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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Effect of condition monitoring on unavailability of a steam turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forced unavailability of E-production plants and the dominant components with regard to unavailability are well known if the organization involved gathers and analyses failure information for some time. For example, in the Netherlands failure information is gathered since 1976. Since 1988 until 1996 failure information was improved by discussions with personnel at the plants involved. However, the relation between forced (unplanned) unavailability and overhauls of systems and components (planned unavailability) is generally not well known. This relation in quantitative form is extremely important in order to optimize for overhauls as well as optimizing condition monitoring systems. By analysis of the cumulative number of failures as a function of time one is able to arrive at a statistical model such as a Weibull model or a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the stated conventional failure information . This model should be valid for a repairable system and should describe either infant mortality or a wear out behavior, preferably both. The model will describe the cumulative number of failures taking into account the effects of past overhauls. Overhauls may be well regarded of as opportunities to remove potential failures before they become critical.

Wels, H.C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Preamble: CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

618 618 Federal Register / Vol. 51, No. 80 / Friday, April 25, 1986 / Rules a n d Regulations - -- COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 40 CFR Part 1502 National Environmental Pollcy Act Regulations; Incomplete or Unavailable Information AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) promulgates regulations, binding on all federal agencies, to implement the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The regulations address the administration of the NEPA process, including preparation of environmental impact statements for major federal actions which significantly affect the quality of the human environment. On August 9 . 1985, CEQ published a proposed

3

80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or 80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information, Final Rule 80 Fed Reg 15618:CEQ NEPA regulations (1986): Incomplete or Unavailable Information, Final Rule The final amendment requires all federal agencies to disclose the fact of incomplete or unavailable information when evaluating reasonably foreseeable significant adverse impacts on the human environment in an EIS, and to obtain that information if the overall costs of doing so are not exorbitant. If the agency is unable to obtain the information because overall costs are exorbitant or because the means to obtain it are not known, the agency must (1) affirmatively discIose the fact that such information is unavailable; (2) explain the relevance of the unavailable information; (3) summarize the existing credible scientific evidence which

4

Comparison of the unavailability using FT model and Markov model of SDS1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Candu nuclear power plants, the unavailability of the shutdown system number 1 (SDS1) is not only a function of the component failure rate, but also the test interval, the test duration, and the channel configuration. In classical fault tree methods, the effect of the configuration change and the test duration is usually ignored. To analyze their effects on the unavailability, a dynamic fault tree model and a Markov process model of the shutdown system number 1 have been developed and quantified using the high neutron power trip channel data in this paper. It is shown that the Markov process model of the SDS1 trip channel provides the most conservative results, while the dynamic fault tree model offers the least conservative one. The unavailability decreases as the test frequency and the test duration increases in both models. (authors)

Cho, S.; Jiang, J. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ont. N6A 5B9 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Kosovo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Kosovo Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code XK 3-letter ISO code...

6

Falkland Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Falkland Islands Population 2,932 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FK 3-letter ISO code...

7

Sensitivity analysis on the effect of software-induced common cause failure probability in the computer-based reactor trip system unavailability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor trip system has been digitized in advanced nuclear power plants, since the programmable nature of computer based systems has a number of advantages over non-programmable systems. However, software is still vulnerable to common cause failure (CCF). Residual software faults represent a CCF concern, which threat the implemented achievements. This study attempts to assess the effectiveness of so-called defensive strategies against software CCF with respect to reliability. Sensitivity analysis has been performed by re-quantifying the models upon changing the software failure probability. Importance measures then have been estimated in order to reveal the specific contribution of software CCF in the trip failure probability. The results reveal the importance and effectiveness of signal and software diversity as applicable strategies to ameliorate inefficiencies due to software CCF in the reactor trip system (RTS). No significant change has been observed in the rate of RTS failure probability for the basic software CCF greater than 1 × 10?4. However, the related Fussell–Vesley has been greater than 0.005, for the lower values. The study concludes that consideration of risk associated with the software based systems is a multi-variant function which requires compromising among them in more precise and comprehensive studies.

Shahabeddin Kamyab; Mohammadreza Nematollahi; Golnoush Shafiee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

9

American Samoa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name American Samoa Population 55,519 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AS 3-letter ISO...

10

Electricity demand, GDP and employment: evidence from Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper applies time series methodologies to examine the causal relationship among electricity demand, real per capita GDP and total labor force for Italy from 1970 to 2009. After a brief introduction, a su...

Cosimo Magazzino

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The link between energy and GDP in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historical studies of the energy-demand patterns of the industrial countries show increasing energy intensity followed by decreasing intensity. To explore the energy intensity patterns of developing countries, a data base was assembled for 38 developing countries. The data base contains estimates of per capita energy demand and GDP for 1950, 1960, 1970 and 1980. If the GDP is measured using the purchasing power parity method, analysis of the data base demonstrates an increase in energy intensity as countries develop.

David B. Reister

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1 Ming-Jie Lu, C.-Y. Cynthia consumption and GDP for several industries. We not only analyze the effects of multiple types of energy impact different kinds of energy consumption and the GDP of different kinds of industries using

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

13

EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTIN...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

111111111111111111111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-004 GDP TURNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACTING OPTIONS This document is approved f()i puolic release per review by: er "-...

14

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 11111111 EMEF DMC EFS-95-003 GDP TuRNOVER CONTINGENCY PLANNING POWER CONTRACT TERMINATION PROVISIONS AND CONSEQUENCES I JULY 1995 B. J. Kirby Power Systems Technology Program...

16

Causal relationship between energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia: aggregated and disaggregated analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the causality between energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia for the 1980 to 2009 period at both aggregated and disaggregated levels as oil, natural gas, and electricity. To determine the Granger causality in the presence of cointegration between variables, a vector error correction model (VECM) is used instead of an autoregressive model (VAR). In the short-run, the neutrality hypothesis is supported between total energy consumption and GDP. This is also true between GDP and oil consumption in one hand and the gas consumption in other hand. Whereas a unidirectional is detected from electricity to the GDP is found (growth hypothesis). In the long-run, total energy consumption, in aggregate and disaggregated forms (gas and electricity) causes GDP (growth hypothesis). For against GDP causes oil consumption (conservation hypothesis). Consequently, the policy makers in Tunisia should place priority an increased commitment to aggregated and disaggregated energy consumption will stabilise the country's inefficient spending and allow it to have a stable income stream in the short-term to raise capital for its long-term investments.

Mehdi Abid; Rafaa Mraihi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Oil market power and United States national security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assuming cOPEC demand growth of 2% (2004 cOPEC demand is unavailable...that importer demand reduction might...power, not oil per se, creates...military spending per capita (38). Iran's...However, Iran's energy consumption equals...domestic product (GDP) (39...

Roger Stern

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy-GDP decoupling in a second best world -A case study on India Cline Guivarcha,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

too optimistic views on spontaneous energy-GDP decoupling of emerging countries economies projections from MERGE for China with recent trends, the World Energy Outlook 2007 (IEA, 2007 the specificities of the developing countries' energy systems. In particular, it appears that most models neglect

Boyer, Edmond

19

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGO HGO HFO RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

20

GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RG LPG R95 R100 RG LPG CN CGO RG Refinery Operation and Management - J.P. Favennec Crude Distillation1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Investigating the impact of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission: A panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the influence of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission in 30 major nuclear energy consuming countries. The panel mode was used taking the period 1990–2010. The results of the study indicated that nuclear energy consumption has a positive long run effect on GDP growth while it has no long run effect on CO2 emission. The Granger causality test results also revealed that nuclear energy consumption has a positive short run causal relationship with GDP growth while it has a negative short run causal relationship with CO2 emission. Based on the results of this study, nuclear energy consumption has an important role in increasing GDP growth in the investigated countries with no effect on CO2 emission. Consequently, unlike fossil fuels which also increase GDP growth, nuclear energy consumption causes less damage to the environment. From the results of the study, a number of recommendations were provided for the investigated countries.

Usama Al-mulali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

23

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP from 2006 toEnergy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 to 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that structural breaks may be important. Since the economy depends heavily on oil revenue, oil price shocks haveThe Long-Run Relationship between Money, Nominal GDP, and the Price Level in Venezuela: 1950 and the price level in the Venezuelan economy. We apply time-series econometric techniques to annual data

Ahmad, Sajjad

25

Interactions between Rho \\{GTPases\\} and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (Rho-GDI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor (Rho-GDI) was used as bait in a two-hybrid screen of a human leucocyte cDNA library. Most of the isolated cDNAs encoded \\{GTPases\\} of the Rho subfamily: RhoA, B, C, Rac1, 2, CDC42 and RhoG. The newly discovered RhoH interacted very poorly with Rho-GDI. Another protein partner shared a homology with RhoA that points to Asp67RhoA-Arg68RhoA-Leu69RhoA as critical for interaction with Rho-GDI. A second screen with RhoA as bait led to the isolation of GDI only. In order to investigate the relative role of protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions between Rho \\{GTPases\\} and Rho-GDI, CAAX box mutants of RhoA were produced. They were found to interact with Rho-GDI as efficiently as wild type RhoA, indicating that protein-protein interactions alone lead to strong binding of the two proteins. The C-terminal polybasic region of RhoA was also shown to be a site of protein-protein interaction with Rho-GDI.

Julien Fauré; Marie-Claire Dagher

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Helix Dipole Movement and Conformational Variability Contribute to Allosteric GDP Release in G[alpha] Subunits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterotrimeric G proteins (Galphabetagamma) transmit signals from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream effectors through a guanine nucleotide signaling cycle. Numerous studies indicate that the carboxy-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha subunits participates in Galpha-receptor binding, and previous EPR studies suggest this receptor-mediated interaction induces a rotation and translation of the alpha5 helix of the Galpha subunit [Oldham, W. M., et al. (2006) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13, 772-777]. On the basis of this result, an engineered disulfide bond was designed to constrain the alpha5 helix of Galpha(i1) into its EPR-measured receptor-associated conformation through the introduction of cysteines at position 56 in the alpha1 helix and position 333 in the alpha5 helix (I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1)). A functional mimetic of the EPR-measured alpha5 helix dipole movement upon receptor association was additionally created by introduction of a positive charge at the amino terminus of this helix, D328R Galpha(i1). Both proteins exhibit a dramatically elevated level of basal nucleotide exchange. The 2.9 A resolution crystal structure of I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) in complex with GDP-AlF(4)(-) reveals the shift of the alpha5 helix toward the guanine nucleotide binding site that is anticipated by EPR measurements. The structure of the I56C/Q333C Galpha(i1) subunit further revealed altered positions for the switch regions and throughout the Galpha(i1) subunit, accompanied by significantly elevated crystallographic temperature factors. Combined with previous evidence in the literature, the structural analysis supports the critical role of electrostatics of the alpha5 helix dipole and overall conformational variability during nucleotide release.

Preininger, Anita M.; Funk, Michael A.; Oldham, William M.; Meier, Scott M.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Adhikary, Suraj; Kimple, Adam J.; Siderovski, David P.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, Tina M.; (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. Thecommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Radical Attack on GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2 (GDI-2) in Spinal Cord Injury of the Rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Radical Attack on GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2 (GDI-2) in Spinal Cord Injury of the Rat ... Herein, mass spectrometry unambiguously identified GDP-dissociation inhibitor-2 (GDI-2) in SCI with post-translational modifications of 3-aminotyrosine (8 h post-injury) and an acrolein adduct of GDI-2 (72 h post-injury). ... Protein profiling in SCI of the rat revealed that, at 8 h following the traumatic lesion, levels of a signalling protein, GDP-dissociation inhibitor-2 protein (GDI-2) (synonym:? Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta), were increased about 3-fold, and we therefore decided to use this potentially important signalling structure to study the presence of oxidation- and nitration-induced PTMs in SCI. ...

Julius Paul Pradeep John; Oliver Pintsov; Alexander Petter-Puchner; Heinz Redl; Arnold Pollak; Wei-Qiang Chen; Gert Lubec

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Outage Log  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1814 4:45 PST 111814 10:18 PST Project Unavailable. 111214 0:22 PST - Hopper IDLMATLABMathematica unavailable on Hopper. 111214 0:22 PST - Edison IDLMATLABMathematica...

30

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

31

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

32

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

33

Problem Formulations for Simulation-based Design Optimization ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 19, 2014 ... Abstract: Typical challenges of simulation-based design optimization include unavailable gradients and unreliable approximations thereof, ...

Bastien Talgorn

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Projects: Units II and III Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Environmental Science Associates Published Environmental Impact Report, prepared for Energy Management...

35

Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Assignment of the human GDI.D4 gene, a GDP/GTP-exchange regulator to chromosome 12, band 12p12.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins performs a wide spectrum of critical cellular functions. Their biochemical activities are dependent on finely controlled cycles of GDP/GTP exchange. Regulators of this exchange are consequently molecules of pivotal importance, indicated by the increasing evidence for their involvement in oncogenic transformation and human diseases. GDP-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) inhibit the activation of GTP-binding proteins by inhibiting the exchange of GDPs and GTPs and may therefore function as tumor-suppressors. We have cloned the cDNA for a novel GDI named GDI-D4, characterized by its high level of expression preferentially in hematopoietic cells. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have now localized the human gene to chromosome 12p12.3, a region deleted in a high frequency of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia.

Adra, C.N.; Lim, B. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kobayashi, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: {beta}-D-Galactoside 2-{alpha}-Lfucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor. 30 figs.

Lowe, J.B.; Lennon, G.; Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Kelly, R.J.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferases, DNA sequences encoding the same, method for producing the same and a method of genotyping a person  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gene encoding GDP-L-fucose: .beta.-D-Galactoside 2-.alpha.-L-fucosyltransferase has been cloned, and a mutation in this gene has been found to be responsible for an individual being a non-secretor.

Lowe, John B. (3125 Bolgos Cir., Ann Arbor, MI 48105); Lennon, Gregory (8309 Norris Canyon, Castro Valley, CA 94552); Rouquier, Sylvie (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Giorgi, Dominique (5, rue du Cannau, 34000 Montpellier, FR); Kelly, Robert J. (3164 Concord, Trenton, MI 48183)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Purification and characterization from rat liver cytosol of a GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for liver 24K G, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, with properties similar to those of smg p25A GDI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification and characterization from rat liver cytosol of a GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for liver 24K G, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, with properties similar to those of smg p25A GDI ...

Takashi Ueda; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Toshihiko Ohmori; Harumasa Ohyanagi; Yoichi Saitoh; Yoshimi Takai

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The R6A-1 peptide binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1} but is not a GDP-dissociation inhibitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that convert signals from membrane receptors into changes in intracellular physiology. Recently, several peptides that bind heterotrimeric G-protein {alpha} subunits have been isolated including the novel G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP binding peptides R6A and KB-752. The R6A peptide and its minimized derivative R6A-1 interact with G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP. Based on spectroscopic analysis of BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S binding to G{alpha}{sub i1}, it has been reported that R6A-1 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity against G{alpha}{sub i1} [W.W. Ja, R.W. Roberts, Biochemistry 43 (28) (2004) 9265-9275]. Using radioligand binding, we show that R6A-1 is not a GDI for G{alpha}{sub i1} subunits. Furthermore, we demonstrate that R6A-1 reduces the fluorescence quantum yield of the G{alpha}{sub i1}-BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S complex, thus explaining the previously reported GDI activity as a fluorescence artifact. We further show that R6A-1 has significant sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor peptide KB-752 that binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1}. We use competitive binding analysis to show that R6A-1 also binds to switch II of G{alpha} subunits.

Willard, Francis S. [Department of Pharmacology, CB 7365, 1106 Mary Ellen Jones Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7365 (United States)]. E-mail: fwillard@med.unc.edu; Siderovski, David P. [Department of Pharmacology, CB 7365, 1106 Mary Ellen Jones Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7365 (United States)

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Magma Energy Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Article: The Magma Energy Exploratory Well Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors John T. Finger and John C. Eichelberger Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council...

42

INTERNATIONAL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Libya next on the slate for Point Four aid . . . ... Polystyrene diverted from Indian plastics industry to American synthetic rubber manufacture since War's outbreak . . . ... Polystyrene Unavailable to India's Plastics ... ...

1950-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Microsoft Word - Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 Table 2-3. Configuration results for the example given one pump train is unavailable. ... 24 Table 3-1. Cut set generation results...

44

A Preliminary Study of the Waters of the Jemez Plateau, New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Waters of the Jemez Plateau, New Mexico Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors Clyde Kelly and E.V. Anspach Published Journal University of New Mexico Bulletin, Chemistry...

45

The Thermal Conductivity of Rocks and Its Dependence Upon Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unavailable. Authors F. Birch and H. Clark Published Journal American Journal of Science, 1940 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

46

Resurgent cauldrons | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

library Journal Article: Resurgent cauldrons Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors R L Smith and R A Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoir 116, 1968 DOI...

47

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV;...

48

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

effects of fuel composition are unavailable for PM emissions from LTC modes. Assess nano-particles from LTC by comparison of particle sizes measured by scanning mobility...

49

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind generators have also been used to provide power toand wind generators is negligible in the national con- text, but provide otherwise unavailable power to

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Structure of a GDP:AlF4 Complex of the SRP \\{GTPases\\} Ffh and FtsY, and Identification of a Peripheral Nucleotide Interaction Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The signal recognition particle (SRP) \\{GTPases\\} Ffh and FtsY play a central role in co-translational targeting of proteins, assembling in a GTP-dependent manner to generate the SRP targeting complex at the membrane. A suite of residues in FtsY have been identified that are essential for the hydrolysis of GTP that accompanies disengagement. We have argued previously on structural grounds that this region mediates interactions that serve to activate the complex for disengagement and term it the activation region. We report here the structure of a complex of the SRP \\{GTPases\\} formed in the presence of GDP:AlF4. This complex accommodates the putative transition-state analog without undergoing significant change from the structure of the ground-state complex formed in the presence of the GTP analog GMPPCP. However, small shifts that do occur within the shared catalytic chamber may be functionally important. Remarkably, an external nucleotide interaction site was identified at the activation region, revealed by an unexpected contaminating GMP molecule bound adjacent to the catalytic chamber. This site exhibits conserved sequence and structural features that suggest a direct interaction with RNA plays a role in regulating the activity of the SRP targeting complex.

Pamela J. Focia; Joseph Gawronski-Salerno; John S. Coon V; Douglas M. Freymann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Weapon Systems Maxime Monnin, LAMIH, University of Valenciennes Benoit Iung, PhD, CRAN, Nancy University of unavailability. Military weapon systems can become unavailable due to system failures or damage to the system. This paper aims to define principles for weapon systems modeling that integrate both system failure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Form PI-1 General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit General Application for Air Preconstruction Permit Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Form PI-1 Air Preconstruction Permit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form_PI-1_General_Application_for_Air_Preconstruction_Permit&oldid=631449" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863640201

53

Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Notice_of_Intent_(NOI)_for_Storm_Water_Discharges_Associated_with_Construction_Activities_under_TPDES_General_Permit_(TXR150000)&oldid=598006"

54

The International Heat Flow Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The International Heat Flow Commission The International Heat Flow Commission Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The International Heat Flow Commission Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): A. E. Beck, V. Cermak Published: Geothermics, 1989 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Data Acquisition-Manipulation (Beck & Cermak, 1989) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_International_Heat_Flow_Commission&oldid=387748" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863774514

55

Levels of the Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) are altered in the prenatal restrain stress mouse model of schizophrenia and are differentially regulated by the mGlu2/3 receptor agonists, LY379268 and LY354740  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract LY379268 and LY354740, two agonists of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors, display different potencies in mouse models of schizophrenia. This differential effect of the two drugs remains unexplained. We performed a proteomic analysis in cultured cortical neurons challenged with either LY379268 or LY354740. Among the few proteins that were differentially influenced by the two drugs, Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor-? (Rab GDI?) was down-regulated by LY379268 and showed a trend to an up-regulation in response to LY354740. In cultured hippocampal neurons, LY379268 selectively down-regulated the ? isoform of Rab GDI. Rab GDI inhibits the activity of the synaptic vesicle-associated protein, Rab3A, and is reduced in the brain of schizophrenic patients. We examined the expression of Rab GDI in mice exposed to prenatal stress (“PRS mice”), which have been described as a putative model of schizophrenia. Rab GDI? protein levels were increased in the hippocampus of PRS mice at postnatal days (PND)1 and 21, but not at PND60. At PND21, PRS mice also showed a reduced depolarization-evoked [3H]d-aspartate release in hippocampal synaptosomes. The increase in Rab GDI? levels in the hippocampus of PRS mice was reversed by a 7-days treatment with LY379268 (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not by treatment with equal doses of LY354740. These data strengthen the validity of PRS mice as a model of schizophrenia, and show for the first time a pharmacodynamic difference between LY379268 and LY354740 which might be taken into account in an attempt to explain the differential effect of the two drugs across mouse models.

Rosamaria Orlando; Marina Borro; Marta Motolese; Gemma Molinaro; Sergio Scaccianoce; Alessandra Caruso; Luigi di Nuzzo; Filippo Caraci; Francesco Matrisciano; Anna Pittaluga; Jerome Mairesse; Maurizio Simmaco; Robert Nisticò; James A. Monn; Ferdinando Nicoletti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Magma Energy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: The Magma Energy Program Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors T.Y. Chu, J.C. Dunn, John T. Finger, John B. Rundle and H.R. Westrich Published Journal Geothermal...

57

BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Job Openings at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials The CFN Jobs List is currently unavailable. You may search for CFN positions in the Lab's job list. About CFN The...

58

A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage in a hostile environment, they are particularly vulnerable in sit- uations of unavailability. Military weapon principles for weapon systems modeling that integrate both system failure and system damage, as well

Boyer, Edmond

59

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on the October 22, 2008, status document online. If unavailable, contact the Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office in Las Vegas at (702) 5 15-5230 and reference File No....

60

Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

V CTHS System Operation Procedures Front Matter C.S.O. 1: Target Fabrication (unavailable pending review) C.S.O. 2: Moving Cryostat Transfer Cart C.S.O. 3: Tritium Fill Station...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Renewable Energy Powered Membrane Technology. 1. Development and Characterization of a Photovoltaic Hybrid Membrane System   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the unavailability of power in many such situations, renewable energy is an obvious solution to power such systems. However, renewable energy is an intermittent power supply and with regards to the performance of intermittently operated desalination systems, only...

Schäfer, Andrea; Broeckmann, Andreas; Richards, Bryce

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Concentrating on Solar Electricity and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...power, pose a “storage problem.” They...unavailable. Aside from pumped hydropower, large-scale storage of electricity is...Spain already have a storage capacity for 7 to...industrial processes, for seawater desalination, or...

Martin Roeb; Hans Müller-Steinhagen

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Developing sustainable food supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unavailable, and oil palm estate and cooperative schemes...value from (more) sustainable production, especially...being developed by the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative...achieve separately (Sustainable Food Laboratory 2005...businesses focus on making a real difference and often...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Design of a lightweight camping cot using carbon fiber tent poles and ripstop nylon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lightweight camping cot is currently unavailable in the backpacking market. Although camping cots do exist, they are not competitive in weight and size with sleeping pads typically used by campers. On average, sleeping ...

Ward, Walton (Walton Henry)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

INTRODUCTION The abundance and activity of many soil-dwelling organisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be limited, as water is biologically unavailable in the form of ice. Similarly, during the austral summer, terrestrial microhabitats may dry depending on the vagaries of precipitation, wind, temperature and insulation

Wall, Diana

67

Surrogate modeling for large-scale black-box systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research introduces a systematic method to reduce the complexity of large-scale blackbox systems for which the governing equations are unavailable. For such systems, surrogate models are critical for many applications, ...

Liem, Rhea Patricia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not...

69

Denver: 128th Annual Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...director, Laboratory for Insulation Re-search, Massachusetts...parts-customized to meet your own specifications. In addition, Keystone...been unavailable. Detailed specification sheets explain the operation...space power generation and thermal control system. Powered...

1961-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Web Facts and Fantasy Stephen Manley, Network Appliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites (intranet servers have been omitted from this study due to the unavailability of intranet server to derive our Web site taxonomy and outlines the basic growth characteristics of these sites. Section 3

71

Environemental Health and Safety www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with immediate needs. There are public and private utility crews, who work to restore electricity, telephone, such as electricity, water, gas and telephone, may be unavailable for hours or weeks. You need to know how to cope

Pawlowski, Wojtek

72

Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

results from eastern Long Valley Caldera Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors J.L. Smith and R.W. Rex Published American Nuclear Society, 1977 Report Number Energy and Mineral...

73

Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

74

Web Page Error 404.1 Page Cannot be Found  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are looking for cannot be found. The Web site you are looking for is unavailable due to its identification configuration settings. Please try the following: If you typed the page...

75

Principal Types of Volcanoes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Principal Types of Volcanoes Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author John Watson Published U.S....

76

MonteCarlo and Analytical Methods for Forced Outage Rate Calculations of Peaking Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(unavailability) of such units. This thesis examines the representation of peaking units using a four-state model and performs the analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations to examine whether such a model does indeed represent the peaking units...

Rondla, Preethi 1988-

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

U-232: Xen p2m_teardown() Bug Lets Local Guest OS Users Deny...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

unavailable and may cause the domain 0 kernel to panic. There is no requirement for memory sharing to be in use. Impact: A guest kernel can cause the host to become unresponsive...

78

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" 2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

79

Review of the energy supply status for sustainable development in the Organization of Islamic Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review describes the situation and the varying potential of energy supply utilization of countries in the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC). This exercise reveals that the increase in energy consumption is associated with economic growth and population expansion. The interconnectivity between energy use and national level, as well as the connection between energy utilization and gross domestic product (GDP), which is an indicator of economic development, must be explained to determine the significance of national energy utility in these countries. Therefore, alternative energy source utilization is necessary for the provision of an appreciable constituent of imminent energy requirements in sectors that utilize energy. Alternative energy source utilization is a crucial factor in ensuring the total capacity of energy sources in various growing economies of the world where clean energy is unavailable. Furthermore, some of these countries also possess alternative energy sources such as hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass. This paper provides details on sustainable energy supply developments in OIC countries. These countries must sustainably develop energy despite their sufficient wealth in crude oil and natural gas. The main purpose of this study is to determine economic growth in relation to energy supply to facilitate sustainable development. In addition, this paper suggests necessary requirements to sustain the energy development processes in OIC countries and as well as some stages that must be adopted to enhance development at a sustainable rate.

Mohamed Gabbasa; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Zahira Yaakob; M.Reza Faraji Zonooz; Ahmad Fudholi; Nilofar Asim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Remote_Detection_Of_Quaternary_Borate_Deposits_With_Aster_Satellite_Imagery_As_A_Geothermal_Exploration_Tool&oldid=389959

82

Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa By S E Ingebritsen, M A Scholl And D R Sherrod Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reply To The Comment By D D Blackwell And G R Priest On Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa By S E Ingebritsen, M A Scholl And D R Sherrod Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): S. E. Ingebritsen, M. A. Scholl, D. R. Sherrod Published: Geothermics, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geothermal Literature Review At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1996)

83

Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Application_to_Occupy_or_Perform_Operations_Upon_a_State_Highway&oldid=675630" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863281925

84

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

85

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Bauer, I. Moeck, B. Norden, A. Schulze, M. H. Weber Published: Publisher Unknown, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Case_Study_For_Geothermal_Exploration_In_The_Ne_German_Basin-_Integrated_Interpretation_Of_Seismic_Tomography,_Litho-Stratigraphy,_Salt_Tectonics,_And_Thermal_Structure&oldid=390106"

86

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Watson Published: Proceedings of the ninth international symposium on remote sensing of environment, April 15-19, p. 1919-1932., 1974 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Reconnaissance_From_Quantitative_Analysis_Of_Thermal_Infrared_Imagery&oldid=387504" Category:

87

Application for a Temporary Water Use Permit for Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up to One Year Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for a Temporary Water Use Permit for Up to 10 Acre Feet and Up to One Year Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: TCEQ, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Application_for_a_Temporary_Water_Use_Permit_for_Up_to_10_Acre_Feet_and_Up_to_One_Year&oldid=648773" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

88

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

89

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

90

" Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" 4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Distillate Fuel Oil","Unswitchable Distillate","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, "

91

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.23;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","LPG Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","LPG Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

92

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.22;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Coal Consumed ","Unswitchable","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","as a Fuel","Coal Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

93

Oil price fluctuations and Its effect on GDP growth.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? During the year of 2008, the world has experienced historically high oil prices reaching an all time high of 147 USD per barrel in… (more)

Gonzalez , Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

GDP Jobs Direct Structure of Australian economy, employment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

last page for the data) #12;Australian 2020 carbon abatement cost curve Cost of abatement A$/t CO2e -50 Conservation tillage Agriculture, livestock Afforestation, pasture Reforestation Forest management Energy Geothermal On-shore wind Afforestation, cropland Coal-to-gas shift Agriculture, waste Coal CCS retrofit

Pezzey, Jack

95

Using a SAT-solver to schedule sports leagues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tournament schedules of sports leagues have to satisfy several types of constraints such as stadium unavailability, fixed matches, forbidden matches, minimum number of breaks. Usually, there is no schedule satisfying all given constraints and, hence, ... Keywords: Propositional satisfiability, Round robin tournaments, Soft constraints, Sports, Sports league scheduling, Timetabling

Andrei Horbach; Thomas Bartsch; Dirk Briskorn

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Please print your full name exactly as it appears on your passport or birth certificate. We cannot issue your immigration document (I-20 or DS-2019) until we receive this form from you. Please complete both sides of the form and attach all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please print your full name exactly as it appears on your passport or birth certificate. We cannot passport identification page or if your passport is unavailable, a copy of your birth certificate. Are you identification page or birth certificate. Please complete: I plan to come alone. I plan to bring the following

97

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling's personal copy Doped sulfone electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cell applications Xiaoguang Sun, C. Austen unavailable as solvents for ambient temperature electrochemistry because of their high melting points

Angell, C. Austen

98

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) ... When the point is reached where barley fails to maintain a high rate of Zn removal, chelate addition could then be used with B. juncea to solubilize residual Zn that had previously been unavailable for uptake. ...

Stephen D. Ebbs; Leon V. Kochian

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Pandemic Flu: What To Know and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cough or sneeze Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it Ifor sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. If a tissue is unavailable, cough or sneeze into your shoulder or elbow instead sick children at home. ­ If you have flu-like symptoms (fever with cough or sore throat), stay home

Tipple, Brett

100

IDENTITY GUIDELINES Natural Environment Research Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-colour reproduction is unavailable. A reverse version can be used on dark backgrounds or images where colour a dark background image or pattern you will need a mono-negative version.These need to be custom: www.nerc.ac.uk/about/enquiries/logos/web/guidelines/ #12;Logo files NERC logo files should

Brierley, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 11, NO. 1, JANUARY 2011 45 A Robust, Adaptive, Solar-Powered WSN Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 11, NO. 1, JANUARY 2011 45 A Robust, Adaptive, Solar-Powered WSN carefully selected or de- signed to guarantee a high quality of service, optimal solar energy harvesting unavailable due to cost, tech- nical feasibility, or a combination of the two. The developed system leads

Alippi, Cesare

102

Energy and Water Flux during Terrestrial Estivation and Overland Movement in a Freshwater Turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distance gained in this energy "trade-off" fits our previous observations that more tur- tles estivate when, energy allocated to one function is typically unavailable for others. Owing to these trade of energy trade-offs are for reproductive effort, where individuals may cease foraging and expend variable

Canberra, University of

103

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology that quantifies potential environmental impacts for comparative purposes in a decision-making context. ... While potential environmental impacts from pollutant emissions into water are characterized in LCA, impacts from water unavailability are not yet fully quantified. ...

Anne-Marie Boulay; Cécile Bulle; Jean-Baptiste Bayart; Louise Deschênes; Manuele Margni

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Precise Enforcement of Progress-Sensitive Security Scott Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise Enforcement of Progress-Sensitive Security Scott Moore Harvard University Aslan Askarov-security (e.g., public or trusted) information. Our system is parameterized on a termination oracle of a program, then an attacker may be able to make a system unavail- able, by causing a server loop to exit (e

Chong, Stephen

105

Putting your best foot forward: investigating real-world mappings for foot-based gestures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Foot-based gestures have recently received attention as an alternative interaction mechanism in situations where the hands are pre-occupied or unavailable. This paper investigates suitable real-world mappings of foot gestures to invoke commands and interact ... Keywords: foot gestures, foot-based interaction, mobile device interaction

Jason Alexander; Teng Han; William Judd; Pourang Irani; Sriram Subramanian

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Temporary Grant and Time Limited Employee Acknowledgement My position is terminable upon occurrence of any of the following: (1) Less than satisfactory performance or (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporary Grant and Time Limited Employee Acknowledgement My position is terminable upon of the grant or time limited project or (3) unavailability of funds able to cover my salary and fringe as a Temporary Grant or Time Limited Employee are eligible include: 1. Insurance (Health, Dental, Life

Bolding, M. Chad

107

Denver: 128th Annual Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unavailable. Detailed specification sheets explain the...operating demonstration plant of the Office of...demon-stration plant utilizes the long...operation of the Freeport plant. Printed material...a Cryogenic Space Power System being developed...power generation and thermal control system...

1961-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Seepage pathway assessment for natural gas to shallow groundwater during well stimulation, in production, and after abandonment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the shallow-zone aquifers shown at the top of...reservoir needed to lift the fracking fluid 1500 meters...shale to near-surface aquifers through natural pathways...systems or deep saline aquifers (de Pater and Dong...surface by a fleet of fracking trucks is unavailable...

Maurice Dusseault; Richard Jackson

109

Acid Phosphatase Activity as an Indicator of Phosphorus Status in Riparian Forest Principle Investigators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to P status. The national Research Council's committee on Long-Range Soil and Water Conservation has constitute an important link between biologically unavailable and bio-available P pools in the soil will be of use to land and water managers and land-use planners in monitoring the performance or riparian areas

Rhode Island, University of

110

MIMO SVD-BASED MULTIPLEXING WITH IMPERFECT CHANNEL KNOWLEDGE Michael D. Larsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-free data multiplexing may then be car- ried out using the subchannel power levels provided by the well-known water lling solution. In practice, however, when nite codebooks are used and perfect CSI is unavailable, adaptations to power levels and bit-loading schemes are often needed to maintain reasonable performance

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

111

CRS GENERAL POLICIES (updated Fall 2014) Page 1 of 14 CAMPUS RECREATIONAL SERVICES POLICIES FOR PATRONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Refer to the Policy Handbook (located at each equipment area) or CRS staff for a full list of specific the unavailability of emergency medical care. Campus Recreational Services does not employ and does not have Recreational Services policies and/or procedures, including verbal and/or physical abuse of employee

Walker, Lawrence R.

112

Closed-form Solutions to a Subclass of Continuous Stochastic Games via Symbolic Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a continuous state generalisation of matching pennies, binary option valuation and robust energy production optimisation, a problem for which closed- form solutions are generally unavailable. We present an exact closed stochastic games provide a convenient framework with which to model robust sequential optimisation in ad

Sanner, Scott

113

Dancers from "Dora Stratou" welcome us to Greece Ionian Sea Rainfall Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the satellite measurements with land-based weather radars, and in turn, the measurements from the land of a weather radar, or especially, a satellite-based instrument, is often dubious, and can lead to incorrect few people live and standard rain gauges are unavailable. Eventually satellite instruments

Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

114

TRBAC: A temporal role-based access control model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Role-based access control (RBAC) models are receiving increasing attention as a generalized approach to access control. Roles may be available to users at certain time periods, and unavailable at others. Moreover, there can be temporal dependencies among ... Keywords: Role triggers, role-based access control, temporal constraints

Elisa Bertino; Piero Andrea Bonatti; Elena Ferrari

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

,FLY AMERICA ACT WAIVER CHECKLIST (/'0 a.rsisl in determining quclificati~nf"" a waiver ofthe restricrionS ofrhe Fly America Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carrier in authorized class ofservice is unavailable. seal on foreign air carner in authorized class.) __ Use offoreign air carrier is a inatter'ofnecessity because ,of. (MlISt check onl! below) ___U.S. flag air carrier cannot provide the air transportation needed, e.g. ~ Use offoreign air carrier

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

116

FLASH: A rapid method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices Andres W. Martinez, Scott T. Phillips, Benjamin J. Wiley, Malancha Gupta and George M. Whitesides*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-defined hydro- phobic barriers of photoresist (as small as 200 mm); the hydro- phobic barriers extend through and hotplate are unavailable). The method provides channels in paper with dimensions as small as 200 mm). The method is compatible with small pieces of paper (i.e., 0.5 in2 ) as well as large (8.5 in Ã? 11 in

Prentiss, Mara

117

5 SPECIMEN COLLECTION AND PRESERVATION This section outlines the use of fixatives and preservatives used in necropsy procedures and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(10% neutral buffered seawater will do the regular buffer is unavailable) is a suitable fixative must be checked routinely during storage to avoid loss of fluid. 10% neutral buffered formalin can. Use extreme care with storage and handling (see Section 3.1). 5.1.3 Ethyl Alcohol EtOH (100%) Used

Marsh, Helene

118

Development of a High Efficiency Ceiling Fan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of ceiling fans to improve comfort during the cooling season is well documented (Rohles et al.. 1983; Fairey et al.. 1986). There are at least two cases: In the first where air conditioning is unavailable, adding ceiling fans may...

Parker, D. S.; Callahan, M. P.; Sonne, J. K.; Su, G. H.; Hibbs, B. D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

CORBA-JS: An Open-Standards Framework for Distributed Object Computing over the Web Tejal B. Parulekar1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORBA-JS: An Open-Standards Framework for Distributed Object Computing over the Web Tejal B technological limitations, DOC was traditionally unavailable in Web-based applications (i.e., stateful applications that communicate over HTTP, and are accessible via a Web browser) without the use of proprietary

Zhou, Yaoqi

120

Performance-directed site selection system of AADMLSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as long response time and service unavailability. The utilization of multiple servers can be used to reduce adverse impacts. The challenge is to identify a good resource site to allocate to the user given a group of servers from which to select...

Prajugo, Mieke

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT DE GRENOBLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different kind of information such as electrical or chemical tests, tripped protections or history components to the electrical systems. Their failures cause long electrical service unavailability: therefore résultats d'essais électriques ou chimiques, le déclenchement de protections ou l'historique de l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu, Qinghua Zheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Deep Web Crawling Using Reinforcement Learning Lu Jiang, Zhaohui Wu, Qian Feng, Jun Liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, qhzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Abstract. Deep web refers to the hidden part of the Web that remains unavailable for standard Web crawlers. To obtain content of Deep Web is challenging and has been acknowledged

Shamos, Michael I.

123

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): John Travis Finger, Eddie Ross Hoover Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Annex_7_-_The_Iea%27S_Role_In_Advanced_Geothermal_Drilling&oldid=389771" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

124

Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Geothermal Field, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Controls on Fault-Hosted Fluid Flow: Preliminary Results from the Coso Geothermal Field, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: cap rock, permeability, fault, fracture, clay, Coso Author(s): Davatzes, N.C.; Hickman, S.H. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2007) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controls_on_Fault-Hosted_Fluid_Flow:_Preliminary_Results_from_the_Coso_Geothermal_Field,_CA&oldid=473359"

125

Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Progress report on electrical resistivity studies, COSO Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The first phase of an electrical geophysical survey of the Coso Geothermal Area is described. The objective of the survey was to outline areas of anomalously conductive ground that may be associated with geothermal activity and to assist in locating drilling sites to test the geothermal potential. Author(s): Ferguson, R. B. Published: Publisher Unknown, 6/1/1973 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Electrical Resistivity At Coso Geothermal Area (1972)

126

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (27) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)

127

Record of Decision on Mode of Transportation and Nevada Rail Corridor for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV (DOE/EIS-0250) (4/8/04)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

57 Federal Register 57 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 68 / Thursday, April 8, 2004 / Notices We must acknowledge and confirm these periods of unavailability before granting you an extension. To request this extension or to confirm our acknowledgement of any system unavailability, you may contact either (1) the persons listed elsewhere in this notice under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT (see VII. Agency Contacts) or (2) the e-GRANTS help desk at 1-888- 336-8930. You may access the electronic grant application for the Training Program- CFDA 84.103A at: http://e-grants.ed.gov. V. Application Review Information 1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this program competition are in 34 CFR Part 642.31 and the application package. Note: For the FY 2004 competition, the

128

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

129

,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Residual Fuel Oil ","Unswitchable Residual","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed as a Fuel","Fuel Oil Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

130

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

131

Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades Author(s): Steven Clausen, Michal Nemcok, Joseph Moore, Jeffrey Hulen, John Bartley Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mapping_Fractures_In_The_Medicine_Lake_Geothermal_System&oldid=388927

132

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Author(s): Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. Published: Geophysics, 10/12/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article

133

Correlation of grain sorghum yield to nitrogen as measured by various soil test methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 'y;. il of wti!c!= ives unavailable to !-i op pi' rts. ?!H! "on ( ll priin'. ed c??ha, "the n? t ainount of nitroger ri!ii used from i!n or g=-. nic m it; ri:, . i !3 panda on the i!itrogen content ot' the mat?rial, ibc compl steno: - i;!!6;ih!!, 6.... 'y;. il of wti!c!= ives unavailable to !-i op pi' rts. ?!H! "on ( ll priin'. ed c??ha, "the n? t ainount of nitroger ri!ii used from i!n or g=-. nic m it; ri:, . i !3 panda on the i!itrogen content ot' the mat?rial, ibc compl steno: - i;!!6;ih!!, 6...

Idris, Md

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1996 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/S0148-9062(97)87449-9 Source: View Original Journal Article Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Numerical_Evaluation_Of_Electromagnetic_Methods_In_Geothermal_Exploration_-_L_Pellerin,_J_M_Johnston_%26_G_W_Hohmann,_Geophysics,_61(1),_1996,_Pp_121-130&oldid=3883

135

Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aerial Thermal Infrared Mapping Of The Waimangu-Waiotapu Geothermal Region, New Zealand - M A Mongillo, Geothermics, 23(5-6), 1994, Pp 511-526 Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts, 1995 Document Number: Unavailable

136

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

137

GTP ARRA Spreadsheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP ARRA Spreadsheet GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Details Activities (243) Areas (25) Regions (0) Abstract: Spreadsheet of ARRA projects provided by DOE on 3/24/2011 listing ARRA projects and exploration techniques used for each project. Author(s): Unknown Published: GTP, 2011/01/01 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Acoustic Logs At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Aeromagnetic Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP)

138

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in Southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Moore, J.L. Published: Publisher Unknown, 9/1/1987 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_interpretation_of_the_Coso_geothermal_field._Summary_report,_October_1986-August_1987&oldid=473519"

139

Withholding the choice of sodium valproate to young women with generalised epilepsy: are we causing more harm than good?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and improved educational and occupational functioning. Prior to referral, documentation revealed no discussion of VPA treatment options. Conclusion Failure to prescribe valproate for IGE, particularly when another first-line treatment has failed, may... of the drug. Although data was unavailable on whether patients were sexually active or using contraception, all women after referral to the transition service routinely received documented nurse-led counselling on contraception and advice about pregnancy...

Mole, Tom B.; Appleton, Richard; Marson, Anthony

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Page 1 of 4 Soil pH; What Is the Big Deal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deficiencies. The availability of #12;Page 2 of 4 our major nutrients, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous is considered optimum at a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. At pH below 6.0 phosphorous can bond with aluminum and iron and at pH above 7.5 it can bond with calcium; both situations can lead to phosphorous being unavailable

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Amikacin pharmacokinetics and the effects of ambient temperature on the dosage regimen in ball pythons (Python reguis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

administered intramuscularly in ball pythons and housed at 37'C. (Peak to trough therapeutic range for amikacin is 25 to 2 p. g/ml) 20 Figure 4. Time-elimination curve for amikacin administered intramuscularly (IM) in ball pythons housed at 25'C . 21..., pharmacokinetic studies with exotic species of animals are seldom funded, and animals often are unavailable. This makes the collection of information very difficult. Therapeutic antimicrobial regimens for snakes are important because of the impact of bacterial...

Johnson, James Harvey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lean Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-low Emissions at High Temperature in Gas-Turbine Burners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This illustrates the weak point of current catalytic combustion technology: the unavailability of catalytic systems stable at the temperature of the gas turbine inlet temperature. ... The possible feeds are methane, gaseous fuels, and gasified biomasses. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Fabrizio D’Alessandro; Giovanna Pacchiarotta; Alberto Rubino; Mauro Sperandio; Pierluigi Villa; Arturo Manrique Carrera; Reza Fakhrai; Gianluigi Marra; Annalisa Congiu

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identification and Characterization of GONST1, a Golgi-Localized GDP-Mannose Transporter in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MNN10 gene identifies a family of related glycosyltransferases...transporter is an autonomous, multi-specific hexameric...Munro, S. (1998). Multi-protein complexes in...functions and defines a new family of related genes. J...University of Cambridge, Building O, Downing Site, Cambridge...

Timothy C. Baldwin; Michael G. Handford; Maria-Isabel Yuseff; Ariel Orellana; Paul Dupree

144

Requiem for the unit root in per capita real GDP? Additional evidence from historical data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present new evidence on the uncertain nature of nonstationarity – that is, trend stationarity vs. difference stationarity – of aggregate per capita real output, by submitting to a composite testing procedure a...

Edoardo Gaffeo; Marco Gallegati; Mauro Gallegati

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Membrane extraction of Rab proteins by GDP dissociation inhibitor characterized using attenuated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissociation inhibitor (GDI) solubilizes prenylated Rab GTPases from and shuttles them between membranes spectroscopy to directly ob- serve extraction of Rab GTPases from model membranes by GDI. In their native form reflection experiments show that GDI genuinely accelerates the intrinsic Rab membrane dissociation

Gerwert, Klaus

146

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 lbs 40 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3556 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4665 lbs GAWR F/R: Unavailable Payload: 1109 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 109.3 in Track F/R: 62.0/61.6 in Length: 189.2 in Width: 71.7 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michellin Tire Model: Energy MXV458 Tire Size: P215/60R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32

147

Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanofermentation System Technology Assistance Program Licensing Staff Search For Technologies Available Technologies Licensing Opportunity Announcements Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Technology Licensing | Technology Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial readiness. TIP projects are proposed by ORNL scientists and engineers and selected competitively based on their potential for near-term societal or economic impact. TIP technologies are advanced through research and development and outreach to industry. TIP is funded by UT-Battelle licensing royalties. When a technology enters the TIP process, it is initially made unavailable

148

Expert opinion in risk analysis; The NUREG-1150 methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk analysis of nuclear power generation often requires the use of expert opinion to provide probabilistic inputs where other sources of information are unavailable or are not cost effective. In the Reactor Rise Reference Document (NUREG-1150), a methodology for the collection of expert opinion was developed. The resulting methodology presented by the author involves a ten-step process: selection of experts, selection of issues, preparation of issue statements, elicitation training, preparation of expert analyses by panel members, discussion of analyses, elicitation, recomposition and aggregation, and review by the panel members. These steps were implemented in a multiple meeting format that brought together experts from a variety of work places.

Hora, S.C.; Iman, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Availability and Reliability Issues for ILC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider (ILC) will be the largest most complicated accelerator ever built. For this reason extensive work is being done early in the design phase to ensure that it will be reliable enough. This includes gathering failure mode data from existing accelerators and simulating the failures and repair times of the ILC. This simulation has been written in a general fashion using MATLAB and could be used for other accelerators. Results from the simulation tool have been used in making some of the major ILC design decisions and an unavailability budget has been developed.

Himel, T.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; /SLAC; Ross, M.; /Fermilab

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Modeling of air currents in the Gulf Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability modeled the wind flow in the Gulf Region in order to make projections of the Kuwait oil fires pollution dispersion. Extensive meteorological models incorporating explicit terrain influences to the flow fields were routinely employed through a six month international assessment support effort organized by the World Meteorological Organization and US scientific research agencies. Results show generally close agreement with visible imagery of the smoke plumes as detected by meteorological satellites. However, there are some examples of significant disagreement or failure of the meteorological models. These failures are most likely directly linked to missing or unavailable weather observations.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Foster, C.S.; Foster, K.T.; Baskett, R.L.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effects of anisotropy on optimal dense coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study optimal dense coding with thermal entangled states of a two-qubit anisotropic \\emph{XXZ} model and a Heisenberg model with Dzyaloshinski-Moriya (DM) interactions. The DM interaction is another kind of anisotropic antisymmetric exchange interaction. The effects of these two kinds of anisotropies on dense coding are studied in detail for both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic cases. For the two models, we give the conditions that the parameters of the models have to satisfy for a valid dense coding. We also found that even though there is entanglement, it is unavailable for our optimal dense coding, which is the same as entanglement teleportation.

Guo-Feng Zhang

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Method for Estimating the Financial Impact of Cyber Information Security Breaches Utilizing the Common Vulnerability Scoring System and Annual Loss Expectancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.900 Functional (F) F 0.950 High (H) H 1.000 Remediation Level (T_RL) Official Fix (OF) OF 0.870 Temporary Fix (TF) TF 0.900 Workaround (W) W 0.950 Unavailable (U) U 1.000 Report Confidence (T_RC) Unconfirmed (UC) UC 0.900 Uncorroborated (UR) UR 0... is theoretical. Remediation Level (T_RL) – Metric to describe the currently available mitigation options. Report Confidence (T_RC) – Metric to describe the degree of confidence in the reported vulnerability. Often, vulnerabilities are announced sans...

Lindsey, Michael B.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method for reliability analysis of complex reactor systems. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and a computer code for efficient and accurate reliability analyses of complex reactor systems are described and illustrated through an example. The method permits realistic analyses through its ability to accurately model and evaluate instantaneous and average unavailabilities for large systems with dependencies. The component models can include continuously monitored, non-repairable, and periodically tested components which are subject to failures resulting from components which are subject to failures resulting from component demands, stand-by conditions, human errors associated with testing and repair, as well as failures during actual operation. The numerical process used is efficient and allows analysis of general system configurations with arbitrary scheduling of maintenance operations.

Elerath, J.G.; Vaurio, J.K.; Wood, A.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Project W-049H instrument and control Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the instrument and control systems have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. The instrument and control system includes three operator control stations, modems, and general purpose LAN interface cabinets in the Effluent Treatment Facility control room; two pump stations; disposal station pumping building; and all local control units installed in the fold. Testing will be performed using actual signals when available and simulated signals when actual signals are unavailable.

Carrigan, M.C.

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

A comparison of momentum fluxes determined from time and space structure functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, approximately 55 ft of the 355-ft length was above the surface, as can be seen in Figure 2. This minimizes greatly the effects of both horizontal and vertical wave motions on the observations. This enabled reliable measurements of Dz(o) and Dz(r = 1 m... of sensors was infrequent toward the end of the observing period, due to the unavailability of sufficient probes . Data Screening The data obtained on magnetic tape were checked to see if cause for any bias was discernable. The observation times were...

Cain, Jimmy Darrell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

Leigh, Richard J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Memory difference control of unknown unstable fixed points: Drifting parameter conditions and delayed measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Difference control schemes for controlling unstable fixed points become important if the exact position of the fixed point is unavailable or moving due to drifting parameters. We propose a memory difference control method for stabilization of a priori unknown unstable fixed points by introducing a memory term. If the amplitude of the control applied in the previous time step is added to the present control signal, fixed points with arbitrary Lyapunov numbers can be controlled. This method is also extended to compensate arbitrary time steps of measurement delay. We show that our method stabilizes orbits of the Chua circuit where ordinary difference control fails.

Jens Christian Claussen; Thorsten Mausbach; Alexander Piel; Heinz Georg Schuster

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Updated radiological dose assessment of Bikini and Eneu Islands at Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a continuing effort to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Radionuclide concentration data developed at Bikini Atoll since 1977 have been used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to develop the annual dose rate and 30- and 50-y integral doses presented here for Bikini and Eneu Island living patterns. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant exposure pathway--it contributes more than 50% of the total dose--and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation. Cesium-137 produces more than 85% of the predicted dose; /sup 90/Sr is the second most significant radionuclide; /sup 60/Co contributes to the external gamma exposure in varying degrees, but is a small part of the total predicted dose; the transuranic radionuclides contribute a small portion of the total predicted lung and bone doses but do present a long-term source of exposure. Maximum annual dose rates for Bikini Island are about 1 rem/y for the whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and about 1.9 rem/y when imports are unavailable. Maximum annual dose rates for Eneu Island when imports are available are 130 mrem/y for the whole body and 136 mrem/y for bone marrow. Similar doses when imported foods are unavailable are 245 and 263 mrem/y, respectively. The 30-y integral doses for Bikini Island are about 23 rem for whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and more than 40 rem when imports are unavailable. The Eneu Island 30-y integral doses for whole body and bone marrow are about 3 rem when imports are available and 5.5 and 6.1 rem, respectively, when imports are unavailable. Doses from living patterns involving some combination of Bikini and Eneu Islands fall between the doses listed above for each island separately.

Robison, W.L.; Mount, M.E.; Phillips, W.A.; Stuart, M.L.; Thompson, S.E.; Conrado, C.L.; Stoker, A.C.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Inhibitors of Leishmania GDP-Mannose Pyrophosphorylase Identified by High-Throughput Screening of Small-Molecule Chemical Library  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...copy of the compound library and retested in triplicate...is a critical global public health priority. Leishmania...small-molecule chemical library of 80,000 drug-like...design of the chemical library being that lead-like...better cover diversity space. We have commented in...

Kurt Lackovic; John P. Parisot; Nerida Sleebs; Jonathan B. Baell; Laurent Debien; Keith G. Watson; Joan M. Curtis; Emanuela Handman; Ian P. Street; Lukasz Kedzierski

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Remote creation of a one-qubit mixed state through a short homogeneous spin-1/2 chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a method of remote mixed state creation of a one-qubit subsystem (receiver) in a spin-1/2 chain governed by the nearest-neighbor XY Hamiltonian. Owing to the evolution of the chain along with the variable local unitary transformation of the one- or two-qubit sender, a large variety of receiver states can be created during a specific time interval starting with a fixed initial state of the whole quantum system. These states form the creatable region of the receiver's state-space. It is remarkable that, with a two-qubit sender, a large creatable region may be covered at a properly fixed time instant t0 using just the variable local unitary transformation of the sender. In this case we have completely local control of remote state creation. In general, for a given initial state, there are some receiver states that may not be created using the above tool. These states form the unavailable region. In turn, this unavailable region might be the creatable region of another sender. Thus, in future, we have a way to share the whole receiver's state-space among the creatable regions of several senders. The effectiveness of remote state creation is characterized by the density function of the creatable region.

A. I. Zenchuk

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Reliability analysis for Atucha II reactor protection system signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atucha II is a 745 MW Argentine Power Nuclear Reactor constructed by ENACE SA, Nuclear Argentine Company for Electrical Power Generation and SIEMENS AG KWU, Erlangen, Germany. A preliminary modular logic analysis of RPS (Reactor Protection System) signals was performed by means of the well known Swedish professional risk and reliability software named Risk-Spectrum taking as a basis a reference signal coded as JR17ER003 which command the two moderator loops valves. From the reliability and behavior knowledge for this reference signal folloos an estimation of the reliability for the other 97 RPS signals. Because the preliminary character of this analysis Main Important Measures are not performed at this stage. Reliability is by the statistic value named unavailability predicted. The scope of this analysis is restricted from the measurement elements to the RPS buffer outputs. In the present context only one redundancy is analyzed so in the Instrumentation and Control area there no CCF (Common Cause Failures) present for signals. Finally those unavailability values could be introduced in the failure domain for the posterior complete Atucha II reliability analysis which includes all mechanical and electromechanical features. Also an estimation of the spurious frequency of RPS signals defined as faulty by no trip is performed.

Jose Luis Roca

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compactness of Urban Growth, the Environment, and the Quality of Life: Evidence from China, 2000-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY gdp Energy Consumption per GDP unit ton standardthe declining of per-GDP-unit energy consumption and carbonenergy consumption per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) unit,

Yuan, Quan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final energy per GDP decreased considerably inper unit of GDP. Final energy per GDP decreased considerablysubstantial decline in final energy demand per unit of GDP.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Scenario E3 Max Tech Wind Power Nuclear Power NG Fired CCcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GWcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GW

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evolutionary conservation and genomic organization of XAP-4, an Xq28 located gene coding for a human rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (GDI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the development of efficient methods for the construction of transcription maps of defined genomic regions, the rate-limiting step in the analysis of the coding potentials of these regions is the elucida...

Z. Sedlacek; D. S. Konecki; B. Korn; S. M. Klauck; A. Poustka

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Data:Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 Aaefc461-2192-437f-acb2-184303942eb0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slash Pine Elec Member Corp Effective date: 1986/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 3 Medium Commercial - 50 kW to 300 kW Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all three-phase consumers for all uses, with a demand of 50 kW or greater, but less than 300 kW, subject to the established rules and regulations of the Cooperative. Where three-phase service is unavailable single-phase service may be provided under this schedule at option of the Cooperative. Source or reference: ISU Documentation

170

CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000520: Categorical Exclusion Determination 690-N (Ford Building) Fire System Isolation and Sanitary Sewer Grouting CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 09/02/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Firewater service to Building 690-N (the Ford Building) will be rendered unavailable by cutting and capping the firewater header to the building. Preparation for excavation and isolation will necessitate the removal of some existing vegetation (pine tree) for the fire system isolation to proceed. Additionally, all access points to the sanitary sewer lines from inside Building 690-N will be grouted closed. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000520.pdf More Documents & Publications

171

CX-007069: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7069: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7069: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007069: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install H Tank Farm to F Tank Farm Radio Repeater Station in E Area CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 08/31/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and F Tank Farm (FTF) personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and FTF, radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio.

172

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 2003/09/01 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Citation S.C. Smith. 2003. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration. In: Programs & Abstracts: Soil and Regolith Geochemistry in the Search for Mineral Deposits. IGES; 2003/09/01; Dublin, CA. Dublin, CA: IGES; p. 78 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermally_Speciated_Mercury_in_Mineral_Exploration&oldid=681717" Categories: References Geothermal References

173

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

174

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

175

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1 ) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 2 331111) 1998 3 2002 4 2006 4 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

176

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different mechanisms, enabling the use of green power sources when the resource itself is unavailable (for example, solar energy at night or wind energy on a calm day). Such devices also provide energy portability for consumer electronics and zero-emission options for transportation, in either hybrid or fully-electric vehicles. Many impressive battery technologies exist today, but the understanding of their operation is somewhat limited, which makes it very challenging to improve

177

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although not part of the current effort, two deep (approximately 2000 m) exploratory wells were drilled on the north flank of Hualalai near Puu Waawaa cinder cone. The geophysical data used for siting these wells were proprietary and hence unavailable for publication; however, the temperatures measured at the bottoms of the wells were reported to be below 20degrees C. Chemical analysis of water samples taken from these wells did not provide useful geothermal data due to contamination of the well water with drilling muds References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

178

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

179

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) Enterprise Development Finance Program (Mississippi) The Mississippi Small Enterprise Development Finance Program (SED) enables the Mississippi Business Finance Corporation (MBFC) to make loans to qualified private companies that will increase employment and investment in the State. The State of Mississippi issues general obligation bonds as the source of funding under the SED Program. The bonds are issued on a composite basis. The costs of issuance are prorated to each company participating in the issue; allowing companies to obtain tax exempt financing that would otherwise be unavailable due to prohibitive costs. October 16, 2013 Small Employer Quality Jobs 7-Year Cash Incentive (Oklahoma) This program provides incentive payments to a qualifying small employer (90

180

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Projects Energy Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Colleen Sievers Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/28/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Citation Colleen Sievers. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects [Internet]. 09/28/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2011/09/28;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/carson_city_field/blm_information/newsroom/2011/september/blm_approves_salt.html

182

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

183

Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System Configurations of the Mirant Potomac River Plant Docket No. EO-05-01: PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. and PEPCO Holdings, Inc. is hereby providing you with additional information concerning reliability impacts under various system conditions associated with the unavailability of the Potomac River Generating Station to serve load in the D.C. area. Also enclosed as part of this submittal is material provided by PEPCO (balance of sentence redacted) In addition, there is a discussion concerning the impacts of demand side response in addressing this situation. Information Concerning Reliability Impacts under Various System

184

Summary - Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank 48 Tank 48 ETR Report Date: August 2006 ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which

185

EMSL: Capabilities: Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing Announcements Computing Announcements Cascade: Cascade - Scheduled Downtime December 31, 2013 5:15 PM - This is a reminder that Cascade will be unavailable beginning at 0800 (PST) on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 for an update to the file system. We expect to return Cascade to service later in the afternoon. Please send e-mail to mscf-consulting@emsl.pnl.gov if you have any questions. Chinook: Chinook - Scheduled Downtime December 31, 2013 2:30 PM - This is a reminder that Chinook is being retired at midnight tonight 12/31/2013. Cascade, its replacement is having an outage on Jan. 7, 2014 beginning at 0800 PDT. For our MOLPRO users, there is now a submit_molpro script on Cascade for submitting MOLPRO jobs to use the most recent version of MOLPRO just installed. We expect to bring

186

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads January 30, 2013 NREL grid and dispatchable power experts are helping the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado, develop a system to maintain power to critical loads when power is unavailable from the local utility. Under an agreement with USAFA and in collaboration with Colorado Springs Utilities, NREL will design a USAFA microgrid using its Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid Design process. The four-step CORE process evaluates existing reports, gathers data, analyzes designs, and monitors project implementation and installation. The data gathering and preliminary generation design evaluation phases are nearly complete. Generation options identified during the preliminary

187

Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 10375 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Industrial 10 kVa of Transformer Capacity or less Commercial Commercial and Industrial 15 - 25 kVa of Transformer Capacity Commercial Commercial and Industrial 37.5 kVa of Transformer Capacity or larger Commercial Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Remote Access Unavailable

188

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

189

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Release Coupling Magnetic Release Coupling An engineer at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a magnetic release coupling that offers features unavailable in coupling technologies currently on the market. Background The magnetic release coupling was originally conceived to reduce exposure of works to radiation and to eliminate inadvertent decoupling of pipe connections. The magnetic coupling provided a quick disconnect connection that did not require time consuming assembly and disassembly while providing a secure connection with a streamlined outer profile for use with no catching or interference problems. The coupling also provided excellent response to impact. After conception, the coupling was projected into other uses such as torque transfer, component connections, hidden

190

Slide03 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide03 Slide03 Slide03 Google, non-Googleable evolution Google: v., to search for information through Google Googleable: adj., information found by Googling Non-Googleable: adj., information that cannot be found by Googling In fact, much of the information on the Web is inherently unavailable to Google and Yahoo! This key limitation would come as a surprise to many Web users, especially young students. The concept that if you "Google" long enough you can find it, is so firmly entrenched in the Web-cognizant public, that the word "Google" has been elevated to a verb. In the Web-savvy vernacular, "To Google" of course means to search the Web using the Google search engine. For example, to find information about the interagency organization CENDI, one "Googles" CENDI.

191

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide03 Submitted by gibsone on Wed, 2013-08-21 13:12 FY2007-nsf Slide03 Google, non-Googleable evolution Google: v., to search for information through Google Googleable: adj., information found by Googling Non-Googleable: adj., information that cannot be found by Googling In fact, much of the information on the Web is inherently unavailable to Google and Yahoo! This key limitation would come as a surprise to many Web users, especially young students. The concept that if you "Google" long enough you can find it, is so firmly entrenched in the Web-cognizant public, that the word "Google" has been elevated to a verb. In the Web-savvy vernacular, "To Google" of course means to search the Web using the Google search engine. For example, to find information about the

192

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide05 Submitted by gibsone on Wed, 2013-08-21 13:12 FY2007-nsf Slide05 OSTI Mission * Information fuels discovery * Superior access to quality information speeds discovery The mission of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information is to advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to DOE researchers and the American people. Search capability is key to our mission. We have developed a different kind of search technology to retrieve that information which is unavailable to Google. Its use in gateways such as Science.gov and WorldWideScience.org is what Eleanor Frierson and I came here to talk about today. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64 Reply (If you're a human, don't change the following field)

193

APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards R&D logo APS-based Technologies Garner Three R&D-100 Awards Three technologies developed for use at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory have won R&D 100 awards. The awards are given annually by R&D Magazine to the 100 most significant technical products of the year. X-RAY SCANNING MICROPROBE The hard x-ray scanning microprobe is a noninvasive tool that provides spatial resolution previously unavailable with x-rays, thereby expanding the potential of traditional x-ray techniques. It was developed by Barry Lai, Zhonghou Cai, Jörg Maser, Dan Legnini and Peter Ilinski of the APS Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team. Wenbing Yun of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory contributed to the technology.

194

NREL: Technology Deployment - NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads NREL Designing Microgrid to Back Up USAFA Critical Loads January 30, 2013 NREL grid and dispatchable power experts are helping the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado, develop a system to maintain power to critical loads when power is unavailable from the local utility. Under an agreement with USAFA and in collaboration with Colorado Springs Utilities, NREL will design a USAFA microgrid using its Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid Design process. The four-step CORE process evaluates existing reports, gathers data, analyzes designs, and monitors project implementation and installation. The data gathering and preliminary generation design evaluation phases are nearly complete. Generation options identified during the preliminary

195

Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors John Snow and Fausto Batini Published Enel Nort America, 04/22/2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting Citation John Snow,Fausto Batini. 04/22/2008. Enel North America Utah Geothermal Working Group Meeting. Cedar City, UT. Enel Nort America. 24p. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enel_North_America_Utah_Geothermal_Working_Group_Meeting&oldid=680551" Categories: References Geothermal References

196

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors C. Kreemer, Geoffrey Blewitt and William C. Hammond Editors John S. Oldow and Patricia H. Cashman Published Geological Society of America, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation

197

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission Virginia's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the restructuring laws, but still require emissions and fuel mix disclosure. Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provider must file a report

198

Training Topic Group Conference Call June 16, 1999 ROLL CALL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 16, 1999 June 16, 1999 ROLL CALL Aubrey Godwin Larry Grove Deena LaRue Carol O'Claire Jim Price Scott Ramsay Bill Ruting Randy Small STATUS OF TRAINING MODULES The subcontractor has forwarded to HAMMER one hardcopy and CD-ROM containing Modules 1-4 student workbooks, instructor guides, and viewgraphs for review. Review comments are being incorporated, and corrected CD-ROM will be forwarded to HAMMER tomorrow. Modules 1-4 material will be used during the July TEC/WG breakout sessions where facilitated and self-study training pilots will be conducted. Scott Ramsay, Rich Gale, and Wilbur Smith will be trainers for the facilitated sessions. Bill Ruting will conduct one self-study session, and another person will be identified to conduct the other self-study session as Tom Breckenridge is unavailable to assist. Modules

199

Tips & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights & Tricks for Uploading Images with Research Highlights Images: (optional) Only images in JPEG, BMP, GIF, or PNG can be accepted up to 10 Mb. The image caption is limited to 500 characters. Tip: For comparisons, lay multiple images out side by side, vertically or in a grid formation to create a single image file for uploading on the Research Highlight Submittal Form. Trick: If image editing soft ware is unavailable, the task can be accomplished using Microsoft (MS) Word as follows: 1. Insert or paste the images on a blank MS Word document and arrange them as desired. 2. Use the "Print Screen" function on the computer to capture the composite image. 3. Paste the new image (created from "Print Screen") onto a new blank MS Word document or

200

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Basin and Range Province; Cassia County Idaho; economic geology; exploration; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; heat flow; heat flux; Idaho; North America; Raft River basin; south-central Idaho; surveys; temperature; thermal conductivity; United States; USGS Author(s): Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1986 Document Number: Unavailable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Definition: Forced Outage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forced Outage Forced Outage Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forced Outage The removal from service availability of a generating unit, transmission line, or other facility for emergency reasons., The condition in which the equipment is unavailable due to unanticipated failure.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Forced_Outage&oldid=480310" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data

202

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nd nd Energy & Innovation Conference November 28-29, 2012 Partnering for Innovation: Critical Materials Roe-Hoan Yoon, Lead Paul King, Business Development Critical Materials Strategic Growth Area NETL-Regional University Allience 2 o Critical: * Intrinsically rare, low grade, or currently unavailable in the United States. o Energy Critical Elements: * Chemical elements that are essential for the deployment of transformative energy technologies. Critical Materials-Definition 3 Application of Critical Materials 3 4  Short Term (present t - 2015) Criticality Matrix Your Logo  Mid Term (2015 - 2025) 5  Essential for the U.S. leading the 6 th wave of technology innovation o Renewable energy development o High-tech industry o Sustainability

203

Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data Green Button: Providing Consumers with Access to Their Energy Data January 19, 2012 - 2:54pm Addthis Aneesh Chopra What does this mean for me? 6 million utility customers in California now have access to their electricity usage data through the Green Button program, and millions more will get access as the program expands. This article is cross-posted from the White House blog. Imagine being able to shrink your utility bill, or knowing the optimal size and cost-effectiveness of solar panels for your home, or verifying that energy-efficiency retrofit investments have successfully paid for themselves over time. Far too often these and similarly important-and potentially money-saving-opportunities are unavailable to us. Why?

204

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Homeowner energy efficient improvements (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying costs up to $2,000 Whole-house evaluation: $150 for the first 1000 customers '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.''''' Kentucky offers ENERGY STAR Home Performance rebates and loans for

205

Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Stratigraphy and geophysical logs of three petroleum test boreholes in the Raft River Valley are presented. The geophysical logs include: temperature, resistivity, spontaneous potential, gamma, caliper, and acoustic logs. Author(s): Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/6272996 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Raft River Geothermal Area

206

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

207

Validation of Cloud Properties Derived from GOES-9 Over the ARM TWP Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Derived from Cloud Properties Derived from GOES-9 Over the ARM TWP Region M. M. Khaiyer, M. L. Nordeen, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and W. L. Smith, Jr. Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautic and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction Satellite data are essential for monitoring clouds and radiative fluxes where ground-based instruments are unavailable. On April 24, 2003, the ninth geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES-9) began operational coverage of the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), replacing the failing fifth geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS-5). The GOES-9 imager provides the opportunity for enhanced monitoring of clouds and radiation over the TWP because it has better spatial resolution and

208

Bernstein-060211 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bernstein-060211 Bernstein-060211 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Professor Elliot R. Bernstein Colorado State University TITLE: "Neutral Cluster Studies of Heterogeneous Catalytic Mechanisms" DATE: Thursday, June 2, 2011 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: Stefan Vajda Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: Heterogeneous catalysis is a major synthetic approach to the generation and production of new materials and important industrial chemicals. Moreover, small clusters and nanoparticles are often responsible for inducing new chemical reactions, both wanted and unwanted. Our studies are focused on the mechanisms for both types of reactions (catalysis and nanoparticle), because mechanistic understanding in these instances (currently unavailable) can lead to improved catalytic reactions and better

209

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 SRS Review Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in

210

Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 07/22/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement [Internet]. 07/22/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City

211

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

212

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-020.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20 20 SECTION A. Project Title: Interim Storage Area for Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) SECTION B. Project Description: Currently, dedicated space is unavailable for above-grade storage of Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) containing 55-gal drums of remote handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU). In the past this waste was packaged in specially constructed liners and placed into the RSWF. When ready for transfer this waste would then be removed from RSWF and transferred to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) where it was sorted and repackaged for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this new interim storage area is needed to eliminate special packaging and placement into RSWF in order to reduce costs and exposure associated with repackaging

213

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

214

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 7b.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1331111) 1998 2 2002 3 20063 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

215

EIA-411 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-411 Data Form EIA-411 Data Release Date: January 28, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2013 Form EIA-411, “Coordinated Bulk Power Supply and Demand Program Report” Form EIA-411 collects electric reliability information from the Nation’s power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas:

216

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 13090 of 28,905 results. 81 - 13090 of 28,905 results. Rebate Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.'''''... http://energy.gov/savings/energy-efficient-home-improvements-program Download CX-006726: Categorical Exclusion Determination Well Coring-Schlumberger Carbon Services CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 03/19/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006726-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EA-1106: Final Environmental Assessment Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1106-final-environmental-assessment Download Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document

217

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

About LEDP About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to grant surplus and available used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges in the United States for use in energy oriented educational programs. This grant program is sponsored by the Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS). The listing of equipment available through LEDP is updated as new equipment is identified. It is available at no cost for a limited time and is granted on a first-received qualified application basis. Specific items may be recalled for DOE use and become unavailable through the program after the

218

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment. Universities, colleges and other non-profit educational institutions of higher learning in the United States are eligible to apply for equipment to use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical, and environmental sciences, and in engineering. The equipment listed in this database is available for grant; however, specific items may be recalled for DOE use and become unavailable through the program. Frequently Asked Questions Who is eligible to apply for equipment? Any non-profit, educational institution of higher learning, such as a middle school, high school, university, college, junior college, technical

219

BNL | Accelerators for Applied Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerators for Applied Research Accelerators for Applied Research Brookhaven National Lab operates several accelerator facilities dedicated to applied research. These facilities directly address questions and concerns on a tremendous range of fields, including medical imaging, cancer therapy, computation, and space exploration. Leading scientists lend their expertise to these accelerators and offer crucial assistant to collaborating researchers, pushing the limits of science and technology. Interested in gaining access to these facilities for research? See the contact number listed for each facility. RHIC tunnel Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)-positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis-produces commercially unavailable radioisotopes for use by the

220

V-189: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users 9: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host V-189: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host July 1, 2013 - 12:48am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle VirtualBox 'tracepath' Bug Lets Local Guest Users Deny Service on the Target Host PLATFORM: VirtualBox 4.2.12 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Oracle VirtualBox. REFERENCE LINKS: VirtualBox ticket: 11863 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028712 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A local user on the guest operating system can issue a 'tracepath' command to cause the network on the target host system to become unavailable. IMPACT: A local user on a guest operating system can cause denial of service conditions on the target host system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geoscience case study- appendixes geoscience case study- appendixes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. Author(s): Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis, J. A. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 11/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5988071 Source: View Original Report Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Raft_River_geoscience_case_study-_appendixes&oldid=473481

222

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant in Churchill County Plant in Churchill County Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Mark Struble Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 02/13/2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Citation Mark Struble. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County [Internet]. 02/13/2005. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2005/02/13;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/info/newsroom/Carson_City_News_Archives/2005/02/blm_approves_salt.html

223

EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1335: Final Environmental Assessment Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications Complex A primary mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to maintain the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in a safe, secure, and reliable manner. Aging weapons contain dated and now unavailable technologies. Modernization of these weapon system components is integral to DOE's responsibility to meet its stockpile stewardship requirements for enhanced performance, and increased safety, security, and reliability in weapons systems. To meet this responsibility, there is a need to modernize key weapon components utilizing microelectronics available only at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). DOE has identified an increasing

224

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

225

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield. Author(s): Glaspey, Douglas J. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/30/2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/922630 Source: View Original Report Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

226

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-020.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 SECTION A. Project Title: Interim Storage Area for Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) SECTION B. Project Description: Currently, dedicated space is unavailable for above-grade storage of Interim Storage Containers (ISCs) containing 55-gal drums of remote handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU). In the past this waste was packaged in specially constructed liners and placed into the RSWF. When ready for transfer this waste would then be removed from RSWF and transferred to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) where it was sorted and repackaged for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this new interim storage area is needed to eliminate special packaging and placement into RSWF in order to reduce costs and exposure associated with repackaging

227

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Citation D.E. White,M.E. Hinkle,I. Barnes. 1970. Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713.

228

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BOREHOLES; WELL DRILLING; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; IDAHO; EQUIPMENT; GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS; WELL CASINGS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; DRILLING; EXPLORATION; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA; WELLS Author(s): Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 10/1/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5091938 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

229

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection? What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection? by Tim Byrne on Fri, 20 Mar, 2009 The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information legacy collection contains an estimated one million technical reports representing six decades of energy research that is, for the most part, unavailable in electronic format. On average, OSTI receives close to two hundred requests each month to digitize specific reports, with the vast majority of the requests coming from DOE employees and contractors. The legacy collection represents an enormous investment in research and development from the Atomic Energy Commission, Energy Research and Development Administration and Department of Energy. With the growing tendency of many researchers to rely solely on research information available

230

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Loans: Up to $20,000 for 100% of cost as long as 85% of work is for qualifying home improvements Homeowner Energy Efficient Rebates (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying improvements up to $2,000 Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of costs up to $20,000 '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.'''''

231

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2 2002 3 2006 3 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 3. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil, coal or coke.

232

LTUG09_HardwareLessonsLearned.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tape Users Group Tape Users Group Sun StorageTek Tape Hardware Migration Experiences Jason Hick 9940B & T10KA to T10KB Serial 9310s to TCP/IP SL8500 Large Tape Users Group Replacing Old Hardware  8ea 9310s containing 40,000+ cartridges (91% occupied) - 16,130 x 9940B tape cartridges - 17,700 x 9840A tape cartridges - 6,859 x T10KA tape cartridges - 34 x 9940B tape drives (3-way & 1-way) - 18 x T10KA tape drives (3-way & 1-way)  Some reasons Sun provided us: - 9940B availability of replacement parts/drives (several weeks on 2-3 occasions) - T10KA sensitive to unavailability of drives and couldn't repair fast enough - 9310s going end-of-life  Some temporary solutions for above: - Buy local spare parts cache - Support for 9310s from 3rd party

233

MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

Ball, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Low Density Nuclear Matter in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for collisions of 47A MeV 10 Band 64 Zn with 124 Sn tar- gets. Results are shown for times ranging from initial collision to 300 fm/c and for impact parameters ranging from 0.3 to 3.3 fm. .. 9 5 Calculated mass fractions as a function of temperature and den- sity....0 bracketrightbigg 1.0+0.1667E 1.05 ? 2 1.0+9.704? 1.2 . (1.1) The fragments generated in AMD-V are generally in an excited state at time about 300fm/c. An unavailable amount of CPU time would be needed if the AMD Model were followed with all fragments de...

Qin, Lijun

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sound transmission loss of nontraditional building materials and redundancies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This line of inquiry aims to provide sound transmission loss data both lab? and field?tested for novel transparent and translucent wall assemblies. Special attention is paid to: (1) Redundant assemblies featuring two layers of material with a large gap or small room between them (2) assemblies featuring emerging materials and (3) assemblies with high thermal resistance values. To that end composite configurations of acrylic polycarbonate aerogel and glass were tested in a laboratory and an acrylic room and glass vestibule were tested in the field. Results will be presented with an eye toward future use of the data. Indeed it was the unavailability of the data in existing publications that initially drove the research.

Michael Ermann; James Carneal; Daniel Mennitt; Christopher Jackson; Bharti Karmarkar; Matthew Helveston; Patrick Clay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Secure password-based authenticated key exchange for web services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses an implementation of an authenticated key-exchange method rendered on message primitives defined in the WS-Trust and WS-SecureConversation specifications. This IEEE-specified cryptographic method (AuthA) is proven-secure for password-based authentication and key exchange, while the WS-Trust and WS-Secure Conversation are emerging Web Services Security specifications that extend the WS-Security specification. A prototype of the presented protocol is integrated in the WSRF-compliant Globus Toolkit V4. Further hardening of the implementation is expected to result in a version that will be shipped with future Globus Toolkit releases. This could help to address the current unavailability of decent shared-secret-based authentication options in the Web Services and Grid world. Future work will be to integrate One-Time-Password (OTP) features in the authentication protocol.

Liang, Fang; Meder, Samuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Siebenlist, Frank

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-17, Ookayama, Meguro-ku 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Statistical analysis of cascading failures in power grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a new microscopic model of cascading failures in transmission power grids. This model accounts for automatic response of the grid to load fluctuations that take place on the scale of minutes, when optimum power flow adjustments and load shedding controls are unavailable. We describe extreme events, caused by load fluctuations, which cause cascading failures of loads, generators and lines. Our model is quasi-static in the causal, discrete time and sequential resolution of individual failures. The model, in its simplest realization based on the Directed Current description of the power flow problem, is tested on three standard IEEE systems consisting of 30, 39 and 118 buses. Our statistical analysis suggests a straightforward classification of cascading and islanding phases in terms of the ratios between average number of removed loads, generators and links. The analysis also demonstrates sensitivity to variations in line capacities. Future research challenges in modeling and control of cascading outages over real-world power networks are discussed.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pfitzner, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Office of the Registrar The University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS/EDUCATION AREA *4.324 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.326 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.328 69 CWS/LM/Wb *4.330 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.332 48 LM/MC/TBL/Wb *4.336 16 Bb/MC/SEM/TBL *4.338 20 BbLM/MC/SEM/TBL *4.340 20 Bb/LM/MC/SEM/TBL 4.342 20 Bb/LM/MC/SEM/TBL 4.344 40 LM/MC/TBL/Wb 4.346 16 Bb/MC/SEM/TBL 4.348 56 LM/MC/TBL/Wb * Unavailable

Johnston, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reliability modeling of demand response considering uncertainty of customer behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand response (DR) has been considered as a generation alternative to improve the reliability indices of the system and load point. However, when the demand resources scheduled in the DR market fail to result in demand reductions, it can potentially bring new problems associated with maintaining a reliable supply. In this paper, a reliability model of the demand resource is constructed considering customers’ behaviors in the same form as conventional generation units, where the availability and unavailability are associated with the simple two-state model. The reliability model is generalized by a multi-state model. In the integrated power market with DR, market players provide the demand reduction and generation, which are represented by an equivalent multi-state demand response and generation, respectively. The reliability indices of the system and load point are evaluated using the optimal power flow by minimizing the summation of load curtailments with various constraints.

Hyung-Geun Kwag; Jin-O Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Application of probabilistic safety assessment models to risk-based inspection of piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the beginning, one of the most useful applications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is its use in evaluating the risk importance of changes to plant design, operations, or other plant conditions. Risk importance measures the impact of a change on the risk. Risk is defined as a combination of the likelihood of failure and consequence of the failure. The consequence can be safety system unavailability, core melt frequency, early release, or various other consequence measures. The goal in this PSA application is to evaluate the risk importance of an ISI process, as applied to plant piping systems. Two approaches can be taken in this evaluation: Current PSA Approach or the Blended Approach. Both are discussed here.

Chapman, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Low-grade geothermal energy conversion by organic Rankine cycle turbine generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports results of a demonstration project which helped determine the feasibility of converting low-grade thermal energy in 49/sup 0/C water into electrical energy via an organic Rankine cycle 2500 watt (electrical) turbine-generator. The geothermal source which supplied the water is located in a rural Alaskan village. The primary reasons an organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator was investigated as a possible source of electric power in rural Alaska are: high cost of operating diesel-electric units and their poor long-term reliability when high-quality maintenance is unavailable; and the extremely high level of long-term reliability reportedly attained by commercially available organic Rankine cycle turbines. The important contribution made by this project is data provided on the thermal and electrical operating characteristics of an experimental organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator operating at a uniquely low vaporizer temperature.

Zarling, J.P.; Aspnes, J.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A multichannel design for QoS aware energy efficient clustering and routing in WMSN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are used in video surveillance applications for disaster management inside buildings. There is unavailability of electricity in a building during a disastrous situation. To have an energy efficient and real-time data delivery, a Quality of Service (QoS) aware energy efficient routing technique is proposed in this paper. It tries to find a route that meets the real-time data delivery deadlines by minimising the energy consumption. Also, WMSNs usually employ single channel design approach whereas at a given instant several video or image streams should be delivered. Based on the channel conditions, a game theory based distributed multichannel allocation mechanism is proposed which improves the network performance parameters in varying channel conditions. These network design mechanisms are investigated using NS-2 simulator for a test case application. It is shown that the combined approach leads to further reduction in the energy consumption by meeting the data reporting deadlines.

Zeeshan Ali Khan; Michel Auguin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Distributed video coding for arrays of remote sensing nodes : final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the Sandia National Laboratory funded Student Fellowship position at New Mexico State University (NMSU) from 2008 to 2010. Ivan Mecimore, the PhD student in Electrical Engineering at NMSU, was conducting research into image and video processing techniques to identify features and correlations within images without requiring the decoding of the data compression. Such an analysis technique would operate on the encoded bit stream, potentially saving considerable processing time when operating on a platform that has limited computational resources. Unfortunately, the student has elected in mid-year not to continue with his research or the fellowship position. The student is unavailable to provide any details of his research for inclusion in this final report. As such, this final report serves solely to document the information provided in the previous end of year summary.

Mecimore, Ivan (New Mexico State University); Creusere, Chuck D. (New Mexico State University); Merchant, Bion John

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The BioAssay network and its implications to future therapeutic discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Opioid Signaling and Tolerance Mechanisms. Anesth. Analg. 2005, 100:1034-1042. 23. Hua Y, Vickers T, Baker B, Bennett C, Krainer A: Enhancement of SMN2 exon 7 inclusion by antisense oligonucleotides targeting the exon. PLoS Biol 2007, 5(4):e73. 24. M N... Unavailable Cellular Organelle Nucleus Membrane Intracellular Cytoplasm a c d 10 2 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 Degree (k) N u m b e r o f B i o a s s a y s 10 1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 ?1 10 0 Degree A v e r a g e C l u s t e r i n g C o e ffi c i e n t #3; #3...

Zhang, Jintao; Lushington, Gerald H.; Huan, Jun

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

Jiles, David C. (Ames, IA); Sipahi, Levent B. (Ames, IA)

1994-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

aMCfast: automation of fast NLO computations for PDF fits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the interface between MadGraph5_aMC@NLO, a self-contained program that calculates cross sections up to next-to-leading order accuracy in an automated manner, and APPLgrid, a code that parametrises such cross sections in the form of look-up tables which can be used for the fast computations needed in the context of PDF fits. The main characteristic of this interface, which we dub aMCfast, is its being fully automated as well, which removes the need to extract manually the process-specific information for additional physics processes, as is the case with other matrix element calculators, and renders it straightforward to include any new process in the PDF fits. We demonstrate this by studying several cases which are easily measured at the LHC, have a good constraining power on PDFs, and some of which were previously unavailable in the form of a fast interface.

Valerio Bertone; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Juan Rojo; Mark Sutton

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

A RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability) analysis of Consolidated Edison's Gowanus and Narrows gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented which accurately assesses the ability of gas turbine generating stations to perform their intended function (reliability) while operating in a peaking duty mode. The developed methodology alloys the RAM modeler to calculate the probability that a peaking unit will produce the energy demanded and in turn calculate the total energy lost during a given time period due to unavailability of individual components. The methodology was applied to Consolidated Edison's Narrows site which has 16 barge-mounted General Electric Frame 5 gas turbines operating under a peaking duty mode. The resulting RAM model was quantified using the Narrows site power demand and failure rate data. The model was also quantified using generic failure data from the Operational Reliability Analysis Program (ORAP) for General Electric Frame 5 peaking gas turbines. A problem description list and counter measures are offered for components contributing more than one percent to gas turbine energy loss. 3 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.

Johnson, B.W.; Whitehead, T.J.; Derenthal, P.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ultrasonic distance scanning techniques for mobile robots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of ultrasound to mobile robot navigation. Two methods employing transducer arrays are described, namely the phased array (PA) method and the maximum-likelihood-estimation (MLE) method. These two methods are compared with the conventional time-of-flight (ToF) method. The paper shows that the PA method has advantages such as giving focused beams and allowing efficient beam steering. Limitations of the method are also discussed, including the need to assume a far-field, the undesired side grating lobes and the unavailability of suitably-sized transmitters. In order to understand the measurement uncertainty, a quantified estimation of the effective range and bearing measurement is calculated. The MLE method has the advantage of only involving one transmitter. The locations of the reflectors employed with this method can be represented in a probability map. Experimental results show that the reliability can be improved through the use of multiple receivers.

D.T. Pham; Z. Ji; A. Soroka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An integrated cost model for production scheduling and perfect maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production scheduling deals with scheduling production jobs on a machine (single or multiple) in order to optimise a specific objective such as total weighted completion times or total weighted tardiness. The assumption that machines are always available for processing jobs is generally used in the production scheduling literature. In reality, machines often are unavailable due to preventive maintenance activities or machine failure. Production scheduling and preventive maintenance planning are interrelated, but are most often treated separately. This interdependency seems to be overlooked in the literature. This work integrates, simultaneously, the decisions of preventive maintenance and job order sequencing for a single machine. The objective is to find the job order sequence and maintenance decisions that would minimise the expected cost.

Laith A. Hadidi; Umar M. Al-Turki; M. Abdur Rahim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Indices of biotic integrity in stated preference valuation of aquatic ecosystem services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stated preference surveys often give minimal attention to distinctions between intermediate and final ecosystem services, leading to the potential for welfare estimates that overlook, misrepresent or double count associated values. This paper illustrates potential mechanisms through which multimetric indexes of the type developed in the ecological literature, here an index of biotic integrity, can be used within stated preference survey scenarios to both improve the validity of survey responses and provide otherwise unavailable information on willingness to pay for intermediate and final ecosystem services. We illustrate the approach using a choice experiment application to the restoration of migratory fish in a Rhode Island watershed. Where assumptions of the model hold, results can allow transparent disentanglement and estimation of marginal values for both intermediate and final ecosystem services.

Robert J. Johnston; Kathleen Segerson; Eric T. Schultz; Elena Y. Besedin; Mahesh Ramachandran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hopper Featured Announcements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage scheduled maintenance tomorrow (Sept 19) and /project outage September 18, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments There will be a scheduled hardware and software maintenance for Hopper next Wednesday, Sept 19, from 6:30 am to midnight Pacific time. Please plan your work accordingly and check the NERSC Message of the Day (MOTD) for status update: http://www.nersc.gov/live-status/motd/. The /project file system (also known as /global/project) will be unavailable from 8am Wednesday, Sept 19 until 5pm Friday, Sept 21, during and after the scheduled Hopper maintenance. If your job depends on /project, please add the following "gres" setting in your batch script (so that your job won't start and fail during the /project outage): #PBS -l gres=project If your job is already queued (but not yet running), the following

255

Microsoft Word - CX-Ostrander-Troutdale-access_road_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 30, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Rick Ross Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Ostrander-Troutdale No. 1 transmission line access road maintenance including grading and rocking of road surfaces and installation of water bars and cross drain culverts Budget Information: Work Order #: Unavailable PP&A Project No.: PP&A #1740 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities for rights-of-way, infrastructures (e.g. roads) routine maintenance activities corrective are required to maintain and preserve infrastructures in a condition suitable for the facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The proposed project is located within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

256

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

257

Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters of Nevada Thermal Waters of Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1979 Report Number Bulletin 91 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Thermal Waters of Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside,John H. Schilling (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1979. Thermal Waters of Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Bulletin 91. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Waters_of_Nevada&oldid=690515" Categories: References Geothermal References

258

Microsoft Word - NERSC_Results.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reliability Results of NERSC Systems Reliability Results of NERSC Systems Akbar Mokhtarani, William Kramer, Jason Hick NERSC - LBNL Abstract In order to address the needs of future scientific applications for storing and accessing large amounts of data in an efficient way, one needs to understand the limitations of current technologies and how they may cause system instability or unavailability. A number of factors can impact system availability ranging from facility-wide power outage to a single point of failure such as network switches or global file systems. In addition, individual component failure in a system can degrade the performance of that system. This paper focuses on analyzing both of these factors and their impacts on the computational and storage systems at NERSC. Component failure data

259

Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Work for Others Agreement Work for Others Agreement scientists The DOE national laboratories were granted the authority to perform work for others by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 [Public Law 83-703; 42 USC 2053]. Work For Others programs at the DOE national laboratories are governed by DOE Directive 481.1-1A, "Reimbursable Work for Non-Federal Sponsors: Process Manual." Work For Others agreements provide an excellent way for companies, universities, and other entities to access the unique facilities, technologies, and expertise available at ORNL on a project-specific basis. This gives the sponsor access to research and development expertise and technology unavailable in the private sector, without having to expend the capital cost of developing or re-creating such facilities, expertise, and technology for itself.

260

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in moderate- and high-temperature geothermal environments Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the sampling and analytical techniques used for tracer analysis in the Raft River and East Mesa field tests. The collection procedures and sample preservation techniques, analytical methods and possible sources of contamination or error are discussed in detail. Author(s): Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 12/1/1984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5121460

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," 411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," collects information from the Nation's power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas: the security of the electrical systems; the usage of

262

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

263

Potomac River Generating Station Dept. of Energy Case No. EO-05-01; September 8, 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Craig A. Glazer Craig A. Glazer Vice President - Federal Government Policy PJM Washington Office (202) 393-7756 .FAX (202) 393-7741 e-mail: glazec@pjm.com CRITICAL ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE INFORMATION HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THIS SUBMITTAL FOR PRIVILEGED TREATMENT September 8, 2005 Lawrence Mansueti Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Rm. 8H-033 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Potomac River Generating Station Dept. of Energy Case No. EO-05-01 Dear Mr. Mansueti: PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. and PEPCO Holdings, Inc. is hereby providing you with additional information concerning reliability impacts under various system conditions associated with the unavailability of the Potomac River Generating Station to serve load in the D.C. area.

264

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Author William V. Parker Published EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging Citation William V. Parker. Discover the Benefits of Radar Imaging [Internet]. 2012. N/A. EIJ Earth Imaging Journal. [updated 2013/09/20;cited 2013/09/20]. Available from: http://eijournal.com/2012/discover-the-benefits-of-radar-imaging GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Web Site: Discover the Benefits of Radar imaging Details Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): William V. Parker Published: EIJ Earth Imaging Journal, 2012

265

Combustion Emissions from Refining Lower Quality Oil: What Is the Global Warming Potential?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Refinery crude feed, processing, yield, and fuel data from four regions accounting for 97% of U.S. refining capacity from 1999 to 2008 were compared among regions and years for effects on processing and energy consumption predicted by the processing characteristics of heavier, higher sulfur oils. ... Estimates that construct process-by-process allocations of emissions among these factors have not been verified by observations from operating refineries in part because publicly reported data are limited for refinery-specific crude feeds and unavailable for process-level material and energy inputs and outputs (4-6). ... Rough estimates including the energy, d, and S lost in bitumen upgrading for SCO refined reveal greater effects of total processing for crude feeds refined in Districts 2 and 4 and follow the relationships observed in refining (Figure 2). ...

Greg Karras

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Candu 6 severe core damage accident consequence analysis for steam generator tube rupture scenario using MAAP4-CANDU V4.0.5A: preliminary results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the preliminary results of the consequence analysis for a generic AECL CANDU 6 station, when it undergoes a postulated, low probability Steam Generator multiple Tube Rupture (SGTR) severe accident with assumed unavailability of several critical plant safety systems. The Modular Accident Analysis Program for CANDU (MAAP4-CANDU) code was used for this analysis. The SGTR accident is assumed to begin with the guillotine rupture of 10 steam generator tubes in one steam generator in Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) loop 1. For the reference case, the following systems were assumed unavailable: moderator and shield cooling, emergency core cooling, crash cool-down, and main and auxiliary feed water. Two additional cases were analyzed, one with the crash cool-down system available, and another with the crash cool-down and the auxiliary feed water systems available. The three scenarios considered in this study show that most of the initial fission product inventory would be retained within the containment by various fission product retention mechanisms. For the case where the crash cool-down system was credited but the auxiliary feed water systems were not credited, the total mass of volatile fission products released to the environment including stable and radioactive isotopes was about four times more than in the reference case, because fission products could be released directly from the PHTS to the environment through the Main Steam Safety Valves (MSSVs), bypassing the containment. For the case where the crash cool-down and auxiliary feed water systems were credited, the volatile fission product release to the environment was insignificant, because the fission product release was substantially mitigated by scrubbing in the water pool in the secondary side of the steam generator (SG). (authors)

Petoukhov, S.M.; Awadh, B.; Mathew, P.M. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (MER*) (2009) *Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (PPP**) **PurchasingNorth West China's Energy Consumption per Unit of GDP Energy

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

final energy per /industrial share of regional GDP (NBSfinal energy use per unit of industrial GDP produced. Evenbuildings, energy use per unit of industrial GDP, and CO 2

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Historical Primary Energy Per GDP and Per11 Historical Primary Energy per GDP and perHistorical Primary Energy Per GDP and Per capita Population

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Causes of Trade Globalization: A Political-Economy and World-Systems Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per? Energy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ? GDP per

Kwon, Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (???Announcement of Energy Consumption per Unit GDP and OtherSystem for Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP, November 11,

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

targets over their energy per GDP intensity. However, littleefficiency. Only total energy per GDP was available for useintensities (Energy Consumption per $ GDP or $ PPP), are

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Industrial ecocycles: rate adjustments and dematerialization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TPES (Mtce) GDP (1985 bil. US$) Figure 3. GDP and total primary energy supply (TPES...structure of final demand, increases in the...with the annual GDP. For example...5000 10 000 15 000 per capita GDP ($ in 1980...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity of GDP (energy per unit GDP) and the carbonand per- capita GDP, but also by unanticipated global increases in the energyg = G/P is per-capita GDP, e = E/G is energy intensity of

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D P ) inhowever, primary energy supply per GDP decelerated a declineattention to primary energy supply per GDP, per capita GDP

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inof 2008 Primary Energy Consumption and GDP Per Capita Canadause and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% bygrowth (GDP per capita). Base case unit energy consumption (

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in China, energy intensity per GDP decreased steeply betweenterms of energy consumption per unit of GDP, by 20% between

Haya, Barbara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The causes and consequences of tax policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state capacity. GDP per energy unit: Economic activityCorrelation (p-value) GDP per energy unit Forest Area

Weller, Nicholas William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tax Man Cometh: Income Taxation as a Measure of State Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state capacity. GDP per energy unit: Economic activityvalue) Indicator GDP per energy unit Average Correlation (p-

Weller, Nick; Ziegler, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Where can I find free economic forecasts? Economic forecasts have become an integral part of business and individual investment decisions. Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Conference Board provides short term (quarterly and annual) forecasts for real GDP, real consumer spending include (among others): GDP and real GDP, price indices for GDP and consumer spending, unemployment are projections of economic activity including GDP growth. These reports can be found on-line at: http

Johnson, Eric E.

282

Fiscal fragility: what the past may say about the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real interest rates and GDP growth rate. For a given future projectedit with the projected debt to GDP ratio. Real rates forit with the projected debt to GDP ratio. Real rates for

Aizenman, Joshua; Pasricha, Gurnain Kaur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Forecasting Agriculturally Driven Global Environmental Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of each variable on GDP (13, 17), combined with global GDP projections (14...population, and per capita GDP, combined with projected...measure of agricultural demand for water, is forecast...Just as demand for energy is the major cause...

David Tilman; Joseph Fargione; Brian Wolff; Carla D'Antonio; Andrew Dobson; Robert Howarth; David Schindler; William H. Schlesinger; Daniel Simberloff; Deborah Swackhamer

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use CO 2 /GDP Primary Energy Consumption/capita Final Energylevel indicators Primary Energy Consumption/GDP Final Energyavg-unweighted Primary Energy Consumption/GDP kgce/RMB

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Key China Energy Statistics 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (2008) tce/thousandTotal Primary Energy Production per GDP (PPP*) tce/thousand2008) Energy-Related CO 2 Emissions per GDP (2008) kg CO 2 /

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i.e. , overall energy or CO2 per unit GDP, city greenhouseenergy use per unit of manufacturing value added GDP ?energy use and CO 2 emissions per unit of manufacturing GDP

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steel, or M J of energy per dollar of GDP. The currentCommercial sector energy per dollar of GDP declinedmeasured by energy use per unit of GDP, is an intensive

Harris, Jeff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators ( ???Statistics on Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP. 2006,tce/10,000 RMB Energy Consumption per unit of GDP (tonne of

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

product (GDP) and energy is measured in Btu to allow for the summing of all energy forms (energyGDP or BtuGDP). On an economy-wide level, it is reflective of both energy...

290

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between energy use per capita and GDP per capita, theof production of energy per capita to GDP per capita was .26Decoupling of energy use and GDP per capita has occurred in

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial Energy Consumed per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 5. TotalCommercial Energy Consumption per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 * 1.Commercial Energy Consumption per Unit GDP, 1970-1993 * (

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy intensity (energy per unit GDP) in the 11 th FYP. Forintensity (total energy per unit GDP)  industrial energyof total (primary) energy per unit GDP in fixed 2005 RMB [

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily, 2007. Energy consumption per unit GDP down 1.23%increase in energy use per unit of GDP after 2002 following2006, the energy consumption per unit of GDP declined 1.23%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 per unit GDP, CO2 per capita, energy structure, etc.Aggregated: energy or CO 2 per unit GDP, energy or CO 2 perper unit GDP Introduction Local level action and leadership are crucial for saving energy and

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ton of steel, or MJ of energy per dollar of GDP. The current2 Commercial sector energy per dollar of GDP declinedmeasured by energy use per unit of GDP, is an intensive

Harris, Jeffrey; Diamond, Rick; Iyer, Maithili; Payne, Christopher; Blumstein, Carl; Siderius, Hans-Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Primary energy supply per unit of GDP (excluding biomass;is defined as energy use per unit of GDP and is an aggregateenergy sector. Much of the variations of CO 2 emissions per unit of GDP

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with4: International trends in energy and GDP per capita, with38 International trends in Energy and GDP Per Capita, with

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% between20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010. China'sincrease in energy use per unit of GDP after 2002 following

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result, energy use per unit of GDP (energy intensity)a rebound in energy use per unit of GDP after 2001, afterresidual energy use in industry per unit of GDP (economic

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily. 2007. Energy consumption per unit GDP down 1.23% inintensity: the amount of energy consumed per unit GDP. IPCC:2006, the energy consumption per unit of GDP declined 1.23%

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 4B.11. Energy Intensity per GDP Unit Table 4B.12.Table 4B.11. Energy Intensity per GDP Unit Table 4B.12.Xinjiang Energy Consumption per GDP Value Changes (%) (

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research Institute’s energy demand model (CERI, 2009): GDP growth, persons perenergy-environment modeling. 1 Major drivers are economic activity (household income, GDP growth and GDP per

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial Sector ? Primary energy per unit GDP ? CO 2indicators ? Primary energy per unit GDP ? CO 2 per unitper unit GDP ? Primary energy per capita ? CO 2 per capita

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decrease in energy consumption per unit GDP in the "Eleventh40-50% reduction in energy consumption per unit GDP by 2020measured by energy consumption per unit GDP in the “The 11th

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years if amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inyears if amount of energy per unit GDP remained constant. Inin the amount of energy consumed per unit GDP; on the other

Levine, Mark D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reducing its energy use per unit of GDP by 20% betweenreduce energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP)as energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP), by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP by...

308

Electric Propulsion for Cars: New Directions for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4 5 · freight;Oil Use vs GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4 5 consumption #12;Oil Use vs GDP kg of oil consumed per US$1000 of GDP, 2005 US OECD (w/o US) · petrochemicals 4

Firestone, Jeremy

309

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H The Proposed Activity (PA) issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and FTF personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and F Tank Farm (FTF), radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio. The installation of the radio repeater station in this PA will allow full and effective radio communications between HTF and FTF. The radio repeater station consists of a pole mounted antenna, a repeater station mounted on a concrete pad at the foot of the pole, and electrical power supplied to the repeater by a nearby electrical panel. The installation will be in E-Area,

310

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 19983 20024 20064 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 4. Denominators represent the value of production for the entire iron and still mills (NAICS 331111), not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, coal, residual fuel oil or coke.

311

Data:9ca64540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 4540-69c3-4b7a-838e-c463df078360 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Distributed Generation Rider over 25 kW Remote Access Unavailable Sector: Description: Applicable to Distributed Generation smaller than 3 MW of connected generation connected in parallel operation to the Cooperative's lines in accordance with the Cooperative's service rules and regulations and the Cooperative's Distributed Generation Procedures and Guidelines Manual for members. This rate is not applicable to temporary, shared, or resale service. This rate is applicable to service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter.

312

Data:44ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 ffaf06-971c-4732-ae1f-248ec212ce33 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kiwash Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Distributed Generation Rider 25 kW and smaller Remote Access Unavailable Sector: Description: Applicable to Distributed Generation smaller than 3 MW of connected generation connected in parallel operation to the Cooperative's lines in accordance with the Cooperative's service rules and regulations and the Cooperative's Distributed Generation Procedures and Guidelines Manual for members. This rate is not applicable to temporary, shared, or resale service. This rate is applicable to service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter.

313

Data:Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 Ed9359bf-3ae7-40c5-925c-a68c8f894563 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Decatur County Rural E M C Effective date: 2010/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: OPTIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY RIDER FOR SINGLE PHASE RESIDENTIAL CONSUMERS (1,000kWh LIMIT) Sector: Residential Description: Available to any member of the Corporation with less than 25 kW monthly demand taking service concurrently under Schedule SP Single Phase Electric Service. The Corporation reserves the right to limit the total number of participants under this Rider. Energy sold pursuant to this Rider is generated using renewable resources. While the Corporation expects that power generated from renewable resources will be readily available on the wholesale market, the Corporation makes no guarantee that such resources will be available at all times. If the Corporation determines that for any reason that renewable resources are unavailable or insufficient to furnish the member purchases hereunder, the Corporation may suspend application of this Rider. When the renewable resources again become available, the Corporation may resume application of this Rider.

314

EIA - Future role of the United States in world coal trade  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future role of the United States in world coal trade Future role of the United States in world coal trade International Energy Outlook 2010 Future role of the United States in world coal trade U.S. coal exports increased each year from 2002 to 2008 at an average annual rate of 12.8 percent, to 82 million tons in 2008. Some analysts have viewed the sharp increase in U.S. exports as an indication of the growing importance of the United States as a world coal supplier. There has also been speculation that China's growing demand for coal will support this trend in the future. However, U.S. coal is a relatively high-cost supply source when shipped to Asian markets, and in the long term U.S. coal will be competing in the Chinese market with lower cost suppliers, notably Australia and Indonesia among others. U.S. exports compete most strongly in European markets and then only when less expensive options are unavailable. In IEO2010, the United States remains a marginal coal supplier over the long term, responding to short-term disruptions or spikes in demand rather than significantly expanding its market share of world coal trade.

315

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H issues E-DCF-H-08125 to install a radio repeater station in E area to enhance radio communications between the 241-2H control room and FTF personnel. Currently, because of the distance between H Tank Farm (HTF) and F Tank Farm (FTF), radio communications between the two areas there is unavailable. As a result, consolidation of the FTF control rooms into the 241-2H control room could leave the 241-2H control room without the capability of communicating with FTF personnel via radio. The installation of the radio repeater station in this PA will allow full and effective radio communications between HTF and FTF. The radio repeater station consists of a pole mounted antenna, a repeater station mounted on a concrete pad at the foot of the pole, and electrical power supplied to the repeater by a nearby electrical panel. The installation will be in E-Area,

316

Data:F14544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 544e9-5e21-4b48-a818-247c09dfce71 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Transmission Voltage Supplemental Services: For NRG Energy Center LLC 16 MW EWG Unit Sector: Industrial Description: "AVAILABILITY: This tariff is available to the 16 MW electric generating station operated by NRG Energy Center, LLC as an Exempt Wholesale Generator ("EWG") and located at 1280 West North Street ("16 MW EWG Unit"). The facility sells capacity and associated energy to third parties and normally provides for its own electrical demand and energy requirements, but requires intermittent service when that source of supply is unavailable. This tariff is available to provide supplemental capacity and associated energy for occasional plant start up and standby needs for the 16 MW EWG Unit, but it shall not be available for 1) resale or 2) for supply of plant auxiliary services for any other plant or generating station."

317

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Achieving negative emissions with BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) in the power sector: New insights from the TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France) model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It seems increasingly likely that atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration will overshoot the recommended 450 ppm CO2 equivalent target. Therefore, it may become necessary to use BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) technologies to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. This technique is gaining increasing attention as it offers the dual benefit of providing low-carbon energy products and leading to negative CO2 emissions. This study evaluates the possible deployment of BECCS in the power sector using the bottom-up multiregional optimization model TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France). Under two climate scenarios, a regional analysis is conducted to discuss where the technology will be developed. The impact of the unavailability of this technology on the structure of the electricity mix and the cost of the energy system completes the analysis. In line with literature, the results suggest that BECCS technology offers an environmentally and economically viable option to achieve stringent targets. The regional analysis shows that industrialized countries will develop CCS (carbon capture and storage) mainly on biomass power plants while CCS on fossil fuel power plants will be widely deployed in China. With a specific constraint on CCS diffusion, the share of renewables and nuclear energy becomes significant to meet the climate targets.

Sandrine Selosse; Olivia Ricci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A study of aggregation bias in estimating the market for home heating and cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Econometricians frequently propose parametric models which are contingent on an underlying assumption of rational economic agents maximizing their utility. Accurate estimation of the parameters of these models depends on using data disaggregated to the level of the actual agents, usually individual consumers or firms. Using data at some other level of aggregation introduces bias into the inferences made from the data. Unfortunately, properly disaggregated data is often unavailable, or at least, much more costly to obtain than aggregate data. Research on consumer choice of home heating equipment has long depended on state-level cross-sectional data. Only recently have investigators been able to build up and successfully use data on consumer attributes and choices at the household level. A study estimated for the Electric Power Research Institute REEPS model is currently one of the best of these. This paper examines the degree of bias that would be introduced in that study if only average data across SMSAs or states were used at several points in the investigation. We examine the market shares and elasticities estimated from that model using only the mean values of the exogenous variables, and find severe errors to be possible. However, if the models were calibrated on only aggregate data originally, we find that proper treatment allows market shares and elasticities to be found with little error relative to the disaggregate models. 22 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Planetary radar astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

Steven J. Ostro

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated risk assessment for LNG terminals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an integrated risk assessment framework for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminals. The basic steps for risk assessment are the following: a) hazard identification, b) accident sequence modeling, where logic models such as Event Trees and Fault Trees are developed c) data acquisition and parameter estimation, used to estimate frequencies of the initiating events, component unavailability and probabilities of human actions, d) accident sequence quantification, where all accident sequences are assessed, e) consequence assessment, where release, evaporation rate, radiation levels and overpressure owing to immediate or delayed ignition of LNG is performed and f) integration of results where risk indices are assessed. Risk assessment of an onshore and an offshore LNG terminal is performed, according to the basic methodological steps, and the distances where individual risk levels equal to 10?5–10?7/yr are assessed and presented in the form of individual contours. A section dedicated to I.A. Papazoglou, pioneer in Quantitative Risk Assessment both in the nuclear and chemical industry is also provided.

O.N. Aneziris; I.A. Papazoglou; M. Konstantinidou; Z. Nivolianitou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Integration of hydrogen management in refinery planning with rigorous process models and product quality specifications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New trends of increased heavy crude markets and clean-fuel legislation, to produce ultra low-sulphur (ULS) gasoline and diesel fuels, are forcing refineries to increase their consumption of hydrogen. This critical situation raises the need to have a tool for operating refineries with flexibility and profitability. This paper addresses the planning of refinery with consideration to hydrogen availability. A systematic method for integrating a hydrogen management strategy within a rigorous refinery planning model is undertaken. The presented model consists of two main building blocks: a set of non-linear processing units' models and a hydrogen balance framework. The two blocks are integrated to produce a refinery-wide planning model with hydrogen management. The hydrogen management alternatives were determined by economic analysis. The proposed model improves the hidden hydrogen unavailability that prevents refineries from achieving their maximum production and profit. The model is illustrated on representative case studies and the results are discussed. It was found that an additional annual profit equivalent to $7 million could be achieved with a one-time investment of $13 million in a new purification unit.

Ali Elkamel; Ibrahim Alhajri; A. Almansoori; Yousef Saif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Structural Basis of Multifunctionality in a Vitamin B[subscript 12]-processing Enzyme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An early step in the intracellular processing of vitamin B{sub 12} involves CblC, which exhibits dual reactivity, catalyzing the reductive decyanation of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}), and the dealkylation of alkylcobalamins (e.g. methylcobalamin; MeCbl). Insights into how the CblC scaffold supports this chemical dichotomy have been unavailable despite it being the most common locus of patient mutations associated with inherited cobalamin disorders that manifest in both severe homocystinuria and methylmalonic aciduria. Herein, we report structures of human CblC, with and without bound MeCbl, which provide novel biochemical insights into its mechanism of action. Our results reveal that CblC is the most divergent member of the NADPH-dependent flavin reductase family and can use FMN or FAD as a prosthetic group to catalyze reductive decyanation. Furthermore, CblC is the first example of an enzyme with glutathione transferase activity that has a sequence and structure unrelated to the GST superfamily. CblC thus represents an example of evolutionary adaptation of a common structural platform to perform diverse chemistries. The CblC structure allows us to rationalize the biochemical basis of a number of pathological mutations associated with severe clinical phenotypes.

Koutmos, Markos; Gherasim, Carmen; Smith, Janet L.; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

DWPF STARTUP FRIT VISCOSITY MEASUREMENT ROUND ROBIN RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A viscosity standard is needed to replace the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) glasses currently being used to calibrate viscosity measurement equipment. The current NIST glasses are either unavailable or less than ideal for calibrating equipment to measure the viscosity of high-level waste glasses. This report documents the results of a viscosity round robin study conducted on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup frit. DWPF startup frit was selected because its viscosity-temperature relationship is similar to most DWPF and Hanford high-level waste glass compositions. The glass underwent grinding and blending to homogenize the large (100 lb) batch. Portions of the batch were supplied to the laboratories (named A through H) for viscosity measurements following a specified temperature schedule with a temperature range of 1150 C to 950 C and with an option to measure viscosity at lower temperatures if their equipment was capable of measuring at the higher viscosities. Results were used to fit the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher and Arrhenius equations to viscosity as a function of temperature for the entire temperature range of 460 C through 1250 C as well as the limited temperature interval of approximately 950 C through 1250 C. The standard errors for confidence and prediction were determined for the fitted models.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Russell, Renee L.; Workman, Phyllis J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Smith, Donald E.; Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chapter 3 - Google Hacking Basics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the basics of Google hacking and the functionality of the directory listings that can be used to locate specific files and directories. Google cache is a powerful tool in the hands of an advanced user. It can be used to locate old versions of pages that may expose information that normally would be unavailable to the casual user. The cache can be used to highlight terms in the cached version of a page, even if the terms were not used as part of the query to find that page. An advanced Google user will always pay careful attention to the details contained in the cached page's header, since there can be important information about the date the page was crawled, the terms that were found in the search, whether the cached page contains external images, links to the original page, and the text of the URL used to access the cached version of the page. Directory listings contain a great deal of information that is interesting from a security perspective. The directory listings can be used to determine specific information about the software installed on a server. Traversal techniques can be used to locate information that is often outside the piercing gaze of Google's crawlers. The chapter explores some specific techniques including directory traversal, incremental substitution, and extension walking.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Using a Balun Transformer Combiner for High Power Microwave Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel coaxial power combiner design has been duplicated that has distinct advantages over other combiner geometries that can handle high power. This design is being applied to combine four 3 kW power supplies to obtain a 10 kW, 5 MHz system for an ICRF antenna on HSX. In the past, Wilkinson type combiners have had limited application to high power systems because of the lack of non-inductive, high power, 100 Omega balance loads. With this new design, standard 50 Omega dummy loads can be used instead for the balance load. The cost is considerably lower than lumped element combiner designs which are dominated by capacitor costs. At such a relatively low frequency, a 3-dB quarter-wave coupled-line coupler becomes impractically long, and a conventional branch-line hybrid requires 35 Omega-line, which is commercially unavailable. The balun combiner uses less transmission line than a ring hybrid and has good bandwidth characteristics even away from its best line impedance. Theoretical calculations and modeling were performed for line impedances from 65 Omega to 75 Omega. Measurements from a low-power test device show excellent agreement with theory, and construction of the high power system is underway.

Kaufman, Michael C [ORNL; Pesavento, Philip V [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

New synthesis of TATB. Process development studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have discovered that 1,1,1-trialkylhydrazinium salts are highly reactive reagents which aminate nitroaromatic compounds through vicarious nucleophilic substitution (VNS) of hydrogen. When applied to picramide, these reagents produce TATB in high yield. Traditionally, TATB has been manufactured in the USA by nitration of the relatively expensive and domestically unavailable 1,3,5- trichlorobenzene (TCB) to give 2,4,6-trichloro- 1,3,5- trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) which is then aminated to yield TATB. Elevated temperatures (1500 C) are required for both reactions. Our new VNS synthesis potentially affords an inexpensive and a more environmentally benign preparation of TATB. We describe in this report our progress in scaling up the synthesis of TATB from the laboratory to the pilot plant. We will discuss structure and control of impurities, changes in yield/quality with reaction conditions, choice of solvents, workup and product isolation, safety, and environmental considerations. Particle size characterizations as well as small-scale safety and performance testing will also be discussed.

Schmidt, R. D., LLNL

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

New synthesis of TATB process development studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We described a new synthesis of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) in 1996 at the 27th International Annual Conference of ICT. 1,1,1-trialkylhydrazinium salts are highly reactive reagents which aminate nitroaromatic compounds through vicarious nucleophilic substitution (VNS) of hydrogen. When applied to picramide, these reagents produce TATB in high yield. Traditionally, TATB has been manufactured in the USA by nitration of the relatively expensive and domestically unavailable 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (TCB) to give 2,4,6-,trichloro- 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) which is then aminated to yield TATB. Elevated temperatures (150{degrees}C) are required for both reactions. Our new VNS synthesis potentially affords an inexpensive and a more environmentally benign preparation of TATB. We describe in this report our progress in scaling up the synthesis of TATB from the laboratory to the pilot plant. We will discuss structure and control of impurities, changes in yield/quality with reaction conditions, choice of solvents, workup and product isolation, safety, and environmental considerations. Particle size characterizations as well as small-scale safety and performance testing will also be discussed.

Schmidt, R.D.; Mitchell, A.R.; Pagoria, P.F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Searching for Smoking Gun Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clear methods to differentiate between decaying and annihilating dark matter (DM) scenarios are still by and large unavailable. In this note, we study the potential astrophysical signatures of a new class of hidden sector decaying DM models, which can address the recent cosmic ray measurements. Such models may produce primary photons and/or neutrinos at large rates, correlated with the leptonic production. The photon and neutrino spectra will then contain sharp features at the TeV scale. We demonstrate the discovery potential for upcoming and future measurements by FERMI, HESS, AGIS and IceCube/DeepCore. We show that these models may be discovered in the near future. Specifically, measurements of diffuse gamma rays by FERMI can detect the start of a hard photon feature. We argue that these hard spectra can be produced by decaying dark matter and be consistent with current constraints, but are difficult to reconcile with models of annihilating DM. Consequently the measurement of a hard spectral feature, in correlation with the current cosmic ray measurements, will strongly favor decaying DM models. Finally we comment on the preliminary results from the Inner Galaxy presented by the FERMI collaboration.

Joshua T. Ruderman; Tomer Volansky

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

Procedures for the external event core damage frequency analyses for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents methods which can be used to perform the assessment of risk due to external events at nuclear power plants. These methods were used to perform the external events risk assessments for the Surry and Peach Bottom nuclear power plants as part of the NRC-sponsored NUREG-1150 risk assessments. These methods apply to the full range of hazards such as earthquakes, fires, floods, etc. which are collectively known as external events. The methods described in this report have been developed under NRC sponsorship and represent, in many cases, both advancements and simplifications over techniques that have been used in past years. They also include the most up-to-date data bases on equipment seismic fragilities, fire occurrence frequencies and fire damageability thresholds. The methods described here are based on making full utilization of the power plant systems logic models developed in the internal events analyses. By making full use of the internal events models one obtains an external event analysis that is consistent both in nomenclature and in level of detail with the internal events analyses, and in addition, automatically includes all the appropriate random and tests/maintenance unavailabilities as appropriate. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Bohn, M.P.; Lambright, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Micronized Coal Reburning (MCR) Demonstration for NO{sub x} Control, as described in a report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1999). The need to meet strict emissions requirements at a minimum cost prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), in conjunction with Fuller Company, Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), and Fluor Daniel, to submit the proposal for this project to be sited at TVA's Shawnee Fossil Plant. In July 1992, TVA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. However, because of operational and environmental compliance strategy changes, the Shawnee site became unavailable.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

SuperB Technical Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic ...

Baszczyk, M; Kolodziej, J; Kucewicz, W; Sapor, M; Jeremie, A; Pous, E Grauges; Bruno, G E; De Robertis, G; Diacono, D; Donvito, G; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Giordano, F; Loddo, F; Loparco, F; Maggi, G P; Manzari, V; Mazziotta, M N; Nappi, E; Palano, A; Santeramo, B; Sgura, I; Silvestris, L; Spinoso, V; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Zhuo, Z; Jenkovszky, L; Balbi, G; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Cafaro, V; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Di Sipio, R; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Gabrielli, A; Galli, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giorgi, F M; Grandi, C; Lax, I; Meo, S Lo; Marconi, U; Montanari, A; Pellegrini, G; Piccinini, M; Rovelli, T; Cesari, N Semprini; Torromeo, G; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Vagnoni, V M; Valentinetti, S; Villa, M; Zoccoli, A; Caron, J -F; Hearty, C; Lu, P F -T; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y -C; Barnyakov, M Yu; Blinov, V E; Botov, A A; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kononov, S A; Kravchenko, E A; Levichev, E B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Shtol, D A; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Cardini, A; Carpinelli, M; Chao, D S -T; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Hanson, J; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Zhu, R Y; Randazzo, N; Burelo, E De La Cruz; Zheng, Y; Campos, P; De Silva, M; Kathirgamaraju, A; Meadows, B; Pushpawela, B; Shi, Y; Sokoloff, M; Castro, G Lopez; Ciaschini, V; Franchini, P; Giacomini, F; Paolini, A; Polania, G A Calderon; Laczek, S; Romanowicz, P; Szybinski, B; Czuchry, M; Flis, L; Harezlak, D; Kocot, J; Radecki, M; Sterzel, M; Szepieniec, T; Szymocha, T; Wójcik, P; Andreotti, M; Baldini, W; Calabrese, R; Carassiti, V; Cibinetto, G; Ramusino, A Cotta; Evangelisti, F; Gianoli, A; Luppi, E; Malaguti, R; Manzali, M; Melchiorri, M; Munerato, M; Padoan, C; Santoro, V; Tomassetti, L; Beretta, M M; Biagini, M; Boscolo, M; Capitolo, E; de Sangro, R; Esposito, M; Felici, G; Finocchiaro, G; Gatta, M; Gatti, C; Guiducci, S; Lauciani, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Raimondi, P; Rama, M; Sanelli, C; Tomassini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Delepine, D; Santos, M A Reyes; Chrzaszcz, M; Grzymkowski, R; Knap, P; Kotula, J; Lesiak, T; Ludwin, J; Michalowski, J; Pawlik, B; Rachwal, B; Stodulski, M; Wiechczynski, J; Witek, M; Zawiejski, L; Zdybal, M; Aushev, V Y; Ustynov, A; Arnaud, N; Bambade, P; Beigbeder, C; Bogard, F; Borsato, M; Breton, D; Brossard, J; Burmistrov, L; Charlet, D; Chaumat, V; Dadoun, O; Berni, M El; Maalmi, J; Puill, V; Rimbault, C; Stocchi, A; Tocut, V; Variola, A; Wallon, S; Wormser, G; Grancagnolo, F; Ben-Haim, E; Sitt, S; Baylac, M; Bourrion, O; Deconto, J -M; Martinez, Y Gomez; Monseu, N; Muraz, J -F; Real, J -S; Vescovi, C; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D; Twedt, E W; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Nderitu, S; Patel, P; Robertson, S H; Swersky, D; Warburton, A; Flores, E Cuautle; Sanchez, G Toledo; Biassoni, P; Bombelli, L; Citterio, M; Coelli, S; Fiorini, C; Liberali, V; Monti, M; Nasri, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Sabatini, F; Stabile, A; Berra, A; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Lietti, D; Maino, M; Pessina, G; Prest, M; Martin, J -P; Simard, M; Starinski, N; Taras, P; Drutskoy, A; Makarychev, S; Nefediev, A V; Aloisio, A; Cavaliere, S; De Nardo, G; Della Pietra, M; Doria, A; Giordano, R; Ordine, A; Pardi, S; Russo, G; Sciacca, C; Bigi, I I; Jessop, C P; Wang, W; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Corvo, M; Crescente, A; Corso, F Dal; Dosselli, U; Fanin, C; Gianelle, A; Longo, S; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Morandin, M; Pengo, R; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Stroili, R; Gaioni, L; Manazza, A; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Re, V; Traversi, G; Zucca, S; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Cecchi, C; Germani, S; Lebeau, M; Lubrano, P; Manoni, E; Papi, A; Rossi, A; Scolieri, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Fella, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M; Lilli, L; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paladino, A; Pantaleo, F; Paoloni, E; Perez, A L Perez; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Téllez, A Fernández; Beck, G; Berman, M; Bevan, A; Gannaway, F; Inguglia, G; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Bocci, V; Capodiferro, M; Chiodi, G; Dafinei, I; Drenska, N V; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Gargiulo, C; Gauzzi, P; Luci, C; Lunadei, R; Martellotti, G; Pellegrino, F; Pettinacci, V; Pinci, D; Recchia, L; Ruggeri, D; Zullo, A; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; De Santis, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Felice, V; Di Palma, F; Di Simone, A; Marcelli, L; Messi, R; Moricciani, D; Sparvoli, R; Tammaro, S; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bussino, S; Ciuchini, M; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Ruggieri, F; Spiriti, E; Wilson, F; Monzon, I Leon; Millan-Almaraz, J R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Aston, D; Dey, B; Fisher, A; Jackson, P D; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; MacFarlane, D; McCulloch, M; Metcalfe, S; Novokhatski, A; Osier, S; Prepost, R; Ratcliff, B; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M; Va'vra, J; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W; Altschul, B D; Purohit, M V; Baudot, J; Ripp-Baudot, I; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Bezshyyko, O; Dolinska, G; Soffer, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

SuperB Technical Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic climate led to a formal cancelation of the project on Nov 27, 2012.

SuperB Collaboration; M. Baszczyk; P. Dorosz; J. Kolodziej; W. Kucewicz; M. Sapor; A. Jeremie; E. Grauges Pous; G. E. Bruno; G. De Robertis; D. Diacono; G. Donvito; P. Fusco; F. Gargano; F. Giordano; F. Loddo; F. Loparco; G. P. Maggi; V. Manzari; M. N. Mazziotta; E. Nappi; A. Palano; B. Santeramo; I. Sgura; L. Silvestris; V. Spinoso; G. Eigen; J. Zalieckas; Z. Zhuo; L. Jenkovszky; G. Balbi; M. Boldini; D. Bonacorsi; V. Cafaro; I. D'Antone; G. M. Dallavalle; R. Di Sipio; F. Fabbri; L. Fabbri; A. Gabrielli; D. Galli; P. Giacomelli; V. Giordano; F. M. Giorgi; C. Grandi; I. Lax; S. Lo Meo; U. Marconi; A. Montanari; G. Pellegrini; M. Piccinini; T. Rovelli; N. Semprini Cesari; G. Torromeo; N. Tosi; R. Travaglini; V. M. Vagnoni; S. Valentinetti; M. Villa; A. Zoccoli; J. -F. Caron; C. Hearty; P. F. -T. Lu; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. -C. So; M. Yu. Barnyakov; V. E. Blinov; A. A. Botov; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; S. A. Kononov; E. A. Kravchenko; E. B. Levichev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; D. A. Shtol; Y. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. Cardini; M. Carpinelli; D. S. -T. Chao; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; K. Flood; J. Hanson; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; R. Y. Zhu; N. Randazzo; E. De La Cruz Burelo; Y. Zheng; P. Campos; M. De Silva; A. Kathirgamaraju; B. Meadows; B. Pushpawela; Y. Shi; M. Sokoloff; G. Lopez Castro; V. Ciaschini; P. Franchini; F. Giacomini; A. Paolini; G. A. Calderon Polania; S. Laczek; P. Romanowicz; B. Szybinski; M. Czuchry; L. Flis; D. Harezlak; J. Kocot; M. Radecki; M. Sterzel; T. Szepieniec; T. Szymocha; P. Wójcik; M. Andreotti; W. Baldini; R. Calabrese; V. Carassiti; G. Cibinetto; A. Cotta Ramusino; F. Evangelisti; A. Gianoli; E. Luppi; R. Malaguti; M. Manzali; M. Melchiorri; M. Munerato; C. Padoan; V. Santoro; L. Tomassetti; M. M. Beretta; M. Biagini; M. Boscolo; E. Capitolo; R. de Sangro; M. Esposito; G. Felici; G. Finocchiaro; M. Gatta; C. Gatti; S. Guiducci; S. Lauciani; P. Patteri; I. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; P. Raimondi; M. Rama; C. Sanelli; S. Tomassini; P. Fabbricatore; D. Delepine; M. A. Reyes Santos; M. Chrzaszcz; R. Grzymkowski; P. Knap; J. Kotula; T. Lesiak; J. Ludwin; J. Michalowski; B. Pawlik; B. Rachwal; M. Stodulski; J. Wiechczynski; M. Witek; L. Zawiejski; M. Zdybal; V. Y. Aushev; A. Ustynov; N. Arnaud; P. Bambade; C. Beigbeder; F. Bogard; M. Borsato; D. Breton; J. Brossard; L. Burmistrov; D. Charlet; V. Chaumat; O. Dadoun; M. El Berni; J. Maalmi; V. Puill; C. Rimbault; A. Stocchi; V. Tocut; A. Variola; S. Wallon; G. Wormser; F. Grancagnolo; E. Ben-Haim; S. Sitt; M. Baylac; O. Bourrion; J. -M. Deconto; Y. Gomez Martinez; N. Monseu; J. -F. Muraz; J. -S. Real; C. Vescovi; R. Cenci; A. Jawahery; D. Roberts; E. W. Twedt; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; S. Nderitu; P. Patel; S. H. Robertson; D. Swersky; A. Warburton; E. Cuautle Flores; G. Toledo Sanchez; P. Biassoni; L. Bombelli; M. Citterio; S. Coelli; C. Fiorini; V. Liberali; M. Monti; B. Nasri; N. Neri; F. Palombo; F. Sabatini; A. Stabile; A. Berra; A. Giachero; C. Gotti; D. Lietti; M. Maino; G. Pessina; M. Prest; J. -P. Martin; M. Simard; N. Starinski; P. Taras; A. Drutskoy; S. Makarychev; A. V. Nefediev; A. Aloisio; S. Cavaliere; G. De Nardo; M. Della Pietra; A. Doria; R. Giordano; A. Ordine; S. Pardi; G. Russo; C. Sciacca; I. I. Bigi; C. P. Jessop; W. Wang; M. Bellato; M. Benettoni; M. Corvo; A. Crescente; F. Dal Corso; U. Dosselli; C. Fanin; A. Gianelle; S. Longo; M. Michelotto; F. Montecassiano; M. Morandin; R. Pengo; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; R. Stroili; L. Gaioni; A. Manazza; M. Manghisoni; L. Ratti; V. Re; G. Traversi; S. Zucca; S. Bizzaglia; M. Bizzarri; C. Cecchi; S. Germani; M. Lebeau; P. Lubrano; E. Manoni; A. Papi; A. Rossi; G. Scolieri; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; A. Fella; F. Forti; M. Giorgi; L. Lilli; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Paladino; F. Pantaleo; E. Paoloni; A. L. Perez Perez; G. Rizzo; J. Walsh; A. Fernández Téllez; G. Beck; M. Berman; A. Bevan; F. Gannaway; G. Inguglia; A. J. Martin; J. Morris; V. Bocci; M. Capodiferro; G. Chiodi; I. Dafinei; N. V. Drenska; R. Faccini; F. Ferroni; C. Gargiulo; P. Gauzzi; C. Luci; R. Lunadei; G. Martellotti; F. Pellegrino; V. Pettinacci; D. Pinci; L. Recchia; D. Ruggeri; A. Zullo; P. Camarri; R. Cardarelli; C. De Santis; A. Di Ciaccio; V. Di Felice; F. Di Palma; A. Di Simone; L. Marcelli; R. Messi; D. Moricciani; R. Sparvoli; S. Tammaro; P. Branchini; A. Budano; S. Bussino; M. Ciuchini; F. Nguyen; A. Passeri; F. Ruggieri; E. Spiriti; F. Wilson; I. Leon Monzon; J. R. Millan-Almaraz; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; D. Aston; B. Dey; A. Fisher; P. D. Jackson; D. W. G. S. Leith; S. Luitz; D. MacFarlane; M. McCulloch; S. Metcalfe; A. Novokhatski; S. Osier; R. Prepost; B. Ratcliff; J. Seeman; M. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; U. Wienands; W. Wisniewski; B. D. Altschul

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Chapter 10 - Dissecting Hacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary It is essential that every Solaris administrator understand the risks posed to a Solaris system by errors in configuration as well as programming. Understanding Solaris' weaknesses as well as its strengths makes a Solaris system defending against easier hacking attempts. The chapter covers some of the more common hacks and exploits used against Solaris systems. These exploits include denial of service (DOS) attacks, either to bring the system down or simply make it unavailable for legitimate users, and buffer overflows to gain remote access or elevated privileges—usually root. Other attacks can include IP spoofing, MAC address spoofing, rootkits, connection hijacking, and logic bombs. With system and network administrators struggling to keep up with user requests and other demands, security is usually the first item to be dropped. Attackers rely on this fact. By understanding how exploits work under Solaris and how exploits affect the Solaris operating environment, the Solaris system administrator is better prepared to eliminate or mitigate the effects of these threats.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The potential of glycerol in freezing preservation of turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium and the ability of the revised consortium to degrade petroleum wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The turbine oil (TuO)-degrading bacterial consortium Tank-2 (original Tank-2) was preserved as a glycerol stock at ?80 °C from 2009 to 2012. Storage methods have been unavailable so far for any TuO-degrading bacterial consortia or isolates. To evaluate the usefulness of glycerol stock, the original Tank-2 consortium frozen in glycerol at ?80 °C was thawed and then revived by repeated culture in mineral salts medium (MSM) containing 0.5% (w/w) TuO (revived Tank-2). The revived Tank-2 consortium exhibited a high activity to degrade TuO, which was equivalent to that of original Tank-2. It also degraded car engine oil, used car engine oil, Arabian light and Vityaz crude oils and TuO in wastewater. These results indicated that a glycerol stock at ?80 °C was useful for storing Tank-2. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) that targeted the V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the DGGE band profiles of principal bacteria were significantly different between the original and revived Tank-2 consortia and between the revived Tank-2 culture grown in MSM containing TuO and that grown in MSM containing other types of petroleum products. This suggested that bacterial strains inherently residing in Tank-2 could adjust their compositions based on the storage and culture conditions.

Kumiko Kurachi; Reia Hosokawa; Marina Takahashi; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

Backus, George A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Decentralized demand–supply matching using community microgrids and consumer demand response: A scenario analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developing countries constantly face the challenge of reliably matching electricity supply to increasing consumer demand. The traditional policy decisions of increasing supply and reducing demand centrally, by building new power plants and/or load shedding, have been insufficient. Locally installed microgrids along with consumer demand response can be suitable decentralized options to augment the centralized grid based systems and plug the demand–supply gap. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) develop a framework to identify the appropriate decentralized energy options for demand–supply matching within a community, and, (2) determine which of these options can suitably plug the existing demand–supply gap at varying levels of grid unavailability. A scenario analysis framework is developed to identify and assess the impact of different decentralized energy options at a community level and demonstrated for a typical urban residential community – Vijayanagar, Bangalore in India. A combination of LPG based CHP microgrid and proactive demand response by the community is the appropriate option that enables the Vijayanagar community to meet its energy needs 24/7 in a reliable, cost-effective manner. The paper concludes with an enumeration of the barriers and feasible strategies for the implementation of community microgrids in India based on stakeholder inputs.

Kumudhini Ravindra; Parameshwar P. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Indonesia: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy have covered Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report covers Indonesia. 37 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Prawiraatmadja, W.; Yamaguchi, N.; Breazeale, K.; Basari, S.R.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A survey of factors contributing to accurate theoretical predictions of atomization energies and molecular structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High level electronic structure predictions of thermochemicalproperties and molecular structure are capable of accuracy rivaling the very best experimental measurements as a result of rapid advances in hardware software and methodology. Despite the progress real world limitations require practical approaches designed for handling general chemical systems that rely on composite strategies in which a single intractable calculation is replaced by a series of smaller calculations. As typically implemented these approaches produce a final or “best ” estimate that is constructed from one major component fine-tuned by multiple corrections that are assumed to be additive. Though individually much smaller than the original unmanageable computational problem these corrections are nonetheless extremely costly. This study presents a survey of the widely varying magnitude of the most important components contributing to the atomization energies and structures of 106 small molecules. It combines large Gaussian basis sets and coupled cluster theory up to quadruple excitations for all systems. In selected cases the effects of quintuple excitations and/or full configuration interaction were also considered. The availability of reliable experimental data for most of the molecules permits an expanded statistical analysis of the accuracy of the approach. In cases where reliable experimental information is currently unavailable the present results are expected to provide some of the most accurate benchmark values available.

David Feller; Kirk A. Peterson; David A. Dixon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Einstein's Proposal of the Photon Concept—a Translation of the Annalen der Physik Paper of 1905  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of the trio of famous papers that Albert Einstein sent to the Annalen der Physik in 1905 only the paper proposing the photon concept has been unavailable in English translation. The American Journal of Physics is publishing the following translation in recognition of the sixtieth anniversary of the appearance of the original work. Physics teachers may take particular interest in the following aspects: (1) Einstein's keen awareness of the heuristic character of his new conception. (2) His demonstration from thermodynamic and statistical considerations that electromagnetic radiation might be conceived as consisting of finite numbers of discrete corpuscles of energy hv. (3) His prediction of the linear relation between the stopping potential of photoelectrons and the frequency of the incident light. This latter aspect of the photoelectric effect was not included among Lenard's early investigations. It remained for Millikan and others to develop the elegant experimental techniques that confirmed Einstein's bold prediction. Readers interested in pursuing the background in greater depth will find it rewarding to refer to the critical analyses by Martin J. Klein in “Einstein's First Paper on Quanta ” in The Natural Philosopher (Blaisdell Publishing Company New York 1963) Vol. II and “Einstein and the Wave-Particle Duality ” in The Natural Philosopher Vol. III 1964. We are grateful to Professor Klein for his criticism and advice regarding this translation and for his generosity in making available to us an unpublished translation of his own.

A. B. Arons; M. B. Peppard

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method of rapid determination of MHD equilibrium properties with the modified version of the SURFAS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid determination of MHD eqilibrium properties of tokamak plasmas is carried out by means of an approximation method based on the use of database files. These are computed a priori from MHD equilibrium solutions obtained by performing reconstruction to match experimental measurements, which include motional Stark effect (MSE) data. The procedure carries out a single iteration of Newton`s method to determine the poloidal variation of the toroidal plasma current density in the equilibrium form j{sub {phi}} = {minus}2{pi}({mu}{sub 0}Rp{prime} + FF{prime}/R) by representing p{prime}({psi}) and F({psi})F{prime}({psi}) in series expansions of Chebyshev polynomials. The polynominal expansion coefficients are obtained through a least-squares data fitting process similar to that used in the equilibrium reconstruction. Knowing the current density j{phi} allows the determination of the internal q-profile from the MSE data. This important stability parameter is generally unavailable from a current filament model. Numerical results calculated in this approach are compared with those determined from an accurate solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation, subject to a similar set of magnetic and pressure measurement constraints.

Lee, D.K.; Hirshman, S.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Okabayashi, M.; Reusch, M.F.; Sun, Y.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

TBM tunnel friction values for the Grizzly Powerhouse Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tunnel boring machine (TBM) driven water conveyance tunnels are becoming increasingly more common. Despite advances in tunnel engineering and construction technology, hydraulic performance data for TBM driven tunnels remains relatively unavailable. At the Grizzly Powerhouse Project, the TBM driven water conveyance tunnel was designed using friction coefficients developed from a previous PG&E project. A range of coefficients were selected to bound the possible hydraulic performance variations of the water conveyance system. These friction coefficients, along with the water conveyance systems characteristics, and expected turbine characteristics, were used in a hydraulic transient analysis to determine the expected system pressure fluctuations, and surge chamber performance. During startup test data, these performance characteristics were measured to allow comparison to the original design assumptions. During construction of the tunnel, plaster casts were made of the actual excavated tunnel unlined and fiber reinforced shotcrete lined surfaces. These castings were used to measure absolute roughness of the surfaces so that a friction coefficient could be developed using the Moody diagram and compare them against the design values. This paper compares the assumed frictional coefficient with computed coefficients from headlosses measured during startup testing, and plaster cast measurement calculations. In addition, a comparison of coefficients will be presented for an other TBM driven water conveyance tunnel constructed in the 1980`s.

Stutsman, R.D. [Ensign & Buckley Consulting Engineers, Larkspur, CA (United States); Rothfuss, B.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in a partially saturated sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To predict the behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments and the economic extractability of natural gas from reservoirs containing gas hydrates, we need reservoir simulators that properly represent the processes that occur, as well as accurate parameters. Several codes are available that represent some or all of the expected processes, and values for some parameters are available. Where values are unavailable, modelers have used estimation techniques to help with their predictions. Although some of these techniques are well respected, measurements are needed in many cases to verify the parameters. We have performed a series of experiments in a partially water saturated silica sand sample. The series included methane hydrate formation, and dissociation by both thermal stimulation and depressurization. The sample was 7.6 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. In addition to measuring the system pressure and temperatures at four locations in the sample, we measured local density within the sample using x-ray computed tomography. Our goals in performing the experiment were to gather information for estimating thermal properties of the medium and to examine nonequilibrium processes.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind; Moridis, George; Freifeld, Barry; Seol, Yongkoo

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Pakistan: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report summarizes the energy and economic situation in Pakistan.

Gazdar, M.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The influence of floodplains on mercury availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The floodplains of the German river Elbe affect the mercury distribution in the river system in two different ways: they act both as a medium-term sink and as a long-term source. The large amounts of mercury deposited onto the floodplains during annual floodings are first effectively fixed in the soils, rendering them basically unavailable. Sequential extraction experiments reveal that only a small fraction of the mercury (< 3%) is present in available forms, whereas the vast majority is associated with humic substances or present in sulfidic binding forms. After deposition, a small fraction of the total mercury is gradually remobilized into the aqueous phase bound passively to water-soluble humic acids. The availability of mercury in these complexes is still low, since environmental influences such as changes in pH or redox potential and competition with other cations do not cause any mercury liberation. In the next step, reactions in the aqueous phase lead to the formation of the highly available volatile species Hg{sup 0} and dimethylmercury (DMM). Their evaporation gives rise to a strong mercury flux from the floodplains into the atmosphere. Preliminary mass balances indicate that the majority of the deposited mercury stays bound in the floodplain soils, while small amounts are emitted back into the river`s ecosystem. Atmospheric emission is more important as a remobilization pathway than aquatic export.

Wallschlaeger, D.; Wilken, R.D. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Physical and Chemical Analytics

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Preliminary reliability and availability analysis of the Heber geothermal binary demonstration plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the reliability and availability of the Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant on the basis of preliminary design information. It also identifies and ranks components of the plant in order of their criticality to system operation and their contribution to system unavailability. The sensitivity of the various components to uncertainties of data and the potential for reliability growth are also examined. The assessment results were obtained through the adaptation and application of an existing reliability and availability methodology to the Heber plant design. These preliminary assessments were made to assist (1) in evaluating design alternatives for the plant and (2) in demonstrating that the closed-loop, multiple-fluid, binary cycle geothermal concept is competitive with the more conventional flashed steam cycle technology. The Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Plant Project is a cooperative effort directed toward accelerating geothermal development for power generation and establishing the binary cycle technology as a proven alternative to the flashed steam cycle for moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. The binary power plant would have a capacity of 45 MW/sub e/ net and would derive its energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) fluid from the Heber reservoir in southern California.

Himpler, H.; White, J.; Witt, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

My Struggles with the Block Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document is the second installment of three in the Cerro Grande Fire Series. Like its predecessor arXiv:quant-ph/0105039, "Notes on a Paulian Idea," it is a collection of letters written to various friends and colleagues, most of whom regularly circuit this archive. The unifying theme of all the letters is that each has something to do with the quantum. Particularly, the collection chronicles the emergence of Quantum Bayesianism as a robust view of quantum theory, eventually evolving into the still-more-radical "QBism" (with the B standing for no particular designation anymore), as it took its most distinctive turn away from various Copenhagen Interpretations. Included are many anecdotes from the history of quantum information theory: for instance, the story of the origin of the terms "qubit" and "quantum information" from their originator's own mouth, a copy of a rejection letter written by E. T. Jaynes for one of Rolf Landauer's original erasure-cost principle papers, and much more. Specialized indices are devoted to historical, technical, and philosophical matters. More roundly, the document is an attempt to provide an essential ingredient, unavailable anywhere else, for turning QBism into a live option within the vast spectrum of quantum foundational thought.

Christopher A. Fuchs; Maximilian Schlosshauer; Blake C. Stacey

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Expanded beam deflection method for simultaneous measurement of displacement and vibrations of multiple microcantilevers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we present an extension of optical beam deflection (OBD) method for measuring displacement and vibrations of an array of microcantilevers. Instead of focusing on the cantilever, the optical beam is either focused above or below the cantilever array, or focused only in the axis parallel to the cantilevers length, allowing a wide optical line to span multiple cantilevers in the array. Each cantilever reflects a part of the incident beam, which is then directed onto a photodiode array detector in a manner allowing distinguishing between individual beams. Each part of reflected beam behaves like a single beam of roughly the same divergence angle in the bending sensing axis as the incident beam. Since sensitivity of the OBD method depends on the divergence angle of deflected beam, high sensitivity is preserved in proposed expanded beam deflection (EBD) method. At the detector, each spot's position is measured at the same time, without time multiplexing of light sources. This provides real simultaneous readout of entire array, unavailable in most of competitive methods, and thus increases time resolution of the measurement. Expanded beam can also span another line of cantilevers allowing monitoring of specially designed two-dimensional arrays. In this paper, we present first results of application of EBD method to cantilever sensors. We show how thermal noise resolution can be easily achieved and combined with thermal noise based resonance frequency measurement.

Nieradka, K.; MaloziePc, G.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T. [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, Wroclaw 50-372 (Poland); Grabiec, P.; Janus, P.; Sierakowski, A. [Division of Silicon Microsystem and Nanostructure Technology, Institute of Electron Technology, Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw 02-668 (Poland)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Wireless power transmission using ultrasonic guided waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unavailability of suitable power supply at desired locations is currently an important obstacle in the development of distributed, wireless sensor networks for applications such as structural health monitoring of aircraft. Proposed solutions range from improved batteries to energy harvesting from vibration, temperature gradients and other sources. A novel approach is being investigated at Cardiff University School of Engineering in cooperation with Airbus. It aims to utilise ultrasonic guided Lamb waves to transmit energy through the aircraft skin. A vibration generator is to be placed in a location where electricity supply is readily available. Ultrasonic waves generated by this device will travel through the aircraft structure to a receiver in a remote wireless sensor node. The receiver will convert the mechanical vibration of the ultrasonic waves back to electricity, which will be used to power the sensor node. This paper describes the measurement and modelling of the interference pattern which emerges when Lamb waves are transmitted continuously as in this power transmission application. The discovered features of the pattern, such as a large signal amplitude variation and a relatively high frequency, are presented and their importance for the development of a power transmission system is discussed.

A Kural; R Pullin; C Featherston; C Paget; K Holford

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The application of Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRINS) to CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As risk-informed applications (RIAs) are actively implanted in the nuclear industry, an issue associated with technical adequacy of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) arises in its modeling and data sourcing. In Korea, PSA for all Korean NPPs has been completed and KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Plant Company) developed the database called the Plant Reliability Data Information System (PRinS). It has several characteristics that distinguish it from other database system such as NPRDs (INPO,1994), PRIS (IAEA), and SRDF (EdF). This database has the function of systematic data management such as automatic data-gathering, periodic data deposition and updating, statistical analysis including Bayesian method, and trend analysis of failure rate or unavailability. In recent PSA for CANDU reactor, the component failure data of EPRI ALWR URD and Component Reliability Database were preferentially used as generic data set. The error factor for most component failure data was estimated by using the information NUREG/CR-4550 and NUREG/CR-4639. Also, annual trend analysis was performed for the functional losses of components using the statistical analysis and chart module of PRinS. Furthermore, the database has been updated regularly and maintained as a living program to reflect the current status. This paper presents the failure data analysis using PRinS which provides Bayesian analysis on main components in the CANDU reactor. (authors)

Hwang, S. W.; Lim, Y. H.; Park, H. C. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Naah-ri 260, Yangnam-myun, Gyeongju-si, Gyeong Buk (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

359

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy efficiency choice in the purchase of residential appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a quantitative analysis of the behavior of the market for the purchase of energy efficiency in residential appliances and heating and cooling equipment. We examine the historical efficiency choices over the period 1972 to 1980 for eight consumer products: gas central space heaters, oil central space heaters, room air conditioners, central air conditioners, electric water heaters, gas water heaters, refrigerators, and freezers. We characterize the behavior of the market for these products by an aggregate market discount rate. Except for air conditioners, the observed discount rates are much higher than real interest rates or the discount rates commonly used in life-cycle cost analysis of consumer choice. They appear to be relatively constant, even though fuel prices escalated rapidly over the time period. We conclude from these results that the market for energy efficiency is not performing well. Several explanations of the under investment in efficiency are proposed: (1) lack of information about the costs and benefits of energy efficiency; (2) prevalence of third party purchasers; (3) unavailability of highly efficient equipment without other features; (4) long manufacturing lead times; and (5) other marketing strategies.

Ruderman, H.; Levine, M.D.; McMahon, J.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Evaluation of solar energy resources by establishing empirical models for diffuse solar radiation on tilted surface and analysis for optimum tilt angle for a prospective location in southern region of Sindh, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diffuse solar radiation data is very important and is required for solar energy system implementations. The main purpose of the present study is to evaluate solar energy resources by establishing diffuse solar radiation models and obtaining optimum tilt angle fora prospective location is southern region of Sindh, Pakistan. Due to the unavailability of measured diffuse solar radiation data, nine new models, based on available data from local agency and values obtain from existing models, to predict diffuse solar radiation on tilted surface has been established. The best model was chosen based on test results from statistical indicators. The optimum tilt angle for monthly, seasonally, half-yearly and yearly adjustment was determined. The optimum tilt angle varies from 0° in May, June and July to 49° in December. The yearly optimum tilt angle was found as 23°, which is close to latitude of investigated location (25°07?N). The monthly average total, beam and diffuse solar radiations were calculated for optimum and vertical tilted surfaces and were compared with those obtain for horizontal surfaces. The half-yearly adjustment of optimum tilt angle is recommended for the investigated location because very small difference in annual solar energy gains in comparison with monthly or seasonal adjustment. The total annual energy for completer year and for four seasons of the year was calculated and found that maximum total annual energy is obtained at optimum tilt angle.

Shahnawaz Farhan Khahro; Kavita Tabbassum; Shahnawaz Talpur; Mohammad Bux Alvi; Xiaozhong Liao; Lei Dong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Upgrading remote sensing with GIS technology in support of petroleum operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote sensing data (including satellite and airborne) that are integrated with CAD and GPS have been successfully employed to improve understanding and mapping of geology, logistics, environment, and facilities. Methods developed over the years have provided the industry with reliable and cost-effective hardcopy and digital products. However, even when the data collected by remote sensing, CAD, and GPS are spatially co-registered and integrated into a high performance workstation, users have been unable to query, model or interactively link to spreadsheets (tabular data) that can contain important attribute information about features seen on the images and maps. This information gap is being rapidly overcome by integrating images, CAD maps, and tabular data with Geographical Information System (GIS) technology. An end result is greater appreciation and broader application of remote sensing by managers and workers in the petroleum industry. A major obstacle to establishing GIS for an overseas operation is the initial cost of data collection and conversion from legacy database management systems and hardcopy to appropriate digital format. GIS applications include using remote sensing images as the basis for documenting changes through time, linking to GPS to improve navigation in the field, verifying well locations and querying/updating well databases, planning facilities, and creating maps of features interpreted from the imagery. The integration of remote sensing, GPS, and now GIS is essential for planning operations in areas where maps are either out-of-date or unavailable.

Ellis, J.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume IV; Washington Subbasin Above McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fishereis, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Effect of the Presence of 2 wt% Hafnium in T-111  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W), and reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the RTG's working environment. Due to the commercial unavailability of the tantalum alloy T-111, Ta-10%W is a possible candidate replacement material because of its high melting point (3037 deg. C), high elastic modulus (207 GPa), high yield, ultimate tensile strengths at both ambient and elevated temperatures, excellent ductility, and exceptional creep properties. Ta-10%W is also attractive due its commercial availability and low cost when compared to T-111. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast Ta-10%W and T-111 for high-temperature nuclear based power conversion applications and to document research that must be conducted to fully characterize both materials.

Barklay, Chadwick D. [University of Dayton, 300 College Park Dayton OH 45469-0240 (United States); Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Argonne National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83403-2528 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

A two-stage supply chain DEA model for measuring container-terminal efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the growing amount of research into container-port operations and efficiency, much of the literature on the subject treats container ports and terminals as black box systems without examining the structure of their transformation and production processes. Research on the network and multi-stage structure of container-terminal operating systems is scarce and its applications in the context of port performance and benchmarking are even scarcer. In this paper, we argue that the container terminal production would be best modelled as a network of interrelated sub-processes and operating sites and develop a supply chain DEA model aimed at capturing the transformational process within the container-terminal system and across its sub-systems. We start by modelling container terminal operations as a container-flow process and analyse their site-specific and combined efficiency before formalising a two-stage supply chain DEA model to measure the efficiencies of both individual and network container terminal operations. Although, due to the unavailability of detailed operational data, this study is limited to container export flows only, the results provide further insight on the network structure of container-terminal operating systems and confirm the existence of disproportionate performances and efficiency levels between container-terminal operating sites and sub-processes.

Khalid Bichou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost estimate of initial SSC experimental equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of the initial detector complement at recently constructed colliding beam facilities (or at those under construction) has been a significant fraction of the cost of the accelerator complex. Because of the complexity of large modern-day detectors, the time-scale for their design and construction is comparable to the time-scale needed for accelerator design and construction. For these reasons it is appropriate to estimate the cost of the anticipated detector complement in parallel with the cost estimates of the collider itself. The fundamental difficulty with this procedure is that, whereas a firm conceptual design of the collider does exist, comparable information is unavailable for the detectors. Traditionally, these have been built by the high energy physics user community according to their perception of the key scientific problems that need to be addressed. The role of the accelerator laboratory in that process has involved technical and managerial coordination and the allocation of running time and local facilities among the proposed experiments. It seems proper that the basic spirit of experimentation reflecting the scientific judgment of the community should be preserved at the SSC. Furthermore, the formal process of initiation of detector proposals can only start once the SSC has been approved as a construction project and a formal laboratory administration put in place. Thus an ad hoc mechanism had to be created to estimate the range of potential detector needs, potential detector costs, and associated computing equipment.

NONE

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reliability improvement of distribution systems using SSVR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a reliability assessment algorithm for distribution systems using a Static Series Voltage Regulator (SSVR). Furthermore, this algorithm considers the effects of Distributed Generation (DG) units, alternative sources, system reconfiguration, load shedding and load adding on distribution system reliability indices. In this algorithm, load points are classified into 8 types and separated restoration times are considered for each class. Comparative studies are conducted to investigate the impacts of DG and alternative source unavailability on the distribution system reliability. For reliability assessment, the customer-oriented reliability indices such as SAIFI, SAIDI, CAIDI ASUI and also load- and energy-oriented indices such as ENS and AENS are evaluated. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is examined on the two standard distribution systems consisting of 33 and 69 nodes. The best location of the SSVR in distribution systems is determined based on different reliability indices, separately. Results show that the proposed algorithm is efficient for large-scale radial distribution systems and can accommodate the effects of fault isolation and load restoration.

Mehdi Hosseini; Heidar Ali Shayanfar; Mahmoud Fotuhi-Firuzabad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reliability enhancement using optimal distribution feeder reconfiguration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure statistics show that distribution networks engage the most contribution to the customer unavailability services. Optimal reconfiguration of distribution systems has many advantages like total power losses reduction, voltage profile enhancement, reliability improvement and so on. Therefore, in this paper a new multiobjective improved shuffled frog leaping algorithm (ISFLA) is proposed to investigate the distribution feeder reconfiguration (DFR) problem from the reliability enhancement point of view. Nevertheless, since the total cost of MW loss is an important and attractive subject to the electric power utilities, the total active power losses is also considered as an objective function in the investigations. Therefore, the objective functions of the problem to be optimized are system average interruption frequency index (SAIFI), system average interruption duration index (SAIDI), average energy not supplied (AENS) and the total active power losses. During the optimization process, the proposed ISFLA finds a set of non-dominated optimal solutions referred to Pareto optimal solutions that are kept in an external memory called repository. As the result of the conflicting behavior of the objective functions investigated, a fuzzy clustering technique is employed to control the size of the repository in the predetermined limits. The feasibility and the efficiency of the proposed method are examined by a standard distribution test system.

Abdollah Kavousi-Fard; Mohammad-Reza Akbari-Zadeh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The environmental protection agency's research program on total human exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) research program on total human exposure to environmental pollution seeks to develop a newly emerging concept in the environmental sciences. Instead of focusing purely on the sources of pollution or their transport and movement through the environment, this research focuses on human beings as the receptors of these pollutants. People and daily activities become the center of attention. The methodology measures and models the pollutant concentrations found at the physical boundaries of people, regardless of whether the pollutants arrive through the air, water, food, or skin. It seeks to characterize quantitatively the impact of pollution on people by determining if an environmental problem exists at the human interface and, if so, by determining the sources, nature, extent, and severity of this environmental problem. By exploiting an emerging new arsenal of miniaturized instruments and by developing statistically representative survey designs for sampling the population of cities, significant progress has been made in recent years in providing previously unavailable human exposure field data needed for making valid risk assessments. The U.S. EPA total human exposure research program includes: development of measurement methods and instruments, development of exposure models and statistical protocols, microenvironmental field studies, total human exposure studies, validation of human exposure models with empirical data, and dosage research investigations.

Wayne Ott; Lance Wallace; David Mage; Gerald Akland; Robert Lewis; Harold Sauls; Charles Rodes; David Kleffman; Donna Kuroda; Karen Morehouse

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Data:A289622a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 22a-180d-483a-b972-04608bbd90b9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Greenville Utilities Comm Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large General Service- Backstand/ Emergency Service Sector: Commercial Description: *kW rate as would be billed according to the electric rate schedule applicable to the user This schedule is available for electric service used by a non-residential customer desiring service to supplement electricity normally provided by Commission approved, customer-owned, cogeneration equipment during times of unavailability or curtailment of such equipment. The schedule is applicable to customers receiving service under either Electric Rate Schedule No. 3-CP-C, Large General Service-CP-C or Electric Rate Schedule No. 11, Medium General Service.

372

Interactive learning at a distance: technology integration training for pre-service and in-service teachers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses a practicum that was designed to provide instruction in technology integration for pre-service and in-service k-12 educators without traditional meeting time. Opportunities for face-to-face instruction were unavailable because classroom facilities with internet/multimedia capabilities were not accessible due to the lack of funding. Content for the online course was established through the use of a needs assessment survey and questionnaire, six textbooks, three websites, and a try-out learning experience (an activity similar to a test drive of an automobile). The writer developed an outcome based online delivery system promoting the use of technology in classrooms for in-service and pre-service teachers offered regardless of time and place. Pre-service and in-service teachers interacted with an instructor and each other via asynchronous communication (e-mail, electronic bulletin boards, web pages, and video tapes) and synchronous communication (audio conferencing). In-service students received credit that could be used for state recertification, while pre-service students received three hours of college credit. A CD-ROM disk with one multimedia software application and tutorial was distributed.

Lisa S. Dillinger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Upconversion-pumped luminescence efficiency of rare-earth-doped hosts sensitized with trivalent ytterbium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the upconversion luminescence efficiencies of phosphors that generate red, green, and blue light. The phosphors studied are single crystals and powders co-doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, and with Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}. The Yb ions are pumped near 980 nm; transfers of two or three quanta to the co-doped rare earth ion generate visible luminescence. The main contribution embodied in this work is the quantitative measurement of this upconversion efficiency, based on the use of a calibrated integrating sphere, determination of the fraction of pump light absorbed, and careful control of the pump laser beam profile. The green phosphors are the most efficient, yielding efficiency values as high as 4 %, with the red and blue materials giving 1 - 2 %. Saturation was observed in all cases, suggesting that populations of upconversion steps of the ions are maximized at higher power. Quasi-CW modeling of the intensity- dependent upconversion efficiency was attempted; input data included level lifetimes, transition cross sections, and cross-relaxation rate coefficients. The saturation of the Yb,Er:fluoride media is explained as the pumping of Er{sup 3+} ions into a bottleneck (long-lived state)- the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} metastable level, making them unavailable for further excitation transfer. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Waide, P.A.; Tassano, J.B.; Payne, S.A.; Kruplce, W.F.; Bischel, W.K. [Gemfire Corporation, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and h = F/G is carbon intensity of world GDP. Where denotedintensity of world GDP, f = F/E is carbon intensity of

Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

"Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown...

377

Three approaches to economical photovoltaics: conformal Cu2S, organic luminescent films, and PbSe nanocrystal superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Figures Energy demand and GDP per capita for 23 countriesnation. Figure 1.1: Energy demand and GDP per capita for 23

Carbone, Ian Anthony

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios Carbon EmissionsEnergy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios .. 37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% betweena 20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010 (Price

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to have a lower energy use per unit of GDP (6.2 – 9.9 MJ/US$shows Income per capita (GDP ppp /Pop), Energy Intensity (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply per Capita Primary Energy Supply per GDP ElectricityGeneration per GDP Primary Energy Supply Shares, APPGDP (kg CO2 per 2000 US$) Sources: International Energy

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Price, Lynn; Kumar, Satish; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Warfield, Corina; Padmanabhan, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

China's Approaches to Financing Sustainable Development: Policies, Practices, and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity (energy consumption per unit of GDP) by an annualper unit of GDP from 2010 level) target of 17 percent, an energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Greening of the Middle Kingdom: The Story of Energy Efficiency in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined as energy use per unit of GDP) from 2005 levels. Tomeasured as energy consumption per RMB¥ 5 of GDP). The

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of declining energy use per unit GDP. Within this reform-and the energy use in agriculture per unit of GDP (economic

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP per capita Transport Future outlook Drivers of Transport Energyenergy demand per passenger-km. Figure 20. Car Ownership and GDP

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - airline business models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State... and Cancellation (Airlines Response to GDP) . . . . . 27 2.1.4 Compression (GDP Response to Dynamic Information... Slot Allocation Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

388

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) byas energy use per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result, energy use per unit of GDP (energy intensity) 1a rebound in energy use per unit of GDP after 2001, after

Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

GREQAMGroupement de Recherche en Economie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille -UMR-CNRS 6579  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_2004), a unidirectional relation from HCE to GDP is existed. Keywords: Health care expenditure per capita; per capital GDP-29 CAUSALITY TEST BETWEEN HEALTH CARE EXPENDITURE AND GDP IN U.S.: COMPARING PERIODS Arshia AMIRIa Bruno-22Sep2010 #12;Causality test between health care expenditure and GDP in U.S.: comparing periods Arshia

391

Powering the planet: Chemical challenges in solar energy utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remainder of the energy supply came mostly...sources (1). Future energy demand is projected to...for future world energy consumption have been those...145 9.4 10.4 GDP GDP § T $/yr 46 140 ¶ 284 ? GDP/N Per capita GDP $/(person-yr...

Nathan S. Lewis; Daniel G. Nocera

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gross domestic product (GDP) brought about by the...global population and per-capita GDP, but also by unanticipated...global increases in the energy intensity of GDP (energy per unit GDP) and the carbon...countries satisfies the demand of consumers in developed countries...

Steven J. Davis; Ken Caldeira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

GEO Down Under The Ground Source Industry in Australia and New Zealand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 22.2 million § GDP: $987 billion § Per capita GDP: $43 300 per capita § Popula8on: 4.4 million § GDP: $134 billion § Per capita GDP: $30 200 rocks and energy genera8on to most § North side of house has greatest solar

394

IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 4 (2009) 024010 (7pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/4/2/024010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide emissions per unit GDP is represented by the product of energy intensity, which represented in terms of GDP, and changes in technology, typically represented as carbon dioxide emissions per-factors. GDP growth (or contraction) is comprised of changes in population and in per capita GDP. Carbon

Colorado at Boulder, University of

395

CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are population increase, per capita GDP (also known as ``affluence level''), the energy intensity of the economy by the gross domestic product, GDP), energy production, E, carbon-based fuels used for energy production, C (E/GDP) and the carbon intensity of the energy system (C/E). The term E/GDP reflects the sectorial

396

Nicolas Gruber Environmental Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! DRIVERS! foss = P · g · e · f = P · · · ! Population! Per capita gross domestic product (GDP/P)! Energy required per unit GDP (E/GDP)! Carbon intensity of energy (foss/E)! GDP! P! E! GDP! foss! E! #12 per year!! CH-Average: !ca 6 tons of CO2 per year! To reach the 2°C stabilization target, the global

Fischlin, Andreas

397

Data:E8fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 fd505b-bab7-417b-b6f4-029693dfb860 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Central Indiana REMC Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OPTIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY RIDER RATE. Sector: Residential Description: Available to all consumers taking service concurrently under Rate Schedule - RS, Residential and Farm Rate; Rate Schedule - RS-TOU, Residential Time-of-Use Rate; Rate Schedule - RS-SEA, Residential Seasonal Rate; and Rate Schedule - ETS, Residential Off-Peak Rate . Rider is for the purchase of energy from renewable resources (predominantly landfill methane gas generation) South Central Indiana Rural Electric Membership Corporation reserves the right to limit the total number of participants under this Optional Rider. Energy sold pursuant to this Optional Rider is generated using renewable resources. While the Corporation expects that power generated from renewable resources will be readily available on the wholesale market, the Corporation makes no guarantee that such resources will be available at all times. If the Corporation determines that for any reason renewable resources are unavailable or insufficient to furnish the retail consumer purchases hereunder, the Corporation may suspend application of this Optional Rider. When the renewable resources again become available, the Corporation may resume application of this Optional Rider.

398

The application of local approach to assess the influence of in-plane constraint on cleavage fracture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assessment of real or postulated flaws within critical components is conventionally carried out using methods based on single parameter fracture mechanics. For low constraint configurations (e.g. shallow cracks) such methods can provide highly conservative assessments. Two-parameter (J-T, J-Q) fracture mechanics has been developed to quantify the influence of crack-tip constraint on fracture and this development has been incorporated into a modified R6 framework to reduce the conservatisms associated with the assessment of low constraint configurations. This framework requires that the constraint of the structure is quantified (with respect to T or Q) and that the materials fracture response to constraint is measured by testing a number of cracked specimens which sample a range of constraint levels. An alternative method of assessment, which may be used in situations where fracture data are unavailable over the full range of constraint, is the so-called local approach to fracture. In this Paper, the local approach has been used alongside the modified R6 framework to assess the cleavage fracture behavior of a well characterized mild steel plate at {minus}50 C. The local approach method predicts: (i) an upswing in cleavage fracture toughness as a function of decreasing crack-tip constraint which is conservative with respect to the actual materials response, (ii) an increase in the scatter of cleavage fracture toughness as a function of decreasing crack-tip constraint. This is a direct consequence of framing the local approach model within two-parameter Weibull statistics. Finally it is shown that the local approach may be used successfully alongside the modified R6 framework to assess low constraint geometries: resultant failure assessment curves reduce the conservatism of the conventional Option 1 curve.

Sherry, A.H.; Sanderson, D.J.; Lidbury, D.P.G. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom); Ainsworth, R.A. [Nuclear Electric, Berkeley (United Kingdom); Kikuchi, K. [JAERI, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume 1; Oregon Subbasins Below Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CIS project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The radionuclide research and production program at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-supported, {open_quotes}Radionuclide and Radiopharmaceutical Research for Medicine{close_quotes} program at BNL has a long record of accomplishment. In the 1950s and 1960s the Hot Lab Division was responsible for the development for such important isotopes as {sup 90}Mo, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 132, 133}I, and especially the generator systems {sup 90}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga. The role in the growth of nuclear medicine of the {sup 99}Mo generator was, and still is, critical. Another very important isotope, {sup 201}Tl for myocardial perfusion studies, was developed in the early 1970s. In 1972 program focus changed somewhat with the construction of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). This was the world`s first facility to demonstrate the capability of a large proton linac for efficient no-carrier added radionuclide production by spallation reactions. It utilizes the excess beam capacity of the 200 MeV proton linac injector for the Alternating Gradient Synchroton. Over two dozen previously unavailable isotopes have been developed at the BLIP, including {sup 67}Cu, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 96}Tc, {sup 123}I, and {sub 127}Xe. Also, other promising isotopes were developed using the High Flux Beam Reactor, including {sup 117m}Sn, {sup 109}Pd, {sup 47}Sc, and {sup 199}Au. Year-round operation with increased beam current can be implemented to alleviate the shortage of, and the interruption in, the supply of medically useful isotopes.

Mausner, L.F.; Kurczak, S.; Schnakenberg, H.; Kolsky, K.L.; Srivastava, S.C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An assessment of the core degradation frequency in a typical large LMFBR design for internal accident initiators-a comparison with PWR predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of the core degradation frequency due to internal accident initiators between a typical large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) design and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been performed. For the PWR system, existing analyses have been utilized. For the reference LMFBR, an extensive analysis has been performed for two accident initiators, i.e., loss of off-site power and loss of main feedwater. Based on this analysis an estimate of about1 X 10/sup -6//reactor X yr has been obtained for the core degradation frequency of the reference LMFBR. This estimate is significantly smaller than the PWR core degradation frequency ( about 6 X 10/sup -5//yr). A sensitivity analysis shows that the parameters having the largest impact on the unavailability of decay heat removal are (a) for the ''loss of off-site power'' initiator: human error and failure to restore off-site power, and (b) for the ''loss of main feedwater'' initiator: the leakage rates of the passive decay heat removal system and the adoption of the policy to repair the Na-NaK heat exchanger only during normal shutdowns. The results indicate that the LMFBR system has the potential of higher resistance than the PWR system to the accident initiators considered. The lower core degradation frequency estimated for the LMFBR system is due to the presence of two redundant and diverse reactor shutdown systems, with a self-actuated feature included in one of them, the incorporation of a passive decay heat removal system, and the significantly lower sensitivity of the reference LMFBR to primary system pipe breaks.

Tzanos, C.P.; Adamantiades, A.G.; Hanan, N.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases'' is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases. Initial studies, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current objective of the project ``Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases`` is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

Benkovitz, C.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of April 1, 1992 through June 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The raw oil shale sample for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored this quarter. The shale that was chosen was from the high-grade zone of the Devonian Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The shale was mined and then transported to the contractor's crushing facility where it was crushed, double-screened, and loaded into 85 55-gal barrels. The barrels, containing a total of 25-30 tons of shale, were transported to the (CAER) Center for Applied Energy Research where the shale was double-screened, analyzed and stored. A major objective of the program is the study of solid-induced secondary coking and cracking reactions. A valved fluidized bed reactor has been the primary apparatus used for this study prior to this quarter, but two additional techniques have been initiated this quarter for the study of other aspects of this issue. First, the two-stage hydropyrolysis reactor at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, was used to study the coking tendency of shale oil vapors under a wide range of pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis conditions. This work enabled us to examine secondary reactions under high pressure conditions (up to 150 bar) which were previously unavailable. Second, the development of a fixed bed reactor system was initiated at the CAER to study the coking and cracking characteristics of model compounds. A fixed bed apparatus was necessary because the conversion of model compounds was too low in the fluidized bed apparatus.

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Robl, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

Bradley, D.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

BETC information management system with focus on ROS estimation. Final report, Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A special-purpose information data base system has been designed by Science Applications, Inc. for the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center to support the technical staff in the areas of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Residual Oil Saturation Estimation (ROS). The system has been built by a multidisciplinary team of designers combining a series of iterative design steps and pilot software development tasks to produce a unique information retrieval system. The diversity of information requirements and the unavailability of organized information resources to support EOR/ROS prompted the need for this system and its specialized functional design. Studies of information usage patterns and information perceptions by BETC staff resulted in the development of a hierarchic arrangement of subject terms (i.e., a subject taxonomy) emphasizing EOR/ROS and its related subject domain. The analysis of usage patterns also revealed that four basic data types were required most often by potential system users. These were: (1) numeric files; (2) bibliographic citations and abstracts; (3) project information such as schedules and budgets; and (4) reference to persons that were authorities in various relevant topical areas. The need for a unique subject taxonomy and for four different data types resulted in the design of a system that will permit the retrieval of information by searching the subject taxonomy, selecting a subject term, or terms, and determining the appropriate data types in one-step searching. To accommodate a diverse user group, the system incorporates a range of man/machine interface features including both menu selection and command language capabilities. In Phase II of this project, a production system was implemented, numeric and bibliographic data were loaded, a citation template was developed, and guidelines for a data base administration function within the Center were developed.

Willoughby, J.K.; Gardner, J.A.; Heath, S.B.; Kehler, M.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A suite of metrics for assessing the performance of solar power forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forecasting solar energy generation is a challenging task because of the variety of solar power systems and weather regimes encountered. Inaccurate forecasts can result in substantial economic losses and power system reliability issues. One of the key challenges is the unavailability of a consistent and robust set of metrics to measure the accuracy of a solar forecast. This paper presents a suite of generally applicable and value-based metrics for solar forecasting for a comprehensive set of scenarios (i.e., different time horizons, geographic locations, and applications) that were developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative’s efforts to improve the accuracy of solar forecasting. In addition, a comprehensive framework is developed to analyze the sensitivity of the proposed metrics to three types of solar forecasting improvements using a design-of-experiments methodology in conjunction with response surface, sensitivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical testing methods. The three types of forecasting improvements are (i) uniform forecasting improvements when there is not a ramp, (ii) ramp forecasting magnitude improvements, and (iii) ramp forecasting threshold changes. Day-ahead and 1-hour-ahead forecasts for both simulated and actual solar power plants are analyzed. The results show that the proposed metrics can efficiently evaluate the quality of solar forecasts and assess the economic and reliability impacts of improved solar forecasting. Sensitivity analysis results show that (i) all proposed metrics are suitable to show the changes in the accuracy of solar forecasts with uniform forecasting improvements, and (ii) the metrics of skewness, kurtosis, and Rényi entropy are specifically suitable to show the changes in the accuracy of solar forecasts with ramp forecasting improvements and a ramp forecasting threshold.

Jie Zhang; Anthony Florita; Bri-Mathias Hodge; Siyuan Lu; Hendrik F. Hamann; Venkat Banunarayanan; Anna M. Brockway

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

Chen, Guo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcmahon, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tung, Chang - Shung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

GOODS-HERSCHEL: SEPARATING HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES USING INFRARED COLOR DIAGNOSTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have compiled a large sample of 151 high-redshift (z = 0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} > 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star-forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S {sub 250}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6} and S {sub 100}/S {sub 24} versus S {sub 8}/S {sub 3.6}; both diagnostics have {approx}10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high-z (z {approx} 2) star-forming galaxies.

Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Leiton, Roger [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hwang, Ho Seong [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Douglas; Magnelli, Benjamin; Popesso, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Valtchanov, Ivan [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain)] [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Dannerbauer, Helmut [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astrophysik, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)] [Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Astrophysik, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Magdis, Georgios [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000 Hz band, Omega_GW(f)<0.14*(f/900 Hz)^3, a factor of 2.5 lower than the best previously reported upper limits. We find Omega_GW(f)<1.8x10^-4 using a spectral index of zero for 170-600 Hz and Omega_GW(f)<1.0*(f/1300 Hz)^3 for 1000-1726 Hz, bands in which no previous direct limits have been placed. The limits in these four bands are the lowest direct measurements to date on the stochastic background. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the recent claim by the BICEP2 experiment of the possible evidence for inflationary gravitational waves.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

412

Recent improvements to the DIII-D neutral beam instrumentation and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIII-D neutral beam (NB) instrumentation and control (I and C) system provides for operational control and synchronization of the eight DIII-D neutral beam injection systems, as well as for pertinent data acquisition and safety interlocking. Recently, improvements were made to the I and C system. With the replacement of the NB control computers, new signal interfacing was required to accommodate the elimination of physical operator panels, in favor of graphical user interface control pages on computer terminal screens. The program in the mode control (MC) programmable logic controller (PLC), which serves as a logic-processing interface between the NB control computers and system hardware, was modified to improve the availability of NB heating of DIII-D plasmas in the event that one or more individual beam systems suddenly become unavailable while preparing for a tokamak experimental shot sequences. An upgraded computer platform was adopted for the NB control system operator interface and new graphical user interface pages were developed to more efficiently display system status data. A failure mode of the armor tile infrared thermometers (pyrometers), which serve to terminate beam pulsing if beam shine-through overheats wall thermal shielding inside the DIII-D tokamak, was characterized such that impending failures can be detected and repairs effected to mitigate beam system down-time. The hardware that controls gas flow to the beamline neutralizer cells was upgraded to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and interlocking was provided to terminate beam pulsing in the event of insufficient neutralizer gas flow. Motivation, implementation, and results of these improvements are presented.

Kellman, D.H.; Hong, R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Chapter 12 - Nonparametric Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of the tests that we have learned up to this point are based on the assumption that the sample(s) came from a normal population, or at the least that the population probability distribution(s) is specified except for a set of free parameters. Such tests are called parametric tests. In general, a parametric test is known to be generally more powerful than other procedures when the underlying assumptions are met. Usually the assumption of normality or any other distributional assumption about the population is hard to verify, especially when the sample sizes are small or the data are measured on an ordinal scale such as the letter grades of a student, in which case we do not have a precise measurement. For example, incidence rates of rare diseases, data from gene-expression microarrays, and the number of car accidents in a given time interval are not normally distributed. Nonparametric tests are tests that do not make such distributional assumptions, particularly the usual assumption of normality. In situations where a distributional model for a set of data is unavailable, nonparametric tests are ideal. Even if the data are distributed normally, nonparametric methods are frequently almost as powerful as parametric methods. These tests involve only order relationships among observations and are based on ranks of the variables and analyzing the ranks instead of the original values. Distribution-free tests generally do make some weak assumptions, such as equality of population variances and/or the distribution, and are of the continuous type.

Kandethody M. Ramachandran; Chris P. Tsokos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 14 - Phytoremediation of Pb-Contaminated Soils Using Synthetic Chelates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although industrialization and high input agriculture has led to improvements in standards of human life on earth, it has resulted in multifarious problems for all inhabitants of this blue planet. Among many others, enrichment of water–soil–plant ecosystem with potentially toxic elements is considered to be one of the most serious threats due to ill effects over all living organisms including humans. As compared to other toxic elements, soil contamination due to Pb warrants special attention because of its long retention in soil and lethal effects on crop growth and human health. A number of techniques have been developed and devised to lower the total and / or available Pb concentration in soils and in turn their accumulation the food chain. However, phytoextraction has attracted tremendous attention from the scientific community due to its lower cost, less disruptive effects on soil and the surrounding environment, and wider acceptance in society. The total concentration of Pb in contaminated soils may not be truly representative of its bioavailability because the major portions of Pb in soil occur in the unavailable forms. Therefore, certain types of chemicals are applied to soil to increase the mobility and phytoavailabilty of Pb to help improve phytoremediative ability of plants to clean up soil within a reasonable time frame. Synthetic and natural organic ligands, such as EDTA, ethylene diamine disuccinate (EDDS), low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and humic substances (HSs) have been used extensively in Pb remediation techniques. With increasing use of synthetic chelants for remediation techniques, detailed understanding of key factors and mechanisms behind this technology is needed before its application on a commercial basis. The present manuscript, therefore, highlights the role of synthetic chelators in the remediation of Pb contaminated soils and also critically assesses the risks and limitations associated with this technology.

Saifullah; Muhammad Shahid; Muhammad Zia-Ur-Rehman; Muhammad Sabir; Hamaad Raza Ahmad

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Preliminary results of the radiological survey at the former Dow Chemical Company site, Madison, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the former Dow Chemical Company plant, now owned and operated by Spectrulite Consortium Inc., supplied materials and provided services for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) under purchase orders issued by the Mallinckrodt Chemical Company, a primary AEC contractor. Information indicates that research and development work involving gamma-phase extrusion of uranium metal was conducted at the Dow Chemical plant. Because documentation establishing the current radiological condition of the property was unavailable, a radiological survey was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1989. The survey included: measurement of indoor gamma exposure rates; collection and radionuclide analysis of dust and debris samples; and measurements to determine alpha and beta-gamma surface contamination. The results of the survey demonstrate that Building 6, the area uranium extrusion and rod-straightening work occurred, is generally free of radioactive residuals originating from former DOE-sponsored activities. However, {sup 238}U- and {sup 232}Th-contaminated dust was found on overhead beams at the south end of Building 6. These findings suggest that past DOE-supported operations were responsible for uranium-contaminated beam dust in excess of guidelines in Building 6. However, the contamination is localized and limited in extent, rendering it highly unlikely that under present use an individual working in or frequenting these remote areas would receive a significant radiation exposure. We recommend that additional scoping survey measurements and sampling be performed to further define the extent of indoor uranium contamination southward to include Building 4 and northward throughout Building 6. 5 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Cottrell, W.D.; Williams, J.K.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Uncertainty and variability in updated estimates of potential dose and risk at a US Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty and interindividual variability were assessed in estimated doses for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island would be treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Doses were estimated for ingested {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, external gamma-exposure, and inhalation+ingestion of {sup 241}Am + {sup 239+240}Pu. Two dietary scenarios were considered: imported foods are available (IA); imported foods are unavailable with only local foods consumed (IUA). After {approximately}5 y of Bikini residence under either IA or IUA assumptions, upper and lower 95% confidence limits on interindividual variability in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a {approximately}threefold factor of its in population-average value; upper and lower 95% confidence limits on uncertainty in calculated dose were estimated to lie within a {approximately}twofold factor of its expected value. For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 y were estimated to be 16 and 52 mSv under IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively. Under the most likely dietary scenario, involving access to imported foods, this analysis indicates that it is most likely that no additional cancer fatalities (above those normally expected) would arise from the increased radiation exposures considered. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Uncertainty analysis for an updated dose assessment for a US nuclear test site: Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of uncertainty and interindividual variability in estimated doses was conducted for a rehabilitation scenario for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, in which the top 40 cm of soil would be removed in the housing and village area, and the rest of the island is treated with potassium fertilizer, prior to an assumed resettlement date of 1999. Predicted doses were considered for the following fallout-related exposure pathways: ingested Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, external gamma exposure, and inhalation and ingestion of Americium-241 + Plutonium-239+240. Two dietary scenarios were considered: (1) imported foods are available (IA), and (2) imported foods are unavailable (only local foods are consumed) (IUA). Corresponding calculations of uncertainty in estimated population-average dose showed that after {approximately}5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to uncertainty in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its population-average value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). Corresponding calculations of interindividual variability in the expected value of dose with respect to uncertainty showed that after {approximately}5 y of residence on Bikini, the upper and lower 95% confidence limits with respect to interindividual variability in this dose are estimated to be approximately 2-fold higher and lower than its expected value, respectively (under both IA and IUA assumptions). For reference, the expected values of population-average dose at age 70 were estimated to be 1.6 and 5.2 cSv under the IA and IUA dietary assumptions, respectively. Assuming that 200 Bikini resettlers would be exposed to local foods (under both IA and IUA assumptions), the maximum 1-y dose received by any Bikini resident is most likely to be approximately 2 and 8 mSv under the IA and IUA assumptions, respectively.

Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.; Robison, W.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - activating uncoupling proteins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.S.A. Reconstitution of the Uncoupling Protein of Brown Adipose Tissue Mitochondria DEMONSTRATION OF GDP... with purified 32-kDa uncoupling protein and used to detect GDP-sensitive...

423

Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of China’s Largestone-to-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP – given China’goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Near-term climate mitigation by short-lived forcers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...century, with global GDP increasing by a factor...mid-century, and primary energy use triples. GDP per capita increases over the...overall scale of the energy system in a reference...as increases in fuel demand are, overall...

Steven J. Smith; Andrew Mizrahi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

426

Cities, Productivity, and Quality of Life  

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...the logarithm of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and urbanization...a 61% increase in per capita GDP (4). Still...to drive on high-demand streets. One way to...emissions from home energy use and transportation...

Edward Glaeser

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evolution of the global virtual water trade network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and increased GDP per capita (GDPPC) of Mexico...2007). China's GDP growth has led to...thus, an increased demand for meat and animal...meat production per capita multiplied by 3.25...Conservation of Energy Resources statistics...

Carole Dalin; Megan Konar; Naota Hanasaki; Andrea Rinaldo; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyond the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measured as jobs, GDP, and investment...expectancy, literacy, and GDP). However...Networked research also demands consistency in data collection...disasters, health, energy, climate, water...midcentury, human per-capita consumption continues...

Stephen R. Carpenter; Harold A. Mooney; John Agard; Doris Capistrano; Ruth S. DeFries; Sandra Díaz; Thomas Dietz; Anantha K. Duraiappah; Alfred Oteng-Yeboah; Henrique Miguel Pereira; Charles Perrings; Walter V. Reid; José Sarukhan; Robert J. Scholes; Anne Whyte

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy use (production, imports, exports, and consumption), GDP per capita, and carbon dioxide emissionscarbon-dioxide emissions are being generated for both GDP and energy consumption— all on a per

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Outsourcing CO2 within China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per ¥GDP) due to the prevalence of heavy industry and/or energyGDP per capita (¥ per person) greatest in provinces of the Central, Northwest, and Southwest regions where coal use and energy-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Outsourcing CO2 within China.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per ¥GDP) due to the prevalence of heavy industry and/or energyGDP per capita (¥ per person) greatest in provinces of the Central, Northwest, and Southwest regions where coal use and energy-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ENERGY USE AND CONSERVATION IN INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratio 2 1 9 6 7 Energy per capita 2 1 7 5 9 GDP per capita 1Energy prices (1owest prices = 1) 1 2 4 5 9 Passenger mi1es per unit GDP

Schipper, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEA. ______. 2010a. World Energy Statistics and Balances.World GDP and Energy Consumption…… 107 4.3 Descriptive Statistics

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Millenium Development Goals and Tobacco Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projected population from the United Nations World Population Prospects (2000 Revision), and an average annual growth rate of real GDP

World Health Organization

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the total primary energy consumption in 2000. Furthermore,The Commercial Primary Energy Consumption by Sector GDP

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Trade and institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Non-Discriminatory Liberalisation to FTAs,” The WorldMarket Protection GDP Liberalisation Intensity Labor Market

Mahakitsiri, Doungdao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mudanas Climticas Globais Desafios e Oportunudades de Pesquisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries consumption pattern. #12;Energy per Capita ( E / Pop = E / GDP x GDP / Pop ) Data ­ years 1980, 85,5 1 1,5 2 2,5 3 3,5 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 GDP/Pop (1000 US$ / Head) Energy/GDP(MBTU/100US;Emission of CO2 per capita from energy consumption C / Pop = C / E x E / P 1980, 85, 90, 85, 2000 and 2002

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

438

To establish infection, pathogenic microorganisms have evolved many strategies to circumvent host defences and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(GDI) proteins bind to GDP-bound RAB proteins to sequester them in the cytoplasm, and the opposing GDI

Nizet, Victor

439

The material footprint of nations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arriving at a usable average stripping ratio...countries and constant price GDP for comparisons...is 68 pairs of average GDP-PPP/cap...The MF of fossil fuels is more than proportional...Environmental effects of household...moving 70-country average of GDP-PPP-2005...3.2: Wood fuel and other extraction...

Thomas O. Wiedmann; Heinz Schandl; Manfred Lenzen; Daniel Moran; Sangwon Suh; James West; Keiichiro Kanemoto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

GREQAMGroupement de Recherche en Economie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille -UMR-CNRS 6579  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_2004), a unidirectional relation from HCE to GDP is existed. Keywords: Health care expenditure per capita; per capital GDP-29 Causality test between health care expenditure and GDP in U.S.: comparing periods Arshia Amiri Bruno Ventelou May 2012 halshs-00520326,version2-28May2012 #12;Causality test between health care expenditure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "unavailable gdp unavailable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

1 ICS 614 Projects (v.1) STRUCTURAL ISSUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ICS 614 Projects (v.1) STRUCTURAL ISSUES: 1. PATIENT IDENTIFICATION The bedeviling problem" and "information technology" in medicine? PROJECTS WITH AN INTERNATIONAL TWIST: 6. FINANCE Corruption in health Macro-health economics: How much should a country spend on health? 3% of GDP, 6% of GDP, 14% of GDP

Reed, Nancy E.

442

Multicriteria Analysis of Economic Activity for Two Groups of European Countries by Decision Support System MKA-1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Five macro-economic criteria have been considered in the analysis: GDP per capita; Exports (% of GDP); Imports (% of GDP); Inflation rate (consumer prices); Unemployment rate. Keywords: multicriteria analysis of multicriteria sorting. Many real life problems in management practice may be formulated as problems of choice

Borissova, Daniela

443

Economic Forces Driving Agriculture and the Seed Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980-2012 with projections until 2030 #12;World map weighted by GDP in 1960 #12;Real Gross Domestic;Population and real per capita GDP in `000 2005 dollars, 2012 and 2030 projections (US per capita income in 2050 Total population (est.) = 9.07 billion 11 #12;U.S. and world real per capita GDP in 2005 dollars

California at Davis, University of

444

Starting your career in United States of America Country Guide for International Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is rather gloomy at present.The US real gross domestic product (GDP) declined by 6.2% in the fourth quarter,which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP,also continued to decline. KEY FACTS:The US economy GDP real growth 2008.According to National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) projections, employers have revised their original

Neirotti, Juan Pablo

445

Parasite prevalence and the worldwide distribution of cognitive ability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic product per capita and several...product (GDP) are controlled...the brain demands 87 per cent of the...their hosts' energy budget...education and GDP per capita are not statistically...a higher GDP, but a wealthier...allocation of energy to immune...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of HANPP per dollar of global GDP based on...of HANPP per capita based on...that future demand for biomass...biomass for energy identified...harvest for energy production...product (GDP) of 2...of HANPP per unit of GDP...HANPP per capita in the five...the future demand for biomass...

Fridolin Krausmann; Karl-Heinz Erb; Simone Gingrich; Helmut Haberl; Alberte Bondeau; Veronika Gaube; Christian Lauk; Christoph Plutzar; Timothy D. Searchinger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Physical and economic consequences of climate change in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rescaled further by the GDP per capita of Nomenclature...depending on country GDP per capita (protection...accounts data, and energy balances). Twenty-four...markets adjust so that demand equals supply...values of welfare and GDP of the climate...

Juan-Carlos Ciscar; Ana Iglesias; Luc Feyen; László Szabó; Denise Van Regemorter; Bas Amelung; Robert Nicholls; Paul Watkiss; Ole B. Christensen; Rutger Dankers; Luis Garrote; Clare M. Goodess; Alistair Hunt; Alvaro Moreno; Julie Richards; Antonio Soria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Revolutionizing China's Environmental Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic product (GDP) (see figure...billion (?10% of GDP). Although global...although China's per capita contribution is...domestic product (GDP) and CO 2 emissions...populace. The public demands the right to speak...investing in clean energy industries, and helping...

Jianguo Liu; Jared Diamond

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

The future costs of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2002 GDP per capita: Argentina...15 000 in GDP per capita, then a...afford higher energy cost? Or, should we demand OPEC countries...15 000 in GDP per capita, then a...afford higher energy cost? Or, should we demand OPEC countries...

Matthew R. Simmons

450

Long-term economic growth stimulus of human capital preservation in the elderly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Third, the GDP share of...sustainable energy production...elasticity of demand for health...relative to GDP will be mitigated...increase in per capital medical...growth of per capita benefit liability...projections of the demand for Medicare...to 24% of GDP by 2085...adjusted per annum, per capita health costs...

Kenneth G. Manton; Xi-Liang Gu; Arthur Ullian; H. Dennis Tolley; Alvin E. Headen; Jr; Gene Lowrimore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Insurance in a Climate of Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of GDP ($25/capita) in developing countries...in relation to GDP. Inflation-adjusted...US$80 billion per year (13...and evacuations, energy price increases, and...losses up 2 to 4% per year (7) owing...Although consumer demand for insurance...donor-country GDP (3). The impacts...

Evan Mills

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy Policy, Volume 39, Issue 4, April 2011, Pages 2165-2178 Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). With a dramatic reversal reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth, energy use per unit of GDP of this historic relationship, energy intensity increased 5% per year during 2002-2005. China`s 11th Five Year Plan

453

The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parity) Energy demand and GDP per capita (1980-2002) As GDP increases, so does the demand's population is in the Fast- developing regions. Primaryenergypercapita(GJ) GDP per capita (purchasing power;Introduction Top Ten problems of Humanity for next 50 years 1. Energy 2. Water 3

Crawford, T. Daniel

454

Energy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDPannualgrowthrate 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 PercapitaGDP GDP Per capita GDP (index 1997=100) Source: CepalEnergy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing Conference on Energy Trading and Risk Management 21 - 22 November 2005, City University, London

Dixon, Juan

455

STATEMENT OF JOSEPH ROMM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in energy consumed per dollar of gross domestic product (GDP) declined (i.e., improved) by less than 1.2 percent a year, while energy demand grew 2.4 percent a year. In the Internet era (1996- 2000), GDP growth change ­ higher GDP growth and lower energy growth. From the point of view of greenhouse gases

456

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Star, the highest correlation is with metropolitan area GDP perEnergy Star buildings in total building stock as dependent variable, only GDP perEnergy Star LEED I II III I II III rentable building area number of stories year built classA classB GDP per

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Author's personal copy European Journal of Cell Biology 90 (2011) 779785  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In the cytoplasm, they exist in the inactive GDP form in a complex with the GDP- dissociation inhibitor (GDI are recruited to membranes and converted into their active GTP-form. This reaction requires removal of GDI, and a replacement of the bound GDP by GTP. Both processes may occur by two different activities. A GDI

Ungermann, Christian

458

Rab cascades and tethering factors in the endomembrane system Daniel F. Markgraf, Karolina Peplowska, Christian Ungermann*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cytosol, the inac- tive GDP-form is bound to GDI (GDP dissociation inhibitor), which also shields the Rab's hydrophobic prenyl anchor [10,11]. To bind to membranes, GDI must be displaced from Rab-GDP by a membrane bound GDF (GDI displacement factor) [12]. A number of integral membrane proteins of the Yip family have

Ungermann, Christian

459

The Aid Effectiveness Literature: The Sad Results of 40 Years of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

covering every aspect of aid one can think of. Two points should be evident from the start: E1: Aid agencies aim at social rates of return of approximately 10% in feasibility studies of their projects. If this is realized, an aid share of 1% (of GDP... , the real rate of growth of gdp, that is, GDP per capita. Aid, h, as the share of development aid (ODA), H, of GDP/GNI, so that h = H/GDP. The model, g = g(h), may be uncontrolled or controlled for country heterogeneity, which we term absolute...

Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

460

Data:715d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 d7b34-4dbc-496b-8c14-00ee86bf1035 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSB - 2 Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 5,000 kW and less than or equal to 15,000 kW Fixed monthly charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

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461

Data:5a9411be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc be-bb55-41ff-bd55-5919ea2ab9cc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSB - 1 Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 5,000 kW and less than or equal to 15,000 kW Fixed monthly charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

462

Data:693b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 b3469-09d1-4173-a383-121e5f1681c0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northcentral Mississippi E P A Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Manufacturing Service SMSB (5000 kW - 15000 kW) Sector: Industrial Description: *This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective contract demand is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

463

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

464

Data:55d73aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b aa4-9718-40f2-a377-34993557ed7b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cullman Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: MSC Manufacturing Service Rate Sector: Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

465

Data:Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b Bec3df21-5b97-4046-8f7a-2ba15e19779b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Murray, Kentucky (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Rate- Schedule SMSB Sector: Commercial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective contract demand is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

466

Data:31f3d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b d157-9498-4a94-82bd-a5c08609db0b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSD Sector: Industrial Description: * greater than 25,000 kW Fixed Monthly Charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

467

Data:572ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef ae204-e0f0-44e1-a396-568fbdf1e3ef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Knoxville Utilities Board Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE MSB Sector: Industrial Description: This rate, subject to availability from TVA, shall be available for firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 5,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other applicable conditions specified below in this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

468

Data:4be888d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 88d4-d250-4fd7-a1c0-cea752cc3215 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE MSC Sector: Industrial Description: * Greater than 15,000 kW and less than or equal to 25,000 kW Fixed Customer Charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

469

Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within {+-} 4.5 mm coordinates shifting. IGRT using XVIcbs is critical to IMRT for prostate and H and N, especially SRT, SRS, and SBRT. To optimize this modality of IGRT, a vigilant QA program is indispensable. Prostate IGRT reveals treatment accuracy as subject to coordinates' adjustments; otherwise a 4.5-mm margin is required to allow for full dose coverage of the clinical target volume, notwithstanding toxicity to normal tissues.

Tsai, Jen-San, E-mail: jen-san.tsai@verizon.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Application of Gaussian Process Modeling to Analysis of Functional Unreliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper applies Gaussian Process (GP) modeling to analysis of the functional unreliability of a “passive system.” GPs have been used widely in many ways [1]. The present application uses a GP for emulation of a system simulation code. Such an emulator can be applied in several distinct ways, discussed below. All applications illustrated in this paper have precedents in the literature; the present paper is an application of GP technology to a problem that was originally analyzed [2] using neural networks (NN), and later [3, 4] by a method called “Alternating Conditional Expectations” (ACE). This exercise enables a multifaceted comparison of both the processes and the results. Given knowledge of the range of possible values of key system variables, one could, in principle, quantify functional unreliability by sampling from their joint probability distribution, and performing a system simulation for each sample to determine whether the function succeeded for that particular setting of the variables. Using previously available system simulation codes, such an approach is generally impractical for a plant-scale problem. It has long been recognized, however, that a well-trained code emulator or surrogate could be used in a sampling process to quantify certain performance metrics, even for plant-scale problems. “Response surfaces” were used for this many years ago. But response surfaces are at their best for smoothly varying functions; in regions of parameter space where key system performance metrics may behave in complex ways, or even exhibit discontinuities, response surfaces are not the best available tool. This consideration was one of several that drove the work in [2]. In the present paper, (1) the original quantification of functional unreliability using NN [2], and later ACE [3], is reprised using GP; (2) additional information provided by the GP about uncertainty in the limit surface, generally unavailable in other representations, is discussed; (3) a simple forensic exercise is performed, analogous to the inverse problem of code calibration, but with an accident management spin: given an observation about containment pressure, what can we say about the system variables? References 1. For an introduction to GPs, see (for example) Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning, C. E. Rasmussen and C. K. I. Williams (MIT, 2006). 2. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Reactor Passive Safety Systems, J. J. Vandenkieboom, PhD Thesis (University of Michigan, 1996). 3. Z. Cui, J. C. Lee, J. J. Vandenkieboom, and R. W. Youngblood, “Unreliability Quantification of a Containment Cooling System through ACE and ANN Algorithms,” Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 85, 178 (2001). 4. Risk and Safety Analysis of Nuclear Systems, J. C. Lee and N. J. McCormick (Wiley, 2011). See especially §11.2.4.

R. Youngblood

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event. Beyond 7 days, only a few simple actions are needed to cope with the SBO for an indefinite amount of time. The operation of the ICS as the primary success path for mitigation of an SBO, allows for near immediate plant restart once power is restored. (authors)

Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W. [New Plants Engineering, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, M/CA 75, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28402 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and reconnaissance, part inspection, geometric modeling, laser-based 3D volumetric imaging, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), aiding first responders, and supporting soldiers with helmet-mounted LADAR for 3D mapping in urban-environment scenarios. The technology developed in this LDRD overcomes the limitations of current laser-based 3D sensors and contributes to the realization of intelligent machine systems reducing manpower need.

Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr. (.; .); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; • Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and • Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

C20H4(C4F8)3: A Fluorine-Containing Annulated Corannulene that Is a Better Electron Acceptor Than C60  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been increased interest in the design and applications of small polyaromatic molecules for energy conversion and storage, organic transistors and OLEDs, and other emerging areas of modern technology.[1] In particular, functionalized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were shown to demonstrate excellent electrical mobilities, in organic thin-film transistors, in some cases even under ambient conditions.[2] It has been suggested that air stability of such organic materials is correlated with their electronic properties, and more specifically, with a high electron affinity.[3] Until recently, geodesic PAHs, such as corannulene[4] or sumanene[5] and their numerous derivatives have not been seriously considered for optoelectronic applications because (i) they typically possess very low electron affinities (e.g., EA(C20H10) = 0.5(1) eV),[6] and (ii) laborious multistep syntheses with moderate-to-low yields made them practically unavailable for such studies.[7] Although the low availability of sumanene remains unchanged, significant progress has been made lately in the large-scale synthesis of corannulene.[8] Furthermore, our recent work demonstrated that functionalization of corannulene molecule with electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) results in drastic enhancement of its electron acceptor properties.[9] In particular, for trifluoromethylated derivative C20H5(CF3)5, a 950 mV positive shift in the reduction potential relative to the parent C20H10 was measured. We also predicted that other EWGs, including halogen atoms or cyanide group, could be used to enhance electron affinity of corannulene. Nearly linear correlation between the number of EWGs and the electron affinity (reduction potential) of the corresponding EWG-substituted corannulene molecules that was demonstrated by our DFT calculations, and, more recently, confirmed for C20H10-x(CF3)x=2,3,[10] provides a good tool for design of the molecules with desired electronic properties. Here, we report the first synthesis, structure, and electronic properties (in solution and in the gas phase) of the derivative of corannulene, which has a higher electron affinity (EA) than a well-studied acceptor fullerene C60

Kuvychko, Igor V.; Dubceac, Cristina; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Granovsky, Alexander A.; Popov, Alexey A.; Petrukhina, Marina A.; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

LSST Charge-Coupled Device Calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prototype charge-coupled device created at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope must be tested to check its functionality and performance. It was installed into the Calypso telescope in Arizona in November of 2008 for this purpose. Since then it has taken many images of various astronomical objects. By doing photometry on standard stars in these images, we can compare our magnitude results to the known magnitudes of these stars. This comparison allows us to then determine the chip's performance and functional capabilities. Expecting to see first light in 2016, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an extremely large ground based telescope that anticipates funding and will be built in Chile. Described as 'Wide-Fast-Deep', the LSST will have an unprecedented wide field of view (ten square degrees for surveys), short exposures (fifteen to thirty seconds and still see faint objects), and the largest digital camera in the world. One of the goals hoped to be achieved with this camera is the measurement of dark matter using strong and weak gravitational lensing. Gravitational lensing occurs when a large cluster of galaxies distorts the light from a galaxy behind this cluster. This causes an arc of light to form around the cluster. By measuring the length of this arc, one can calculate how much matter should be present in the cluster. Since the amount that should be present is vastly greater than the amount of visible matter that can be seen, it is postulated that the difference between these two numbers is made up of dark matter. This is a direct way of measuring the amount of dark matter in the universe. Thousands of galaxy clusters will be seen with LSST, allowing precise measurements of strong lensing effects. Weak lensing is a much smaller effect, distorting the shape of galaxies by only a few percent. The scale of LSST will allow these small effects to be measured with a precision unavailable with current smaller surveys. Some of the other uses for the LSST will be cataloging the entire sky, observing exploding supernovae and near Earth objects, and probing into the nature of dark energy. Since the LSST is such a large project, one organization alone cannot build it. Therefore many organizations have come together, each one working on a specific part of the telescope's construction. Here at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) the camera is being designed.

Stout, Tiarra Johannas; /Idaho State U. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain in effect, although deeper powder beds (up to 2 inches) also yielded temperatures of greater than 950 C for longer than 2 hours.

COMPTON, J.A.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

CFD SIMULATION OF PROPOSED VALIDATION DATA FOR A FLOW PROBLEM RECONFIGURED TO ELIMINATE AN UNDESIRABLE FLOW INSTABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting the development of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), which will be based on a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design. The VHTR is a single-phase helium-cooled reactor wherein the helium will be heated initially to 750 °C and later to temperatures approaching 1000 °C. The high temperatures are desired to increase reactor efficiency and to provide a heat source for the manufacture of hydrogen and other applications. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used in the past to design or license nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is expected that CFD will be used in the design and safety analysis of forthcoming designs. This is partly because of the maturity of CFD and partly because detailed information is desired of the flow and heat transfer inside the reactor to avoid hot spots and other conditions that might compromise reactor safety. Numerical computations of turbulent flow should be validated against experimental data for flow conditions that contain some or all of the physics expected in the thermal fluid machinery of interest. To this end, a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of the prismatic VHTR was constructed and installed in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) matched index of refraction (MIR) test facility and data were taken. The data were then studied and compared to CFD calculations to help determine their suitability for validation data. One of the main findings was that the inlet data, which were measured and controlled by calibrated mass flow rotameters and were also measured using detailed stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) showed considerable discrepancies in mass flow rate between the two methods. The other finding was that a randomly unstable recirculation zone occurs in the flow. This instability has a very significant effect on the flow field in the vicinity of the inlet jets. Because its time scale is long and because it is apparently a random instability, it was deemed undesirable for a validation data set. It was predicted using CFD that by eliminating the first of the four jets, the recirculation zone could be stabilized. The present paper reports detailed results for the three-jet case with comparisons to the four-jet data inasmuch as three-jet data are still unavailable. Hence, the present simulations are true or blind predictions.

Richard W. Johnson; Hugh M. McIlroy

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Advanced radioisotope power sources for future deep space missions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) has been well established for deep space mission applications. The success of the Voyager Galileo Cassini and numerous other missions proved the efficacy of these technologies in deep space. Future deep space missions may also require Advanced Radioisotope Power System (ARPS) technologies to accomplish their goals. In the Exploration of the Solar System (ESS) theme several missions are in the planning stages or under study that would be enabled by ARPS technology. Two ESS missions in the planning stage may employ ARPS. Currently planned for launch in 2006 the Europa Orbiter mission (EO) will perform a detailed orbital exploration of Jupiter’s moon Europa to determine the presence of liquid water under the icy surface. An ARPS based upon Stirling engine technology is currently baselined for this mission. The Pluto Kuiper Express mission (PKE) planned for launch in 2004 to study Pluto its moon Charon and the Kuiper belt is baselined to use a new RTG (F-8) assembled from parts remaining from the Cassini spare RTG. However if this unit is unavailable the Cassini spare RTG (F-5) or ARPS technologies would be required. Future missions under study may also require ARPS technologies. Mission studies are now underway for a detailed exploration program for Europa with multiple mission concepts for landers and future surface and subsurface explorers. For the orbital phase of these missions ARPS technologies may provide the necessary power for the spacecraft and orbital telecommunications relay capability for landed assets. For extended surface and subsurface operations ARPS may provide the power for lander operations and for drilling. Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) will perform a detailed study of Saturn’s rings and ring dynamics. The Neptune Orbiter (NO) mission will perform a detailed multi disciplinary study of Neptune. Titan Explorer (TE) will perform in-situ exploration of Saturn’s moon Titan with both orbital operations and landed operations enabled by ARPS technologies. All of these missions would be enabled by ARPS technology. This paper presents the current status of ongoing studies of future ESS mission concepts and the design assumptions and capabilities required from ARPS technologies. Where specific capabilities have been assumed in the studies the results are presented along with a discussion of the implementation alternatives. No decision on power sources would be made until after completion of an Environmental Impact Statement for each project.

Erik N. Nilsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Data:Eb880de9-4f9a-4be2-8f30-835e50ffa7f6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80de9-4f9a-4be2-8f30-835e50ffa7f6 80de9-4f9a-4be2-8f30-835e50ffa7f6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: MANUFACTURING SERVICE RATE--SCHEDULE TDMSA TOU Sector: Industrial Description: * Fixed Monthly Charge = Customer Charge ($2,000) + Administrative Charge ($350) This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 1,000 kW but not more than 5,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other conditions of this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.

482

Data:665523ac-f812-4c47-a727-97d27985a261 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

523ac-f812-4c47-a727-97d27985a261 523ac-f812-4c47-a727-97d27985a261 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Knoxville Utilities Board Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule MSD Sector: Industrial Description: This rate, subject to availability from TVA, shall be available for firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 25,000 kW, and (b) the major use of electricity is for activities conducted at the delivery point serving that customer which are classified with a 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification Code between 20 and 39, inclusive, or classified with 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 5181, or 2007 NAICS codes 5182, 522320, and 541214; provided, however, customers qualifying for service under this schedule on the basis of such a NAICS code shall have an average monthly load factor of at least 80 percent during the preceding 12 months; provided further, however, that for the first 12 months of service to a new customer this load factor requirement shall be based on the customer's expected load factor for those 12 months as projected before the customer begins taking service; provided that the other applicable conditions specified below in this section are met. As used in the previous sentence "monthly load factor" shall mean a percentage calculated by dividing the total metered energy for a month by the product of the metered demand for that month and the number of clock hours in that month, exclusive of any hours during which power was unavailable due to an interruption or curtailment of the customer's service and of any hours in which the customer was unable to use power due to a Force Majeure event reasonably beyond the customer's control.