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Sample records for umd jhu u-m

  1. AmeriFlux US-UMd UMBS Disturbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Peter; Gough, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-UMd UMBS Disturbance. Site Description - The UMBS Disturbance site is an artificial disturbance site that has recently been created as part of the Forest Accelerate Succession ExperimenT (FASET). In Spring 2008, every aspen and birch tree (>6,700, ~35% canopy LAI), the dominant early successional trees, were girdled over 39 ha of the FASET treatment plot to stimulate a disturbance that will move the forest into a later successional stage, dominated by maples, oaks, and white pine. This treatment caused aspen and birch mortality within 2 - 3 years. As a result of the changed canopy structure, there is a divergence in net ecosystem exchange between the control plot (enhanced carbon uptake) and the treatment plot (reduced carbon uptake).

  2. M E M O R A N D U M D A T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  3. S U B J E C T M E M O R A N D U M D K

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  4. I M E M O R A N D U M T O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  5. F R O M M E M O R A N D U M D A T E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r F R O M : M E M O R A N D U M D A T E ----B--M S U B J E C T : A L T E R N A T E ' N A M E 8 --- ----a- O W N E R ( S ) --- Past ---...

  6. F R O M M E M O R A N D U M D A T E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r F R O M : M E M O R A N D U M D A T E ----B--M S U B J E C T : A L T E R N A T E ' N A M E 8 ---------------------- ----a- O W N E R ( S ) -------- Past ¶ ------------------------ Current: -------------------------- O w n e r contactrd 0 yes 0 no; if yes, datr contacted ------------ T Y P E O F O P E R A T IO N ----------------- 0 R e s e a r c h & D e v e l o p m e n t 0 Facility T y p e 0 Production scale tm s tin g 0 P ilot S c a l e 0 B e n c h S c a l e Process 0 T h e o r e tical S

  7. Five Year Results of US Intergroup/RTOG 9704 With Postoperative CA 19-9 {<=}90 U/mL and Comparison to the CONKO-001 Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Adam C.; Winter, Kathryn; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Benson, Alan B.; MacDonald, John; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9704 was the largest randomized trial to use adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. This report analyzes 5-year survival by serum level of tumor marker CA 19-9 of {<=}90 vs >90 U/mL and compares results to the those of the CONKO-001 trial. Methods and Materials: CA 19-9 expression was analyzed as a dichotomized variable ({<=}90 vs >90 U/mL). Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify the impact of the CA 19-9 value on overall survival (OS). Actuarial estimates of OS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Both univariate (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.3, P<.0001) and multivariate (HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 2.2-4.2, P<.0001) analyses demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in OS for CA 19-9 serum level of {>=}90 U/mL. For patients in the gemcitabine (Gem) treatment arm with CA 19-9 <90 U/mL, median survival was 21 months. For patients with CA 19-9 {>=}90 U/mL, this number dropped to 10 months. In patients with pancreatic head tumors in the Gem treatment arm with RT quality assurance per protocol and CA 19-9 of <90 U/mL, median survival and 5-year rate were 24 months and 34%. In comparison, the median survival and 5-year OS rate for patients in the Gem arm of the CONKO trial were 22 months and 21%. Conclusions: This analysis demonstrates that patients with postresection CA 19-9 values {>=}90 U/mL had a significantly worse survival. Patients with pancreatic head tumors treated with Gem with CA 19-9 serum level of <90 U/mL and per protocol RT had favorable survival compared to that seen in the CONKO trial. CA 19-9 is a stratification factor for the current RTOG adjuvant pancreas trial (0848).

  8. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the U M{sub 4,5} absorption edges of UFe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finazzi, M.; Sainctavit, P.; Dias, A.; Kappler, J.; Krill, G.; Sanchez, J.; Dalmas de Reotier, P.; Yaouanc, A.; Rogalev, A.; Goulon, J.

    1997-02-01

    We present an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study performed at the U M{sub 4,5} edges on UFe{sub 2}, a ferromagnet with almost itinerant 5f electrons. The analysis of the branching ratio of the U M{sub 4,5} edges confirms the fact that the occupation number of the 5f states in UFe{sub 2} is lower than in other compounds where the f electrons are more localized. Magnetic circular dichroism effects are observed consistently with the presence of an orbital 5f magnetic moment which aligns parallel to the total magnetic moment. In agreement with a polarized neutron study, we find a nearly perfect cancellation of the U-5f spin and orbital magnetic moments, which results in a vanishing small total U-5f magnetic moment. Results are discussed in comparison with atomic multiplet calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. V O L U M E

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    7 V e h i c l e E m i s s i o n s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because

  10. The University of Maryland | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    About Office of the President Colleges and Schools Libraries UMD Right Now - News UMD's Campus Tour Social Media UMD is on Facebook UMD on You Tube Follow UMD on Twitter UMD's RSS ...

  11. People | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center People Directors Director Gary Rubloff, UMD Website Deputy Director Sang Bok Lee, UMD Website Assoc Director for Sandia Sean Hearne, SNL-ALBQ Assoc Director for Programs Elizabeth Lathrop, UMD Primary Investigators Thrust 1 Phil Collins - UCI Bryan Eichhorn - UMD Kevin Leung - SNL-ALBQ Chuck Martin - UFL Zuzanna Siwy - UCI Thrust 2 Chunsheng Wang - UMD Sang Bok Lee - UMD Liangbing Hu - UMD Mark Reed - Yale YuHuang Wang - UMD Thrust 3 Reginald Penner - UCI John Cumings - UMD Katherine

  12. TO: FILE M E M O R A N D U M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... was discontinued in June. 'Beryllium metal is being produced in the privately oFned plants of hte Brush Beryllium Co. of Cleveland, Ohio and the Be ilium Car .*: of Reading, Pa. ...

  13. Remarks on the N = 1 S U ( M + p ) × S U ( p ) quiver gauge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2012-02-08 OSTI Identifier: 1099118 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; ...

  14. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table E3. Residential Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy e Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass ...

  15. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 Table E10. Residential Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy e Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass ...

  16. M E M O R A N D U M To: DOE Office of General Counsel From: William...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Present for APGA were Dave Schryver and Dan Lapato and its General Counsel, William T. Miller of McCarter & English, LLP. Present for DOE were John Cymbalski and Dan Cohen. The ...

  17. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,958.2 575.9 651.5 497.4 1,724.9 431.4 277.0 -475.0 0.0 378.7 262.4 848.4 468.7 Alaska 603.1 18.2 329.6 233.6 581.4 0.0 21.8 0.0

  18. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama 0.0 28.2 3.9 (s) 2.1 0.2 0.0 6.2 0.0 0.9 0.0 78.2 113.5 148.8 262.4 Alaska 8.3 18.0 7.3 (s) 0.7 0.4 0.0 8.4 0.0 0.8 0.1 9.4 45.0 18.2 63.2 Arizona 0.0 31.3 5.9

  19. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama 488.6 355.1 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 431.4 90.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,371.2 Alaska 9.9 32.0 2.9 0.0 0.7 3.7 0.0 14.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.4 0.0 61.6 Arizona 442.7 211.6 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 338.0 58.2 3.6 0.0

  20. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama 87.3 209.0 19.9 1.2 2.7 2.2 32.3 58.3 0.0 150.8 0.0 (s) 118.2 623.6 224.8 848.4 Alaska (s) 261.5 23.2 (s) 0.7 0.0 29.8 53.7 0.0

  1. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama 0.0 39.9 0.1 (s) 4.7 4.8 7.7 0.1 0.2 112.4 165.0 213.8 378.7 Alaska 0.0 17.8 6.7 (s) 0.4 7.1 2.5 0.1 (s) 7.0 34.4 13.5 47.8 Arizona 0.0 33.3 (s) (s) 3.9 3.9 3.3 0.1 17.0 110.4 167.9 218.4 386.3 Arkansas 0.0 38.9 (s)

  2. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama 575.9 651.5 143.7 14.2 8.5 288.4 7.7 35.0 497.4 1,724.9 651.5 310.6 Alaska 18.2 329.6 73.2 96.0 1.2

  3. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama 0.0 19.4 0.3 118.8 14.2 0.5 2.3 307.7 5.5 449.4 0.0 468.7 0.0 468.7 Alaska 0.0 0.3 0.7 33.1 96.0 0.1 0.5 32.4 0.0 162.7 0.0 163.0 0.0 163.0 Arizona 0.0 16.0 1.0 106.5 21.5 1.1 1.7 316.5 0.0

  4. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Table C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2014 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Million Short Tons Billion Cubic Feet Million Barrels Billion Kilowatthours Million Barrels Alabama 27.1 635.6 24.9 2.5 2.2 61.4 1.2 5.6 97.9 41.2 9.5 6.4 Alaska 1.2 328.9 12.7 16.9 0.3 6.6 0.1 5.0 41.6 0.0 1.5 0.6 Arizona 23.1

  5. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama 87.3 296.4 142.7 14.2 8.5 310.6 7.7 35.0 518.6 0.0 159.4 0.0 0.1 0.2 308.8 1,370.8 587.4 1,958.2 Alaska 8.3

  6. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorland, William

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  7. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table E11. Commercial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste e Alabama - 328.0 83.9 0.4 47.4 5.8 - 137.6 4.3 469.8 2,473.6 2,943.4 Alaska 40.1 148.8 192.8 0.5 15.7 12.5 - 221.5 2.8 413.2 472.1 885.3 Arizona - 314.9 139.0 (s) 38.7 6.1 - 183.8 2.7 501.4 2,967.7 3,469.1 Arkansas - 399.3

  8. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Table E14. Electric Power Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Electricity Imports c Total Energy d Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste b Alabama 1,316.5 1,640.3 21.4 - - 21.4 344.2 13.6 - 3,336.0 Alaska 48.5 161.6 67.3 - 14.1 81.4 - - - 291.6 Arizona 929.3 1,090.2 14.1 - - 14.1 276.7 9.7 2.6 2,322.8 Arkansas 802.6 479.2 5.6 - (s) 5.6 126.1 7.1 - 1,420.7 California 17.1 4,348.9

  9. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Table E12. Industrial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f,g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f,g Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste e Alabama 197.4 163.4 360.8 982.0 449.3 17.8 69.4 34.4 540.9 1,111.7 443.8 2,898.4 2,107.8 5,006.2 Alaska - 0.1 0.1 8.8 666.2 0.7 22.1 - 208.3 897.3 0.2 906.4 192.6 1,099.0 Arizona - 15.3 15.3

  10. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices and Expenditures 10 Table E8. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 1,677.3 3,521.2 3,718.3 283.1 226.6 8,039.9 97.2 713.3 13,078.4 344.2 498.0 19,119.2 -3,336.0 8,363.3 24,146.5

  11. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table E13. Transportation Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel a LPG b Lubricants Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama - 2.3 9.5 3,161.2 283.1 16.3 161.9 7,964.7 62.9 11,659.5 11,661.7 - 11,661.7 Alaska - 0.1 21.9 983.0 2,013.3 2.4 31.4 1,090.6 - 4,142.6 4,142.7 - 4,142.7 Arizona - 24.2 34.5 2,976.8 458.0 30.6 115.6 8,574.0 -

  12. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table E9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2014 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total g,h Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 360.8 1,880.9 3,696.9 283.1 226.6 8,039.9 97.2 713.3 13,057.0 484.4 15,783.2 8,363.3 24,146.5 Alaska 40.2 319.2 2,020.9 2,013.3 32.9 1,125.1 - 263.1 5,455.4 20.0 5,834.8 1,055.8 6,890.6 Arizona 15.3 1,065.5

  13. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Table E4. Commercial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste e Alabama - 11.64 21.48 25.33 23.03 25.88 - 22.16 12.12 13.53 31.62 26.06 Alaska 4.83 8.28 26.40 31.05 22.19 33.67 - 26.38 4.23 11.69 50.10 19.78 Arizona - 10.05 23.47 32.78 23.43 27.09 - 23.57 16.31 12.76 29.70 24.91

  14. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table E7. Electric Power Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Electricity Imports c,d Total Energy e Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste b Alabama 2.69 4.62 20.94 - - 20.94 0.80 2.70 - 2.60 Alaska 4.91 5.05 22.98 - 18.87 22.14 - - - 6.40 Arizona 2.10 5.15 22.60 - - 22.60 0.82 2.70 13.31 2.33 Arkansas 2.40 6.46 21.41 - 19.89 21.40 0.83 2.70 - 2.53 California 2.49 5.06 19.63

  15. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table E5. Industrial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f,g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f,g Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste e Alabama 4.44 3.82 4.13 5.36 22.59 14.95 25.88 15.65 23.78 22.83 3.24 6.36 18.03 8.74 Alaska - 4.85 4.85 7.95 28.75 23.37 33.67 - 16.75 24.72 1.74 24.14 45.91 26.33 Arizona - 2.94 2.94 7.31

  16. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 2.91 5.81 25.88 19.92 26.79 25.88 12.59 28.08 25.64 0.80 3.43 8.43 2.60 27.20 18.64 Alaska 4.87 6.99 28.53 20.97 27.65 33.67 18.87 19.35

  17. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Table E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation Gasoline a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants a Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama - 9.87 33.16 26.62 19.92 29.63 69.44 25.88 11.37 25.95 25.94 - 25.94 Alaska - 8.28 33.16 29.67 20.97 28.40 69.44 33.67 - 25.46 25.46 - 25.46 Arizona - 11.57 33.16 27.94 21.30 28.40 69.44 27.09 - 27.19 27.12

  18. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Table E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total g,h Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 4.13 7.48 25.92 19.92 26.79 25.88 12.59 28.08 25.65 3.46 15.98 27.20 18.64 Alaska 4.83 8.66 28.76 20.97 27.65 33.67 - 19.35 25.44 10.91 22.31 51.27 24.43 Arizona 2.94 11.85 26.90 21.30 30.28 27.09 - 23.91

  19. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Successful LED Wall Washer Retrofit...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    while retaining the quality of light when LED modules replaced 87 halogen lamps in existing wall washers at the University of Maryland's (UMD) Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. ...

  20. New method to determine planetary boundary layer depth | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Zhanqing Li College of Global Change and Earth System Science, State Laboratory of Earth Surface Process and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, China. zli@atmos.umd.edu ...

  1. University of Maryland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Logo: University of Maryland Name: University of Maryland Address: College Park, MD Zip: 20742 Website: www.umd.edu Coordinates: 38.980666,...

  2. GATEWAY DEMONSTRATION UNIVERSITY PROJECTS | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Video: Princeton's Dillon Gymnasium UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND umd-thumb.jpg Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Evaluation of LED wall washers and retrofits in the performing arts ...

  3. Memo Is Homologous to Nonheme Iron Dioxygenases and Binds an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Affiliations (JHU-MED) ( Publication Date: 2008-04-02 OSTI Identifier: 1006524 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: J. Biol. Chem.; Journal Volume: ...

  4. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S. ; Freire, Ernesto ; Sodroski, Joseph ; Madani, Navid ; Hendrickson, Wayne A. ; Smith, III, Amos B. 1 ; DFCI) 2 ; UPENN) 2 ; JHU) 2 ; Bryn Mawr) 2 ; Harvard-Med) ...

  5. Miniaturized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miniaturized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Reinhard Radermacher raderm@umd.edu 20%+ Better University of Maryland College Park Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 3/1/2013 Planned end date: 2/29/2016 Key Milestones 1. Design optimization, 3/30/14 2. Fabrication/testing, 1kW prototype, 1/30/2015 3. Fabrication/testing, 10kW prototype, 9/30/2015 Budget: Total Budget: $1500K Total UMD: $1050K Total DOE $ to date for UMD: $881K Total future DOE $

  6. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    viagrid x Swisdak, Marc University of Maryland swisdak@glue.umd.edu inperson x x Taylor, John ANL jtaylor@mcs.anl.gov inperson x Turner, David NERSC dpturner@lbl.gov inperson x x...

  7. U.S. DOE Webinar Series - 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in winter - Approximately 13 MW of building cooling in summer provided by steam-turbine-driven chillers UMD combined cycle power plant Steam-driven chiller for heat-driven ...

  8. Enhancement of [alpha]-Helix Mimicry by an [alpha/beta]-Peptide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Johnson, Lisa M. ; Mortenson, David E. ; Yun, Hyun Gi ; Horne, W. Seth ; Ketas, Thomas J. ; Lu, Min ; Moore, John P. ; Gellman, Samuel H. 1 ; UMD-NJ) 2 ; Weill-Med) ...

  9. Compact Thermoelastic Cooling System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    50% penetration and 40% energy saving by 2025, the ... Cooling won the Invention of the Year Award, UMD, ... DC motors can run on batteries, fuel cells or a solar PV ...

  10. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N APL JHU Clark B SSI DUston C MNHN Langevin Y Univ Paris Sud Mauchien P CEA McKay C NASA Ames Newsom H UNM Vaniman D PSI Baroukh J CNES Barraclough Bruce Los Alamos National...

  11. 슬라이드 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting, Norfolk, VA. 2008. 3. 10 Determination of aerosol single scattering albedo and radiative forcing from ground and space observations Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), Univ. of Maryland (UMD) Univ. of Maryland (UMD) Kwon Kwon - - Ho Lee Ho Lee , Zhanqing Li , Zhanqing Li Contents Introduction 1 SSA retrieval 2 Applications 3 Summary 4 1 Contribution to The East-AIRE campaign Final

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-11-001 John Hopkins EC.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-001 SECTION A. Project Title: Solid Rocket Propellant Fire Characterization SECTION B. Project Description The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) will perform research to understand the performance of fuel used as heat sources in radioisotope power systems under accident scenarios that would subject the heat sources to solid rocket propellant fire. JHU/APL will subject fuel simulants (no radioactive material is used for these tests) to solid rocket propellant fires

  13. Minituraized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miniaturized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Reinhard Radermacher raderm@umd.edu University of Maryland College Park Better 20%+ 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 3/1/2013 Original end date: 2/29/2016 Revised end date: 10/30/2016 Key Milestones 1. Design optimization, 3/30/14 2. Fabrication/testing, 1kW prototype, 6/30/2015 3. Fabrication/testing, 10kW prototype, 1/30/2016 Budget: Total Budget: $1500K Total UMD: $1050K Total DOE $ to date

  14. M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amount contours. Figure 2. Divergence overlaid with gridded hourly precipitation amount. M u M d correlation with CRM precip M c,d M c,u M u M d M d + M u + MSE std dev wind std...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: MTEM 2014: Malware Technical Exchange

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting: Technical Program Committee Members Technical Program Committee Members Stan Sikora (chair) - Sandia National Laboratories Aaron Hackworth - Secureworks Alex Pease - Sandia National Laboratories Alex Quintana - Sandia National Laboratories Ann Cox - Department of Homeland Security Cory Cohen - CERT, Software Engineering Institute David Sames - JHU Applied Physics Laboratory Desiree Beck - MITRE Douglas Stetson - MIT Lincoln Laboratory Graham Baker - MIT Lincoln Laboratory Gregg

  16. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    approaches for hydrogen storage materials Leonid Bendersky Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory NIST, Gaithersburg MD Contributors: G. Downing, E. Mackey, R. Paul, R. Greenberg (NIST:CSTL); L. Cook, M. Green (NIST:MSEL) R. Cavicchi (NIST:CSTL); I. Takeuchi, H. Oguchi (UMd) Two Main Challenges to Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Design and fabrication of appropriate materials libraries Rapid, quantitative measurements of hydrogenation phenomenon We are attacking both

  17. News Story | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Invalid Story ID No article found for this site Current Headlines Wood Windows are Cooler than Glass Gary Rubloff named Distinguished University Professor EFRC NEES 2016 Collaboration Travel Grant Awards Ingenious method enables sharper flat-panel displays at lower energy costs NEES project shows hybrid battery/capacitor with off-the-charts cycling capacity Hu and Munday Win Young Investigator Award UMD has Largest University Showing at 2016 ARPA-E Summit CREB Kicks Off its Research

  18. LCLS - Activities of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Bill Colson Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Chairman Jerry Hastings National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Pat O'Shea University of Maryland (UMD) Jörg Rossbach Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Ron Ruth Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Ross Schlueter Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory (LBNL) Meetings of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) 5) December 10-11, 2001: Fifth meeting of the LCLS Technical Advisory

  19. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TWO FACULTY POSITIONS IN ENERGY RESEARCH: The A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland is seeking applicants for the University of Maryland Energy Research Center (UMERC), www.energy.umd.edu. UMERC is a strategic university initiative that brings together faculty across the campus to advance the frontiers of energy science and technology in the Nation's capitol. It includes and collaborates with the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center "Nanostructures for Electrical

  20. Jared Hertzberg > Postdoc - Univeristy of Maryland > Center Alumni > The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Materials Center at Cornell Jared Hertzberg Postdoc - Univeristy of Maryland jaredh@umd.edu Dr. Hertzberg received his PhD from the University of Maryland in 2009. While at Cornell, he worked with the Robinson Group on high-precision mechanical measurement, phonon transport in nanostructured materials, nanofabrication of MEMS/NEMS mechanical resonators, superconducting circuits, and Josephson-junction devices. He has returned to the University of Maryland where he is currently a

  1. Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2017 Academic Year Fall Semester 2016 Wood Windows are Cooler than Glass Gary Rubloff named Distinguished University Professor 2015-2016 Academic Year Spring Semester 2016 EFRC NEES 2016 Collaboration Travel Grant Awards Ingenious method enables sharper flat-panel displays at lower energy costs NEES project shows hybrid battery/capacitor with off-the-charts cycling capacity Hu and Munday Win Young Investigator Award UMD has Largest University Showing at 2016 ARPA-E Summit CREB Kicks Off its

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copyright © 2011 CALCE Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering 1 Technology Advances to Improve Reliability - A Broad View Diganta Das, Ph.D. Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering (CALCE) University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 diganta@umd.edu 301-405-7770 University of Maryland Copyright © 2011 CALCE Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering 2 University of Maryland: 2011 * Started in 1856 * About 48,000 students * Ranked 13 th in the world in engineering programs, by The

  3. Energy Economy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010 Energy and the Economy US EIA & JHU SAIS 2010 Energy Conference April 6, 2010 All prices are those current at the end of the previous trading session unless otherwise indicated. Prices are sourced from local exchanges via Reuters, Bloomberg and other vendors. Data is sourced from Deutsche Bank and subject companies. DISCLOSURES AND ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS ARE LOCATED IN APPENDIX 1. Adam Sieminski, CFA Chief Energy Economist adam.sieminski@db.com +1 202

  4. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010 Energy and the Economy US EIA & JHU SAIS 2010 Energy Conference April 6, 2010 All prices are those current at the end of the previous trading session unless otherwise indicated. Prices are sourced from local exchanges via Reuters, Bloomberg and other vendors. Data is sourced from Deutsche Bank and subject companies. DISCLOSURES AND ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS ARE LOCATED IN APPENDIX 1. Adam Sieminski, CFA Chief Energy Economist adam.sieminski@db.com +1 202

  5. Miniaturized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miniaturized Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Exchangers 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Prof. Reinhard Radermacher, raderm@umd.edu University of Maryland College Park Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 03/01/2013 Planned end date: 02/29/2016 Key Milestones 1. Heat exchanger designs/process: 6/30/14 2. Fabrication/testing of 1 kW: 9/30/14 3. Fabrication/testing of 10 kW: 9/30/2015 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $561K Total future DOE $: $489K Target Market/Audience: Residential and

  6. SENSE-Project-Abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response to ASCR Program Announcement LAB 15-1295 SENSE: SDN for End-to-end Networked Science at the Exascale Lead PI: Inder Monga, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, imonga@es.net, 510-499-8065 Team: ANL - Linda Winkler, Kate Keahey, Caltech - Harvey Newman, Ramiro Voicu, FNAL - Phil DeMar, LBNL/ESnet - Chin Guok, John MacAuley, LBNL/NERSC - Jason Hick, UMD/MAX - Tom Lehman, Xi Yang, Alberto Jimenez Abstract: Traditionally, WAN and campus networks and services have evolved independently from each

  7. Teleseminars | Events | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontier Research Center Teleseminars Event Search - teleseminar EFRC NEES Teleseminar - Long-Qing Chen Thursday, May 26, 2016 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., 1146 AV Williams More» EFRC NEES Teleseminar - William McGehee Tuesday, March 29, 2016 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., 1146 AV Williams More» NEW DATE: EFRC NEES Teleseminar - LiPON Protective Layer for 3D conversion electrode/Li metal anode Tuesday, March 8, 2016 4:00 p.m., UMD location: 1146 AVW More» EFRC NEES Teleseminar: Raman Spectroscopy to

  8. Heat transfer in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Proceedings of the wanter mnnual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 16-21, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are: condensation heat transfer on long vertical, axially ridged tubes tests of the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University (APL/JHU) folded-tube, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) heat exchanger the design of a 1.0-MW OTEC heat exchanger for ocean testing and convective vaporization and condensation in serrated-fin channels. Also considered are: heat tranfer studies of an improved heat transfer monitor for OTEC an analysis of the mist lift process for mist flow, open-cycle OTEC the heat transfer characteristics of working fluids for OTEC and a comparison of major OTEC power system characteristics.

  9. DISCLAIMER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Draft Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Monument Valley, Arizona, U M T M Site ......... 2-1 2.3 Ground Water Characteristics ......

  10. Raexplore: Enabling Rapid, Automated Architecture Exploration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relatively minor features such as branch prediction, prefetching, and memory management. .... 15 H. Gahvari, A. H. Baker, M. Schulz, U. M. Yang, K. E. Jordan, and ...

  11. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating

  12. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables

  13. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND97-2426 Unlimited Release UC-705 Penetration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Attn: Mike Gunger P.O. Box 877 Shalimar, FL 32579 Northrop G r u m a n Corp. Attn: Ernie Silva, B-2 Division 8900 E. Washington Blvd. Pic0 Rivera, CA 90660-3783 Karagozian & Case ...

  14. LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... was applied to a l i t h i u m f i r e 3 inches deep. ... of Metal-Water Reactions," Progress i n Nuclear Energy, Ser. I V , Technology, Engineering and Safety, 4: pp. ...

  15. Energy Efficiency in Separate Tenant Spaces … A Feasibility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Study E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y Energy Efficiency in Separate Tenant Spaces - A Feasibility Study 1 Executive Summary Commercial buildings account for 20% of energy used in ...

  16. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energys (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nations premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty

  17. Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery Davis

    2011-09-09

    The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

  18. Final Report, 2011-2014. Forecasting Carbon Storage as Eastern Forests Age. Joining Experimental and Modeling Approaches at the UMBS AmeriFlux Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Peter; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher; Nadelhoffer, Knute

    2015-03-12

    At the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) AmeriFlux sites (US-UMB and US-UMd), long-term C cycling measurements and a novel ecosystem-scale experiment are revealing physical, biological, and ecological mechanisms driving long-term trajectories of C cycling, providing new data for improving modeling forecasts of C storage in eastern forests. Our findings provide support for previously untested hypotheses that stand-level structural and biological properties constrain long-term trajectories of C storage, and that remotely sensed canopy structural parameters can substantially improve model forecasts of forest C storage. Through the Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET), we are directly testing the hypothesis that forest C storage will increase due to increasing structural and biological complexity of the emerging tree communities. Support from this project, 2011-2014, enabled us to incorporate novel physical and ecological mechanisms into ecological, meteorological, and hydrological models to improve forecasts of future forest C storage in response to disturbance, succession, and current and long-term climate variation

  19. Marine Renewable Energy Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigeant, Paul; Miller, John; Howes, Brian; McGowan, Jon G.; Baldwin, Kenneth; Grilli, Annette; Terray, Eugene

    2013-10-08

    Project Goals: The funding provided by this contract supported the following activities: A) Test Site Development; B) Seed Grant Funded Technology Development; C) Stakeholder Activities The first year of funding was dedicated to the formation of the NE MREC University Consortium which was comprised of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMD) and Amherst (UMA), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), University of New Hampshire (UNH), and the University of Rhode Island (URI). The consortium worked together to encourage research and promote benefits of obtaining energy from ocean wind, waves, tides and currents. In addition, NE MREC’s goal was to fund projects aimed at potential test sites with the first year funding going to studies of the potential for tidal device testing in Muskeget Channel, at the General Sullivan Bridge in New Hampshire, and for wave device testing at the proposed National Offshore Renewable Energy Innovation Zone (NOREIZ) located off the Massachusetts coast. The project spanned 4.5 years and addressed three specific tasks that are interrelated but also served as independent investigations.

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yale

    2014-07-01

    JHU/APL conducted solid propellant fire characterization tests in warm, humid, ambient conditions near sea level. Yttria and ceria surrogate materials were placed in the fires. The substrates simulating ground surfaces were concrete from a Kennedy Space Center launch pad, and steel covered with a protective ablative material representing a launch platform. In-situ instrumentation consisted of witness materials, thermocouples, air handlers, filters, and cascade impactors; remote instrumentation consisted of optical cameras and spectrometers. Test and analysis team members included the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Alliant Techsystems, and the Johns Hopkins University. Test data were analyzed, reported, and delivered, including plume rise and transport captured on video. Derivation of the alumina particle size distributions formed the basis for condensing vapor and agglomeration estimates. Assessment of alumina mass in the plume, along with the surrogate fraction from filter forensics, provided an estimate of airborne surrogate mass. Technical interchange meetings were held with SNL and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Specifications for the fire environment were developed and delivered. A thermochemistry model that simultaneously provides the maximum temperature and heat flux was developed and delivered. An SPIE paper on 3D pyrometry of the fire was written and presented.

  1. Section 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    u % m 2 2 & m 2 cosh(m 3 u) m 1 m 2 m 3 Session Papers 11 A Narrow Band Longwave Radiation Model Based on Parameters Fitted to Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model J. X. Warner and R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The results from the Intercomparison of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) (Ellingson et al. 1991) showed about ±2% differences in flux calculations between the narrowband models and line-by-bine models. Narrowband and

  2. 2014_Spring-Summer EEP Quarterly-08-07

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness V O L U M E 3 , I S S U E 2 S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 1 4 DOE hosts Clear Path II B Building on the success of last year's Clear Path exercise, on May 28, 2014 the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted Clear Path II Pre-Hurricane Season Energy Emergency Response Forum and Exercise at Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. Clear Path II brought together representatives from the

  3. B

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... CITIZENS INSTITUTE FOR A POSITIVE ENERGY POLICY LINDSAY A U D I N CITY O F M O N T I C E L L O CLARK UNIVERSITY CLEVELAND ELECTRIC I L L U M I N A T I N G R I C H A R D TERRY ...

  4. T O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . . M A ' lb-3 T O : FILE F R O M : A ---...w-w-- M E M O R A N D U M S U B J E C T : ;;HEl l,ol p & b & T-- & A L T E R N A T E . ---...v--B ---... N C I M E ...

  5. Construction of the noncommutative complex ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhituo

    2014-09-15

    We describe the construction of the noncommutative complex ball whose commutative analog is the Hermitian symmetric space D = SU(m, 1)/U(m), with the method of coherent state quantization. In the commutative limit, we obtain the standard manifold. We also consider a quantum field theory model on the noncommutative manifold.

  6. Monthly Energy Review - June 2002

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    i o n s b y I n d u s t r y U r a n i u m I n d u s t r y A n n u a l 2 0 0 1 Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information...

  7. CASL - University of Michigan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI The U-M College of Engineering is home to four leading engineering departments that are actively participating in CASL: Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Aerospace Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Key Contributions Computational methods development for radiation transport and coupled multiphysics simulation Uncertainty quantification for computational fluid dynamics with adjoint methods Analysis of structural

  8. Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    n s u m p tio n 20.68 19.50 18.77 19.13 19.28 0.8% Note: Gasoline consumption includes ethanol. Source: 2007-2010, EIA Petroleum Supply Monthly; 2011, February 2011 Short Term...

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T A P O O R O I N R D O R Y A D W E E W A L T M O C R M R N S N O W M A N A C S A N I U M C C S I W R Cloud Hail Icy Mittens Puddles Rain Rainbow Sleet Snow Snowman Storm Umbrella...

  10. G?)~~<+!T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... d i a t i o n C o n t a m i n a t i o n Clearance Report. ( E b e r l i n e I n s t r u m ... j e c t R a d i a t i o n Contamination Clearance Report March 28, 1979 - September 23, ...

  11. Lumens: The new way to shop for light

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    r a d i t i o n a l I n c a n d e s c e n t W a t t s L u m e n s ( B r i g h t n e s s ) LUMENS: THE NEW WAY TO SHOP FOR LIGHT Choose Your Next Light Bulb for the Brightness You ...

  12. A Roadmap for More Effective Requests for Proposals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Road Map for More Effective Requests for Proposal (RFP) Presented at DOE Office of Indian Energy Webinar P R E S E N T E R : B O B PA R K I N S , P E O P T I M U M G R O U P L L C ...

  13. P N

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... s o n n e l of Reynolds Engineering and E l e c t r i c ... Water was still dripping v e r y slowly into the cavity one ... damage i n t h i s A 4.6-m-deep s u m p a t the F i g u r e ...

  14. Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... N I IUQ I W I HQ Area C: H-rd Q u o s Eased on 9% UCL Concsntrmonr Burmr.lng n*l(Sp.olym Cunlculmi.) I B Y n h n g h m o n i m B m n Manpanels M W e n u m Nimte ...

  15. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  16. Aerodynamic, structural, and trajectory analysis of ASTRID-1 vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, L.S.; Iwaskiw, A.P.; Oursler, M.A.; Perini, L.L.; Schaefer, E.D.

    1994-02-10

    The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory, JHU/API, in support of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL, is conducting aerodynamic, trajectory, and structural analysis of the Advanced Single Stage Technology Rapid Insertion Demonstration (ASTRID) vehicle, being launched out of Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in February 1994. The launch is designated ASTRID-1 and is the first in a series of three that will be launched out of VAFB. Launch dates for the next two flights have not been identified, but they are scheduled for the 1994-1995 time frame. The primary goal of the ASTRID-1 flight is to test the LLNL light weight thrust on demand bi-propellant pumped divert propulsion system. The system is employed as the main thrusters for the ASTRID-1 vehicle and uses hydrazine as the mono-propellant. The major conclusions are: (1) The vehicle is very stable throughout flight (stability margin = 17 to 24 inches); (2) The aerodynamic frequency and the roll rate are such that pitch-roll interactions will be small; (3) The high stability margin combined with the high launcher elevation angle makes the vehicle flight path highly sensitive to perturbations during the initial phase of flight, i.e., during the first second of flight after leaving the rail; (4) The major impact dispersions for the test flight are due to winds. The wind impact dispersions are 90% dictated by the low altitude, 0 to 1000 ft., wind conditions; and (5) In order to minimize wind dispersions, head wind conditions are favored for the launch as November VAFB mean tail winds result in land impacts. The ballistic wind methodology can be employed to assess the impact points of winds at the launch site.

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    \ (l'- ( ~ 1 i 1 ,i D A T E /////y9 l3r.r~ G ? ? $ + . C o n tract N u m b e r This D o c u m e n t C o m i s t o f 1 2 3 P a g e s t T h :s is c o p y o f :$ a C l 2 e & x $ s n t& n g e d ta ..'l: -.,.t:, _ . :+ C '*.r b 'I dr, I y ..: /L . *I . . . t;y *a i .L ~ ..::..--r~ ;~ ..-c 2 7 . . . . . - L /x& c L .E - , I i::JL:[isd.re !,ff i.7 :*' --.--1---w-. -.I-- . . . . . ,,....,,.i--$ A T - 3 3 '-1 - c E N - 5 3 . b - = 8 "> L (;.-< M O U N D L A B O , R A T O R Y O p e

  18. News - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archives Events/News Archives 1st Annual CSTEC External Workshop: August 4, 2010 2nd Annual CSTEC External Workshop: May 3, 2011 3rd Annual CSTEC External Workshop: October 2, 2012 DOE to establish Energy Frontier Research Center in solar energy at U-M CSTEC investigators co-chair ICEL2010 Forcing mismatched elements together could yield better solar cells Recycling waste heat into energy: Researchers take a step toward more efficient conversion Multi-EFRC Collaborative Effort on TE in

  19. O O

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f C C o o n n s s u u m m e e r r A A d d v v o o c c a a t t e e 2515 Warren Ave., Suite 304 Telephone 307-777-7427 FAX 307-777-5748 TTY 307-777-5723 ...

  20. FINAL DRAFT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT DMEAST #11461499 v6 M E M O R A N D U M To: National Renewable Energy Laboratories From: R. Thomas Hoffmann Darin Lowder Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll LLP Date: June 30, 2009 Re: Residential Financing Options for Solar Power in Salt Lake County, Utah As part of our engagement with the National Renewable Energy Laboratories conducting the Salt Lake County Solar America Residential Finance Study, we have drafted this report summarizing the tools and mechanisms available for

  1. Pretreatment of isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with l-oxothiazolidine 4-carboxylate reduces sulfur mustard cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, C.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Despite 70 years of research, there appears to be no satisfactory prophylaxis or treatment for the vesicant chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD). Attempts to modify cytotoxicity of HD are now focusing on the use of intracellular 'scavengers' to interact with sulfur mustard before it can react with critical targets within the cell. Glutathione (GSH) is known to react readily with HD and is involved in the major metabolic pathway to HD detoxification. Glutathione level within the cell was raised 40-60% over control values by pretreatment of quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with 10 mM L-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC), a masked cysteine precursor. This increase in glutathione level was not toxic to the cells as judged by trypan blue dye exclusion and reached a maximum level in 48 hrs. PBL pretreated with 10 mM OTC for 48 hrs were harvested, washed, and exposed to 10, 50, or 100 uM HD. After an additional 48 hrs of incubation at 37 deg C, cytotoxicity was measured by propidium iodide dye uptake using flow cytometry. Pretreatment with OTC led to a 20% decrease in cytotoxicity with 10 uM HD, an 11% decrease in cytotoxicity with 50 uM HD, and an 8% decrease in cytotoxicity with 100 uM HD. Cytotoxicity of HD was not influenced by addition of 10 mM OTC 2 hrs after HD exposure. These results suggest that biochemical manipulation of intracellular GSH level may provide an important pretreatment regimen to reduce the cytotoxicity of HD.

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Section 1. Documentation Guide D O C U M E N T A T I O N G U I D E This section describes the data identification codes in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Sections 2 through 6 provide information for each of the major energy sources: coal, natural gas, petroleum, renewable energy, and electricity. Section 7 describes adjustments for consumption of industrial process fuel and intermediate products and other uncosted energy sources that are removed in the calculation of expenditures.

  3. Continuum physics with quenched overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Stephan; Hoelbling, Christian

    2005-10-01

    We calculate m{sub ud}=(m{sub u}+m{sub d})/2, m{sub s}, f{sub {pi}} and f{sub K} in the quenched continuum limit with UV-filtered overlap fermions. We see rather small scaling violations on lattices as coarse as a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1 GeV and conjecture that similar advantages would be manifest in unquenched studies.

  4. Microsoft Word - winter.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0, 1998 http:www.eia.doe.gov A v e r a g e T e m p e r a tu r e fo r F o u r M a jo r G a s C o n s u m in g M e tr o A r e a s 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 1 0 1 9 8 1 0...

  5. Microsoft Word - winter.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7, 1998 http:www.eia.doe.gov A v e r a g e T e m p e r a t u r e fo r F o u r M a jo r G a s C o n s u m in g M e t r o A r e a s 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 1 0 1 9 8 1...

  6. DOE/OR/20722-22 UC-70A DBaffu Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    22 UC-70A DBaffu Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-ACO5-81OR20722 c P c P RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT FOR THE DUPONT CHAMBER WORKS PLANT Deepwater, New Jersey Bechtel National, Inc. Advanced Technology Division June 1984 Technical Information Center Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy -- .,,.... - ~S",.W -. - - -. _ -- --- --.- ----.-- ___ ..---. -.~ LEGAL NOTICE ' I91i.m report war prepared u M account of work

  7. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U

  8. RADIOISOTOPE IDENTIFICATION OF SHIELDED AND MASKED SNM RDD MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    Sonar and speech techniques have been investigated to improve functionality and enable handheld and other man-portable, mobile, and portal systems to positively detect and identify illicit nuclear materials, with minimal data and with minimal false positives and false negatives. RadSonar isotope detection and identification is an algorithm development project funded by NA-22 and employing the resources of Savannah River National Laboratory and three University Laboratories (JHU-APL, UT-ARL, and UW-APL). Algorithms have been developed that improve the probability of detection and decrease the number of false positives and negatives. Two algorithms have been developed and tested. The first algorithm uses support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to determine the most prevalent nuclide(s) in a spectrum. It then uses a constrained weighted least squares fit to estimate and remove the contribution of these nuclide(s) to the spectrum, iterating classification and fitting until there is nothing of significance left. If any Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) were detected in this process, a second tier of more stringent classifiers are used to make the final SNM alert decision. The second algorithm is looking at identifying existing feature sets that would be relevant in the radioisotope identification context. The underlying philosophy here is to identify parallels between the physics and/or the structures present in the data for the two applications (speech analysis and gamma spectroscopy). The expectation is that similar approaches may work in both cases. The mel-frequency cepstral representation of spectra is widely used in speech, particularly for two reasons: approximation of the response of the human ear, and simplicity of channel effect separation (in this context, a 'channel' is a method of signal transport that affects the signal, examples being vocal tract shape, room echoes, and microphone response). Measured and simulated gamma-ray spectra from a hand

  9. U P A D O E M A T E R I A L T R A N S F E R S T U D Y

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U P A D O E M A T E R I A L T R A N S F E R S T U D Y 2015 UPA Report - January 2015 ES-1 TradeTech E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y This report examines the impacts of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) excess material transfers on the domestic (US) uranium market. The report addresses these impacts in the context of DOE's latest Request for Information (ROI), published on December 8, 2014, which outlines seven specific questions regarding the effect its material transfers have had on the US

  10. DOE/ES-0001 MASe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 MASe IKlWEOBYTIg APR 9 m A History of the Energy Research and Development Administration IVIarch 1982 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, IVIanagement and Administration Office of The Executive Secretary DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS U N U M i e DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or

  11. REMEDIAL ACTION WORK PLAN FOR THE MAYI'IOOD SITE JULY I9B4 UNITED...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    n d H y d r o l o g y 3 . 0 M a n a g e m e n t A p p r o a c h 4 . 0 W o r k P l a n 4 . ... m p l i n g a n d A n a l y s i s 4 . l 0 W a s t e V o l u m e P r o j e c t i o n s 4 . ...

  12. EM ARRA Best Practices and Lessons Learned Workshop: Field Manager's Top Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    N V I R O N M E N T A L I M P A C T S T A T E M E N T S U M M A R Y PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT DOE/EIS-0486 Final U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Washington, DC October 2015 This page intentionally left blank. SUMMARY PLAINS & EASTERN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT S-i COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability COOPERATING

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Section 7. Consumption Adjustments for Calculating Expenditures C O N S U M P T I O N A D J U S T M E N T S Expenditures developed in the EIA State Energy Data System (SEDS) are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the SEDS consumption estimates. The consumption estimates are adjusted to remove process fuel, intermediate petroleum products, electricity exports, and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaic

  14. Energy Efficiency in Separate Tenant Spaces … A Feasibility Study, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y Energy Efficiency in Separate Tenant Spaces - A Feasibility Study 1 Executive Summary Commercial buildings account for 20% of energy used in the United States economy, 1 with leased spaces representing approximately 50% of all commercial building energy use. 2 Increasingly, market pressures such as rising energy costs, new requirements to publicly disclose energy usage, and increased attention on energy efficiency as a means to combat climate change are

  15. Cars af Tomorrow and the American Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cars of Tomorrow and the American Community High School Curriculum Created by Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) Click on the links below to take you to the Chapter heading: Cover Page and Orientation Availability and Distribution of Alternative Fuels Health, Pollution, and Safety Operation, Maintenance, and Refueling Fuel Fact Sheets H I G H S C H O O L C U R R I C U L U M O N A L T E R N A T I V E F U E L S 50 Miles Street, Suite 3, Greenfield, MA 01301 www.nesea.org June, 2002

  16. DOE/EIA-0214(2014)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    214(2014) June 2016 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2014 2014 Consumption Summary Tables S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption 3 Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2014 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial

  17. DOE/EIA-0376(2014)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    376(2014) June 2016 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2014 2014 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Prices and Expenditures 3 Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2014 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel

  18. Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staggered fermions | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using staggered fermions Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, Daping Du, A. X. El-Khadra, J. Foley, E. D. Freeland6, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, Jongjeong Kim, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, Si-Wei Qiu, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D. Toussaint, R. S. Van de Water, Ran Zhou Using staggered

  19. Neutral B-meson mixing from three-flavor lattice quantum chromodynamics:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Neutral B-meson mixing from three-flavor lattice quantum chromodynamics: Determination of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, M. Di Pierro, A. X. El-Khadra, R. T. Evans, E. D. Freeland, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, J. E. Hetrick, R. Jain, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D.

  20. Nonperturbative QCD Simulations with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarks | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Nonperturbative QCD Simulations with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered Quarks Authors: Bazavov, A., Bernard, C., DeTar, C., Gottlieb, S., Heller, U.M., Hetrick, J.E., Laiho, J., Levkova, L., Mackenzie, P.B., Oktay, M.B., Sugar, R., Toussaint, D., Van de Water, R.S. Dramatic progress has been made over the last decade in the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) through the use of improved formulations of QCD on the lattice (improved

  1. D9E/OSE-0005 Energy History Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D9E/OSE-0005 Energy History Series }flOifMmSL^ N u m b e r 3 OJ Institutional Origins of The Department of Energy * *T THE FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION BY ROGER M. ANDERS NOVEMBER 1980 Historian's Office OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 mmmm OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNUMITW DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor

  2. Summary of Public Input

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    u m m a r y o f P u b l i c I n p u t M e e t i n g E m b a s s y S u i t e s D . C . C o n v e n t i o n C e n t e r 9 0 0 1 0 t h S t r e e t N W W a s h i n g t o n , D C 2 0 0 0 1 S e p t e m b e r 1 5 , 2 0 1 6 CONSENT- BASED SITING 1 : 3 0 P M O p e n H o u s e ( b e f o r e m e e t i n g b e g i n s ) 2 : 0 0 P M W e l c o m e 2 : 1 0 P M K e y n o t e , J o h n K o t e k , A c t i n g A s s i s t a n t S e c r e t a r y f o r N u c l e a r E n e r g y 2 : 2 5 P M S u m m a r y o f P u b

  3. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    SQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  4. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, David Barry; Oehrlein, Gottlieb

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge based with regard to low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand the mechanism by which atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) modify surfaces and how these modifications depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish this. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of representative biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic biomolecule changes. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) accompanied these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is the significant radical-induced deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example at atmospheric pressure, endotoxic biomolecule film inactivation may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at

  5. Final Report of “Collaborative research: Fundamental science of low temperature plasma-biological material interactions” (Award# DE-SC0005105)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Seog, Joonil; Graves, David; Chu, J. -W.

    2014-09-24

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge on low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand how deactivation processes depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish these objectives. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of model endotoxic biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic modifications in biomolecules. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) were accompanied by these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is that the significant deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching using radical species. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example, at atmospheric pressure, inactivation of endotoxic biomolecule film may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at atmospheric pressure using several types of low

  6. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02

    completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  7. H O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O I - * , TWl rrporl «lf pnpmd u u iccouni of work fponiortd by fbc Unfad Suirs Gomuncnl. KtHka U» Unllii s u m nor Ih. Vaiui SHIM Atomic EnotT Comminjon, oar cur or tncir cnptoynf. nor Mr of ihtk caatrutott, ubcoRtmuirB, or tlwk cmptorra. milMsuir w n a f r . «prM§orimp&cd.of iMnmauy _ { l i . UBl Ibbililr or raponiiMlitr ror Ui. n e o n , , cum- *** pUUuu or tmfol«B or W larornutloa. ippiniia. proaoct or procac rfiKlowd. or rtprucnu Out iu use would not fafrinf* pririirly owned

  8. S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  9. X

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    "__. _li _,.- r -+ .." .~ *-, ? . ,~ .t 1,. " . , Iii). R X ? . & R A D . D E F T . W O R K R E Q U E S T A ssigX U X l T o t B . v: B a rry D a te r 3 /1 5 /5 4 Frojeot lfo .r l-5 4 - 1 0 J o b Desorlptio n : Check o n d r u m cieanlw tests using s h o t b lasting. Follow-Up D a te : (1) 3 /1 9 /5 4 (3) (5) (2) (4) (6) R e q u e s t B y : R . C . H e a th e r to n r- , rJ

  10. FY 2011 Summary of Performance and Financial Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S S u u m m m m a a r r y y o o f f P P e e r r f f o o r r m m a a n n c c e e a a n n d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l I I n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n DOE/CF-0070 Agency Reporting he Reports Consolidation Act of 2000 authorizes federal agencies, with concurrence from the Office of Management and Budget, to consolidate various reports in order to provide performance, financial, and related information in a more meaningful and useful format. The Department of Energy (DOE) has

  11. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFF C . 1 Ili II11IlIIllllllllllllllI1111I~I B M - 171- 147 ~ ~ ~ 0 3 3 1 0 8 Biology and M e d i c i n e AMCHITKA BIOENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM BIOENVIRONMENTAL S A F E T Y STUDIES, AMC HITKA ISLAND, ALASKA CANNIKIN D t 2 MONTHS REPORT Compiled by James B . K i r k w o o d and R. G l e n Fuller J u n e , 1972 P r e p a r e d for the U . S. A t o m i c E n e r g y C o m m i s s i o n under C o n t r a c t N o . AT(2b- 1 ) - 17 1 - - BATTELLE Columbus Labor a t o r ies 5 05 King Avenue C o l u m b u s

  12. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  13. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  14. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    *. ( ARGONNE RATIONAL 1-Ci3ORATORY . 1 D&TX 7. my 19, 1349 70 t. Z. ROse at L, Em &=i*p~~4 DVur;uM hLl%L ?bvs -Lcs . FReti c. c. Fqpr an2 2. E. sulu+rr fis2 S*crep t & fbQ s-e: of the ?atagel DrFAm%un !! 1 0 * the >rt &Fz=z d t& &men of ScieJce & >&7*-z 4-q 2s'; %rZion 0C the ZLLS~~~ of Science a2 31~52-37 fo2 T&imcyyg c.=A+=< he-< - ,,a uas c:cgetes ALL 12, 1SL9. Z 0 sor;~~,-~-lioi! c.jme s 'm&-go& ~WC& c ",& d*cg&A

  15. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  16. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  17. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E. Ray; John R. Bargar; Alice C. Dohnalkova; Vaidee Sivaswamy; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2011-05-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and removal of soluble U(VI) from contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. U(VI) removal was examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of the near complete removal of 100 uM U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. Profiles of ortho-phosphate concentration over time suggested phosphate liberation from cells. However, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 uM AQDS. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 20% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. EXAFS fits further show that that U(IV) is present dominantly as a monomeric sorbed complex. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). These results suggest that strain UFO1 has the ability to mediate U(VI) removal from solution via both reductive and phosphate precipitation mechanisms, and may potentially be useful for the remediation of U

  18. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETER, GARY F.

    2014-07-16

    Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set

  19. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  20. Climate Action Champions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H I T E H O U S E C L I M AT E A C T I O N C H A M P I O N S T r i b a l L e a d e r F o r u m 4 M a r c h , 2 0 1 5 G O A L 1 : P r o m o t e c h a m p i o n s u c c e s s a n d a c h i e v e m e n t t o p e e r s a n d b e y o n d , t o s u p p o r t f u r t h e r c l i m a t e a c t i o n a t t h e c i t y, r e g i o n a l a n d t r i b a l g o v e r n m e n t l e v e l . G O A L 2 : I d e n t i f y & s t r e a m l i n e a c c e s s t o f e d e r a l f u n d i n g / t e c h n i c a l a s

  1. R I C H A R D H

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * R I C H A R D H . - B R Y A N G o v e r n o r A W i I',' '- 3 & /I ,,+ A ? - q ,& ... ' ; //, 7 : S T A T E O F N E V A D A D E P A R T M E N T O F H U M A N R E S O U R C E S B U R E A U O F R E G U L A T O R Y H E A L T H S E R V I C E S 5 0 5 East K i n g S treet, R o o m 2 0 2 C a r s o n City, N e v a d a 8 9 7 1 0 ( 7 0 2 ) 8 8 5 - 4 4 7 5 J E R R Y G R I E P E N T R O G Director February 1 9 , 1 9 8 5 J o h n E . B a u b l i tz, Director Division o f R e m e d i a l A ction P

  2. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  3. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N u n a v u t O n t a r i o A l b e r t a Te x a s N o r t h w e s t Te r r i t o r i e s M a n i t o b a B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S a s k a t c h e w a n Y u k o n M o n t a n a U t a h I d a h o C a l i f o r n i a N e v a d a O r e g o n A r i z o n a I o w a K a n s a s C o l o r a d o W y o m i n g S o n o r a N e w M e x i c o M i n n e s o t a N e b r a s k a O h i o C h i h u a h u a I l l i n o i s M i s s o u r i F l o r i d a G e o r g i a O k l a h o m a W a s h i n g t o n S o

  4. Te

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A l a s k a N u n a v u t O n t a r i o A l b e r t a Te x a s N o r t h w e s t Te r r i t o r i e s M a n i t o b a B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S a s k a t c h e w a n Y u k o n M o n t a n a U t a h I d a h o C a l i f o r n i a N e v a d a O r e g o n A r i z o n a I o w a K a n s a s C o l o r a d o W y o m i n g S o n o r a N e w M e x i c o M i n n e s o t a N e b r a s k a O h i o C h i h u a h u a I l l i n o i s M i s s o u r i F l o r i d a G e o r g i a O k l a h o m a W a s h i n

  5. T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    k a t u s R e p o r t o n t h e T h r e e N u c l e a r E x p e r i m e n t s F o r Stimul.ation of Tight G a s Sands ' G e r a l d R. Luetkehans Vice P r e siclent . & R G e o n u c l e a r C o r p o r a t i o n L a s Vegas, Nevada J o h n T o m a n L a w r e n c e ~ i v e ' r m o r e L a b o r a t o r y L i v e r m o r e , California F o r . P r e s e n t a t i o n a t t h e S y r n p o s i u m o n Stirfiulation. of Low P e r m e a b i l i t y R e s e r v o i r s F e b r u a r y 16 &

  6. T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    h i s is a n informal r e p o r t i n t e n d e d p r i m a r i l y for i n t e r n a l or l i m i t e d e x t e r n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n . ( T h e o p i n i o n s a n d c o n - c l u s i o n s s t a t e d are t h o s e of t h e a u t h o r a n d m a y or m a y not b e t h o s e of t h e l a b o r a t o r y . ) T h i s r e p o r t is not t o b e g i v e n a d d i t i o n a l e x t e r n a l d i s t r i b u t i o n or c i t e d i n e x t e r n a l d o c u - m e n t s w i t h o u t t h e c

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . ~- - - Environmental . T r i t i u m S u r v e i l l a n c e f o r ; P r o j e c t R u l i s o n . -~ - Donald T.' Wruble 36411 Vernon E. Andrews George A. Boysen I n t r o d u c t i o r ! 1 I \ Project!Rui-isY-was t h e second n u c l e a r experiment conducted j o i n t l y by t h e U. S. Government and p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y t o i n v e s t i g a t e t h e f e a s i b i l i t y of u s i n g n u c l e a r exp&tb&?s t o s t i m u l a t e p r o d u c t i o n of n a t u r a l g

  8. Free radicals release vasodilator(s) from endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X.; Hu, Y.C.; Gillis, C.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Electrolysis-generated free radicals (ES-FR) injure the endothelium (EC) of rabbit lungs perfused in situ. The authors now report that ES-FR release EDRF-like substance(s) from both vascular EC and smooth muscle sources. Rabbit aortic segments with or without endothelium or columns of bovine aortic EC grown on biosilon beads were perfused with Krebs solution containing 6 uM indomethacin and 10 units/ml SOD. Effluent passed over two endothelial-denuded aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine. Electrolysis of perfusion medium, released a vasodilator substance(s) from both. Vasodilatation was directly related to the current used and had t{sub 1/2} similar to that of EDRF released from EC columns by ADP. Release was attenuated by N-{omega}-nitro-L-arginine or sodium salicylate perfused through the cell column or aortic segments, or by 0.5% hemoglobin passed over the bioassay aortic rings. Finally, prompt transfer of 0.3-0.5 ml of medium, subjected to ES off-line, also relaxed pre-contracted aortic rings. Thus ES-FR can release EDRF-like substance(s) from both aortic EC and EC-denuded aortic smooth muscle. Since release was attenuated by salicylate, a specific trapping agent for hydroxyl radicals, the authors suggest that the latter is related to release of the vasodilator.

  9. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2014-04-01

    The workshop was held from September 23-25, 2013 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Dragan Huterer, Katherine Freese, and Heidi Wu (University of Michigan). Marilena Lo Verde (University of Chicago) also served as an external organizer. This workshop sought to gather experimentalists and theorists to discuss and define directions in cosmology research after the 1st year release of Planck data. The workshop included 35 invited (non-U-M) cosmologists, most of them relatively junior. The workshop was notable for spirited discussion of various theoretical ideas and experimental developments, and particularly on how one could test theory with ongoing and future experiments. In our follow-up poll, 95% of participants reported that interactions with other participants at the workshop may lead to further collaboration. Most participants (again about 95%) reported that they are very satisfied with the quality of the program, information they received, and the logistical support. Slides are available on line at: http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/CAP13/program.html. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 23 participants came under the program. Slides are available on line for talks when applicable: http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/winter 2014 and http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/fall-2013.

  10. MASTER Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Canada Limited ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF NEUTRONS SCATTERED FROM GRAPHITE, LIGHT AND HEAVY WATER,ICE,ZIRCONIUM HY0RI0E,1ITHIUM HYORIOE,SOOIUM HYDRIDE AND CHLORIDE BY THE BERYLLIUM DETECTOR METHOD C R N P 9 4 8 b y A . D . B . W O O D S , B . N . B R O C K H O U S E , M. S A K A M O T O A N D R . N . S I N C L A I R P a p e r f o r P r e s e n t a t i o n a t t h e I A E A S y m p o s i u m on I n e l a s t i c S c a t t e r i n g o f N e u t r o n s i n S o l i d s a n d L i q u i d s , V i e n n

  11. Spokane Seattle Portland Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spokane Seattle Portland Y a k i m a R i d g e Um tan um Rid ge R a t t l e s n a k e M o u n t a i n G a b l e M o u n t a i n G a b l e B u t t e Sa dd le M ou nt a in s H w y . 2 4 0 Hwy. 24 Hw y. 243 H w y . 2 4 4 0 0 4 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 0 1106.1 m 4 0 0 4 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 0 821.7 m 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 W h i t e B l u f f s 2 0 0 2 0 0 400 400 200 200 600 600 6 0 0 6 0 0 W h i t e B l u f f s WB10 Ponds S a d d le M o u n ta in L a k e C o l u m b i a R i v e

  12. C E N T R A L F IL E S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  16. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ?25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  17. TH-C-17A-02: New Radioluminescence Strategies Based On CRET (Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer) for Imaging and Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volotskova, O; Sun, C; Pratx, G; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov photons are produced when charged particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a media with a speed greater than that of the light in the media. Cerenkov radiation is mostly in the UV/Blue region and, thus, readily absorbed by biological tissue. Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) is a wavelength-shifting phenomenon from blue Cerenkov light to more penetrating red wavelengths. We demonstrate the feasibility of in-depth imaging of CRET light originating from radionuclides realized by down conversion of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, a novel particle composed of few atoms of gold coated with serum proteins) in vivo. Methods: Bovine Serum Albumin, Human Serum Albumin and Transferrin conjugated gold nanoclusters were synthesized, characterized and examined for CRET. Three different clinically used radiotracers: 18F-FDG, 90Y and 99mTc were used. Optical spectrum (440–750 nm) was recorded by sensitive bioluminescence imaging system at physiological temperature. Dose dependence (activity range from 0.5 up to 800uCi) and concentration dependence (0.01 to 1uM) studies were carried out. The compound was also imaged in a xenograft mouse model. Results: Only β+ and β--emitting radionuclides (18F-FDG, 90Y) are capable of CRET; no signal was found in 99mTc (γ-emitter). The emission peak of CRET by AuNCs was found to be ∼700 nm and was ∼3 fold times of background. In vitro studies showed a linear dependency between luminescence intensity and dose and concentration. CRET by gold nanoclusters was observed in xenografted mice injected with 100uCi of 18F-FDG. Conclusion: The unique optical, transport and chemical properties of AuNCs (gold nanoclusters) make them ideal candidates for in-vivo imaging applications. Development of new molecular imaging probes will allow us to achieve substantially improved spatiotemporal resolution, sensitivity and specificity for tumor imaging and detection.

  18. BENZO[a]PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE PERTURBATION OF CELL CYCLE KINETICS OF SYNCHRONIZED MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlman, A.L.; Navsky, B.N.; Bartholomew, J.C

    1980-07-01

    A cell cycle synchronization system is described for the analysis of the perturbation of cell cycle kinetics and the cycle-phase specificity of chemicals and other agents. We used the system to study the effects of ({+-})r-7, t-8-dihydroxy-t-9, 10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BaP diol epoxide) upon the cell cycle of mouse liver epithelial cells(NMuLi). BaP diol epoxide(0.6 uM) was added to replated cultures of NMuLi cells that had been synchronized in various stages of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation. DNA histograms were obtained by flow cytometry as a function of time after replating. The data were analyzed by a computer modeling routine and reduced to a few graphs illustrating the 'net effects' of the BaP diol epoxide relative to controls. BaP diol epoxide slowed S-phase traversal in all samples relative to their respective control. Traversal through G{sub 2}M was also slowed by at least 50%. BaP diol epoxide had no apparent effect upon G{sub 1} traversal by cycling cells, but delayed the recruitment of quiescent G{sub 0} cells by about 2 hrs. The methods described constitute a powerful new approach for probing the cell cycle effects of a wide variety of agents. The present system appears to be extremely sensitive and capable of characterizing the action of agents on each phase of the cell cycle. The methods are automatable and would allow for the assay and possible differential characterization of mutagens and carcinogens.

  19. Assessment of beating parameters in human induced pluripotent stem cells enables quantitative in vitro screening for cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko, Oksana; Cromwell, Evan F.; Crittenden, Carole; Wignall, Jessica A.; Wright, Fred A.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-12-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes show promise for screening during early drug development. Here, we tested a hypothesis that in vitro assessment of multiple cardiomyocyte physiological parameters enables predictive and mechanistically-interpretable evaluation of cardiotoxicity in a high-throughput format. Human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were exposed for 30 min or 24 h to 131 drugs, positive (107) and negative (24) for in vivo cardiotoxicity, in up to 6 concentrations (3 nM to 30 uM) in 384-well plates. Fast kinetic imaging was used to monitor changes in cardiomyocyte function using intracellular Ca{sup 2+} flux readouts synchronous with beating, and cell viability. A number of physiological parameters of cardiomyocyte beating, such as beat rate, peak shape (amplitude, width, raise, decay, etc.) and regularity were collected using automated data analysis. Concentrationresponse profiles were evaluated using logistic modeling to derive a benchmark concentration (BMC) point-of-departure value, based on one standard deviation departure from the estimated baseline in vehicle (0.3% dimethyl sulfoxide)-treated cells. BMC values were used for cardiotoxicity classification and ranking of compounds. Beat rate and several peak shape parameters were found to be good predictors, while cell viability had poor classification accuracy. In addition, we applied the Toxicological Prioritization Index (ToxPi) approach to integrate and display data across many collected parameters, to derive cardiosafety ranking of tested compounds. Multi-parameter screening of beating profiles allows for cardiotoxicity risk assessment and identification of specific patterns defining mechanism-specific effects. These data and analysis methods may be used widely for compound screening and early safety evaluation in drug development. - Highlights: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are promising in vitro models. We tested if evaluation of

  20. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Two Dictyostelium Cellobiohydrolases from the Amoebozoa Kingdom Reveal a High Level of Conservation Between Distant Phylogenetic Trees of Life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hobdey, Sarah E.; Knott, Brandon C.; Momeni, Majid Haddad; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Borisova, Anna S.; Podkaminer, Kara K.; VanderWall, Todd A.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Glycoside Hydrolase Family 7 (GH7) cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) are commonly employed enzymes in plant cell wall degradation across eukaryotic kingdoms of life, as they provide significant hydrolytic potential in cellulose turnover. To date, many fungal GH7 CBHs have been examined, yet many questions remain regarding structure-activity relationships in these important natural and commercial enzymes. Here, we present crystal structures and biochemical analysis of two GH7 CBHs from social amoeba: Dictyostelium discoideum and Dictyostelium purpureum (DdiCel7A and DpuCel7A, respectively). DdiCel7A and DpuCel7A natively consist of a catalytic domain and do not exhibit a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). The structures, resolved to 2.1 Amore » (DdiCel7A), and 2.7 A (DpuCel7A), are homologous to other GH7 CBHs with an enclosed active site tunnel. Two primary differences between the Dictyostelium CBHs and the archetypal model GH7 CBH from Trichoderma reesei Cel7A (TreCel7A) occur near the hydrolytic active site and the product binding sites. To compare the activity of these enzymes with TreCel7A, the Family 1 TreCel7A CBM and linker was added to the C-terminus of the Dictyostelium enzymes, DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM, which were recombinantly expressed in T. reesei. DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM hydrolyze Avicel, pretreated corn stover, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose as efficiently as TreCel7A when compared at their temperature optima. The Ki of cellobiose is significantly higher for DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM than for TreCel7A: 205, 130, and 29 uM, respectively. Taken together, the present study highlights the remarkable conservation in the activity of these key natural and industrial enzymes across quite distant phylogenetic trees of life.« less

  1. Enhanced vector borne disease surveillance of California Culex mosquito populations reveals spatial and species-specific barriers of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Curtis, Deanna Joy; Koh, Chung-Yan; Brodsky, Benjamin H; Lane, Todd

    2014-08-01

    Monitor i ng in f ectio n s in v ect o rs su c h as m osquit o es, s a nd fl i es, tsetse fl i es, a nd ticks to i denti f y hu m a n path o gens m a y s e r v e as a n ear l y w arn i ng det e ction system t o dir e ct loc a l g o v er n ment dise a se pr e v en t i v e m easu r e s . One major hurdle i n de t ection is the abi l i t y to scre e n l arge n u mbers of v e c t ors for h uman patho g ens w i thout t h e u s e of ge n o t y pe - s p ecific m o lecu l ar tec h nique s . N e x t genera t ion s equ e nc i ng (NG S ) pr o v i des a n unbi a sed p latfo r m capab l e of identi f y i ng k n o w n a n d unk n o w n p ath o ge n s circula t ing w i thin a v e ctor p opul a tion, but utili z ing t h is te c h nolo g y i s tim e - con s u ming a n d cos t l y for v ecto r -b o rne disease su r v e illan c e pr o gra m s. T o addr e s s this w e d e v e lop e d cos t -eff e ct i v e Ilumina(r) R NA- S eq l i bra r y p r epara t ion m e thodol o gies i n con j u n ction w i t h an automa t ed c ompu t at i onal a n a l y sis pipel i n e to ch a racter i ze t h e microbial popula t ions c ircula t i n g in Cu l e x m o squit o e s (Cul e x qui n quef a s c iatu s , C ul e x quinq u efasc i atus / pip i ens co m pl e x h y bri d s, and C u l e x ta r salis ) t hroug h out Californ i a. W e assembled 2 0 n o vel a n d w e l l -do c ume n ted a r b o v i ruses repres e nting mem b e rs of B u n y a v ir i da e , F l a v i virid a e, If a virida e , Meson i v i rida e , Nid o v iri d ae, O rtho m y x o virid a e, Pa r v o v iri d ae, Re o virid a e, R h a b d o v i rid a e, T y m o v iri d ae, a s w ell as s e v e r al u n assi g n e d v irus e s . In addit i o n, w e m app e d mRNA s pecies to d i vergent s peci e s of t r y panos o ma a nd pl a s modium eu k a r yotic parasit e s and cha r a c terized t he p r oka r yot i c microb i al c o mposit i on to i d enti f y bacteri a l tran s c r ipts der i v ed from wolba c hia, clo s tridi u m, m y c oplas m a, fusoba c