% peri.e. decreases in the carbon intensity of the global economyonly on the current carbon intensity of global energy and

Davis, Steven J; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP, 1970-1993 5. Total Energy Consumption by Sector forUrban Rural 3. Total Energy Consumption f Shares Year Mtceor about 6% of total energy consumption in 1992 (including

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The supply chain of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on GTAP data of energy consumed and trade in each region byper unit of energy. Using trade data, these emissions aretrade, economic inputoutput by sector, GDP, population, energy

Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon intensity of energy embodied in trade fossil fuelsf t ) and energy con- sumption per US$ of trade (e t ). Thetrade, economic inputoutput by sector, GDP, population, energy

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percentage of world energy consumption over the two decades,82 percent of total world energy consumption, as produced byof world GDP % of world energy consumption As is common in

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Quality Adjustment for Health Care Spending on Chronic Disease: Evidence from Diabetes Treatment, 19992009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although US health care expenditures reached 17.6 percent of GDP in 2009, quality measurement in this important service sector remains limited. Studying quality changes associated with 11 years of health care for patients ...

Eggleston, Karen N

452

www.risoe.dkMaj Munch Andersen Risoe National LaboratoryMaj Munch Andersen Risoe National LaboratoryMaj Munch AndersenMaj Munch Andersen Towards a greening of innovation systemsTowards a greening of innovation systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2010) ­ plans to invest US$175 billion in environmental protection (more than 1.5 pct. of GDP) ­ save water use-economic paradigm? · A full-world economy: A high environmental performance as an international standard

453

www.apre.it Universit degli Studi La Sapienza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nazionale: Bioeconomy NMP ERC borgna@apre.it #12;2014 - 2020 Europa 2020 Innovation Union 7 PQ EIT CIP;24 Scenari 2010 - 2050 World GDP (constant USD), Source: Global Europe 2050 2010 2050 #12;Multipol

Di Pillo, Gianni

454

UNDERSTANDING THE US-CHINA TRADE Henry Bowen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is in the midst of economic change Economic future uncertain for Chinese households Massive incentives to save, declined from 47% of GDP to 36% in past 10 years #12;CASE STUDY 3 recent changes to China's economic

New Hampshire, University of

455

Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometrics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has ...

Shi, Xiaoyu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 3232 Smartphone based health accessory for colorimetric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on oral health risks. Introduction The cost of healthcare in the U.S. is projected to reach 30% of the GDP noninvasive real-time analysis using disposable test strips. In this paper, we first introduce the system

Erickson, David

457

The ERD Policy Brief Series is based on papers or notes prepared by ADB staff and their resource persons. The series is designed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. #12;Projected Real GDP Growth by Country/Region (baseline, annualized percent change, 2005, Berkeley. This note is based on a research project "Long-Term Scenarios for Asian Growth and Trade, 2005

Kammen, Daniel M.

458

http://www.washington.edu/admin/pb/home/ Date: February 16, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of slow recovery, including Real GDP growth, the housing industry remains weak, unemployment high billion state budget deficit projected for the biennium at that time remains a problem to be solved

Stein, William

459

Slide 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2011 Total global oil production, 2002- 2011 (millions of barrels per day) World real GDP increased 17.5% (logarithmically) from 2004 to 2008 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 2002 2003...

460

Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and with universal emissions trading, assuming transparentpermits under an emission trading system are used to promoteGDP in 2012 without emissions trading, and 0.1-1.1% lower

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Is newer better? Penn World Table Revisions and their impact on growth estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper sheds light on two problems in the Penn World Table (PWT) GDP estimates. First, we show that these estimates vary substantially across different versions of the PWT despite being derived from very similar ...

Johnson, Simon

462

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aizhu Chen. Chinas energy intensity rises 3.2 pct in Q1. Table 1 Energy Use, Energy Intensity, and GDP Data (2005-2 Table 2 Frozen 2005 Energy Intensity Baseline and Reported

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a result, primary energy consumption per GDP in 2050 willC 0 emissions per primary energy consumption in 2050 will bebehind energy consumption, we have paid attention to primary

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

IT adoption in hospitals : social networking, governance and the clockspeed of change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The healthcare industry is expanding swiftly and total healthcare expenditures are expected to reach 18% of GDP by 2008. However there exist steep variances in quality of care and high incidences of medical error. This has ...

Samarth, Chandrika N. (Chandrika Nayantara)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bill, and its impact on the construction economy in Alabama. The study utilized construction employment rates, construction GDP, and construction spending as the major indices detailing the health of the construction economy in Alabama. This research...

Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

466

Compactness of Urban Growth, the Environment, and the Quality of Life: Evidence from China, 2000-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to per-capita energy consumption and carbon emissions, butmore per-capita energy consumption and carbon emission.of per-GDP-unit energy consumption and carbon emission.

Yuan, Quan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes the carbon emissions per unit of energy. Thisresult, lower energy use and carbon emissions per passengeremissions as the product of population, GDP per capita, energy intensity, and carbon

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related carbon emissions per unit GDP. Energy intensity: thes per capita emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide weres carbon emissions, per se. On the basis of NBS energy data,

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

automatic fiscal stabilisers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This paper examines the long term profile of fiscal deficit and debt relative to GDP in India, with a view to analysing debt-deficit sustainability issues along with the...

470

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

471

Income and Health Spending: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health expenditures as a share of GDP in the United States have more than tripled over the past half-century. A common conjecture is that this is a consequence of rising income. We investigate this hypothesis by instrumenting ...

Acemoglu, Daron

472

The Economic and Policy Consequences of Catastrophes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How likely is a catastrophic event that would substantially reduce the capital stock, GDP, and wealth? How much should society be willing to pay to reduce the probability or impact of a catastrophe? We answer these questions ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

473

Annual Review of Low-Carbon Development in China (2011-2012)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Five-Year Plan (FYP) period where China set a target of reducing its energy intensity (energy consumption per unit of GDP) by 20% compared to the 2005 baseline, and it achieved...

474

Fact #768: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

downs. Those ups and downs are also reflected in the change in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over time which shows a trend similar to the vehicle sales trend. Vehicle sales have...

475

ARPA-E 2011 Keynote: Secretary Steven Chu | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

investing big time. How much are they investing? Well, the top-10 countries in clean energy investments as a fraction of the GDP, we have Spain, China, the United Kingdom,...

476

ETC/RWM working paper 2008/2 Projection of end-of-life vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cars per capita (car density), GDP per capita and the vintage distribution of cars are com- bined. To estimate the number of ELVs, an EU energy and transport scenario, that includes projections

477

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Intensity Figure DataThe energy intensity of the U.S. economy, measured as primary energy use (in Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2005 dollars), declines by 40 percent from 2009 to 2035...

478

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

RFS target to be met as soon as possible. Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.1 percent from 2009 to 2035. Other energy market...

479

China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 billion in wages and benefits; 650 million in state and local taxes; and a total GDP contribution of 9.6 billion. What does this mean for tribal communities? Well,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

use per capita declining by 15 percent from 2011 to 2040 (Figure 8). From 1990 to 2011, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part...

482

3-26-09_Final_Testimony_(Rodgers).pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

dioxide from energy consumption in 2007. 5 1 McKinsey Global Institute, "Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth," May 2007. 2 Bureau of Economic Analysis (applies both to GDP...

483

Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To deepen the understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

Judson, Ruth A.

484

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

rate of 0.5 percent per year from 2010 to 2035 (Figure 9). figure dataFrom 1990 to 2010, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part...

485

A Resilient Real-Time Agent-Based System for a Reconfigurable Power Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outages and other power quality and reliability events to be 1% of GDP, or $100 billion per year [4 infrastructure that includes renewable or sustainable energy sources [1][2]. The existing energy management

Tolbert, Leon M.

486

Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To deepen understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

Judson, Ruth A.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.

487

Determinants of energy intensity in industrialized countries : a comparison of China and India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of final energy per unit of economic output (usually in terms of gross domestic product, or GDP), known as energy intensity, is often used to measure the effectiveness of energy use and the consumption patterns ...

Huang, Feiya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4288.022461,4495.833008,4718.956055 "Energy Intensity" " (thousand Btu per 2000 dollar of GDP)" " Delivered Energy",6.45164299,6.422497749,6.280744553,6.26495409,6.143614769,6.0102...

489

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4369.788574,4597.428223,4843.846191 "Energy Intensity" " (thousand Btu per 2000 dollar of GDP)" " Delivered Energy",6.45164299,6.422497749,6.283946991,6.304526806,6.22622776,6.0826...

490

Responses of African economies to the international economic shocks: an empirical study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1970-2007. The results suggest that there is no decoupling. 12 countries are exposed to OEDC GDP per prolonged recessions." Nkomo (2006) studied the relationship between world oil price movements, energy

491

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

share spent on services rising mainly as a result of increasing expenditures on health care. The share of GDP devoted to business fixed investment ranges from 10 percent to 17...

492

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

share spent on services rising mainly as a result of increasing expenditures on health care. The share of GDP devoted to business fixed investment ranges from 10 percent to 17...

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex ii technical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GDP of about 0.2% to 2% in 2010 for different Annex II regions. With full emissions trading between... to Annex II countries. Under assumptions of dras- tic ... Source:...

494

Urban and rural policies and the climate change issue: the French experience of governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) The carbon intensity of the French GDP decreased by 17% during the period 1990-2003 (i.e. an annual decrease-2012. Although this objective is weak1 compared to other European Union (EU) countries, the projected emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

495

EMEF DMC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GDP :MMES MMUS NCS OSHA PGDP PORTS RCW S&M USEC EFS-95-002 ACRONYMS decontamination and decommissioning Department ofEnergy environmental safety and health gaseous diffusion...

496

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No.4 Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario towe projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-relatedcrises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The benefits of taking a big bank into a small woodland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$93 billion revenue · bigger than GDP of Vietnam, Bangladesh or Morocco $2.4 trillion assets · bigger to deliver a business project 100 Gave me the knowledge and resources to influence others 100 Helped me

498

Design and implementation of multi-asset funds in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

India, over the past decade, has steadily emerged as a center of attractive investment opportunities, owing to high GDP growth rates and rising levels of per capita income. Asset management in India is going through a ...

Singh, Yuvraj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

43 International trends in CO2 emissions and GDP per capita,53 Figure 62 Transport CO2 Emission Reduction under AIS by54 Figure 63 AIS EV Change in CO2 Emissions Relative to

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Executive summaries of reports leading to the construction of the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summaries have been written for 61 reports and compilations of data which in part, have led to the construction of the Baca 50 MW Geothermal Demonstration Project (GDP). The reports and data include environmental research, reservoir and feasibility studies, the project proposal to DOE and the Final Environmental Impact Statement. These executive summaries are intended to give the reader a general overview of each report prior to requesting the report from the GDP Data Manager.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.; Westermeier, J.F.; Giroux, H.D.; Lowe, G.D.; Nienberg, M.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z