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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWMON 1.12-1 GWMON 1.12-1 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan for the Land Farm Pilot Test Monument Valley, Arizona August 2000 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Ofice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-5 1 1-001 5-21-000 Document Number U0106701 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0106701 Contents Contents 1.0 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Pilot-Test Extraction Wellfield 2 4.0 Water Elevation Measurements and Monitoring ............... 4

3

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE August 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis A sheep’s foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. A sheep's foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. Moab, UT MILL TAILINGS REMOVAL Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast Utah, as a legacy to the former ore-processing site that operated for nearly three decades beginning in the mid-1950s. That is until April 2009, when the U.S. Department of Energy began moving the tailings by rail to an engineered disposal cell constructed 30 miles north near Crescent Junction, Utah. The mill tailings,

4

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations...........................................................................................................v Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

5

Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2000-177-TAR GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-12-000 Document Number U0066302 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0066302 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado

6

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites AGENCY: U.S. DEP.4RTMENT OF ENERGY ACTIOK: FL&-DING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP-ACT (FONSI) SU$IM$RY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement ground lvater compliance strategies for two Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTR.4) Project sites near Slick Rock. Colorado. The purpose of the strategies is to comply with U.S. En\.ironmental Protection .Qency (EP.Aj ground n'ater standards defined in Title 40 Codr ~fF~d~w/ iieplutio?r.s (CFR) Part 192. and in so doing. protect human health and the en\.ironment. Ground water at the Slick Rock sites is contaminated with residual radioactive materials from hisTorica acti\,ities, associated with the processin of uranium ore, The planned action (~formeri>,.

7

DOE/EA-1312: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (September 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

8

EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle,...

9

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

N /A

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

UMTRA Ground Water Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

... 7 Figure 3. Uranium Distribution from April 2013 Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site...

11

Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is in McKinley County, New Mexico. As part of UMTRA surface remediation, residual radioactive materials were consolidated on the site in a disposal cell that was completed July 1995. The need for ground water monitoring was evaluated and found not to be necessary beyond the completion of the remedial action because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as limited use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Planned, routine ground water sampling activities for calendar year 1995 to 1997 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Naturita, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, sampling frequency, and specific rationale for each routine monitoring station at the site. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Naturita UMTRA Project processing site in the spring of 1994. No water sampling was performed during 1993 at either the Naturita processing site (NAT-01) or the Dry Flats disposal site (NAT-12). Results of previous water sampling at the Naturita processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated as a result of uranium processing activities. Baseline ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Dry Flats disposal site. Water sampling activities scheduled for April 1994 include preconstruction sampling of selected monitor wells at the processing site, surface water sampling of the San Miguel River, sampling of several springs/seeps in the vicinity of the disposal site, and sampling of two monitor wells in Coke Oven Valley. The monitor well locations provide sampling points to characterize ground water quality and flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been updated to reflect constituents related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted annually at minimum during the period of construction activities.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

Not Available

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Belfield and Bowman Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in the spring of 1996. Water sampling was conducted in 1993 at both the Belfield processing site and the Bowman processing/disposal site. Results of the sampling at both sites indicate that ground water conditions have remained relatively stable over time. Water sampling activities are not scheduled for 1994 because ground water conditions at the two sites are relatively stable, the 1993 sampling was comprehensive, and surface remediation activities are not scheduled to start until 1996. The next water sampling event is scheduled before the start of remedial activities and will include sampling selected monitor wells at both sites and several domestic wells in the vicinity.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ground water protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ground water work breakdown structure dictionary  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the activities that are necessary to assess in ground water remediation as specified in the UMTRA Project. These activities include the following: site characterization; remedial action compliance and design documentation; environment, health, and safety program; technology assessment; property access and acquisition activities; site remedial actions; long term surveillance and licensing; and technical and management support.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in the spring of 1994. Results of water sampling activity from 1989 to 1993 indicate that ground water contamination occurs primarily in the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer (the uppermost aquifer) and that the contamination migrates along four distinct contaminant plumes. Contaminated ground water from some wells in these regions has significantly elevated levels of aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, sulfate, and uranium. Contamination in the Dilworth aquifer was identified in monitor well 977 and in monitor well 833 at the southern edge of former tailings pile 4. There is no evidence that surface water quality in Tordilla and Scared Dog Creeks is impacted by tailings seepage. The following water sampling activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (1) Ground water sampling from 15 monitor wells to monitor the migration of the four major contaminant plumes within the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer. (2) Ground water sampling from five monitor wells to monitor contaminated and background ground water quality conditions in the Dilworth aquifer. Because of disposal cell construction activities, all plume monitor wells screened in the Dilworth aquifer were abandoned. No surface water locations are proposed for sampling. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer downgradient of the disposal cell. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents currently related to uranium processing activities and natural uranium mineralization. Water sampling is normally conducted biannually in late summer and midwinter.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

22

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the basis for ground water sampling at the Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site during fiscal year 1994. It identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations and will be updated annually. The Ambrosia Lake site is in McKinley County, New Mexico, about 40 kilometers (km) (25 miles [mi]) north of Grants, New Mexico, and 1.6 km (1 mi) east of New Mexico Highway 509 (Figure 1.1). The town closest to the tailings pile is San Mateo, about 16 km ( 10 mi) southeast (Figure 1.2). The former mill and tailings pile are in Section 28, and two holding ponds are in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 9 West. The site is shown on the US Geological Survey (USGS) map (USGS, 1980). The site is approximately 2100 meters (m) (7000 feet [ft]) above sea level.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project: Project plan. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) [Public Law (PL) 95-604, 42 United States Code (USC) 7901], hereinafter referred to as the ``Act,`` authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination. To fulfill this mission, the DOE has established two projects under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. The Ground Water Project was established in April 1991 as a major project and a separate project plan will be prepared for that portion of the mission. This project plan covers the UMTRA Surface Project, a major system acquisition (MSA).

Not Available

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Falls City, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Produced by the US Department of Energy (DOE), this site observational work plan (SOWP) will be used to determine site-specific activities to comply with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at this Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The purpose of the SOWP is to recommend a site-specific ground water compliance strategy at the Falls City UMTRA Project site. The Falls City SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of site hydrogeological data, delineates a conceptual model of the aquifer system, and discusses the origins of milling-related ground water contamination. It also defines the magnitude of ground water contamination, potential environmental and health risks associated with ground water contamination and data gaps, and targets a proposed compliance strategy.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

43

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

44

Colorado Ground Water Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Ground Water Commission Place Colorado Website http:water.state.co.usgroun References Colorado Ground Water Commission...

45

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Ground water compliance for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site, is governed by the Uranium Mills Tailings Radiation Control Act (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR Part 192; 60 FR 2854). The EPA standards describe specific conditions for which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) may apply for supplemental standards for contaminated ground water rather than meeting background levels or numerical standards. To achieve compliance with Subpart A of the EPA standards the residual radioactive materials are currently being consolidated on the site by the DOE in a disposal cell, isolating them from direct human or ecological contact and further dispersion into the environment. Completion of the disposal cell is scheduled for early 1995. An environmental assessment and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) were completed in 1987. Concurrence with the UMTRA Surface Project Ambrosia Lake remedial action plan (RAP) was granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and state of New Mexico in 1990. The DOE deferred compliance with Subpart B of the EPA standards in the Surface Project RAP. This site observational work plan (SOWP) is the first document to address ground water compliance under Subpart B at the Ambrosia Lake site. The Ambrosia Lake UMTRA Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. Contamination of ground water resulted from discharge of waste water, infiltration of water through the tailings pile, hydraulic placement of mill tailings in nearby mines, and water pumped from mine shafts.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. The potential for impacts to human health and the environment from contaminated ground water currently does not exist. No domestic or livestock wells accessing ground water from the uppermost aquifer have been identified within a 5 mile radius from the site. Therefore, no current exposure pathways to humans, livestock, or wildlife exist, nor are any foreseen. The proposed ground water compliance strategy under consideration for application at the Ambrosia Lake site is to perform no remediation, based on the application of supplemental standards because the ground water has ``limited use.``

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed compliance strategy of natural flushing combined with institutional controls and continued monitoring for the New Rifle uranium mill...

52

UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

55

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

56

Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designated Ground Water Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Designated Ground Water Basin Map Details Activities (0) Areas...

57

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

58

UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project`s ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors` evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Water budget for SRP burial ground area  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide migration from the SRP burial ground for solid low-level waste has been studied extensively. Most of the buried radionuclides are fixed on the soil and show negligible movement. The major exception is tritium, which when leached from the waste by percolating rainfall, forms tritiated water and moves with the groundwater. The presence of tritium has been useful in tracing groundwater flow paths to outcrop. A subsurface tritium plume moving from the southwest corner of the burial ground toward an outcrop near Four Mile Creek has been defined. Groundwater movement is so slow that much of the tritium decays before reaching the outcrop. The burial ground tritium plume defined to date is virtually all in the uppermost sediment layer, the Barnwell Formation. The purpose of the study reported in this memorandum was to investigate the hypothesis that deeper flow paths, capable of carrying substantial amounts of tritium, may exist in the vicinity of the burial ground. As a first step in seeking deeper flow paths, a water budget was constructed for the burial ground site. The water budget, a materials balance used by hydrologists, is expressed in annual area inches of rainfall. Components of the water budget for the burial ground area were analyzed to determine whether significant flow paths may exist below the tan clay. Mean annual precipitation was estimated as 47 inches, with evapotranspiration, run-off, and groundwater recharge estimated as 30, 2, and 15 inches, respectively. These estimates, when combined with groundwater discharge data, suggest that 5 inches of the groundwater recharge flow above the tan clay and that 10 inches flow below the tan clay. Therefore, two-thirds of the groundwater recharge appears to follow flow paths that are deeper than those previously found. 13 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

Hubbard, J.E.; Emslie, R.H.

1984-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Supplement to the site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide additional and more detailed information to supplement review of the site observational work plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995) for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This document includes a discussion of the average linear velocity of the ground water in the alluvium and a discussion of the ground water quality of the alluvium, weathered Mancos Shale, and the Tres Hermanos-C Member of the Mancos Shale. The data from a 1989 aquifer test were analyzed using the curve-matching software AQTESOLV and then compared with the original results. A hydrograph of the ground water elevations in monitoring wells screened in the alluvium is presented to show how the ground water elevations change with time. Stiff and Piper diagrams were created to describe the changes in ground water geochemistry in the alluvium/weathered Mancos Sahel unit, the Tres Hermanos-C Sandstone unit, the Tres Hermanos-B Sandstone unit, and the Dakota Sandstone. Background information on other related topics such as site history, cell construction, soil characteristics, and well construction are presented in the SOWP. A geologic cross section depicts the conceptual model of the hydrostratigraphy and ground water chemistry of the Ambrosia Lake site. Hydrogeologic information of each hydrostratigraphic unit is presented.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Supplement to the site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide additional and more detailed information to supplement review of the site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This document includes a discussion of (1) the average linear velocity of the ground water in the alluvium; (2) the ground water quality of the alluvium, weathered Mancos Shale, and the Tres Hermanos-C Member of the Mancos Shale; and (3) the fate and transport of contaminants from the uppermost aquifer to the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation. The data from a 1989 aquifer test were analyzed using the curve-matching software AQTESOLV and then compared with the original results. A hydrograph of the ground water elevations in monitoring wells screened in the alluvium is presented to show how the ground water elevations change with time. Stiff and Piper diagrams were created to describe the changes in ground water geochemistry in the alluvium/weathered Mancos Shale unit, the Tres Hermanos-C Sandstone unit, the Tres Hermanos-B Sandstone unit, and the Dakota Sandstone. Background information on other related topics such as site history, cell construction, soil characteristics, and well construction are presented in the SOWP. Figure 1 is a geologic cross section depicting the conceptual model of the hydrostratigraphy and ground water chemistry of the Ambrosia Lake site. Table 1 presents hydrogeologic information of each hydrostratigraphic unit.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Stream Discharge Measurements, Ground Water Level Data, and Ground Water Well Hydrographs This page intentionally left blank Contents Section .................................................................................. Surface Water Time-Concentration Plots D1.O ............................................................................................... Stream Discharge Measurements D2.0 ............................................................. Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots for Uranium D3.0 .......................................................................................................... Ground Water Level Data D4.0 ..............................................................................................

65

Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water (Indiana) Ground Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting

66

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality Surface and Ground Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQualitySurfaceandGround&oldid612197...

68

UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

70

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City,...

71

Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Geologic Map of Site Area ........................................................................................................ E1.O Stream Flow Measurements ...................................................................................................... E2.0 Estimates of Ground Water Flow .............................................................................................. E3.0 .......................................... MODFLOW Flow Budget Analysis for OU 1 1 1 Model Subregions E4.0 ............................................................................ Burro Canyon Aquifer Ground Water Model E5.0 This page intentionally left blank

72

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called

73

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow almost always involves some sort (Yeh 1986; Poeter and Hill 1997; Hill et al. 1998). Other data beside hydraulic head have been used in calibration of ground water models, including rates of ground water exchange with streams and other surface

Saiers, James

74

Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution  

SciTech Connect

The problem of trying to remove ground-water pollution by pumping and treating are pointed out. Various Superfund sites are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many chemicals have been discarded in an undocumented manner, and their place in the groundwater is not known. Results of a remedial program to remove perchloroethylene at a concentration of 6132 parts per billion from groundwater in a site in New Jersey showed that with an average extraction rate of 300 gallons per minute from 1978 to 1984 contamination level was lowered below 100 parts per billion. However, after shutdown of pumping the level rose to 12,588 parts per billion in 1988. These results lead the author to propose that the practical solutions for water supplies may be treatment at the time it enters the system for use.

Abelson, P.H.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ground water hydrology report: Revision 1, Attachment 3. Final  

SciTech Connect

This report presents ground water hydrogeologic activities for the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. The Department of Energy has characterized the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the site and determined that the proposed remedial action would comply with the requirements of the EPA ground water protection standards.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

UMTRA project list of reportable occurrences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This UMTRA Project List of Reportable occurrences is provided to facilitate efficient categorization of reportable occurrences. These guidelines have been established in compliance with DOE minimum reporting requirements under DOE Order 5000.3B. Occurrences are arranged into nine groups relating to US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project operations for active sites. These nine groupings are provided for reference to determined whether an occurrence meets reporting requirement criteria in accordance with the minimum reporting requirements. Event groups and significance categories that cannot or will not occur, and that do not apply to UMTRA Project operations, are omitted. Occurrence categorization shall be as follows: Group 1. Facility Condition; Group 2. Environmental; Group 3. Personnel Safety; Group 4. Personnel Radiation Protection; Group 5. Safeguards and Security; Group 6. Transportation; Group 7. Value Basis Reporting; Group 8. Facility Status; and Group 9. Cross-Category Items.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

79

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality monitoring, notification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive

82

DOE/EA-1268: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site December 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office...

83

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook,...

84

Probability Models for Annual Extreme Water-Equivalent Ground Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of annual extreme water-equivalents of ground snow (reported as inches of water) measured up through the winter of 197980 at 76 weather stations in the northeast quadrant of the United States is presented. The analysis ...

Bruce Ellingwood; Robert K. Redfield

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Water resources protection strategy: Revision 1, Attachment 4  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) must provide a demonstration of compliance with the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards for inactive mill sites pursuant to 40 CFR Part 192. This plan outlines the proposed strategy to demonstrate compliance with the ground water standards at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This demonstration consists of (1) the ground water protection standard, (2) a performance assessment, (3) a closure performance demonstration, and (4) a performance monitoring and corrective action program.

NONE

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Record of Decision for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198) (4/28/97)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13 13 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 1997 / Notices export to Canada should be clearly marked with Docket EA-144. Additional copies are to be filed directly with: Kevin J. Lipson, Jolanta Sterbenz, Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. Columbia Square, 555 Thirteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004-1109, (202)637-5600 and Gary A. Jeffries, CNG Energy Services Corporation, One Park Ridge Center, P.O. Box 15746, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15244-0746, (412)787-4268. A final decision will be made on these applications after the environmental impacts have been evaluated pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), and a determination is made by the DOE that the proposed actions will not adversely impact on the reliability of the U.S. electric power supply system.

87

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

89

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

90

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach to focus on ground water systems that are susceptible to fecal contamination, and requires ground water systems that are at risk of fecal contamination to take corrective action. A minor correction to the final Rule was published on November 21, 2006 (71 FR 67427). The GWR applies to all PWSs2 that use ground water

91

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and are not required by MODPATH or MT3D. 3.6.4 Flow Model Calibration The IRA Work Plan states that the model would be calibrated using October 2002 water levels. However,...

95

File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

96

GROUND WATER PROTECTION ISSUES WITH GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Closed loop vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps are grouted to facilitate heat transfer and prevent ground water contamination. The grout must exhibit suitable thermal conductivity as well as adequate hydraulic sealing characteristics. Permeability and infiltration tests were performed to assess the ability of cementitious grout to control vertical seepage in boreholes. It was determined that a superplasticized cement-sand grout is a more effective borehole sealant than neat cement over a range of likely operational temperatures. The feasibility of using non-destructive methods to verify bonding in heat exchangers is reviewed.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

GRR/Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Water Quality Control Act 5 CCR 1002-61 Colorado Discharge Permit System 5 CCR 1002-41 Basic Standards for Ground Water 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

100

Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003  

SciTech Connect

Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 19131998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GRR/Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies NAC 534.444 Waiver to use water to explore for oil, gas or geothermal resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Division of Water Resources (NDWR) may grant a waiver of the

102

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill 5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill Tailings Site by using the selected alternative stated in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 1, 1997 EA-1155: Final Environmental Assessment Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site,

103

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

104

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

GRR/Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19COIDeterminationOfNontributaryGroundWaterStatus.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 CRS 37-90-137 Permits to Construct Wells Outside of Designated Basins CRS 37-90-103 Underground Water Definitions CRS 37-82-101 Waters of Natural Surface Streams Subject to Appropriation CRS 37-92-102 Legislative Declaration - Basic Tenets of Colorado Water Law Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

106

Procedures for preparation, printing, and distribution of UMTRA Project National Environmental Policy Act documents  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the procedures for preparation, printing and distribution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project National Environmental Policy Act documents. (KJD)

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

109

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

110

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

111

Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ground-Based FSSP and PVM Measurements of Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently published ground-based measurements of liquid water content (LWC) measured in fogs by two microphysical instruments, the FSSP-100 and PVM-100, are evaluated. These publications had suggested that the PVM-100 underestimated LWC ...

H. Gerber; Glendon Frick; Alfred R. Rodi

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

115

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.8 (Rule 8) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Pits are used in drilling operations to contain drilling related fluids and

116

Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1981, 299 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radionuclide chemical contaminants. This report is one of a series prepared annually to document and evaluate the status of ground water at the Hanford Site. Two substances, tritium and nonradioactive nitrate, are easily transported in ground water; therefore, these substances are used as primary tracers to monitor the movement of contaminated ground water. Data collected during 1981 describe the movement of tritium and the nonradioactive nitrate plumes as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay. The gross beta (/sup 106/Ru) levels have become so low that it will no longer be considered a major radionuclide contaminant. The tritium plume continues to show increasing concentrations near the Columbia River. While it is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, its contribution to the river has not been distinguished from other sources at this time. This plume shows much the same configuration as in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980. The size of the nitrate plume appears stable. Concentrations of nitrate in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continue to be high as a result of past leaks from the evaporation facility. The overall quality of the ground water at the Hanford Site is generally comparable to that of other ground waters in eastern Washington. Any exceptions to this statement will be noted in this report.

Eddy, P.A.; Cline, C.S.; Prater, L.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical or horizontal ground-coupling, an open groundwater loop, or a surface water loop. This paper discusses system performance characteristics, component selection procedures presently being used, improvements currently being considered and future possibilities for improved efficiency and reliability. Optimum designs require proper matching of the heat pump unit to the water circulation system, the building space heating/cooling load and water heating requirements. General trends resulting from system and component choices will be discussed. Water heating methods with these heat pumps will be considered.

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R317-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates discharges

119

Infiltration/ground water linkage in the southwest: Response of shallow ground water to interannual variations of precipitation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic gradients, residence times and the hydrochemistry of shallow ground water are linked to the episodic precipitation and recharge events characteristic of the arid southwest. In this region, the amount of precipitation, and corresponding biomass, is dependant upon altitude with greater frequency and duration in the montane highlands and less in the desert lowlands. Results from a four-year study at the Rio Calaveras research site in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico show a strong correlation between the physical and hydrochemical properties of shallow ground water and variations of seasonal precipitation and infiltration. For example, the water table shows a dramatic response to snowmelt infiltration during years of abundant snow pack (El Nifio) and diminished response during years of reduced snow pack (La Niiia). The chemical structure of shallow ground water is also affected by the precipitation regime, primarily by variations in the flux of reductants (organic carbon) and oxidants (dissolved oxygen) from the vadose zone to the water table. Generally, oxic conditions persist during spring snowmelt infiltration shifting to anoxic conditions as biotic and abiotic processes transform dissolved oxygen. Other redox-sensitive constituents (ferrous iron, manganese, sulfate, nitrate, and nitrite) show increasing and decreasing concentrations as redox fluctuates seasonally and year-to-year. The cycling of these redox sensitive solutes in the subsurface depends upon the character of the aquifer materials, the biomass at the surface, moisture and temperature regime of the vadose zone, and frequency of infiltration events.

Groffman, A. R. (Armand R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effects of uranium mining of ground water in Ambrosia Lake area, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal ore-bearing zone in the Ambrosia Lake area of the Grants uranium district is the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). This unit is also one of the major artesian aquifers in the region. Significant declines in the potentiometric lead within the aquifer have been recorded, although cones of depression do not appear to have spread laterally more than a few miles. Loss of potentiometric head in the Westwater Canyon Member has resulted in the interformational migration of ground water along fault zones from overlying aquifers of Cretaceous age. This migration has produced local deterioration in chemical quality of the ground water.

Kelly, T.E.; Link, R.L.; Schipper, M.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, oils, cleaners, batteries, pesticides and wood preservatives are commonly used in households and on farms, but they can be hazardous to ground water if handled improperly. This publication explains proper methods of using, storing and disposing of hazardous materials.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Thermal Discharge Retrievals with Ground Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at a mid-latitude cold-water site along the Atlantic coast near Plymouth, MA. In contrast to the relative uniformity of the sea-surface temperature in the open ocean the water temperature near Pilgrim exhibits strong spatial gradients and temporal variability. This made it critical that all images be accurately registered in order to extract temperature values at the six buoy locations. Sixteen images during a one-year period from August 2000 to July 2001 were selected for the study. The RMS error of Pilgrim water temperature is about 3.5 C for the 4 buoys located in open water. The RMS error of the combined temperatures from 3 of the open-water buoys is 2.8 C. The RMS error includes errors in the ground truth. The magnitude of this error is estimated to range between 0.8 and 2.3 C. The two main components of this error are warm-layer effect and spatial variability. The actual error in the MTI retrievals for Pilgrim daytime conditions is estimated to be between 2.7 and 3.4 C for individual buoys and between 1.7 and 2.7 C for the combined open-water buoys.

Kurzeja, R.J.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 8): Libby Ground Water Contamination Site, Libby, Montana, September 1986. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned wood-treating operations on the mill property are the source of ground-water contamination at the Libby Ground Water Contamination site in the northwest corner of Montana. In 1979, shortly after installation of private wells, some homeowners detected the presence of a creosote odor, and EPA monitoring in 1981 confirmed ground-water contamination. Based on 1984 well sample results, Champion International Corporation implemented the Buy Water Plan. Under this program, individuals with contaminated ground water wells agree to cease using their wells and use water from the public water system operated by the City of Libby. The program, indefinite in term, would be terminated upon the elimination of the threat of contamination, if the well owner provides a written termination notice, or if other alternatives become available. The primary contaminants of concern include: VOCs, PAHs, PCP, organics, inorganics, heavy metals, and creosote. Selected remedies are proposed and included in the report.

Not Available

1986-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

An update on the SRP burial ground area water balance and hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the burial ground area prepared by Hubbard and Emslie concluded that about 15 inches, almost one-third of the average annual precipitation, normally infiltrates the land surface and recharges the groundwater. Also, evapotranspiration was estimated to average 30 inches annually, and runoff from the land surface was estimated as 1 to 3 inches. More information has become available recently from lysimeter studies, climatic stations, groundwater studies, and stream discharge measurements. These additional data generally support the conclusions above with some modifications. The type of vegetation cover on the land surface affects the site hydrology and water budget components of evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The lysimeter studies indicate that about 12 inches more water is lost annually to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration with deep-rooted pine trees present than in areas where bare soil or shallow-rooted grass cover occur. Therefore, recharge in the burial ground area may differ from that with similar soils in forested areas of the Savannah River Plant. Study of the hydrologic properties of soils in the burial ground area indicates that infiltration rates for the soils generally are relatively high, exceeding one inch per hour. Runoff as overland flow tends to occur only with intense rainfall events of 1 inch or more. The soil-water characteristic curves are representative of relatively coarse-textured soils.

Wells, D.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site; Cook, J.W.

1986-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water monitoring procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring is the primary method used to protect our ground-water resources. The primary objectives of monitoring programs are to detect, to attribute, and to mitigate any changes in-water quality or quantity. Previous monitoring programs have had numerous problems including the failure to produce usable information and the failure to balance the competing factors of cost-effectiveness and environmental protection. A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water procedure was designed which consists of eight steps and two feedback loops. The reason for monitoring must first be determined before clear monitoring goals can be set. Characterization of the site allows proper design of the monitoring network. Data is then collected and analyzed creating usable information. Applying this new information to the information expansion loop permits a better understanding of the initial site characterization. Finally evaluating the entire routine to determine the effectiveness of the program allows the optimization loop to modify the system for greater efficiency. The value of this procedure was tested at selected sites in the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas. The mine, which is currently in compliance with state regulations, is not operating an efficient monitoring program. The problems included over-monitoring of metals in and around reclaimed mine blocks, over-monitoring by monitoring wells in the same aquifer, and the failure to attribute changes in a monitoring well near a dewatering well. The feedback loops helped to optimize the entire program by recognizing problems in the stratigraphic column and modifying the monitoring program to lower monitoring costs. Three major benefits are gained by using this procedure: the ground-water monitoring routine can be made more cost-effective, environmental protection will be increased, and environmental liability will be decreased.

Doucette, Richard Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites  

SciTech Connect

This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according to their "leachability.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE/EA-1388: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site (September 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388 388 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Site September 2001 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ vii Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... ix 1.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................................1

142

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity hotspots, yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ground-state ammonia and water in absorption towards Sgr B2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Odin submillimetre-wave satellite telescope to observe the ground state transitions of ortho-ammonia and ortho-water, including their 15N, 18O, and 17O isotopologues, towards Sgr B2. The extensive simultaneous velocity coverage of the observations, >500 km/s, ensures that we can probe the conditions of both the warm, dense gas of the molecular cloud Sgr B2 near the Galactic centre, and the more diffuse gas in the Galactic disk clouds along the line-of-sight. We present ground-state NH3 absorption in seven distinct velocity features along the line-of-sight towards Sgr B2. We find a nearly linear correlation between the column densities of NH3 and CS, and a square-root relation to N2H+. The ammonia abundance in these diffuse Galactic disk clouds is estimated to be about (0.5-1)e-8, similar to that observed for diffuse clouds in the outer Galaxy. On the basis of the detection of H218O absorption in the 3 kpc arm, and the absence of such a feature in the H217O spectrum, we conclude that the water...

Wirstrm, E S; Black, J H; Hjalmarson, ; Larsson, B; Olofsson, A O H; Encrenaz, P J; Falgarone, E; Frisk, U; Olberg, M; Sandqvist, Aa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Computer simulation models relevant to ground water contamination from EOR or other fluids - state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect

Ground water contamination is a serious national problem. The use of computers to simulate the behavior of fluids in the subsurface has proliferated extensively over the last decade. Numerical models are being used to solve water supply problems, various kinds of enertgy production problems, and ground water contamination problems. Modeling techniques have progressed to the point that their accuracy is only limited by the modeller's ability to describe the reservoir in question and the heterogeneities therein. Pursuant to the Task and Milestone Update of Project BE3A, this report summarizes the state of the art of computer simulation models relevant to contamination of ground water by enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemicals and/or waste fluids. 150 refs., 6 tabs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometric Observations of Precipitable Water Vapor: A Comparison with Ground Truth from Two Radiosonde Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-channel microwave radiometric measurements of precipitable water vapor are compared with values determined from two types of radiosondes. The first type is used in conventional soundings taken by the National Weather Service. The second is ...

Ed R. Westwater; Michael J. Falls; Ingrid A. Popa Fotino

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOEIAL162350-65

152

Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.

Alpers, C.N.; Hamlin, S.N.; Hunerlach, M.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Critique of the Climatic Record of Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water equivalent of snow on the ground (SWE) has been measured daily since 1952 at National Weather Service first-order stations whenever snow depth exceeded 5 cm (2 in). These data are used in snowmelt analyses, snow climatology, and snow ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) show promise for reducing house energy consumption, and a desuperheater can potentially further reduce energy consumption where the heat pump from the space conditioning system creates hot water. Two unoccupied houses were instrumented to document the installed operational space conditioning and water heating efficiency of their GSHP systems. This paper discusses instrumentation methods and field operation characteristics of the GSHPs, compares manufacturers' values of the coefficients of performance calculated from field measured data for the two GSHPs, and compares the measured efficiency of the desuperheater system to other domestic hot water systems.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DC WRRC Report No. 103 Background Study of the Ground Water in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow at outlet from tower: Water Spray Guns: Water quantity for conditioning: Water quantity by controlling the amount of water returned from the atomizing nozzles. The water, when sprayed into the tower around the outside of the tower, and connected to the spray headers by means of flexible hoses. Water

District of Columbia, University of the

159

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Transient drainage summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 7 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 8 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '05. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 589.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 30.8 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon : Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 5 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 12 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY06. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 355.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 19.3 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide project coordination and technical assistance to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality enhancement and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Enhancement Reserve Program (CREP) and other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Three of those four streams and one other major Sherman County stream are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Temperature in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has resulted in providing technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, two implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 3 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '04. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in reducing the backlog of conservation projects within Sherman County, while adhering to the objectives set forth for this grant.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including 119 WASCBs, 74,591 feet of terraces, 3 spring developments, 24,839 feet of riparian or pasture cross fencing, 1,072 acres of direct seed trials, 14 landowners implementing 34 CREP contracts, and the development of 5 additional CREP contracts slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY07. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 1898.3 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting approximately 52 miles of riparian or intermittent stream channel habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Project licensing plan for UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) sites  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Licensing Plan is to establish how a disposal site will be licensed, and to provide responsibilities of participatory agencies as legislated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604). This Plan has been developed to ensure that the objectives of licensing are met by identifying the necessary institutional controls, participatory agency responsibilities, and key milestones in the licensing process. The Plan contains the legislative basis for and a description of the licensing process ( Process'') for UMTRA sites. This is followed by a discussion of agency responsibilities, and milestones in the Process. The Plan concludes with a generic timeline of this Process. As discussed in Section 2.1, a custodial maintenance and surveillance plan will constitute the basis for a site license. The details of maintenance and surveillance are discussed in the Project Maintenance and Surveillance Plan (AL-350124.0000). 5 refs., 4 figs.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Final report of the UMTRA independent technical review of TAC audit programs  

SciTech Connect

This report details the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of practices and procedures for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project audit program. The audit program is conducted by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the UMTRA Project. The purpose of the ITR was to ensure that the TAC audit program is effective and is conducted efficiently. The ITR was conducted from May 16-20, 1994. A review team observed audit practices in the field, reviewed the TAC audit program`s documentation, and discussed the program with TAC staff and management. The format of this report has been developed around EPA guidelines; they comprise most of the major section headings. Each section begins by identifying the criteria that the TAC program is measured against, then describing the approach used by the ITR team to measure each TAC audit program against the criteria. An assessment of each type of audit is then summarized for each component in the following order: Radiological audit summary; Health and safety audit summary; Environmental audit summary; Quality assurance audit summary.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DOE responses to CDH October 1993 comments on the Remedical Action Plan for the Naturita, Colorado, Umtra Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document includes the October 1993 comments provided by the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on the Department of Energy (DOE) Preliminary Final Remedial Action Plan for the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Site. DOE`s responses are included after each CDH comment.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Uranium and nitrate continuk to be elevated in terrace well 817 just west of the disposal cell. Wells with sample concentrations that exceeded UMTRA ground water standards are...

171

Comment and response document for the long-term surveillance plan and the completion report for the Lowman, Idaho, disposal site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains comments, maps, ground water monitoring data, deeding information for remedial action on mill tailings at the Lowman, Idaho UMTRA site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Length Design for Ground Source Heat Pumps. InternationalClosed-Loop/Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems Installationon Closed-Loop Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems. ASHRAE

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Results of Year-Round Remotely Sensed Integrated Water Vapor by Ground-Based Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years of measurements with a time resolution of 1 min, some climatological findings on precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid water (CLW) in central Europe are given. A weak diurnal cycle is apparent. The mean overall ...

J. Gldner; D. Spnkuch

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Validation of AIRS Retrievals of Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor Using Measurements from a Network of Ground-Based GPS Receivers over the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust and easily implemented verification procedure based on the column-integrated precipitable water (IPW) vapor estimates derived from a network of ground-based global positioning system (GPS) receivers has been used to assess the quality of ...

M. K. Rama Varma Raja; Seth I. Gutman; James G. Yoe; Larry M. McMillin; Jiang Zhao

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Experimental Determination of Water Vapor Profiles from Ground-Based Radiometer Measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor profiles have been obtained from radiometer measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz and ground values of humidity, temperature and pressure. The inversion technique was based on minimum variance estimation, including constraints derived ...

B. G. Skoog; J. I. H. Askne; G. Elgered

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Water Vapor Flux Measurements from Ground-Based Vertically Pointed Water Vapor Differential Absorption and Doppler Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, two lidar systems were used to measure the vertical water vapor flux in a convective boundary layer by means of eddy correlation. This was achieved by combining a water vapor differential absorption lidar and a heterodyne wind ...

Andreas Giez; Gerhard Ehret; Ronald L. Schwiesow; Kenneth J. Davis; Donald H. Lenschow

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site  

SciTech Connect

The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

Hall, L.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational GroundBased Active and Passive Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote ...

D. D. Turner; W. F. Feltz; R. A. Ferrare

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 12 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy ...

Paul E. Racette; Ed R. Westwater; Yong Han; Albin J. Gasiewski; Marian Klein; Domenico Cimini; David C. Jones; Will Manning; Edward J. Kim; James R. Wang; Vladimir Leuski; Peter Kiedron

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Study of the Reactions Controlling the Mobility of Uranium in Ground and Surface Water Systems in Contact with Apatite  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to define the mechanisms, equilibria, kinetics, and extent of sorption of aqueous uranium onto hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)) for a range of pH, ionic strength, aqueous uranium concentration, dissolved carbon/air CO{sub 2}, and mineral surface area. We conducted chemical modeling, batch and flow-through experiments, chemical analysis, x-ray absorption and diffraction measurement, and electron microscopy. Our motivation was the need to immobilize U in water and soil to prevent it's entry into water supplies and ultimately, biological systems. Applying hydroxyapatite to in-situ treatment of uranium-bearing ground water could be an effective, low cost technology. We found that hydroxyapatite quickly, effectively, and reversibly sorbed uranium at a high capacity by inner-sphere complexation over a wide range of conditions. Our results indicate that at aqueous uranium concentrations below 10-20 ppb: (1) equilibrium sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite occurs in hours, regardless of pH; (2) in ambient and CO{sub 2}-free atmospheres, over 98% of initial uranium is sorbed to hydroxyapatite, (3) in waters in equilibrium with higher air CO{sub 2} concentrations, sorption removed over 97% of aqueous uranium, except above pH 9, where aqueous uranium concentrations were reduced by less than 40%, and (4) at near-neutral pH, bicarbonate alkalinities in excess of 500 slightly retarded sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite, relative to lower alkalinities. Uranium sorption and precipitation are reversible and are not appreciably affected by ionic strength. The reversibility of these reactions requires that in situ treatment be carefully monitored to avoid breakthrough and de-sorption of uranium unto ground water. At typical surface conditions, sorption is the only mode of uranium sequestration below 20-50 ppb U - above this range, precipitation of uranium phosphate minerals begins to dominate sequestration processes. We verified that one m{sup 2} of hydroxyapatite can sorb over 7.53 X 10{sup -6} moles or 1.8 mg of uranium in agreement with calculations based on phosphate and calcium oxide sites on the unit cell. Our work is significant because small masses of hydroxyapatite can sorb appreciable masses of uranium quickly over a wide range of chemistries. Preliminary work with ground water containing 260 ppb of uranium and cow bone char indicates that its sorptive capacity is appreciable less than pure hydroxyapatite. Pure crystalline hydroxyapatite sequestered 2.9 mg of uranium per m{sup 2} as opposed to 0.083 mg of uranium sequestered per m{sup 2} of cow bone char, or 27% versus 3.5% by surface area, respectively. Extended x-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy defined mono- and bidentate sorption of uranium to phosphate and calcium oxide groups on the hydroxyapatite surface. The EXAFS data indicate that up to several thousand parts U per million parts hydroxyapatite, surface complexation, and not precipitation, is the predominant process. Above this uranium: hydroxyapatite mass ratio, precipitation of meta-autunite (H{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})2(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 10H{sub 2}0) dominates the sequestration process.

Taffet, M

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Determining an optimal sampling frequency for measuring bulk temporal changes in ground-water quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, statistical methods are used to determine an optimal sampling and analysis plan. When the DQO decision rule for instituting remedial actions is based on a critical change in water quality, the monitoring program design must ensure that this change can be detected and measured with a specified confidence. Usually the focus is on the change at a single monitoring location and the process is limited to addressing the uncertainty inherent in the analytical methods and the variability at that location. However, new strategies that permit ranking the waste sites and prioritizing remedial activities require the means for assessing overall changes for small regions over time, where both spatial and temporal variability exist and where the uncertainty associated with these variations far exceeds measurement error. Two new methods for assessing these overall changes have been developed and are demonstrated by application to a waste disposal site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These methods incorporate historical data where available and allow the user to either test the statistical significance of a linear trend or of an annual change compared to a baseline year for a group of water quality wells.

Moline, G.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE/EA-1313: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (03/22/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1313 DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 2005 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0069700 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Office of Legacy Management EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Site March 2005 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ....................................................................................................... vii Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................

194

Pesticides in ground water database: A compilation of monitoring studies, 1971-1991. Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report presents summary results on pesticide monitoring of ground water from 1971 to 1991. It is compiled from ground water monitoring projects performed primarily by federal agencies, state agencies and research institutions. The data is well and sample specific. The report is broken into a National Summary and 10 US EPA regional volumes. The information is presented as text, maps, graphs and tables on a national, EPA regional and state/county level. The Region 8 volume is comprised of data from Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Hoheisel, C.; Karrier, J.; Lees, S.; Davies-Hilliard, L.; Hannon, P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaporative Concentration of 100x J13 Ground Water at 60% Relative Humidity and 90C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these experiments we studied the behavior of a synthetic concentrated J13 solution as it comes in contact with a Ni-Cr-Mo-alloy selected for waste canisters in the designated high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concentrated synthetic J13 solution was allowed to drip slowly onto heated test specimens (90 C, 60% relative humidity) where the water moved down the surface of the specimens, evaporated and minerals precipitated. Mineral separation or zoning along the evaporation path was not observed. We infer from solid analyses and geochemical modeling, that the most corrosive components (Ca, Mg, and F) are limited by mineral precipitation. Minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include thermonatrite, natrite, and trona, all sodium carbonate minerals, as well as kogarkoite (Na{sub 3}SO{sub 4}F), halite (NaCl), and niter (KNO{sub 3}). Calcite and a magnesium silicate precipitation are based on chemical analyses of the solids and geochemical modeling. The most significant finding of this study is that sulfate and fluoride concentrations are controlled by the solubility of kogarkoite. Kogarkoite thermodynamic data are needed in the Yucca Mountain Project database to predict the corrosiveness of carbonate brines and to establish the extent to which fluoride is removed from the brines as a solid.

Staggs, K; Maureen Alai,; Hailey, P; Carroll, S A; Sutton, M; Nguyen, Q A

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part I: Airborne to Ground-Based Lidar Systems and Comparisons with Chilled-Mirror Hygrometer Radiosondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor data measured with airborne and ground-based lidar systems during the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002), which took place in the Southern Great Plains during 13 May25 June 2002 were investigated. So far, the data collected ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Thorsten Schaberl; Paolo Di Girolamo; Donato Summa; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; David N. Whiteman; Belay B. Demoz; Edward V. Browell; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Susan Kooi; Junhong Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE`s fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE`s plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

Ruiz, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Meteorological Applications of Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals from the Ground-Based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is a well-calibrated ground-based instrument that measures high-resolution atmospheric emitted radiances from the atmosphere. The spectral resolution of the instrument is better than one ...

Wayne F. Feltz; William L. Smith; Robert O. Knuteson; Henry E. Revercomb; Harold M. Woolf; H. Ben Howell

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

1987 annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations related to the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December, 1984. A summary of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources is provided for project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. This report summarizes all DOE UKTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado for the 1987 calender year.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2001 APRIL 15 AND 2005 JANUARY 20 GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENTS BY THE MILAGRO WATER CERENKOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER CERENKOV DETECTOR BY Trevor Morgan B.S., University of New Hampshire (2004) DISSERTATION Submitted

California at Santa Cruz, University of

208

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Deployment and Evaluation of a System for Ground-Based Measurement of Cloud Liquid Water Turbulent Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct interception of windblown cloud water by forests has been dubbed occult deposition because it represents a hydrological input that is hidden from rain gauges. Eddy correlation studies of this phenomenon have estimated cloud water fluxes ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Peter M. Anthoni; Richard J. Vong; Anthony C. Delany; Gordon D. Maclean

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EIS-0198: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Record of Decision 8: Record of Decision EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this Record of Decision regarding its programmatic decision for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project. This decision enables DOE to take action under its UMTRA Ground Water Project, and is based on the environmental analyses in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198), which DOE issued in December 1996. Record of Decision for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) 62 FR 22913 More Documents & Publications

215

Grounding intentionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I argue that current attempts to ground intentionality face one of two challenges. Either the grounding feature of intentionality will be itself intentional or the grounding feature is disparate in nature from the representational capacity of an intentional mental state and therefore no connection between the two can be taken to exist. I examine two current accounts of intentionality and the features they utilize to ground it. I maintain that both views fall prey to one or both of the objections I raise. I conclude that any account of intentionality will need to meet both of these challenges in order to be counted successful.

Huizenga Steven R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal dab was collected from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) measurement and covered the twenty-one year span 1970- 1990. The ESRD data was gathered from the Texas Department of Health Kidney Program ESRD Registry for the five-year span 1988-1992. This registry included more than 99% of incident ESRD cases over the same time period. The 1990 U.S. Census data was used to estimate county population by age, race and sex. Exposure was defined as residence in a county with ground water measurements that fell in the highest quartile for each metal (mercury 0.297ug/, arsenic 3.216ug/l, lead 4.685ug/l, cadmium 1.423ug/l, cumulative metal level 8.911ug/l). Outcome was defined as an incident case of ESRD between the years 1988-1992 and examined as five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Among 254 Texas counties, 52 had at least 7 years of metal measurements for lead and cadmium, 51 counties had at least 7 years of metal measurements for arsenic and mercury and 50 counties had 7 years of measurements for all four metals. Linear and logistic regression procedures were carried out to examine the relationship between heavy metal ground water levels and incidence of ESRD. None of the metals demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship with five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Counties with high levels of heavy metals did not indicate an increased odds of having a five-year ESRD incidence per 10,000 persons above the 1988-1992 state average. The percentage of Black or Hispanic persons in a county was a positive predictor of increased five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons.

Bishop, Scott Alan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE`s obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

u0052100_Beav.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

312 312 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

219

Detection of water absorption in the dayside atmosphere of HD 189733 b using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy at 3.2 microns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a 5 sigma detection of water absorption features in the dayside spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. We used high-resolution (R~100,000) spectra taken at 3.2 microns with CRIRES on the VLT to trace the radial velocity shift of the water features in the planet's dayside atmosphere during 5 hours of its 2.2 day orbit as it approached secondary eclipse. Despite considerable telluric contamination in this wavelength regime, we detect the signal within our uncertainties at the expected combination of systemic velocity (Vsys=-3 +5-6 km/s) and planet orbital velocity (Kp=154 +14-10 km/s), and determine a H2O line contrast ratio of (1.3+/-0.2)x10^-3 with respect to the stellar continuum. We find no evidence of significant absorption or emission from other carbon-bearing molecules, such as methane, although we do note a marginal increase in the significance of our detection with the inclusion of carbon dioxide in our template spectrum. This result demonstrates that ground-based, high-resolution spectrosc...

Birkby, J L; Brogi, M; de Mooij, E J W; Schwarz, H; Albrecht, S; Snellen, I A G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Estimating calibration equations for predicting Ra-226 soil concentrations using RTRAK in-situ detectors at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Umtra site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a field study conducted at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, UMTRA site to obtain data for calibrating the RTRAK Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors for estimating concentrations of Ra-226 in surface soil. The statistical analyses indicate that the data are useful for estimating the calibration equations. Several statistical models are used to evaluate which model is best as a basis for the calibration equations. A procedure is provided for using the estimated calibration equations and extensive RTRAK measurements to estimate the average Ra-226 concentration on 100-m/sup 2/ land areas to determine whether additional remedial action is needed. The UMTRA Project office proposes to use the RTRAK for cleanup verification of surface Ra-226 contamination. The system enables 100% coverage of areas having undergone remedial action. The sensitivity of the system enables verification at less than 5 pCi/g averaged over 100 m/sup 2/, as specified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards (40 CFR Part 192). This analysis demonstrates RTRAK's ability to meet reasonable standards of statistical accuracy, using commonly accepted procedures. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Gilbert, R. O.; Meyer, H. R.; Miller, M. L.; Begley, C.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Annual report on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1991--September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource studies that were undertaken in support of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in the state of Colorado for the period of October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report fulfills the DOE`s obligation to provide an annual report to the state of Colorado on the status and results of cultural resource studies conducted during the above period of record. This requirement is stated in a programmatic memorandum of agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Previous reports were based on a calendar year reporting period. However, in order to be more consistent with the programmatic memorandum of agreement, the period of record for this and subsequent annual reports has been changed to the Federal fiscal year. The current status and summaries of 1992 cultural resource surveys are provided for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. The sites are Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock.

Not Available

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Public Involvment Plan - Rifle, Colorado  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAR 4-TAR MAC-GWRIF 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New and Old Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Sites May 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Rifle UMTRA Sites Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project Public Participation Plan dated October 1997. This Public Involvement Plan applies to both the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project sites and details the activities that have been or will be carried out to meet the public participation requirements of the

224

F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\mvsowp\MONPIP.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7.1 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site July 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Monument Valley UMTRA Site Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project Public Participation Plan dated October 1997. This Public Involvement Plan applies to the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site and details the activities that have been or will be carried out to meet the public participation requirements of the National

225

Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Commentary by Jerry S. Szymanski and C.B. Archambeau regarding ``Spring deposits and late pleistocene ground-water levels in southern Nevada``, by J. Quade. Special report number 16, Contract number 94/96.0003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a critical analysis of a paper presented at the 5th Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management. The thrust of this paper was to determine the historic level of ground water in the vicinity of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. This author reviews conclusions reached by the former author and analyzes reference materials used to obtain his assessment of paleo-ground water levels. This author disagrees with the conclusions and analytical methods used. This author presents information relative to water table fluctuations as a result of intrusion of geothermal fluids and makes claim that such intrusion would jeopardize the integrity of the repository by flooding.

Szymanski, J.S.; Archambeau, C.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water easy. Since refrigeration equipment runs more than heat pumps, energy savings can be large for ground-coupled refrigeration. The paper presents a design procedure for ground loops for heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration. It gives an overview of the commercial ground-coupled systems in Louisiana that have both refrigeration and heat pumps. Systems vary from small offices to a three-story office building with 187 tons. A chain of hamburger outlets uses total ground-coupling in all of its stores. A grocery store has ground-coupling for heat pumps and refrigeration. Desuperheaters provide 80 percent of the hot water for a coin laundry in the same building. A comparison of energy costs in a bank with a ground-coupled heat pump system to a similar bank with air-conditioning and gas for heat revealed a 31 percent reduction in utility costs for the ground-coupled building. Two buildings of the Mississippi Power and Light Co. have ground-coupled heat pumps in one, and high efficiency air source heat pumps in the other. Energy savings in nine months was 60,000 kWh (25 percent), and electric peak demand was reduced 42 kW (35 percent).

Braud, H. J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Records Schedule-UMTRA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEQh!?ST FOP. RECOhD WEQh!?ST FOP. RECOhD ' 3ISPOSITIQN AClT H O R l N - - . (See Insrru~t,ons on reverse) 'c NATIOKAL ARCMVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (MR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 I . FROM ( A g e n c y or e s t a b l ~ s h m e n t ) , U. S . Denar-merit o f Enercy 2. MAJOR SU8OlVlSiON i 51 bu~uerque $net a t i i o n s O f ?ice (kL9 j 3. MINOR SUBDIVISION Urani urn !

232

Microsoft Word - U01804.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0400 0400 GJO-2003-422-TAC GJO-GWTUB 30.13.2-2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation through August 2002 May 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0180400 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation May 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 Aquifer Horizons....................................................................................................................2

233

Microsoft Word - U0184800-September 2003.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4800 4800 GJO-2003-483-TAC GJO-GWTUB 30.13.2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation September 2002 through February 2003 September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0184800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Tuba City UMTRA Project Site Semi-Annual Performance Evaluation September 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Remediation System Performance Standards...............................................................1

234

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

235

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) use the earth's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Fact Sheet Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) use the earth's constant. Waste heat can be used to heat hot water. System Types There are two types of ground source heat pumps, closed loop and open loop systems. Closed loop heat pumps use the earth as the heat source and heat sink

Paulsson, Johan

236

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

237

1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300 300 GJO-2003-431-TAC GJO-GWSHP 13.2-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Baseline Performance Report for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0179300 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Baseline Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico

238

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Transmission Line Grounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published a comprehensive grounding report. Published in two parts, the report covered the theoretical and practical aspects of transmission line grounding practices. To further improve the tools available for grounding analysis, an investigation into practical ways to calculate the fault current distribution and ground potential rise of the transmission line grounding system was conducted. Furthermore, a survey of utilities has documented industry pr...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (Redirected from Ground Electromagnetic Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but the authors have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. The authors proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water (Table 1). They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100 \\261 10% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80% of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but they have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. Their proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water. They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100--210% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80 % of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

244

Microsoft Word - U0186500.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

500 500 GJO-2003-487-TAC GJO-GWSHP 11.7 UMTRA Ground Water Project Wildlife Management Plan for the Evaporation Pond at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC-13-02GJ79491 Document Number U0186500 DOE/Grand Junction Office Wildlife Management PlanShiprock Evaporation Pond September 2003 Page 1 1.0 Introduction The Proposed Action in the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Mill Tailings Site (EA) (DOE 2001) recommends active ground water remediation for the portion of the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site

245

Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School classroom space-conditioning equipment in hot and humid climates is often excessively burdened by the requirement to dehumidify incoming air to maintain proper thermal comfort and air quality. To that end, application of new or modified technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School District, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy Office of the State of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The retrofit classroom, along with a similar baseline classroom (employing a water source heat pump supplied by a boiler/cooling tower loop), were instrumented with an Internet-based system to control and monitor performance, efficiency, and a variety of air states. Those include classroom air, outdoor air, semi-conditioned fresh air, and supply air. Particular attention was dedicated to the humidity content and the carbon dioxide content of conditioned space (classroom) air and to the intake rate of forced fresh air. This field study builds on a previous laboratory study of a water-source heat pump coupled to an enthalpy recovery system. The laboratory work showed good potential for reducing the moisture load from forced ventilation air. At simulated outdoor conditions of 90F (32.2C) and 90% RH, the enthalpy recovery wheel in the nominal 2-ton system was able to capture and exhaust 9.9 lb of moisture that would otherwise have to be handled solely by the cooling coil.

Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Contamination of ground and surface waters due to uranium mining and milling. Volume I: Biological processes for concentrating trace elements from uranium mine waters. Open file report 25 Jul 79-14 Sep 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from uranium mines in the Ambrosia Lake district near Grants, N. Mex., contains uranium, selenium, radium, and molybdenum. A novel treatment process for waters from two mines, sections 35 and 36, to reduce the concentrations of the trace contaminants was developed. Particulates are settled by ponding and the waters are passed through an ion exchange resin to remove uranium; barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and radium from the mine waters. The mine waters are subsequently passed through three consecutive algae ponds prior to discharge. Water, sediment, and biological samples were collected over a 4-year period and analyzed to assess the role of biological agents in removal of inorganic trace contaminants from the mine waters.

Brieley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

J.M. Calle

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

249

Water application related to oil shale listed  

SciTech Connect

A water right application filed by the Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. is reported for surface waters and ground water in Rio Blanco County, Colorado.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrical grounding prong socket  

SciTech Connect

The invention is a socket for a grounding prong used in a three prong electrical plug and a receptacle for the three prong plug. The socket being sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having a ridge to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket.

Leong, Robert (Dublin, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Predaceous Ground Beetles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predaceous ground beetles can be a nuisance to homeowners, especially when they are numerous. This publication describes the beetles and discusses ways to prevent and treat them.

Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

History of Residential Grounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of residential electrical service grounding practices in the United States. The report focuses on the history of the National Electrical Code (NEC), which prescribes standards for wiring practices in residences, including grounding of the building electrical service.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ways of grounding imagination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses and evaluates use of different participatory design methods in relation to addressing the challenge of grounding imagination. It presents reflections on the use of three participatory design methods, deployed in the WorkSpace project: ... Keywords: PD methods, analytical triangulation, bricolage, future laboratory, grounding imagination, in-situ prototyping experiments

Monika Bscher; Mette Agger Eriksen; Jannie Friis Kristensen; Preben Holst Mogensen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ground Motion Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 2nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Ground Motion in Future Accelerators November 6 - 9, 2000 SLAC Coordinators: Andrei Seryi & Tor Raubenheimer Proceedings Updated June 26, 2001 Agenda and Presentations Workshop photos Summaries Useful links Poster Goals Introduction to the problems Structure Registration Registered participants Committees Location, Accommodations and Travel Workshop on Ground Motion in Future Accelerators A workshop was held at SLAC that was devoted to ground motion and its effects on future accelerators. Ground motion and vibration can be a limiting effect in synchrotron light sources, hadron circular colliders, and electron/positron linear colliders. Over the last several years, there has been significant progress in the understanding of the ground motion and its effects, however, there are

256

New and Underutilized Technology: Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Ground Source Heat Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps New and Underutilized Technology: Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps October 8, 2013 - 2:59pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for commercial ground source heat pumps within the Federal sector. Benefits Commercial ground source heat pumps are ground source heat pump with loops that feed multiple packaged heat pumps and a single ground source water loop. Unit capacity is typically 1-10 tons and may be utilized in an array of multiple units to serve a large load. Application Condensing boilers are appropriate for housing, service, office, and research and development applications. Key Factors for Deployment FEMP has made great progress with commercial ground source heat pump technology deployment within the Federal sector. Primary barriers deal with

257

DOEIAL162350-158  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEIAL162350-158 DOEIAL162350-158 REV. 0 SlTE OBSERVATlONAL WORK PLAN FOR THE UMTRA PROJECT SlTE AT SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO July 1995 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Project Office Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank . m -AMWAL wocrr M N Hwc THE U Y ~ U ~ Q I F C T SE AT slclm0a . NEW UEXW TAW.€ OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................... 1-1 1 . 1 PURPOSE AND CONTENT ................................. 1-1 1.2 GROUND WATER COMPLIANCE STRATEGIES .................. 1-2 1.3 RELATIONSHIP TO PROGRAMMATIC UMTRA GROUND WATER DOCUMENTS .......................................... 1-2 1.4 RELATIONSHIP TO SITE-SPECIFIC DOCUMENTS .................

258

1987 annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource investigations related to the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE`s obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December, 1984. A summary of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources is provided for project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. This report summarizes all DOE UKTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado for the 1987 calender year.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

Macleish, K.G.

1958-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Remediation of Uranium-Contaminated Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The shallow alluvial aquifer at Fry Canyon, Utah, is contaminated with up to 17 mgL uranium leached from processed tailings at an ore upgrader processing plant that was operated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EA-1458: Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

458: Environmental Assessment 458: Environmental Assessment EA-1458: Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites, DOE Grand Junction Office, Grand Junction, Colorado The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing ground water compliance strategies for two former uranium-ore processing sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to protect human health and the environment at abandoned uranium-ore processing sites by complying with the EPA ground water standards in 40 CFR 192 Subpart B. DOE proposes to implement the compliance strategy outlined in the SOWP (DOE 2002b), which uses the framework established in the PEIS (DOE 1996). DOE/EA-1458; Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at

262

Modeling and Experimental Research on Ground-Source Heat Pump in Operation by Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source Heat Pump(GSHP) is becoming the more and more focus of the worlds attention as a HVAC technique of energy saving and environment protection. This paper first introduced the experiment for Ground-Source water/water Heat Pump. The heat ... Keywords: Ground-Source Heat Pump(GSHP), Neural Network(NN) Predication modeling

Jianping Chen; Zhiwei Lian; Lizheng Tan; Weifeng Zhu; Weiqiang Zhang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Substation Grounding Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of research performed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in 2011 on the subject of degradation of buried grounding grids in electric power substations. Substation ground grids are usually made of copper conductors, which are placed below grade and are joined together and to the above-grade structures with various types of connectors. While above-grade connections are visible and may be inspected, below-grade connections are not visible or readily accessible for insp...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

EPRI Substation Grounding Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been conducting research in the area of substation grounding and fault current management for several decades. This research has resulted in a large number of reports and other products. To help users locate the results of EPRIs research in substation grounding and fault current management, an annual update is prepared containing brief descriptions of the products.ObjectiveThe objective of this report is ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Guide for Transmission Line Grounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical utilities have a duty to provide effective grounding for managing steady-state and fault currents, whether near a large generating station or at a remote distribution pole ground. For transmission lines, this imperative is usually met with investment in overhead ground wires and grounding electrodes. Effective grounding at each tower improves reliability8212by providing low path impedance to lightning strokes8212and contributes to safety. However, the fundamental physical parameters in ground ...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

EA-1312: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

312: Finding of No Significant Impact 312: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1312: Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) The U.S. Department of Energy proposes a strategy to achieve ground water compliance at the Grand Junction, Colorado, LJMTRA project site, formerly known as the Climax Uranium Millsite. The proposed compliance strategy is no remediation and the application of supplemental standards. This proposed action and a no-action alternative are described in the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (see attached DOE/EAB 1312). The Environmental Assessment analyzes the relevant environmental issues at the Grand Junction site, which include ground water, surface water, water and

268

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 5, is an applications guide of the three computer programs. SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS, for the purpose of designing a safe substation grounding system. The applications guide utilizes four example substation grounding systems for the purpose of illustrating the application of the programs, SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS. The examples are based on data provided by four contributing utilities, namely, Houston Lighting and Power Company, Southern Company Services, Puget Sound Power and Light Company, and Arizona Public Service Company. For the purpose of illustrating specific capabilities of the computer programs, the data have been modified. As a result, the final designs of the four systems do not necessarily represent actual grounding system designs by these utilities. The example system 1 is a 138 kV/35 kV distribution substation. The example system 2 is a medium size 230 kV/115 kV transmission substation. The third example system is a generation substation while the last is a large 525 kV/345 kV/230 kV transmission substation. The four examples cover most of the practical problems that a user may encounter in the design of substation grounding systems.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOEIAU6235043S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEIAU6235043S DOEIAU6235043S REV. 2 SUPPLEMENT TO THE BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE MONUMENT VALLEY URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE, NEAR CANE VALLEY, ARIZONA March 1996 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico SUPPLEMENT TO THE BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE MONUMENT VALLEY URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR CANE VALLEY, ARIZONA TABLE OF CONTENTS Supplement 1 Human Health Risk Assessment Methodology for the UMTRA Ground Water Project 2 Derivation of Ingestion Rate and Body Weight Distributions 3 Hydrologic Calculations 4 Ground Water Quality Data by Location 5 Surface Water Quality Data by Location

271

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

272

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Radiosonde Comparisons During the WVIOP2000 Field Experiment D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquil, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Y. Han Science System Applications National Aeronautics Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland S. Keihm Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California Introduction During September to October 2000, a water vapor intensive operational period (WVIOP) was conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and

273

Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade October 15, 2010 - 4:28pm Addthis Existing Miami-Dade county water treatment facility. Existing Miami-Dade county water treatment facility. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Officials from Miami-Dade County and the U.S. Department of Energy were on hand Wednesday, October 13th to formally break ground on an innovative project that will help improve the energy efficiency of one of the county's major water treatment facilities. The project will upgrade and expand the existing power generation system at the water plant which generates electricity from digester gas produced at the plant. Landfill gas, which is produced from the Solid Waste Department's South Dade Landfill, will be collected and piped across a

274

Definition: Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see...

275

Substation Ground Grid Impedance Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because safety impacts all segments of the electric power industry, the integrity and conformance to standards of substation grounding systems is of paramount importance. This report summarizes field demonstrations of commercially available meters for performance evaluation of large grounding systems, including the EPRI Ground Grid Evaluator (commercially known as the Smart Ground Multimeter or SGM).

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Improved Smart Ground Multimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Smart Ground Multimeter (SGM) underwent three major redesigns since its original development in the early 1980s. This report describes the latest redesign and provides useful tips on the assessment of measured data quality and on resolving measurement problems in the field.

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

The five volume report comprises the user manual, installation, and validation manual and an applications guide for the SGA (Substation Grounding Analysis) software package. SGA consists of four computer programs: (1) SOMIP, (2) SMECC, (3) SGSYS, and (4) TGRND. The first three programs provide a comprehensive analysis tool for the design of substation grounding systems to meet safety standards. The fourth program, TGRND, provides a state of the art analysis tool for computing transient ground potential rise and ground system impedance. This part of the report, Volume 1, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SOMIP (SOil Measurement Interpretation Program). This program computes the best estimate of the parameters of a two layer soil model from usual soil resistivity measurements. Four pin or three pin soil measurements can be accommodated. In addition, it provides error bounds on the soil parameters for a given confidence level. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SOMIP and provides two test cases for validation purposes. 4 refs.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ground Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey Ground Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Gravity Survey Details Activities (48) Areas (34) Regions (2) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and large-scale deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

279

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system for the .Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company which will accept models of ground-water conditions operations on the Hanford ground-water regime which moves through ancient sand and gravel channels deep under environmental impacts as essential factors in the planning, design and construction of water resources projects

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

280

EA-1399: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Final Environmental Assessment 99: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1399: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. (Figures 1 and 2). This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

282

Ground Truth Collections at the MTI Core Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) selected 13 sites across the continental US and one site in the western Pacific to serve as the primary or core site for collection of ground truth data for validation of MTI science algorithms. Imagery and ground truth data from several of these sites are presented in this paper. These sites are the Comanche Peak, Pilgrim and Turkey Point power plants, Ivanpah playas, Crater Lake, Stennis Space Center and the Tropical Western Pacific ARM site on the island of Nauru. Ground truth data includes water temperatures (bulk and skin), radiometric data, meteorological data and plant operating data. The organizations that manage these sites assist SRTC with its ground truth data collections and also give the MTI project a variety of ground truth measurements that they make for their own purposes. Collectively, the ground truth data from the 14 core sites constitute a comprehensive database for science algorithm validation.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microsoft Word - U01860_Feb to Aug 03.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

0 0 GJO-2003-490-TAC GJO-GWSHP 13.2 UMTRA Ground Water Project Semiannual Performance Report February 2003 through August 2003 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0186000 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Semi-Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico September 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Remediation System Performance Standards...............................................................1

284

Microsoft Word - U01866.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

186600 186600 GJO-2003-489-TAC GJO-GWDUR 2.0 UMTRA Ground Water Project Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Document Number U0186600 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Verification Monitoring Report-Durango, Colorado September 2003 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Purpose of Report ......................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Compliance Strategy.....................................................................................................

285

shippip.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6-TAR 6-TAR MAC-GWSHP 7.1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ8733 Public Involvement Plan for the Shiprock UMTRA Site Page ii Contents Regulatory History.........................................................................................................................1 Roles and Responsibilities .............................................................................................................2 Site Background.............................................................................................................................3

286

Ground State Entanglement Energetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the ground state of simple quantum systems coupled to an environment. In general the system is entangled with its environment. As a consequence, even at zero temperature, the energy of the system is not sharp: a projective measurement can find the system in an excited state. We show that energy fluctuation measurements at zero temperature provide entanglement information. For two-state systems which exhibit a persistent current in the ground state, energy fluctuations and persistent current fluctuations are closely related. The harmonic oscillator serves to illustrate energy fluctuations in a system with an infinite number of states. In addition to the energy distribution we discuss the energy-energy time-correlation function in the zero-temperature limit.

M. Buttiker; A. N. Jordan

2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solar Colletors Combined with Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Dwellings - Analyses of System Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of ground-source heat pumps for heating buildings and domestic hot water in dwellings is increasing rapidly in Sweden. The heat pump extracts heat (more)

Kjellsson, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

CEUS Ground Motion Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three utilities are currently pursuing early site permits (ESPs) for possible siting of new nuclear power plant facilities in the central and eastern United States (CEUS). The geological, seismological, and engineering characteristics of a site and its environs must be investigated in sufficient scope and detail. These investigations are needed to adequately evaluate a proposed site and to provide sufficient information for estimating the site's safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) ground motion. Nuclear Regul...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ground Squirrels and Gophers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Squirrels and Gophers Squirrels and Gophers Nature Bulletin No. 224-A April 2, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND SQUIRRELS AND GOPHERS On sunny summer days, a dusty-colored animal with yellowish and brown stripes, about the size of a small rat, often may be noticed creeping through the grass of prairies, pastures, golf courses or lawns. Watch him. He pauses every few feet to sit up, look and listen for a moment. Nervous and timid, he crouches low at every distant sound or passing shadow. Startle him and he scurries away, and then may suddenly halt and freeze, bolt upright, as stiff and straight as a stake driven in the ground. If approached, he gives a loud shrill trilling whistle and, with a flip of his tail, pops out of sight. Watch that spot closely and, in less than a minute, a snaky head appears. Be quiet. He has many enemies above ground and he also has a lot of curiosity. Presently he sits up upon his haunches again.

290

Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11900 11900 DOE/EA-1399 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87355 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison Site July 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

291

Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

11900 11900 DOE/EA-1399 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87355 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison Site July 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

292

Microsoft Word - U0163300.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EA-1458 EA-1458 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ..........................................................................................................v Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... vii

293

Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

naturally flows into Lake Michigan; all surface and ground-reversed, away from Lake Michigan, making the river thewater (extracted from Lake Michigan) per day. This water

Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

C-1. Ground Water Remedial Technologies and Process Options C-1.1. Ground Water Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This appendix presents detailed descriptions of the remedial technologies and process options presented in Chapter 3. Sources for these descriptions are referenced at the end of appropriate sections. Several of the remedial technologies described in this appendix have already been tested and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300. The remedial technologies already being used in ongoing removal actions or prototype remedial actions at Site 300 are identified in the following discussion.

C. Ground; Water Extraction Wells

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations of Atmospheric Water for Climate Research J. B. Snider, D. A. Hazen, A. J. Francavilla, W. B. Madsen, and M. D. Jacobson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Surface-based microwave and infrared radiometers have been employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) in climate research since 1987. The ability of these systems to operate continuously and unattended for extended periods of time has provided significant new information on atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid. These data are being employed to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation feedback mechanisms, an understanding

296

Microsoft Word - U0127400.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12-TAR 12-TAR MAC-GWMON 1.8 Chemistry of Phase I Phytoremediation Soils: Work Plan for the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site September 2001 This page intentionally left blank UMTRA Ground Water Project Chemistry of Phase I Phytoremediation Soils: Work Plan for the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site September 2001 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0015-37-000 Document Number U0127400 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0127400 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Chemistry of Phase I Phytoremediation Soils: Work Plan

297

U01024.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2001-214-TAR GJO-2001-214-TAR MAC-GWGUN 1.1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site March 2001 GJO-2001-214-TAR MAC-GWGUN 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site March 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0010-02-000 Document Number U01024 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U01024 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for Gunnison, Colorado March 2001 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations .......................................................................................................... ix

298

GRR/Section 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and Tributary Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and Tributary Ground Water 19COENewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndTributaryGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COENewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndTributaryGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Developers seeking a new water right to appropriate surface water and

299

EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388: Finding of No Significant Impact 388: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact Groundwater Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings SIte DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

300

Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Stratocumulus Properties during CLARA, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to obtain droplet concentration for water clouds from ground-based remote sensing observations. It relies on observations of cloud thickness, liquid water path, and optical extinction near the cloud base. The method was ...

R. Boers; H. Russchenberg; J. Erkelens; V. Venema; A. van Lammeren; A. Apituley; S. Jongen

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ground potential rise monitor  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ground motion data for International Collider models  

SciTech Connect

The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

gjpip.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWGRJ 7.1 GWGRJ 7.1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) July 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ8733 Public Involvement Plan July 1999 Page 1 Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Site This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project Public Participation Plan dated October 1997. This public involvement plan is specific to the Grand Junction, Colorado, site and describes the activities that will meet

304

Microsoft Word - u01493_July2002.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

97-TAR 97-TAR MAC-GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 U0149300 GJO-2001-297-TAR GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0149300 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Shiprock, New Mexico July 2002 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction 1-1 2.0 Site Information 2-1 2.1 Site Location and Information ............................................................................

305

Microsoft Word - New Rifle EA.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE/EA-1406 DOE/EA-1406 Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site July 2003 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U01341 DOE/EA-1406 Rev. 0 Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site July 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle Site July 2003 Page iii Contents

306

Microsoft Word - cover.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1999-90-TAR 1999-90-TAR MAC-GWGRJ 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 2001 GJO-1999-90-TAR MAC-GWGRJ 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Grand Junction, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0008-09-000 Document Number U0050100 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0050100 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Grand Junction, Colorado May 2001 Page ii Contents 1.0 Introduction.........................................................................................................................

307

Finding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) September 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Assessment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes a strategy to achieve ground water compliance at the Grand Junction, Colorado, LJMTRA project site, formerly known as the Climax Uranium Millsite. The proposed compliance strategy is no remediation and the application of supplemental standards. This proposed action and a no-action alternative are described in the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (see attached DOE/EAB 1312). The Environmental Assessment analyzes the relevant environmental issues at the Grand Junction site,

308

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heatdistribution systems, ground-source heat pumps and ground

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Water Prism Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the design and implementation of Water Prism, a decision support system that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed or local levels. It considers surface, ground and impoundment waters, and all water using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power and the environment). This report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

313

GRR/Section 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and Tributary Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap...

314

Alternative Materials for Ground Electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power utility companies struggle with issues resulting from copper theftespecially on transmission line support structures accessible to the public and fitted with copper grounding conductors. It is increasingly important to identify alternative materials that can be used to provide a durable grounding system yet not be targeted for theft. In response, EPRI is investigating the use of alternative materials for electrode designsexamining life expectancy, corrosion, material compatibility and current handl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutrients are available. Blowdown - the water discharged from a boiler or cooling tower to dispose and explains the procedures the owner/operator intends to take to perform assessment monitoring. Attenuation procedures. Equipotential Line - a line in a two-dimensional ground-water flow field such that the total

Soerens, Thomas

316

Transient analysis of grounding systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the problem of computing the ground potential rise of grounding systems during transients. Finite element analysis is employed to model the constituent parts of a grounding system. Short lengths of earth embedded electrodes are characterized as transmission lines with distributed inductance, capacitance and leakage resistance to earth. Leakage resistance to earth is accurately computed with the method of moments. The other parameters of the finite element, namely inductance and capacitance, are computed from the resistance utilizing Maxwell's equations. This modeling enables the computation of the transient response of substation grounding systems to fast or slow waves striking the substation. The result is obtained in terms of a convolution of the step response of the system and the striking wave. In this way the impedance of substation systems to 60 cycles is accurately computed. Results demonstrate the dependence of the 60 cycle impedance on system parameters. The methodology allows to interface this model of a substation ground mat with the Electromagnetic Transient Analysis Program thus, allowing explicit representation of earth effects in electromagmatic transients computations.

Meliopoulos, A.P.; Moharam, M.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ground Magnetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Magnetics Ground Magnetics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Magnetics Details Activities (15) Areas (12) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Presence of magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Stratigraphic/Structural: Mapping of basement structures, horst blocks, fault systems, fracture zones, dykes and intrusions. Hydrological: The circulation of hydrothermal fluid may impact the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. Thermal: Rocks lose their magnetic properties at the Curie temperature (580° C for magnetite) [1] and, upon cooling, remagnetize in the present magnetic field orientation. The Curie point depth in the subsurface may be determined in a magnetic survey to provide information about hydrothermal activity in a region.

318

Ground Truth: A Positive Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Flash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the circumstances and effects of a cloud-to-ground lightning flash that lowered positive charge and struck a residential home near Albany, New York. The characteristics of the flash were detected and recorded by a wide-band magnetic ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville; Ronald W. Henderson

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ground states in complex bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified framework for analyzing the existence of ground states in wide classes of elastic complex bodies is presented here. The approach makes use of classical semicontinuity results, Sobolev mappinngs and Cartesian currents. Weak diffeomorphisms are used to represent macroscopic deformations. Sobolev maps and Cartesian currents describe the inner substructure of the material elements. Balance equations for irregular minimizers are derived. A contribution to the debate about the role of the balance of configurational actions follows. After describing a list of possible applications of the general results collected here, a concrete discussion of the existence of ground states in thermodynamically stable quasicrystals is presented at the end.

Paolo Maria Mariano; Giuseppe Modica

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

LINE-ABOVE-GROUND ATTENUATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The line-above-ground attenuator provides a continuously variable microwave attenuator for a coaxial line that is capable of high attenuation and low insertion loss. The device consists of a short section of the line-above- ground plane type transmission lime, a pair of identical rectangular slabs of lossy material like polytron, whose longitudinal axes are parallel to and indentically spaced away from either side of the line, and a geared mechanism to adjust amd maintain this spaced relationship. This device permits optimum fineness and accuracy of attenuator control which heretofore has been difficult to achieve.

Wilds, R.B.; Ames, J.R.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers. Ground Water. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). 2010. Well Development by Hydrofracturing. http://des.nh.gov/o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathwaysadvective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fracturescould allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults.

Tom Myers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ORNL/TM-2008/232 Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump water heater and ClimateMaster TrilogyTM 40 Q-ModeTM geothermal (ground- source) integrated heat buildings on the flexible research platforms. · The greatest barrier preventing wider use of geothermal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

323

Field Intercomparison of Ground-Based Cloud Physics Instruments at Whitetop Mountain, Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 1987 a two-week field intercomparison study of ground-based cloud liquid water content (LWC) and cloud detector instruments was performed at the Tennessee Valley Authority research station at the summit of Whitetop Mountain, Virginia. The ...

R. J. Valente; R. K. A. M. Mallant; S. E. McLaren; R. S. Schemenauer; R. E. Stogner

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Quantitative Comparison of Ground-Based FSSP and PVM Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud microphysical measurements of two ground-based field campaigns are analyzed in order to compare Particle Volume Monitor (PVM) measurements and Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP)-derived integrated quantities (mainly liquid water ...

M. Wendisch

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, fiscal year 1995 annual report to stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping projects. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA Project. DOE`s UMTRA Project is the world`s largest materials management project ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA Project, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-fourth of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA Project and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation.

NONE

1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

DARPA Learning Applied to Ground Robots (LAGR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DARPA Learning Applied to Ground Robots (LAGR) Project (Concluded). Summary: The National Institute of Standards ...

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 1040 of 28,905 results. 31 - 1040 of 28,905 results. Article CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE Moab, UT - Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast Utah, as a legacy to the former ore-processing site that operated for nearly three decades beginning in the mid-1950s. http://energy.gov/em/articles/cleaning-mill-tailings-and-ground-water-moab-umtra-project-site Download CX-001669: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Fence Around Bryan Mound K-9 Training Area CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Freeport, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001669-categorical-exclusion-determination

328

Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2002 31, 2002 Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site November 13, 2002 EA-1452: Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado UMTRA Project Site July 1, 2002 EA-1399: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site May 31, 2002 EA-1378: Finding of No Significant Impact Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center, Golden, Colorado September 3, 2001 EA-1354: Final Environmental Assessment Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project May 1, 2001 EA-1371: Final Environmental Assessment Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan for Rock Creek Reserve

329

U0083900.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GJO-2002-304-TAR GJO-2002-304-TAR MAC-GWTUB 11.11.2 Plan for Injection of Treated Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Project Site March 2002 Prepared by U. S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0023-17-000 Document Number U0083900 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0083900 DOE/Grand Junction Office Plan for Injection of Treated Ground Water at the Tuba City UMTRA Site March 2002 Page 1 Introduction This plan was initially developed in March 2000 to provide information normally required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine the need for notification or permitting of underground injection wells that are part of remediation at the Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium

330

EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) This document is the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed action to address ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This site is also known as the former Climax uranium millsite. The purpose of this EA is to present the proposed action and alternatives and discuss their environmental effects. The EA presents a strategy for achieving compliance with requirements established in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (42 United States Code 7901 et seq.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency' (EPA's) "Health and Environmental Protection Standards

331

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates an award-winning grounds maintenance program that comprises a comprehensive landscape and irrigation management program. The program has helped the laboratory reduce its water use for irrigation by 30%. PNNL is located in Richland, Washington, and is managed and operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). PNNL scientists and engineers perform research on a variety of subjects, including energy and national security. PNNL has more than 4,200 staff members, sits on 600 acres, and houses 2 million square feet of facilities. The laboratory is located in an arid region of the state, receiving only eight inches of precipitation annually. It has more than 100 acres of turf and landscaped areas and

332

Reading Comprehension - The Water Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Water Cycle The Water Cycle Evaporation, Condensation and Precipitation The _________ moon sun water clouds evaporates _________ fish oceans rain water from lakes and oceans. As the air rises, it cools. The water vapor condenses into tiny droplets of _________ evaporation clouds water sunshine . The droplets crowd together and form a _________ cloud lake storm precipitation . Wind blows the _________ rain sun droplet cloud towards the land. The tiny droplets join together and fall as precipitation to the _________ river lake ground cloud . The water soaks into the ground and collects in _________ rivers and lakes oceans and clouds jars and cups plants and animals . The _________ storm cycle river house that never ends has started again! A water cycle diagram. Use the diagram to identify the different parts of the water cycle:

333

Arsenic Geochemistry in Source Waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has focused on arsenic geochemistry in natural waters. ThisG402 XU2-7 ARSENIC GEOCHEMISTRY IN SOURCE WATERS OF T H EOrganism Interactions, Geochemistry, Ground Water Quality,

Hering, Janet G; Wilkie, Jennifer A; Chiu, Van Q

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement 198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project This PEIS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law codified at 42USC '7901 et seq. This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water

336

Ground Magnetics (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Magnetics (Nannini, 1986) Ground Magnetics (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detection and quantitative assessment of such intrusive events can be facilitated by magnetic surveys (ground or aerial magnetic field measurements). These surveys are based on the magnetic susceptibility contrast between magmatic rocks at depth and the sedimentary formations above. References Raffaello Nannini (1986) Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_(Nannini,_1986)&oldid=388291

337

A cathodically protected electrical substation ground grid  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a discussion on the design of a cathodically protected electrical substation grounding system in which a steel ground grid and steel ground rods were used in place of the commonly used copper ground grid and copperweld ground rods. Several electrical constraints are presented which discuss common electrical utility requirements, safety considerations and economic factors. The grounding system materials which were chosen are discussed along with the means of cathodic protection. Finally, the design, construction and testing considerations are presented as an aid to others who wish to design a similar system.

Nelson, J.P.; Holm, W.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Distribution Grounding of Underground Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase I of a two-phase project to assess industry practices and standards for grounding and bonding of medium-voltage underground residential distribution (URD) and underground commercial distribution (UCD) circuits and worker safety in worksites with these systems.The report includes an overview of the issues and concerns associated with underground distribution systems safety and, in particular, worker safety in worksites. It identifies the industry and utility ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Simplified Procedure for Sizing Vertical Ground Coupled Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified technique for the sizing of vertical U-tube ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) heat exchangers for Texas climates was developed utilizing a transient simulation model of a ground coupled heat pump and weather and soil data for Texas. The simulation model discretized the ground heat exchanger into elements and computed the temperature distribution surrounding the heat exchanger on a minute-by-minute basis. Hundreds of runs were made with the model for a wide range of ground temperatures, ground thermal properties (density, thermal conductivity, and specific heat), and outdoor weather. A set of sizing charts were developed from the model runs that could provide quick reference on the size of the ground heat exchanger. Corrections for ground temperature, ground density, ground thermal conductivity, and indoor air temperature were presented. Soil temperature and thermal conductivity were found to be the most important parameters for sizing GCHP heat exchangers. Results from the simplified method were compared to two available heat exchanger sizing methods: the National Water Well Association (NWWA) and the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA). The simplified method predicted shorter lengths than those from either of these two methods.

O'Neal, D. L.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Aldred, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy-Water Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emerging Issues and Challenges Emerging Issues and Challenges DOE/EIA 2010 Energy Conference Mike Hightower Sandia National Laboratories mmhight@sandia.gov, 505-844-5499 Energy and Water are ... Interdependent Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production require water: * Thermoelectric cooling * Hydropower * Energy minerals extraction/mining * Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels) * Emission control Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use require energy: * Pumping * Conveyance and Transport * Treatment * Use conditioning * Surface and Ground water Water Consumption by Sector U.S. Freshwater Consumption, 100 Bgal/day Livestock 3.3% Thermoelectric 3.3% Commercial 1.2% Domestic 7.1% Industrial 3.3% Mining 1.2% Irrigation 80.6% Energy uses 27 percent of all non-agricultural fresh water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ground Plane Identification Using LIDAR in Forested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To operate autonomously in forested environments, unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) must be able to identify the load-bearing surface of the terrain (i.e. the ground). This paper presents a novel two-stage approach for ...

McDaniel, Matt W.

342

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission  

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission Technology Summary ... The invention can transmit electrical power through the surface of the ...

343

US ARMY GROUND VEHICLE CREW COMPARTMENT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test fixture was constructed from an excess ground vehicle hull ... instrumentation measured acid gas exposure levels: ion selective electrodes (grab ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sizing of Overhead Ground Wires for Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overhead ground wires, or shield wires, are placed on transmission lines as air terminals for lightning strikes to shield the phase conductors from direct strikes. Although of short duration, lightning strikes to ground wires may result in significant damage. Utilities are increasingly using optical fiber ground wires (OPGWs), and severe damage to the OPGWs could result in failure of the communication link. There is renewed interest in the dimensioning and testing of ground wires for improved ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Modeling reducibility on ground terms using constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling reducibility on ground terms using constraints Isabelle GNAEDIGa , H´el`ene KIRCHNERb a on ground terms using (dis)equational constraints. We show in particular that innermost (ir)reducibility can on the ground term algebra that any rewriting chain starting from any term termi- nates, provided that terms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soil and ground water  

SciTech Connect

This program systematically evaluates the use of acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to increase fluid and contaminant extraction rates from a wide range of unconsolidated soils. Successful completion of this program will result in a commercially-viable, advanced in-situ remediation technology that will significantly reduce clean-up times and costs. This technology should have wide applicability since it is envisioned to augment existing remediation technologies, such as traditional pump and treat and soil vapor extraction, not replace them. The overall program has three phases: Phase 1--laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase 2--technology scaling study; Phase 3--field demonstration. Phase 1 of the program, corresponding to this period of performance, has as its primary objectives to provide a laboratory-scale proof of concept, and to fully characterize the effects of AEFs on fluid and contaminant extraction rates in a wide variety of soil types. The laboratory measurements of the soil transport properties and process parameters will be used in a computer model of the enhanced remediation process. A Technology Merit and Trade Study will complete Phase 1.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Rynne, T.M.; Spencer, J.W. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ground Water Inhibitors of Localized Corrosion in Passivating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

348

GROUND WATER USE FOR COOLING: ASSOCIATED AQUIFER TEMPERATURE CHANGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive or scarce, cooling towers or ponds are employed.~-1), for dry and wet cooling tower systems, respectively.condenser cooling sys terns such as towers or ponds are

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparison of Cloud Liquid Content Measured by Two Independent Ground-Based Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on observations of liquid water in clouds made by two independent ground-based microwave instruments. One system is a dual-frequency (20.6, 31.65 GHz) microwave radiometer designed to measure emission from the precipitable water vapor ...

J. B. Snider; F. O. Guiraud; D. C. Hogg

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Saturated hydraulic conductivity determined by on ground mono-offset Ground-Penetrating Radar inside a single ring infiltrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we show how to use GPR data acquired along the infiltration of water inside a single ring infiltrometer to inverse the saturated hydraulic conductivity. We used Hydrus-1D to simulate the water infiltration. We generated water content profiles at each time step of infiltration, based on a particular value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, knowing the other van Genuchten parameters. Water content profiles were converted to dielectric permittivity profiles using the Complex Refractive Index Method relation. We then used the GprMax suite of programs to generate radargrams and to follow the wetting front using arrival time of electromagnetic waves recorded by a Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR). Theoretically, the 1D time convolution between reflectivity and GPR signal at any infiltration time step is related to the peak of the reflected amplitude recorded in the corresponding trace in the radargram. We used this relation ship to invert the saturated hydraulic conductivity for constant and fallin...

Lger, Emmanuel; Coquet, Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

352

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986. SWSA 6 is currently undergoing process knowledge, and repackaging activities. RCRA/CERCLA closure. A revised Closure Plan 2.2.1.1 RCRA Assessments, Closures, and Corrective Measures The Hazardous and Solid. At the Y-12 Plant, 26 RCRA units have been certified closed by TDEC since the mid-1980s. Closure

353

Microsoft Word - S05072_WaterQualityComplStrategy.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Analysis of Uranium Trends in Ground Water, August 2007. Several possible causes were cited for the discrepancy between expected and...

354

Muscatine Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

clothes washers, dryers, ranges, room air and central air conditioners, ground source heat pumps, and water heaters are eligible for this program. The rebate amount...

355

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Ground Loop Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loop Design Ground Loop Design logo Ground Loop Design is a versatile ground source heat pump system design program that helps the trained geothermal HVAC designerengineer...

356

Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up Jump to: navigation, search Name Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Solar, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy, Wind Phase Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 10/1/2009

358

EA-1406-FEA-2003.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

341 341 DOE/EA-1406 Rev. 0 Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site July 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle Site July 2003 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations........................................................................................................ vii Executive Summary........................................................................................................................ix 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

359

Microsoft Word - U0179700.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

700 700 DOE/EA-1466 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita Site April 2003 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ..........................................................................................................v Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1

360

GJO-2001-208-TAR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2001-208-TAR GJO-2001-208-TAR MAC-GWSHP 11.7-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Biological Assessment for Ground Water Remediation at the Shiprock Site Final April 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0020-26-000 Document Number U0118600 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-966587335 This Page Intentionally Blank Contents Page . Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 1 Background .................................................................................................................................. 1 ........................................................................................................................ Action Summary 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U0174100.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4100 4100 DOE/EA-1452 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final November 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junctio n, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango Site November 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................... v 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Site Description ...............................................................................................................1

362

Simulation of Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump Systems and Experimental Validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid ground source heat pump systems incorporate both ground loop heat exchangers and auxiliary heat rejecters, such as cooling towers, fluid coolers, cooling ponds, or pavement heating systems. The design of the hybrid ground source heat pump system involves many degrees of freedom; e.g. the size of the cooling tower interacts with the control strategy, the ground loop heat exchanger design, and other parameters. This paper presents a simulation of such a system using a direct contact evaporative cooling tower as the supplemental heat rejecter. The simulation is performed in a component-based modeling environment using component models of a vertical ground loop heat exchanger, plate frame heat exchanger, cooling tower, circulating pumps, and heat pumps. Seven months (March to September 2005) of five-minutely experimental data from a hybrid ground source heat pump system were used for validation purposes. The source side of the system consists of two packaged water-to-water heat pumps, a three-borehole ground loop heat exchanger, and a direct contact evaporative cooling tower, isolated by a plate frame heat exchanger. The load side serves two small buildings with hydronic heating and cooling. Experimental validations of each component simulation and the entire system simulation are presented.

Jason E. Gentry; Jeffrey D. Spitler; Daniel E. Fisher; Xiaowei Xu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Condition Assessment of Substation Ground Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the first stage of research to develop a simple and inexpensive method and device to assess the integrity of substation grounding grids. The problem has been studied before but there is not, to our knowledge, a reliable and inexpensive method or device to make a reliable diagnosis. While the EPRI-developed Ground Grid Evaluator (commercially knows as the Smart Ground Multimeter or SGM) can be used to provide valuable information, the equipment is considered to be expensive and requi...

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

Condition Assessment of Substation Ground Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the second stage of a research project to develop a simple and inexpensive method and device to assess the integrity of substation grounding grids. The problem has been studied before but a reliable and inexpensive method or device to make a reliable diagnosis of grid condition is still lacking. While the EPRI-developed Ground Grid Evaluator (commercially known as the Smart Ground Multimeter) can be used to provide valuable information, the equipment is expensive and requires extens...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Recent ground motion studies at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Understanding slow and fast ground motion is important for the successful operation and design for present and future colliders. Since 2000 there have been several studies of ground motion at Fermilab. Several different types of HLS (hydro static level sensors) have been used to study slow ground motion (less than 1 hertz) seismometers have been used for fast (greater than 1 hertz) motions. Data have been taken at the surface and at locations 100 meters below the surface. Data of recent slow ground motion measurements with HLSs, many years of alignment data and results of the ATL-analysis are presented and discussed.

Shiltsev, V.; Volk, J.; /Fermilab; Singatulin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates an award-winning grounds maintenance program that comprises a comprehensive landscape and irrigation management program. The...

367

US ARMY GROUND VEHICLE HALON REPLACEMENT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test fixture has been constructed from a derelict ground vehicle hull ... exposure levels: ion selective electrodes (grab hag sampling), sorbent tubes ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Enclosed ground-flare incinerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved ground flare is provided comprising a stack, two or more burner assemblies, and a servicing port so that some of the burner assemblies can be serviced while others remain in operation. The burner assemblies comprise a burner conduit and nozzles which are individually fitted to the stack's burner chamber and are each removably supported in the chamber. Each burner conduit is sealed to and sandwiched between a waste gas inlet port and a matching a closure port on the other side of the stack. The closure port can be opened for physically releasing the burner conduit and supplying sufficient axial movement room for extracting the conduit from the socket, thereby releasing the conduit for hand removal through a servicing port. Preferably, the lower end of the stack is formed of one or more axially displaced lower tubular shells which are concentrically spaced for forming annular inlets for admitting combustion air. An upper tubular exhaust stack, similarly formed, admits additional combustion air for increasing the efficiency of combustion, increasing the flow of exhausted for improved atmospheric dispersion and for cooling the upper stack.

Wiseman, Thomas R. (Calgary, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Water Prism, Volume 2: Prototype Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Prism is a decision support system (DSS) that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed, or local levels. It considers surface, ground, and impoundment waters and all water-using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power, and the environment). This technical update illustrates how Water Prism is used by applying it to two large watersheds: the Muskingum River Basin (Ohio) and the Green River Basin ...

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Design Ground Snow Loads for Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weight of snow with a mean recurrence interval of 50 years, called the design ground snow load, is used by engineers and planners to estimate the weight of snow that roofs must be designed to support National maps of ground snow load have ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Dennis J. Edgell; Molly A. Delaney

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Parameterizing a Groundness Analysis of Logic Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a parametric groundness analysis whose input and output are parameterized by a set of groundness parameters. The result of the analysis can be instantiated for different uses of the program. It can also be used to derive sufficient conditions ...

Lunjin Lu

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sharing and groundness dependencies in logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate Jacobs and Langen's Sharing domain, introduced for the analysis of variable sharing in logic programs, and show that it is isomorphic to Marriott and Sndergaard's Pos domain, introduced for the analysis of groundness dependencies. ... Keywords: Boolean functions, abstract interpretation, dataflow analysis, global analysis, groundness analysis, program analysis, sharing analysis

Michael Codish; Harald Sndergaard; Peter J. Stuckey

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Little Climates -- Weather Just Above The Ground  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather Just Above The Ground Weather Just Above The Ground Nature Bulletin No. 481-A February 17, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W, Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE CLIMATES -- Weather Just Above the Ground In a previous bulletin we talked about little climates, underground, resulting from weather conditions in the soil. Just above the ground there is another "little climate" equally important. We frequently see evidences of it without realizing how and why they were produced. Just above the earth, there lies a narrow layer of changeable weather that is affected at both surfaces by its mighty neighbors: the land below and the restless air in the atmosphere above it. Under the spell of gravity, it clings to the ground in spite of all but the swiftest winds. In this layer there are special weather conditions overlooked by nearly everyone.

374

Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground Source Heat Pumps (Redirected from Geothermal Heat Pumps) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ground Source Heat Pumps Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps GSHP Links Related documents and websites An Information Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump Owner List of Heat Pumps Incentives List of Ground Source Heat Pumps Incentives Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Various ways to configure a geothermal heat pump system. (Source: The Geo-Heat Center's Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump

375

Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground Source Heat Pumps Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ground Source Heat Pumps Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps GSHP Links Related documents and websites An Information Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump Owner List of Heat Pumps Incentives List of Ground Source Heat Pumps Incentives Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Various ways to configure a geothermal heat pump system. (Source: The Geo-Heat Center's Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump

376

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practicee on Federal Landscaped Grounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W A S H I N G T O N April 26, 1994 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practicee on Federal Landscaped Grounds The Report of the National Performance Review contains recommendations for a series of environmental actions, including one to increase environmentally and economically beneficial landscaping practices at Federal facilities and federally funded project.. Environmentally beneficial landscaping entail. utilizing techniques that complement and enhance the local environment and seek to minimize the adverse effects that the landscaping will have on it. In particular, this means using regionally native plants and employing landscaping practices and technologies that conserve water

377

Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6-1 6-1 6.0 References ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry), 2004. Toxicological Profile for Strontium, U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services, Public Health Service, April. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1994. Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Shiprock, New Mexico, DOE/AL/62350-48F, Rev. 1, April. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand Junction, Colorado, November. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2002. Final Groundwater Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2001-297-TAR, Grand

378

Microsoft Word - contents  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2001-272-TAR GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January 2002 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Purpose and Scope .................................................................................................1-1

379

Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New Mexico - February 2002. GJO-2001-276-TAR. MAC-GWSHP 13.3-1.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2001-276-TAR GJO-2001-276-TAR MAC-GWSHP13.3-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Results of A Piezocone Investigation Shiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0020-28-003 Document Number U0145400 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0145400 DOE/Grand Junction Office Results of A Piezocone InvestigationShiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Page 2 Executive Summary A piezocone study was performed at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA disposal cell as a screening- level investigation of in situ moisture conditions within the disposal cell. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if moisture conditions within the cell are saturated,

380

Mon Valley work plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWSHP 1.8 GWSHP 1.8 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Work Plan for Characterization Activities at the Shiprock UMTRA Project Site June 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number UGW-511-0020-01-000 Document Number U0013400 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Note: Some of the section page numbers in the Table of Contents may not correspond to the page on which the section appears when viewing them in Adobe Acrobat. Document Number U0013400 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Work Plan for Characterization Activities at Shiprock Project Site June 1998 Draft Final Page v Contents Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi 1.0 Introduction .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7 7 6.0 References ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry), 2004. Toxicological Profile for Strontium, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, April. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1994. Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Shiprock, New Mexico, DOE/AL/62350-48F, Rev. 1, Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico, April. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand Junction, Colorado, November. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2002. Final Groundwater Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2001-297-TAR, Grand

382

Definition: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground electromagnetic techniques measure electromagnetic fields in order to determine subsurface electrical resistivity with the earth surface as the observation point.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental interactions in nature, the other three being the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and gravitation. This force is described by electromagnetic fields, and has innumerable physical instances including the interaction of electrically charged particles and the interaction of uncharged magnetic force fields with electrical conductors. The word

383

Grounded Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grounded Renewable Energy Grounded Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Grounded Renewable Energy Place Carbondale, Colorado Zip 81623 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product Grounded Renewable Energy designs turn-key solar systems for homes and businesses in Colorado. Coordinates 41.573959°, -75.501361° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.573959,"lon":-75.501361,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Earthquake ground motion modeling on parallel computers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and discuss the performance of a parallel elastic wave propagation simulator that is being used to model and study earthquake-induced ground motion in large sedimentary basins. The components of the system include mesh generators, ...

Hesheng Bao; Jacobo Bielak; Omar Ghattas; Loukas F. Kallivokas; David R. O'Hallaron; Jonathan R. Shewchuk; Jifeng Xu

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

Saito, G.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Embodied object schemas for grounding language use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the Object Schema Model (OSM) for grounded language interaction. Dynamic representations of objects are used as the central point of coordination between actions, sensations, planning, and language ...

Hsiao, Kai-yuh, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Grounding linguistic analysis in control applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of grounding linguistic analysis in control applications, such as automated maintenance of computers and game playing. We assume access to natural language documents that describe the ...

Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ground Clutter Canceling with a Regression Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores ground clutter filtering with a class of cancelers that use regression. Regression filters perform this task in a simple manner, resulting in similar or better performance than the fifth-order elliptic filter implemented in ...

Sebastin M. Torres; Dusan S. Zrnic

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Commonality of ground systems in launch operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA is examining the utility of requiring a certain degree of commonality in both flight and ground systems in the Constellation Program. While the benefits of commonality seem obvious in terms of minimizing upfront ...

Quinn, Shawn M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ground Movement in SSRL Ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Grounding and Lightning Protection of Capacitor Controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the third report in EPRI's capacitor reliability study. It deals with capacitor controller grounding and lightning protection. Prior reports dealt with nuisance fuse operations, operating and construction practices, and use of distribution line capacitors for transmission voltage support. Simulations were performed to investigate various controller mounting locations and grounding configurations and their impact on the magnitude of surges reaching the controller. Once these aspects of capacitor c...

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI project "Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar Phase II," also called the "GPiR Project," started in August 1998 at Schlumberger-Doll Research, a division of Schlumberger Technology Corporation. Its goal was to determine if modern ground-penetrating radar (GPR) could make three-dimensional (3D) images of buried utility lines accurate and detailed enough to help utility companies better manage their underground infrastructure. Work began with a comparison of commercial and prototype GPR systems in the lab...

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Feasibility Study of Using Ground Source Heat Pumps in Two Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The building is located near the end of the central steam distribution system. Steam from the central steam and Mt. Olympus BOQ) presently heated by steam from the central steam plant. Ground source heat pump, it was assumed that natural gas-fired water heaters would replace the steam converters that presently provide hot

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

394

Efficiency, Economic and Environmental Assessment of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Central Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of a ground-source heat pump (GSP) for heating, cooling and hot water in a Central Pennsylvania residence (namely, the author's house) is analyzed, compared to a simulation of electricity and a heating-oil furnace (with electric cooling) ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ground- and Space-Based Temperature and Humidity Retrievals: Statistical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A near-real-time integrated temperature and water vapor sounding system has been designed and in operation since June 1993. It combines hourly data from the ground-based radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), a two-channel microwave radiometer, ...

B. Boba Stankov

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations Ignasi in forthcoming publications. Keywords-grounding analysis; earthing analysis, underground substations; I to a river (at substations next to hydroelectric dams), or the grounding system of a buried electrical

Colominas, Ignasi

397

Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A recent assessment indicates that if 20% of US homes replaced their existing space-conditioning and water-heating systems with properly designed, installed and operated state-of-the-art GSHP systems, it would yield significant benefits each year. These include 0.8 quad British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy savings, 54.3 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} emission reductions, $10.4 billion in energy cost savings and 43.2 gigawatts of reduction in summer peak electrical demand.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected a ground water compliance strategy for the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (Tuba City site). This compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40, Part 192 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 192) entitled "Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings." Contamination in the ground water consists of residual radioactive material, which is defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) (42 U.S. Code, Section 4321

399

Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis · Simulated at the power plant level with 4841 individual plants modeled · Plants distinguishedProject Impetus · Energy-Water Roadmap findings: ­ Reduce fresh water consumption in electric power generation Surface Water Ground Water Population Growth Industry Fuels Wind Hydro Solar Thermoelectric #12;System

Keller, Arturo A.

400

Ground-coupled heat pump systems: a pumping analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems use the ground as a heat source or sink that absorbs heat from or rejects heat to the soil, respectively; (more)

Mays, Cristin Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ground Gravity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date...

402

Deputy Secretary Poneman Attends Ground Breaking at Tennessee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Deputy Secretary Poneman Attends Ground Breaking at Tennessee Advanced Vehicle Battery Plant Deputy Secretary Poneman Attends Ground Breaking at Tennessee Advanced Vehicle...

403

Department of Veterans Affairs, FONSI - Ground mounted solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground mounted solar photovoltaic power at San Joaquin National Cemetery Department of Veterans Affairs, FONSI - Ground mounted solar photovoltaic power at San Joaquin National...

404

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps A detailled description of the...

405

Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain...

406

GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is WIUUTEO GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPCOn August 27, 1980, an insulation failure occurred dt-ringby a failure uf ground plane insulation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Management of the Hanford water table and waste management implications  

SciTech Connect

The geology and hydrology of the Hanford Reservation are reviewed, with emphasis on ground water flow, to identify those areas that should be restricted from unconditional release due to radionuclide cortamination or radioactive waste storage as well as those areas that would have no hydrological restrictions. The effects of the discharge of large quantities of cooling water from the radiochemical plants on ground water flow were also evaluated. (CH)

Tomlinson, R.E.; Isaacson, R.E.; Brown, D.J.; Veatch, M.D.

1970-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System Simulation Using Visual Modeling Tool For Hvacsim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems incorporate both ground loop heat exchangers and supplemental heat rejecters, such as cooling towers, cooling ponds, or pavement heating systems. HVACSIM+ capabilities have recently been extended by the addition of ground loop heat exchanger models, water-to-water and waterto-air heat pump models, pavement heating system models, and heat rejection pond models. New component models are discussed and a hybrid ground source heat pump system with heated pavement as a supplemental cooler is simulated using the visual modeling tool. First, though, an introduction to a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+ is given. The user interface that originally came with the program could not be characterized as user-friendly. The new graphical interface allows users to develop system models by hooking components together. Provisions for controlling the simulation, setting the component parameters, editing the boundary file, and plotting the output are also included.

M. H. Khan; A. Varanasi; J. D. Spitler; D. E. Fisher; R. D. Delahoussaye

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

D. Tang

2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data Sources from Satellite, Ground Radar, and a Numerical Model Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Seo,...

411

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

412

Seismic fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems including the impact of differential ground subsidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though Differential Ground Subsidence (DGS) impacts the seismic response of segmented buried pipelines augmenting their vulnerability, fragility formulations to estimate repair rates under such condition are not available in the literature. Physical models to estimate pipeline seismic damage considering other cases of permanent ground subsidence (e.g. faulting, tectonic uplift, liquefaction, and landslides) have been extensively reported, not being the case of DGS. The refinement of the study of two important phenomena in Mexico City - the 1985 Michoacan earthquake scenario and the sinking of the city due to ground subsidence - has contributed to the analysis of the interrelation of pipeline damage, ground motion intensity, and DGS; from the analysis of the 48-inch pipeline network of the Mexico City's Water System, fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems for two DGS levels are proposed. The novel parameter PGV{sup 2}/PGA, being PGV peak ground velocity and PGA peak ground acceleration, has been used as seismic parameter in these formulations, since it has shown better correlation to pipeline damage than PGV alone according to previous studies. By comparing the proposed fragilities, it is concluded that a change in the DGS level (from Low-Medium to High) could increase the pipeline repair rates (number of repairs per kilometer) by factors ranging from 1.3 to 2.0; being the higher the seismic intensity the lower the factor.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ordaz, Mario [UNAM, MEXICO CITY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Definition: Ground Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Ground Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Ground Gravity Survey The ground gravitational method is the study of the distribution of mass in the subsurface with the observation point at the earth's surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A gravity anomaly is the difference between the observed acceleration of a planet's gravity and a value predicted from a model. A location with a positive anomaly exhibits more gravity than predicted, while a negative anomaly exhibits a lower value than predicted. References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Geophysical-Field-Theory-Three-Volume-Gravitational/dp/0124020410 Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

414

GroundedPower Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GroundedPower Inc GroundedPower Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GroundedPower Inc Place Gloucester, Massachusetts Zip 1930 Product Massachusetts-based company developing home and building energy management systems via IP-based software. Coordinates 37.413962°, -76.526305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.413962,"lon":-76.526305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Ground subsidence due to mining operations. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ground subsidence associated with mining operations. Mine subsidence is discussed with reference to mathematical modeling, forecasting extent of cavitation, and rock mechanics and mechanisms of stress relaxation. Damage to above and below-ground structures as well as agricultural areas, and mining techniques designed to prevent or reduce subsidence are included. Monitoring of subsidence and detection of cavitation for surface, underground, and ocean floor mining areas are discussed and examples are analyzed. Subsidence due to aquifer water removal is referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 2, Appendixes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information derived form the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the main text. This Volume contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text.

Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

EA-1406-FONSI-2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for for Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION: FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement a ground water cleanup compliance strategy for the New Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) former processing site. The proposed compliance strategy at the New Rifle site is passive remediation by natural flushing with institutional controls and monitoring. The purpose of the strategy is to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground lvater standards defined in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 192. Subpart B, and in so doing, protect human health and the environment. Ground water at the New Rifle site is contaminated with residual radioactive materials

418

Subsurface Characterization at Ground Failure Sites in Adapazari, Turkey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground failure. Lastly, ?ve CPTs and three borings were com- pleted at the Adapazari Electrical Substation,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

GRR/Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Idaho Code Title 42 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) has the exclusive authority for regulation of appropriation of the public surface and ground waters of

420

Issues in Ground-Truthing Graphic Documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the nature of ground-truth: whether it is always well-defined fora given task, oron ly relative and approximate. In the conventional scenario, reference data is produced by recording the interpretation of each test document using a chosen ...

Daniel P. Lopresti; George Nagy

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "umtra ground water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Grounding geographic categories in the meaningful environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontologies are a common approach to improve semantic interoperability by explicitly specifying the vocabulary used by a particular information community. Complex expressions are defined in terms of primitive ones. This shifts the problem of semantic ... Keywords: meaningful environment, semantic datum, semantic heterogeneity, symbol grounding problem

Simon Scheider; Krzysztof Janowicz; Werner Kuhn

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Impedance of surface footings on layered ground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2Hz. Unfortunately, environmental ... Keywords: Boundary elements, Domain-transformation method, Dynamic stiffness, Footing, Foundation, Layered soil, Wind turbine

L. Andersen; J. Clausen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors affecting longevity of cement grouts for fully grouted rock bolt system. Provide updated information on cement grout mix design for fully grouted rock bolt system. (5) Evaluate longevity of materials for the emplacement drift invert.

D.H.Tang

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Enhanced oil recovery water requirements  

SciTech Connect

Water requirements for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are evaluated using publicly available information, data from actual field applications, and information provided by knowledgeable EOR technologists in 14 major oil companies. Water quantity and quality requirements are estimated for individual EOR processes (steam drive; in situ combustion; and CO/sub 2/, micellar-polymer, polymer, and caustic flooding) in those states and specific geographic locations where these processes will play major roles in future petroleum production by the year 2000. The estimated quantity requirements represent the total water needed from all sources. A reduction in these quantities can be achieved by reinjecting all of the produced water potentially available for recycle in the oil recovery method. For injection water quality requirements, it is noted that not all of the water used for EOR needs to be fresh. The use of treated produced water can reduce significantly the quantities of fresh water that would be sought from other sources. Although no major EOR project to date has been abandoned because of water supply problems, competing regional uses for water, drought situations, and scarcity of high quality surface water and ground water could be impediments to certain projects in the near future.

Royce, B.; Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Geffen, T.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Role of the inclusion survey contractor in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty-four former uranium mills are involved in the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP). The Radiological Survey Activities project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC) in the UMTRA program. Responsibilities of the ISC are: (1) to identify potentially contaminated sites in the vicinity of these former uranium mills; (2) conduct radiological surveys to assess whether the property is contaminated with material originating from the mill in excess of Environmental Protection Agency criteria formulated specifically for the UMTRA program (40 CFR 192); and (3) provide recommendations to DOE regarding remedial action. Properties are identified by the ISC using historical information, serial and ground-level gamma scanning, and surveying erosional pathways (wind and water movement of contamination from primary sources). Currently, over 8000 vicinity properties have been identified that warrant further investigation. Once identified, an inclusion survey is conducted to assess whether a property is sufficiently contaminated to warrant inclusion into the UMTRA program. The inclusion survey includes a complete gamma scan of the surfaces of the property outdoors and the lowest habitable level indoors, and collection of soil samples outdoors and/or radon daughter samples indoors if required. Survey methods are described. 8 references.

Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOEIALl62350-64  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEIALl62350-64 DOEIALl62350-64 REV. 1 BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION A T THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR FALLS CITY, TEXAS September 1994 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Project Office Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank BASELINE RISK ASSESSMEhT OF GROUhO WATER COhTAMlhATION AT THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR FALLS CITY, TEXAS CITIZEN'S SUMMARY CITIZEN'S SUMMARY This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives:

431

St. Johns River Water Management District 4049 Reid Street P.O. Box 1429 Palatka, FL 32178-1429  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ground or surface water and· water from public and private utilities. Additional information Irrigation withdrawn from ground or surface· water, from a private well or pump, or from a public or private utility or transient housing units, hotel and motel units, and public medians and rights-of-way. #12;St. Johns River

Watson, Craig A.

432

Estimation of Near-Ground Propagation Conditions Using Radar Ground Echo Coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical gradient of refractivity (dN/dh) determines the path of the radar beam; namely, the larger the negative values of the refractivity gradient, the more the beam bends toward the ground. The variability of the propagation conditions ...

Shinju Park; Frdric Fabry

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceive that drinking water is not safe. Furthermore, those who give lower ratings to the quality of their ground water are more likely to regularly purchase bottle water for drinking and use bottle water as their primary drinking water source.

Zhihua Hu; Lois Wright Morton; Robert L. Mahler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

GPS Meteorology: Direct Estimation of the Absolute Value of Precipitable Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple approach to estimating vertically integrated atmospheric water vapor, or precipitable water, from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio signals collected by a regional network of ground-based geodetic GPS receiver is illustrated and ...

Jingping Duan; Michael Bevis; Peng Fang; Yehuda Bock; Steven Chiswell; Steven Businger; Christian Rocken; Frederick Solheim; Terasa van Hove; Randolph Ware; Simon McClusky; Thomas A. Herring; Robert W. King

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

436

Ground Source Heat Pump System Data Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peer Review Peer Review GSHP System Data Analysis Xiaobing Liu, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory liux2@ornl.gov (865-574-2593) 4/3/2013 - GSHP Data Analysis in 1 st phase of U.S.-China CERC-BEE - GSHP ARRA Grantee Data Mining 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: High first cost of ground heat exchangers (GHXs) and lack of knowledge/trust in achievable benefits are major barriers preventing

437

Ground Source Heat Pump System Data Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review Peer Review GSHP System Data Analysis Xiaobing Liu, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory liux2@ornl.gov (865-574-2593) 4/3/2013 - GSHP Data Analysis in 1 st phase of U.S.-China CERC-BEE - GSHP ARRA Grantee Data Mining 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: High first cost of ground heat exchangers (GHXs) and lack of knowledge/trust in achievable benefits are major barriers preventing

438

Entanglement Energetics in the Ground State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how many-body ground state entanglement information may be extracted from sub-system energy measurements at zero temperature. A precise relation between entanglement and energy fluctuations is demonstrated in the weak coupling limit. Examples are given with the two-state system and the harmonic oscillator, and energy probability distributions are calculated. Comparisons made with recent qubit experiments show this type of measurement provides another method to quantify entanglement with the environment.

Andrew N. Jordan; Markus Buttiker

2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z