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1

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

2

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

3

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

4

Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

Nguyen, Khanh Bao

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

History of extreme ultraviolet lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology was proposed and progressed on both hemispheres in the latter part of the 1980s independently. Although this technology is a design using a catoptric system instead of refraction lens and the accuracy of subnanometer is demanded for all component engineering the research and development of Japan and the United States has led to significant breakthroughs in processing and measurement technology over the past 20 years. EUVL is now the most promising next-generation technology for large scale integration fabrication. This article discusses the beginnings of EUVL what advances are needed and future prospects.

Hiroo Kinoshita

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Validity of the thin mask approximation in extreme ultraviolet mask roughness simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the case of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, modeling has shown that reflector phase roughness on the lithographic mask is a significant concern due to the image plan speckle it causes and the resulting line-edge roughness on imaged features. Modeling results have recently been used to determine the requirements for future production worthy masks yielding the extremely stringent specification of 50 pm rms roughness. Owing to the scale of the problem in terms of memory requirements, past modeling results have all been based on the thin mask approximation. EUV masks, however, are inherently three dimensional in nature and thus the question arises as to the validity of the thin mask approximation. Here we directly compare image plane speckle calculation results using the fast two dimensional thin mask model to rigorous finite-difference time-domain results and find the two methods to be comparable.

Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Critical illumination condenser for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A condenser system couples a radiation source to an imaging system. The authors have designed a critical illumination condenser system which meets the technical challenges of extreme ultraviolet projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The optical system, a three spherical mirror optical design, is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. This type of condenser optical design is sufficiently versatile to be employed with two distinct systems, one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and one from AT and T/Sandia.

Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Large-solid-angle illuminators for extreme ultraviolet lithography with laser plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Plasma Sources (LPSS) of extreme ultraviolet radiation are an attractive alternative to synchrotron radiation sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) due to their modularity, brightness, and modest size and cost. To fully exploit the extreme ultraviolet power emitted by such sources, it is necessary to capture the largest possible fraction of the source emission half-sphere while simultaneously optimizing the illumination stationarity and uniformity on the object mask. In this LDRD project, laser plasma source illumination systems for EUVL have been designed and then theoretically and experimentally characterized. Ellipsoidal condensers have been found to be simple yet extremely efficient condensers for small-field EUVL imaging systems. The effects of aberrations in such condensers on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging have been studied with physical optics modeling. Lastly, the design of an efficient large-solid-angle condenser has been completed. It collects 50% of the available laser plasma source power at 14 nm and delivers it properly to the object mask in a wide-arc-field camera.

Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development of a laboratory extreme-ultraviolet lithography tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a laboratory EUV lithography tool based on a laser plasma source, a 10x Schwarzchild camera, and a magnetically levitated wafer stage is presented. Interferometric measurements of the camera aberrations are incorporated into physical-optics simulations to estimate the EUV imaging performance of the camera. Experimental results demonstrate the successful matching of five multilayer reflecting surfaces, coated to specification for a wide range of figure and incidence angle requirements. High-resolution, 10x-reduction images of a reflection mask are shown.

Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Nissen, R.P.; Wilkerson, G.A.; Paul, P.H.; Birtola, S.R.; Jin, P.S.; Arling, R.W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Himel, M.D.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tennant, D.M.; Fetter, L.A.; Wood, O.R. II [AT& T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States); Waskiewicz, W.K.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Jewell, T.E. [Jewell (T.E.), Boulder, CO (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Multilayer reflective coatings for extreme-ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayer mirror coatings which reflect extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are a key enabling technology for EUV lithography. Mo/Si multilayers with reflectances of 67.5% at 13.4 nm are now routinely achieved and reflectances of 70 2% at 11.4 nm were obtained with MO/Be multilayers. High reflectance is achieved with careful control of substrate quality, layer thicknesses, multilayer materials, interface quality, and surface termination. Reflectance and film stress were found to be stable relative to the requirements for application to EUV lithography. The run-to-run reproducibility of the reflectance peak position was characterized to be better than 0.2%, providing the required wavelength matching among the seven multilayer-coated mirrors used in the present lithography system design. Uniformity of coating was improved to better than 0.5% across 150 mm diameter substrates. These improvements in EUV multilayer mirror technology will enable us to meet the stringent specifications for coating the large optical substrates for our next-generation EUV lithography system.

Montcalm, C., LLNL

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Atom Nano-lithography with Multi-layer Light Masks: Particle Optics Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the focusing of atoms by multiple layers of standing light waves in the context of atom lithography. In particular, atomic localization by a double-layer light mask is examined using the optimal squeezing approach. Operation of the focusing setup is analyzed both in the paraxial approximation and in the regime of nonlinear spatial squeezing for the thin-thin as well as thin-thick atom lens combinations. It is shown that the optimized double light mask may considerably reduce the imaging problems, improve the quality of focusing and enhance the contrast ratio of the deposited structures.

R. Arun; I. Sh. Averbukh; T. Pfau

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Extreme ultraviolet lithography: A few more pieces of the puzzle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the performance of extreme ultraviolet micro?eld expo-calibration of extreme ultraviolet photoresists,” Opticsthree essential components of extreme ultraviolet (EUV)

Anderson, Christopher N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Effects of Oxygen Plasma on the Chemical Composition and Morphology of the Ru Capping Layer of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Mask Blanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination removal from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask surfaces is one of the most important aspects to improve reliability for the next generation of EUV lithography. We report chemical and morphological changes of the ruthenium (Ru) mask surface after oxygen plasma treatment using surface sensitive analytical methods: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Chemical analysis of the EUV masks shows an increase in the subsurface oxygen concentration, Ru oxidation and surface roughness. XPS spectra at various photoelectron takeoff angles suggest that the EUV mask surface was covered with chemisorbed oxygen after oxygen plasma treatment. It is proposed that the Kirkendall effect is the most plausible mechanism that explains the Ru surface oxidation. The etching rate of the Ru capping layer by oxygen plasma was estimated to be 1.5 {+-} 0.2 {angstrom}/min, based on TEM cross sectional analysis.

Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of compact extreme ultraviolet interferometry for on-line test of lithography cameras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a candidate technology for the microelectronics industry with design rules for 0.1 {micro}m features and beyond. When characterizing an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic optical system, visible light interferometry is limited to measuring wavefront aberration caused by surface figure error while failing to measure wavefront errors induced by the multilayer coatings. This fact has generated interest in developing interferometry at an EUV camera`s operational wavelength (at-wavelength testing), which is typically around 13 nm. While a laser plasma source (LPS) is being developed as a lithography production source, it has generally been considered that only an undulator located at a synchrotron facility can provide the necessary laser-like point source for EUV interferometry. Although an undulator-based approach has been successfully demonstrated, it would be advantageous to test a camera in its operational configuration. The authors are developing the latter approach by utilizing extended source size schemes to provide usable flux throughput. A slit or a grating mounted in front of the source can provide the necessary spatial coherence for Ronchi interferometry. The usable source size is limited only by the well-corrected field of view of the camera under test. The development of this interferometer will be presented.

Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Nissen, R.P.; Krenz, K.D.; Stulen, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Sweatt, W.C.; Warren, M.E.; Wendt, J.R.; Kravitz, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bjorkholm, J.E. [AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Wafer and reticle positioning system for the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Engineering Test Stand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an overview of the wafer and reticle positioning system of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Engineering Test Stand (ETS). EUVL represents one of the most promising technologies for supporting the integrated circuit (IC) industry's lithography needs for critical features below 100nm. EUVL research and development includes development of capabilities for demonstrating key EUV technologies. The ETS is under development at the EUV Virtual National Laboratory, to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data that supports production-tool development. The stages and their associated metrology operated in a vacuum environment and must meet stringent outgassing specifications. A tight tolerance is placed on the stage tracking performance to minimize image distortion and provide high position repeatability. The wafer must track the reticle with less than {+-}3nm of position error and jitter must not exceed 10nm rms. To meet these performance requirements, magnetically levitated positioning stages utilizing a system of sophisticated control electronics will be used. System modeling and experimentation have contributed to the development of the positioning system and results indicate that desired ETS performance is achievable.

WRONOSKY,JOHN B.; SMITH,TONY G.; CRAIG,MARCUS J.; STURGIS,BEVERLY R.; DARNOLD,JOEL R.; WERLING,DAVID K.; KINCY,MARK A.; TICHENOR,DANIEL A.; WILLIAMS,MARK E.; BISCHOFF,PAUL

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Maskless, reticle-free, lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characterization of an expanded-field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10x-reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 {mu}m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view, an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An off-set aperture, located on the convex primary, defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 450 turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUV radiation onto a near-normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated, matched and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave-front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of two of the design value. Images recorded in PMMA and ZEP 520 resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 {mu}m.

Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Characterization of an expanded?field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10×?reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 ?m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An offset aperture located on the convex primary defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet(EUV)radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 45° turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUVradiation onto a near?normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated matched and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave?front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of 2 of the design value. Images recorded in poly(methyl methacrylate) and ZEP 520 (Nippon Zeon) resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 ?m.

G. D. Kubiak; D. A. Tichenor; A. K. Ray?Chaudhuri; M. E. Malinowski; R. H. Stulen; S. J. Haney; K. W. Berger; R. P. Nissen; G. A. Wilkerson; P. H. Paul; J. E. Bjorkholm; L. A. Fetter; R. R. Freeman; M. D. Himel; A. A. MacDowell; D. M. Tennant; O. R. Wood II; W. K. Waskiewicz; D. L. White; D. L. Windt; T. E. Jewell

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Characterization of an expanded-field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10[times]-reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 [mu]m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view, an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An offset aperture, located on the convex primary, defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 45[degree] turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUV radiation onto a near-normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated, matched, and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave-front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of 2 of the design value. Images recorded in poly(methyl methacrylate) and ZEP 520 (Nippon Zeon) resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 [mu]m.

Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Nissen, R.P.; Wilkerson, G.A.; Paul, P.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States)); Bjorkholm, J.E.; Fetter, L.A.; Freeman, R.R.; Himel, M.D.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tennant, D.M.; Wood, O.R. II (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733-3030 (United States)); Waskiewicz, W.K.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974-2070 (United States)); Jewell, T.E. (Optical Engineering Consultant, Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method for generating extreme ultraviolet with mather-type plasma accelerators for use in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave uses two intersecting plasma beams generated by two plasma accelerators. The intersection of the two plasma beams emits electromagnetic radiation and in particular radiation in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. In the preferred orientation two axially aligned counter streaming plasmas collide to produce an intense source of electromagnetic radiation at the 13.5 nm wavelength. The Mather type plasma accelerators can utilize tin, or lithium covered electrodes. Tin, lithium or xenon can be used as the photon emitting gas source.

Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL); Konkashbaev, Isak (Bolingbrook, IL)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

25

Metrology Sources for EUV Lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mask inspection and validation are key elements of the EUV lithography infrastructure. Requirements for the light sources to enable these tools will be ...

Home, Steve; Blackborow, Paul; Bensen, Matthew M; Partlow, Matthew J; Gustafson, Deborah; Goldstein, Michael

26

At-wavelength interferometry for extreme ultraviolet lithography Edita Tejnil,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was implemented to characterize the aberrations of a 10 Schwarzschild multilayer-coated reflective optical system with imaging performed with the 10 Schwarzschild optic on an extreme ultraviolet exposure tool. © 1997 American by the figure of mirror surfaces and by multilayer coating properties.1 Common-path techniques, such as point

Bokor, Jeffrey

27

Tuning extreme ultraviolet emission for optimum coupling with multilayer mirrors for future lithography through control of ionic charge states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the identification of the optimum plasma conditions for a laser-produced plasma source for efficient coupling with multilayer mirrors at 6.x nm for beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography. A small shift to lower energies of the peak emission for Nd:YAG laser-produced gadolinium plasmas was observed with increasing laser power density. Charge-defined emission spectra were observed in electron beam ion trap (EBIT) studies and the charge states responsible identified by use of the flexible atomic code (FAC). The EBIT spectra displayed a larger systematic shift of the peak wavelength of intense emission at 6.x nm to longer wavelengths with increasing ionic charge. This combination of spectra enabled the key ion stage to be confirmed as Gd{sup 18+}, over a range of laser power densities, with contributions from Gd{sup 17+} and Gd{sup 19+} responsible for the slight shift to longer wavelengths in the laser-plasma spectra. The FAC calculation also identified the origin of observed out-of-band emission and the charge states responsible.

Ohashi, Hayato, E-mail: ohashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Kawasaki, Masato [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kanehara, Tatsuhiko; Aida, Yuya; Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Torii, Shuichi; Makimura, Tetsuya [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Passivating overcoat bilayer for multilayer reflective coatings for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passivating overcoat bilayer is used for multilayer reflective coatings for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft x-ray applications to prevent oxidation and corrosion of the multilayer coating, thereby improving the EUV optical performance. The overcoat bilayer comprises a layer of silicon or beryllium underneath at least one top layer of an elemental or a compound material that resists oxidation and corrosion. Materials for the top layer include carbon, palladium, carbides, borides, nitrides, and oxides. The thicknesses of the two layers that make up the overcoat bilayer are optimized to produce the highest reflectance at the wavelength range of operation. Protective overcoat systems comprising three or more layers are also possible.

Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

Bokor, Jeffrey (Oakland, CA); Lin, Yun (Berkeley, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. ...

Winston, Donald

31

XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

Newnam, B.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optimization of extreme ultraviolet photons emission and collection in mass-limited laser produced plasmas for lithography application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of extreme ultraviolet photons emission and collection in mass-limited laser produced in DPP or with pre-pulsing in LPP provide wide area for optimization in regards to conversion efficiency and collection as well as calculating photons source location and size. We optimized several parameters of dual

Harilal, S. S.

33

Optimization of extreme ultraviolet photons emission and collection in mass-limited laser produced plasmas for lithography application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress in development of commercial system for next generation EUV lithography requires, among other factors, significant improvement in EUV photon sources such as discharge produced plasma (DPP) and laser produced plasma (LPP) devices. There are still many uncertainties in determining the optimum device since there are many parameters for the suitable and efficient energy source and target configuration and size. Complex devices with trigger lasers in DPP or with pre-pulsing in LPP provide wide area for optimization in regards to conversion efficiency (CE) and components lifetime. We considered in our analysis a promising LPP source configuration using 10-30 {mu}m tin droplet targets, and predicted conditions for the most efficient EUV radiation output and collection as well as calculating photons source location and size. We optimized several parameters of dual-beam lasers and their relationship to target size. We used our HEIGHTS comprehensive and integrated full 3D simulation package to study and optimize LPP processes with various target sizes to maximize the CE of the system.

Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the chemical influence of cleaning of the Ru capping layer on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector surface. The cleaning of EUV reflector to remove the contamination particles has two requirements: to prevent corrosion and etching of the reflector surface and to maintain the reflectivity functionality of the reflector after the corrosive cleaning processes. Two main approaches for EUV reflector cleaning, wet chemical treatments [sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM), ozonated water, and ozonated hydrogen peroxide] and dry cleaning (oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment), were tested. The changes in surface morphology and roughness were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the surface etching and change of oxidation states were probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Significant surface oxidation of the Ru capping layer was observed after oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment, while the oxidation is unnoticeable after SPM treatment. Based on these surface studies, the authors found that SPM treatment exhibits the minimal corrosive interactions with Ru capping layer. They address the molecular mechanism of corrosive gas and liquid-phase chemical interaction with the surface of Ru capping layer on the EUV reflector.

Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Seo, Hyungtak; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Effects of Oxygen Plasma on the Chemical Composition and Morphology of the Ru Capping Layer of the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Mask Blanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P-5B-03 The effects of oxygen plasma on the chemicalRu) mask surface after oxygen plasma treatment using surfacein the subsurface oxygen concentration, Ru oxidation and

Belau, Leonid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nanoimprint lithography with a soft roller and focused UV light for flexible substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a nanoimprint lithography system for flexible substrates. With this system, a flexible substrate is pressed on a stamp with a low pressing load, a narrow contact area, and a focused ultraviolet (UV) light. The system efficiently transfers ... Keywords: Flexible substrate, Nanoimprint lithography, Roller, Ultraviolet light

Hyungjun Lim; Geehong Kim; Kee-Bong Choi; Mira Jeong; Jihyeong Ryu; Jaejong Lee

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Maskless lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Maskless lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides. 12 figs.

Sweatt, W.C.; Stulen, R.H.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Absorbance modulation optical lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the concept of absorbance-modulation optical lithography (AMOL) is described, and the feasibility experimentally verified. AMOL is an implementation of nodal lithography, which is not bounded by the diffraction ...

Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Microfield exposure tool enables advances in EUV lithography development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With demonstrated resist resolution of 20 nm half pitch, the SEMATECH Berkeley BUV microfield exposure tool continues to push crucial advances in the areas of BUY resists and masks. The ever progressing shrink in computer chip feature sizes has been fueled over the years by a continual reduction in the wavelength of light used to pattern the chips. Recently, this trend has been threatened by unavailability of lens materials suitable for wavelengths shorter than 193 nm. To circumvent this roadblock, a reflective technology utilizing a significantly shorter extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength (13.5 nm) has been under development for the past decade. The dramatic wavelength shrink was required to compensate for optical design limitations intrinsic in mirror-based systems compared to refractive lens systems. With this significant reduction in wavelength comes a variety of new challenges including developing sources of adequate power, photoresists with suitable resolution, sensitivity, and line-edge roughness characteristics, as well as the fabrication of reflection masks with zero defects. While source development can proceed in the absence of available exposure tools, in order for progress to be made in the areas of resists and masks it is crucial to have access to advanced exposure tools with resolutions equal to or better than that expected from initial production tools. These advanced development tools, however, need not be full field tools. Also, implementing such tools at synchrotron facilities allows them to be developed independent of the availability of reliable stand-alone BUY sources. One such tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool (MET). The most unique attribute of the SEMA TECH Berkeley MET is its use of a custom-coherence illuminator made possible by its implementation on a synchrotron beamline. With only conventional illumination and conventional binary masks, the resolution limit of the 0.3-NA optic is approximately 25 nm, however, with EUV not expected in production before the 22-nm half pitch node even finer resolution capabilities are now required from development tools. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET's custom-coherence illuminator allows it to be used with aggressive modified illumination enabling kJ factors as low as 0.25. Noting that the lithographic resolution of an exposure tool is defined as k{sub 1}{lambda}/NA, yielding an ultimate resolution limit of 11 nm. To achieve sub-20-nm aerial-image resolution while avoiding forbidden pitches on Manhattan-geometry features with the centrally-obscured MET optic, a 45-degree oriented dipole pupil fill is used. Figure 1 shows the computed aerial-image contrast as a function of half pitch for a dipole pupil fill optimized to print down to the 19-nm half pitch level. This is achieved with relatively uniform performance at larger dimensions. Using this illumination, printing down to the 20-nm half pitch level has been demonstrated in chemically amplified resists as shown in Fig. 2. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET tool plays a crucial role in the advancement of EUV resists. The unique programmable coherence properties of this tool enable it to achieve higher resolution than other EUV projection tools. As presented here, over the past year the tool has been used to demonstrate resist resolutions of 20 half pitch. Although not discussed here, because the Berkeley MET tool is a true projection lithography tool, it also plays a crucial role in advanced EUV mask research. Examples of the work done in this area include defect printability, mask architecture, and phase shift masks.

Naulleau, Patrick

2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

MOVING MASK LITHOGRAPHY FOR REAL-TIME SYNTHESIS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, California, USA #12;First, we measured the flow speed by generating a test particle and measuring its speed to the limitations in the field of view and computational speed, the maximum measurable flow speed is ~300 µm-phase photocurable oligomer stream with the UV light exposure using a high-magnification objective lens [1]. However

Park, Namkyoo

45

Plating/Lithography-new  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plating/Lithography Plating/Lithography Manufacturing Technologies The Plating capabilities in the Thin Film, Vacuum and Packaging department include both electroless and electro plating. These processes support Multi-Chip Module, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), Weapons Systems (Neutron Tubes) and other miscellaneous projects. Photo-processing facilities provide pattern- ing and circuitry on a variety of substrate materials. The department's capabilities include dry film, liquid, and electrophoreti- cally deposited resist application, exposure, development and patterning. Capabilities * Electroplate large areas using cyanide and non-cyanide based chemistries * Routinely plate copper, nickel and gold * Expertise in developing plating process- es for unusual applications and metals

46

Actinic imaging of native and programmed defects on a full-field mask , K. A. Goldberga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c Global Foundries Dresden Module One. KG Wilschdorfer Landstr. 101, 01109 Dresden, Germany technology node. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the mask, the absorber pattern presented previously [3] separated the defects into the following categories: cleaning residue, particle

47

EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micro-scale spatial resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. They describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV) wavelength microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. The defects present in EUV masks can appear in many well-known forms: as particles that cause amplitude or phase variations in the reflected field; as surface contamination that reduces reflectivity and contrast; and as damage from inspection and use that reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating. This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. They describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in defect repair studies, observations of laser damage, actinic inspection following scanning electron microscopy, and the detection of both native and programmed defects.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Barty, Anton; Anderson, Erik; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Transparent fluids for 157-nm immersion lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- gineers. [DOI: 10.1117/1.1637366] Subject terms: 157-nm lithography; immersion fluid; perfluoropolyether

Rollins, Andrew M.

49

Wavelength-specific reflections: A decade of EUV actinic mask inspection research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mask inspection is essential for the success of any pattern-transfer lithography technology, and EUV Lithography in particular faces unique challenges. EUV masks resonant-reflective multilayer coatings have a narrow, wavelength-specific response that dramatically affects the way that defects appear, or disappear, at various illuminating wavelengths. Furthermore, the ever-shrinking size of 'critical' defects limits the potential effectiveness of DUV inspection techniques over time. Researchers pursuing numerous ways of finding and characterizing defects on EUV masks and have met with varying degrees of success. Their lessons inform the current, urgent exploration to select the most effective techniques for high-volume manufacturing. Ranging from basic research and demonstration experiments to commercial inspection tool prototypes, we survey the recent history of work in this area, including sixteen projects in Europe, Asia, and America. Solutions range from scanning beams to microscopy, dark field imaging to pattern transfer.

Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method for maskless lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

Sweatt, William C. (13027 Arrovo de Vista, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Stulen, Richard H. (5258 Roxanne Ct., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Synchrotron radiation sources and condensers for projection x-ray lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design requirements for a compact electron storage ring that could be used as a soft x-ray source for projection lithography are discussed. The design concepts of the x-ray optics that are required to collect and condition the radiation in divergence, uniformity and direction to properly illuminate the mask and the particular x-ray projection camera used are discussed. Preliminary designs for an entire soft x-ray projection lithography system using an electron storage ring as a soft X-ray source are presented. It is shown that by combining the existing technology of storage rings with large collection angle condensers, a powerful and reliable source of 130[Angstrom] photons for production line projection x-ray lithography is possible.

Murphy, J.B.; MacDowell, A.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); White, D.L. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)); Wood, O.R. II (AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Synchrotron radiation sources and condensers for projection x-ray lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design requirements for a compact electron storage ring that could be used as a soft x-ray source for projection lithography are discussed. The design concepts of the x-ray optics that are required to collect and condition the radiation in divergence, uniformity and direction to properly illuminate the mask and the particular x-ray projection camera used are discussed. Preliminary designs for an entire soft x-ray projection lithography system using an electron storage ring as a soft X-ray source are presented. It is shown that by combining the existing technology of storage rings with large collection angle condensers, a powerful and reliable source of 130{Angstrom} photons for production line projection x-ray lithography is possible.

Murphy, J.B.; MacDowell, A.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); White, D.L. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Wood, O.R. II [AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EMSL - ultraviolet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ultraviolet en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

54

Development of an immersion maskless lithography system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As lithography quickly approaches its limits with current technologies, a host of new ideas is being proposed in hopes of pushing lithography to new levels of performance. The work presented in this thesis explores the use ...

Chao, David, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. We describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV wavelength) microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. Types of defects: (a) Buried Substrate Defects: particles & pits (causes amplitude and/or phase variations); (b) Surface Contamination (reduces reflectivity and (possibly) contrast); (c) Damage from Inspection and Use (reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating). This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. We describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in four cases: defect repair studies; observations of laser damage; after scanning electron microscopy; and native and programmed defects.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, S.B.; Kemp, C.D.; Barty, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

Masked multichannel analyzer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

Winiecki, Alan L. (Downers Grove, IL); Kroop, David C. (Columbia, MD); McGee, Marilyn K. (Colorado Springs, CO); Lenkszus, Frank R. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Extreme-UV lithography system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photolithography system that employs a condenser that includes a series of aspheric mirrors on one side of a small, incoherent source of radiation producing a series of beams is provided. Each aspheric mirror images the quasi point source into a curved line segment. A relatively small arc of the ring image is needed by the camera; all of the beams are so manipulated that they all fall onto this same arc needed by the camera. Also, all of the beams are aimed through the camera's virtual entrance pupil. The condenser includes a correcting mirror for reshaping a beam segment which improves the overall system efficiency. The condenser efficiently fills the larger radius ringfield created by today's advanced camera designs. The system further includes (i) means for adjusting the intensity profile at the camera's entrance pupil or (ii) means for partially shielding the illumination imaging onto the mask or wafer. The adjusting means can, for example, change at least one of: (i) partial coherence of the photolithography system, (ii) mask image illumination uniformity on the wafer or (iii) centroid position of the illumination flux in the entrance pupil. A particularly preferred adjusting means includes at least one vignetting mask that covers at least a portion of the at least two substantially equal radial segments of the parent aspheric mirror.

Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ORC Seminar Series Presents: "Nonlinear laser lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORC Seminar Series Presents: "Nonlinear laser lithography: formation of self-authored 50 journal and more than 150 conference papers and he has given more than 100 invited talks. http://www.orc

Anderson, Jim

59

Cryogenic xenon droplets for advanced lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cryogenic xenon droplet production system for use in anadvanced laser plasma source for x-ray lithography has been designed, fabricated, and tested at ORNL. The droplet generator is based on proven (ink jet printer) drop-on-demand.

Gouge, M.J.; Fisher, P.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Micro-optic fabrication with subdomain masking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative fabrication technique is introduced that is based on multiple-exposure techniques for micro-optics fabrication. This approach is compatible with conventional lithography...

Pitchumani, Mahesh; Brown, Jeremiah; Mohammed, Waleed; Johnson, Eric G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Coatings on reflective mask substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

Tong, William Man-Wai (Oakland, CA); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Mangat, Pawitter J. S. (Gilbert, AZ); Stivers, Alan R. (San Jose, CA); Kofron, Patrick G. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, Matthew A. (Austin, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Extreme-UV lithography condenser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA); Shafer, David (Fairfield, CT); McGuire, James (Pasadena, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplate microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Barty, A; Rekawa, S; Kemp, C; Gunion, R; Salmassi, F; Gullikson, E; Anderson, E; Han, H

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas for a monochromatic 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the critical density, a narrower EUV x-ray spectrum and a higher conversion efficiency from laserDynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas for a monochromatic 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet source-0417 ABSTRACT Dynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas were investigated for a monochromatic EUV lithography

Najmabadi, Farrokh

65

Residue-free fabrication of high-performance graphene devices by patterned PMMA stencil mask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals and their hybrid structures have recently attracted much attention due to their potential applications. The fabrication of metallic contacts or nanostructures on 2D materials is very common and generally achieved by performing electron-beam (e-beam) lithography. However, e-beam lithography is not applicable in certain situations, e.g., cases in which the e-beam resist does not adhere to the substrates or the intrinsic properties of the 2D materials are greatly altered and degraded. Here, we present a residue-free approach for fabricating high-performance graphene devices by patterning a thin film of e-beam resist as a stencil mask. This technique can be generally applied to substrates with varying surface conditions, while causing negligible residues on graphene. The technique also preserves the design flexibility offered by e-beam lithography and therefore allows us to fabricate multi-probe metallic contacts. The graphene field-effect transistors fabricated by this method exhibit smooth surfaces, high mobility, and distinct magnetotransport properties, confirming the advantages and versatility of the presented residue-free technique for the fabrication of devices composed of 2D materials.

Shih, Fu-Yu [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shao-Yu; Wu, Tsuei-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua, E-mail: wwang@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, Cheng-Hua; Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ho, Po-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Magnetic nanostructures patterned by block copolymer lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this research was twofold: understanding the methods of patterning magnetic films using self-assembled block copolymer masks and examining the magnetic reversal mechanisms of as deposited and patterned magnetic ...

Ilievski, Filip, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fabrication of phosphor micro-grids using proton beam lithography.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new nuclear microscopy technique called ion photon emission microscopy or IPEM was recently invented. IPEM allows analysis involving single ions, such as ion beam induced charge (IBIC) or single event upset (SEU) imaging using a slightly modified optical microscope. The spatial resolution of IPEM is currently limited to more than 10 {micro}m by the scattering and reflection of ion-induced photons, i.e. light blooming or spreading, in the ionoluminescent phosphor layer. We are developing a 'Microscopic Gridded Phosphor' (also called Black Matrix) where the phosphor nanocrystals are confined within the gaps of a micrometer scale opaque grid, which limits the amount of detrimental light blooming. MeV-energy proton beam lithography is ideally suited to lithographically form masks for the grid because of high aspect ratio, pattern density and sub-micron resolution of this technique. In brief, the fabrication of the grids was made in the following manner: (1) a MeV proton beam focused to 1.5-2 {micro}m directly fabricated a matrix of pillars in a 15 {micro}m thick SU-8 lithographic resist; (2) 7:1 aspect ratio pillars were then formed by developing the proton exposed area; (3) Ni (Au) was electrochemically deposited onto Cu-coated Si from a sulfamate bath (or buffered CN bath); (4) the SU-8 pillars were removed by chemical etching; finally (5) the metal micro-grid was freed from its substrate by etching the underlying Cu layer. Our proposed metal micro-grids promise an order-of-magnitude improvement in the resolution of IPEM.

Rossi, Paolo (University of Padova and INFN, Padova, Italy); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Doyle, Barney Lee; Malmqvist, Klas (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Hearne, Sean Joseph; Nilsson, Christer (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Kristiansson, Per (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Wegden, Marie (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Elfman, Mikael (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Pallon, Jan (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden); Auzelyte, Vaida (Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From Rechargeable Batteries, Photochromics, Electrochemical Lithography: From Interfacial Studies to Practical Applications Speaker(s): Robert Kostecki Date: January 11, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney The constantly growing power requirements of portable electronic devices and the need for high-power batteries for electric vehicles have created a strong demand for new batteries or substantial improvements of existing ones. Fundamental problems associated with complex interfacial processes in batteries must be resolved to enhance battery performance and lifetime. An overview of the principles of electrode-electrolyte interfacial studies, experimental methods, recent results, and potential applications will be presented. Advanced instrumental techniques and

69

UNCTIONAL PERFLUOROPOLYETHERS AS NOVEL MATERIALS FOR MICROFLUIDICS AND SOFT LITHOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCTIONAL PERFLUOROPOLYETHERS AS NOVEL MATERIALS FOR MICROFLUIDICS AND SOFT LITHOGRAPHY Jason P photocurable perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs). PFPEs are a unique class of fluoropolymers that are liquids at room

Carter, Kenneth

70

Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

Jiang, Ximan

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - arf immersion lithography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

immersion lithography using ArF illumination... node; 38-nm node; high-n immersion fluids; ArF immersion lithography; 193-nm immersion ... Source: French, Roger H. -...

73

Top-surface imaging resists for lithography with strongly attenuated radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strong resist photoabsorption at wavelengths below 248 nm necessitates the use of a thin layer imaging (TLI) scheme for microlithography using 193 nm, 157 nm, or 13.4 nm radiation. Previous to this work, a TLI process commonly known as silylated top surface imaging (TSI) was developed by a Sandia/AT and T team for use in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) at 13.4 nm. Using this bilayer process, 0.13 {micro}m resolution with 87{degree} sidewalls in 0.7 {micro}m of resist was achieved for EUV exposures. New imaging layer polymers, silylation reagents and crosslinkers, and process conditions were screened for improvement in this TSI process with the ultimate goal of demonstrating a resist technology capable of 0.10 {micro}m critical dimension (CD). The results of these attempted improvements to the TSI process are described in this report.

Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Kubiak, G.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.; Pollagi, T.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Maskless Lithography Using Drop-On-Demand Inkjet Printing Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be an attractive alternative approach. A schematic diagram of a maskless lithography system using the DOD inkjet material droplets under computer control. Each droplet takes a ballistic trajectory and lands on a certain and other disposable electronic devices. Thirdly, inkjet printing lithography could handle a wide range

Bokor, Jeffrey

75

Wafer scale patterning by soft UV-nanoimprint lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present first results on wafer scale patterning within one imprint step only, using Soft UV-Nanoimprint Lithography (UV-NIL). In this process, flexible transparent stamps, fabricated by cast moulding ensure a conformal contact, whereas the usage of ... Keywords: UV-nanoimprint, nanoimprint, patterning on wafer scale, soft lithography

U. Plachetka; M. Bender; A. Fuchs; B. Vratzov; T. Glinsner; F. Lindner; H. Kurz

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Controlled doping of graphene using ultraviolet irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic properties of graphene are tunable via doping, making it attractive in low dimensional organic electronics. Common methods of doping graphene, however, adversely affect charge mobility and degrade device performance. We demonstrate a facile shadow mask technique of defining electrodes on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thereby eliminating the use of detrimental chemicals needed in the corresponding lithographic process. Further, we report on the controlled, effective, and reversible doping of graphene via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with minimal impact on charge mobility. The change in charge concentration saturates at {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and the quantum yield is {approx}10{sup -5} e/photon upon initial UV exposure. This simple and controlled strategy opens the possibility of doping wafer-size CVD graphene for diverse applications.

Luo Zhengtang [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Pinto, Nicholas J.; Davila, Yarely [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Puerto Rico at Humacao, Humacao, 00792 (Puerto Rico); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

Extreme Ultraviolet Light Chris Cosio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospectus Extreme Ultraviolet Light Chris Cosio #12;The field of extreme ultraviolet light (XUV to the way XUV interacts with object, XUV properties are difficult to observe. Extreme ultraviolet light is absorbed by all objects it comes in contact with. Furthermore, extreme ultraviolet light also has low

Hart, Gus

78

Reusable plasmonic substrates fabricated by interference lithography: a platform for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reusable plasmonic substrates fabricated by interference lithography: a platform for systematic between electromagnetic and chemical enhancement, the development of standardized and recyclable SERS open a powerful platform within an analytical tool and in particular for systematic SERS studies

Dalang, Robert C.

79

Case studies on lithography-friendly vlsi circuit layout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lithography-friendly. In this work, we intend to implement these modifications as a series of perturbations on the initial layout generated by the CAD tool for the circuit. To implement these changes we first calculate the feature variations offline...

Shah, Pratik Jitendra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Achieving sub-10-nm resolution using scanning electron beam lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achieving the highest possible resolution using scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) has become an increasingly urgent problem in recent years, as advances in various nanotechnology applications have driven demand for ...

Cord, Bryan M. (Bryan Michael), 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Imaging capabilities of resist in deep ultraviolet liquid immersion interferometric lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Will Conley Freescale Semiconductor Assignee known from oil-immersion optical microscopy. Through the use of immersion media, such as deionized water

New Mexico, University of

82

Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

Chang, Chang

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide...

84

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

Howells, Malcolm R. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Metrology for electron-beam lithography and resist contrast at the sub-10 nm scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring the resolution limit of electron-beam lithography is of great interest both scientifically and technologically. However, when electron-beam lithography approaches its resolution limit, imaging and metrology of ...

Duan, Huigao

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - aperture lithography ppal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut Collection: Engineering 26 Immersion fluids for lithography: refractive index measurement using...

89

Argonne CNM Highlight: Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly Block copolymer lithography approach to nanoscale self-assembly hybrid organic-organomemtalliic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate This image created by Seth Darling and Nathan Ramanathan was selected for the September 2009 cover of Materials Today. Block copolymer lithography represents a promising next-generation alternative to traditional top-down methodologies. The figure shows an optical micrograph of a hybrid organic-organometallic block copolymer thin film cast on a silicon nitride membrane substrate, which reveals thickness-induced coloring effects reminiscent of art glass. This polymer self-assembles into an ordered nanoscale cylindrical morphology, the orientation of which can be controlled with film thickness. Cylinders

90

Thermal oxidation as a simple method to increase resolution in nanoimprint lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a simple thermal oxidation technique for decreasing feature sizes of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) masters. During oxidation, the dimensions of negative features are reduced (e.g., gaps become narrower), and the dimensions of positive features ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Master fabrication, Nanoimprint lithography, Resolution, Thermal oxidation

Andrew P. Bonifas; Richard L. McCreery; Kenneth D. Harris

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Actinic extreme ultraviolet mask inspection beyond 0.25 numerical aperture K. A. Goldberg,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source the zoneplate lens. Glancing incidence beamline mirrors, including a Kirkpatrick­Baez KB mirror pair create Schwarzschild objective. Using an off-axis subaperture of the Schwarzs- child objecti

92

Miniature hybrid plasma focus extreme ultraviolet source driven by 10 kA fast current pulse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A miniature hybrid plasma focus device, operated in xenon gas medium and driven by a 10 kA fast current pulse, has been used to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation in the range of 6-15 nm. At present the radiation characteristics from xenon plasma were mainly assessed qualitatively using standard tools such as visible light framing camera, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pinhole camera, and EUV photodiode. Strong pinching of xenon plasma is indicative from both visible and EUV imagings. The maximum size of the EUV emitting zone is estimated to be of the order of 0.21x1.55 mm and the estimated value is within the accepted value as benchmarked by industries. The EUV intensity measurement by photodiode showed fairly isotropic radiation at least in a half solid angle. This device can be developed further as a competent source for EUV metrology or lithography applications.

Mohanty, S.R.; Sakamoto, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Song, I.; Watanabe, M.; Kawamura, T.; Okino, A.; Horioka, K.; Hotta, E. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO); Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ultraviolet-Renormalon Calculus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the status of the so-called ultraviolet (UV) renormalon which contributes to large order divergences of perturbative expansions in quantum chromodynamics. We argue that although the renormalon is associated with short distance dynamics, the class of renormalon graphs is not well defined and its overall weight is not controlled by theory. From this point of view there is not much difference from the case of Borel nonsummable singularities. Phenomenologically the UV renormalon is related to an effective four-fermion interaction originating within fundamental QCD.

A. I. Vainshtein and V. I. Zakharov

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ultratech Develops an Improved Lithography Tool for LED Wafer Manufacturing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ultratech modified an existing lithography tool used for semiconductor manufacturing to better meet the cost and performance targets of the high-brightness LED manufacturing industry. The goal was to make the equipment compatible with the wide range of substrate diameters and thicknesses prevalent in the industry while reducing the capital cost and the overall cost of ownership (COO).

96

Digital microfluidics using soft lithography{ John Paul Urbanski,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital microfluidics using soft lithography{ John Paul Urbanski,a William Thies,b Christopher published as an Advance Article on the web 29th November 2005 DOI: 10.1039/b510127a Although microfluidic software to drive the pumps, valves, and electrodes used to manipulate fluids in microfluidic devices

Amarasinghe, Saman

97

Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Condenser for extreme-UV lithography with discharge source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Condenser system, for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography, employs quasi grazing-incidence collector mirrors that are coated with a suitable reflective metal such as ruthenium to collect radiation from a discharge source to minimize the effect of contaminant accumulation on the collecting mirrors.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Nguyen, Khanh B. (Sunnyvale, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

New technique for aberration diagnostics and alignment of an extreme ultraviolet Schwarzschild objective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Schwarzschild objectives are widely used in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/soft X-ray spectral region both as reduction and magnification optics, e.g. for small-field projection lithography and microscopy, respectively. When using a Schwarzschild objective as a micro-exposure tool (MET) at high spatial resolution (half-pitch?0.1 ?m), in addition to the tight requirements on the design and surface figure for the single optics, also an accurate alignment between the two mirrors is needed to reach the planned spatial imaging detail. Ideally, at-wavelength alignment should be done in order to overcome limitations due to diffractive effects. While this can be easily performed on synchrotron beam lines, it becomes time expensive (and components consuming) on low-power laboratory plasma sources. In this work we propose and test a new technique to align a EUV Schwarzschild objective by means of ultraviolet light. The aligned objective allowed the attainment of lithographic patterning with edge response of 90 nm, as part of the laboratory-scale MET for EUV projection lithography realized at the ENEA Frascati Research Centre.

S. Bollanti; P. Di Lazzaro; F. Flora; L. Mezi; D. Murra; A. Torre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet Biomedical devices with active components could be made from nanostructured systems. February 24, 2012 Researcher working with nanocrystals A researcher at LANL works with nanocrystals. Get Expertise Researcher Sergio Brovelli Physical Chem & Applied Spectroscopy Email Research Team Leader Alberto Paleari University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy Such devices could, for example, selectively activate light-sensitive drugs for better medical treatment or probe for the presence of fluorescent markers in medical diagnostics. LEDs produce light in the ultraviolet range A process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range has been developed by a

102

Extreme ultraviolet interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources of systematic measurement errors. To overcome a variety of experimental difficulties, several new methods in interferogram analysis and phase-retrieval were developed: the Fourier-Transform Method of Phase-Shift Determination, which uses Fourier-domain analysis to improve the accuracy of phase-shifting interferometry; the Fourier-Transform Guided Unwrap Method, which was developed to overcome difficulties associated with a high density of mid-spatial-frequency blemishes and which uses a low-spatial-frequency approximation to the measured wavefront to guide the phase unwrapping in the presence of noise; and, finally, an expedient method of Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization which facilitates polynomial basis transformations in wave-front surface fitting procedures.

Goldberg, K.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Large-Area Zone Plate Fabrication with Optical Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zone plates as condenser optics for x-ray microscopes offer simple optical designs for both illumination and spectral resolution when used as a linear monochromator. However, due to the long write times for electron beam lithography, both the availability and the size of zone plates for condensers have been limited. Since the resolution provided by the linear monochromator scales almost linearly with the diameter of the zone plate, the full potential for zone plate monochromators as illumination systems for x-ray microscopes has not been achieved. For example, the 10-mm-diameter zone plate has demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/{Delta}E = 700[1], but with a 26-mm-diameter zone plate, the calculated spectral resolution is higher than E/{Delta}E = 3000. These large-area zone plates are possible to fabricate with the leading edge semiconductor lithography tools such as those available at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany. One of the lithography tools available is the ASML TWINSCAN XT: 1950i with 37-nm resolution [2]. A single 300-mm wafer can contain more than 60 fields, each with a large area condenser, and the throughput of the tool can be more than one wafer every minute.

Denbeaux, G. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom localization lithography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic Force Microscope Kumar et al... Lithography Parameters Using an ... Source: Yang, Eui-Hyeok - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology...

105

Nodal photolithography : lithography via far-field optical nodes in the resist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I investigate one approach - stimulated emission depletion - to surmounting the diffraction limitation of optical lithography. This approach uses farfield optical nodes to orchestrate reversible, saturable ...

Winston, Donald, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Resolution limits and process latitude of comformable contact nano-lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conformable Contact Lithography enables researchers to attain high-resolution lithographic patterning at manageable cost. This thesis characterizes the minimum resolvable feature size and process latitude of Conformable ...

Fucetola, Corey Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Gray scale x-ray mask  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Gonzales, Marcela (Seattle, WA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b, , Zhen He c microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) platform built by soft-lithography tech- niques. The MFC design includes a unique sub-5 lL polydimethylsiloxane soft chamber featuring carbon cloth electrodes and microfluidic

109

Single-molecule transistor fabrication by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-molecule transistor fabrication by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly J of single-molecule transistors by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly. Ultrathin metal fabrication of electrodes that can be bridged by a single molecule remains a significant challenge

Hone, James

110

Quantum lithography with classical light: Generation of arbitrary patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum lithography with classical light: Generation of arbitrary patterns Qingqing Sun,1,2 Philip R. Hemmer,3 and M. Suhail Zubairy1,2 1Department of Physics and Institute of Quantum Studies, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843..., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2733 #1;2000#2;. #3;7#4; S. Kawata, H.-B. Sun, T. Tanaka, and K. Takada, Nature #1;Lon- don#2; 412, 697 #1;2001#2;. #3;8#4; M. D?Angelo, M. V. Chekhova, and Y. Shih, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 013602 #1;2001#2;. #3;9#4; A. Pe?er, B...

Sun, Qingqing; Hemmer, Philip R.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fabrication and testing of optics for EUV projection lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EUV Lithography (EUVL) is a leading candidate as a stepper technology for fabricating the ``0.1 {micro}m generation`` of microelectronic circuits. EUVL is an optical printing technique qualitatively similar to DUV Lithography (DUVL), except that 11-13nm wavelength light is used instead of 193-248nm. The feasibility of creating 0.1{micro}m features has been well-established using small-field EUVL printing tools and development efforts are currently underway to demonstrate that cost-effective production equipment can be engineered to perform full-width ring-field imaging consistent with high wafer throughput rates Ensuring that an industrial supplier base will be available for key components and subsystems is crucial to the success of EUVL. In particular, the projection optics are the heart of the EUVL imaging system, yet they have figure and finish specifications that are beyond the state-of-the-art in optics manufacturing. Thus it is important to demonstrate that industry will be able to fabricate and certify these optics commensurate with EUVL requirements. Indeed, the goal of this paper is to demonstrate that procuring EUVL projection optical substrates is feasible. This conclusion is based on measurements of both commercially-available and developmental substrates. The paper discusses EUVL figure and finish specifications, followed by examples of ultrasmooth and accurate surfaces, and concludes with a discussion of how substrates are measured and evaluated.

Taylor, J. S., LLNL

1998-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

P.7 / G. Yoo A Maskless Laser-Write Lithography Processing of Thin-Film Transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solar-cell panel processing, as substrate sizes increase, the cost of mask fabrication rapidly increases

Kanicki, Jerzy

113

The New X-Ray Lithography Beamline BL1 At DELTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithography using synchrotron radiation in the x-ray regime provides a powerful method to produce mechanical components of sub-millimeter size with a very good quality for microtechnological applications. In recent years the demand for x-ray lithography beamtime for industrial production of microparts increased rapidly resulting in the development of new experimental endstations at synchrotron radiation sources dedicated for the production of micromechanical devices. We present in this work the layout of the new x-ray lithography beamline BL1 at the synchrotron radiation source DELTA in Dortmund and discuss first results of exposure tests.

Lietz, D.; Paulus, M.; Sternemann, C.; Berges, U.; Hippert, B.; Tolan, M. [Fakultaet Physik / DELTA, TU Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, 44227 Dortmund (Germany)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Plasma focus x?ray source for lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bright and reliable x?ray source for lithography has been developed using plasma focus.Discharge with constant pressure gas one of the features of plasma focus makes the x?ray source system simple and lengthens lifetime. A fine ceramicinsulator made of alumina in place of a conventional Pyrex glass insulator improves system reliability. The system operates for more than 105discharges without maintenance. The lifetime of the system is ten times longer than that of a conventional plasma focusdevice. The resolution of a pattern printed by multishot exposure depends not only on the diameter of pinched plasma but also on the variation of source position. A new spherical electrode surrounding the plasma?focusing space is added to stabilize the location of the spot on the axis by eddy currents which exert the Lorentz force on the plasma. The spot position deviation has become negligibly small as compared with the pinched plasma diameter. The x?ray source size for neon is 1 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. Consequently 0.4??m fine pattern has been printed with this source. Neon radiates intense x rays in opposite voltage polarity to that of a conventional plasma focus. Polarity inversion enables a very thin beryllium window to be located on the axis with the assistance of magnetic deflector and plasma stop. An x?ray intensity of 5 mJ/cm2/shot 25 cm from the source with an irradiance of 10 mW/cm2 at the 2?Hz repetition rate has been obtained. The plasma focus is a promising x?ray source for lithography from the viewpoint of intensity resolution and lifetime.

Yasuo Kato; Isao Ochiai; Yoshio Watanabe; Seiichi Murayama

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

X-ray mask and method for providing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention describes a method for fabricating an x-ray mask tool which can achieve pattern features having lateral dimension of less than 1 micron. The process uses a thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask to transfer an trace image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is then anisotropically etched to provide an etched image of the trace image pattern consisting of a series of channels in the silicon having a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. These channels are then filled by depositing a metal such as gold to provide an inverse image of the trace image and thereby providing a robust x-ray mask tool.

Morales, Alfredo M. (Pleasanton, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA)

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

X-ray lithography induced radiation damage in CMOS and bipolar devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation effects from a synchroton x-ray lithography source on the performance degradation and long term reliability of high performance self-aligned bipolar devices and deep sub-micron CMOS devices are studi...

L. K. Wang

118

High Excitation Efficiency of Channel Plasmon Polaritons in Tailored, UV-Lithography-Defined V-Grooves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate >50% conversion of light to V-groove channel plasmon-polaritons (CPPs) via compact waveguide-termination mirrors. Devices are fabricated using UV-lithography and...

Smith, Cameron L; Thilsted, Anil H; Garcia-Ortiz, Cesar E; Radko, Ilya P; Marie, Rodolphe; Jeppesen, Claus; Vannahme, Christoph; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Kristensen, Anders

119

Modeling the point-spread function in helium-ion lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present here a hybrid approach to modeling helium-ion lithography that combines the power and ease-of-use of the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) software with the results of recent work simulating secondary ...

Winston, Donald

120

Nanometer-precision electron-beam lithography with applications in integrated optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning electron-beam lithography (SEBL) provides sub-10-nm resolution and arbitrary-pattern generation; however, SEBL's pattern-placement accuracy remains inadequate for future integrated-circuits and integrated-optical ...

Hastings, Jeffrey Todd, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Understanding of hydrogen silsesquioxane electron resist for sub-5-nm-half-pitch lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The authors, demonstrated that 4.5-nm-half-pitch structures could be achieved using electron-beam lithography, followed by salty development. They also hypothesized a development mechanism for hydrogen silsesquioxane, ...

Berggren, Karl K.

122

Development of a microfluidic device for patterning multiple species by scanning probe lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning Probe Lithography (SPL) is a versatile nanofabrication platform that leverages microfluidic “ink” delivery systems with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) for generating surface-patterned chemical functionality on the sub-100 nm length scale...

Rivas Cardona, Juan Alberto

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Contact region fidelity, sensitivity, and control in roll-based soft lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft lithography is a printing process that uses small features on an elastomeric stamp to transfer micron and sub-micron patterns to a substrate. Translating this lab scale process to a roll-based manufacturing platform ...

Petrzelka, Joseph E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Modeling of multiple-optical-axis pattern-integrated interference lithography systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The image quality and collimation in a multiple-optical-axis pattern-integrated interference lithography system are evaluated for an elementary optical system composed of single-element lenses. Image quality… (more)

Sedivy, Donald E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cryogenic etching of nano-scale silicon trenches with resist masks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic silicon etching using SF"6-O"2 at the sub-50 nm scale has been developed for nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-photonics systems where high aspect ratio trenches are desired. It was found that the SF"6-O"2 chemistry at cryogenic ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Nano-imprint lithography, Nano-scale pattern transfer, Nanofabrication, Plasma etching

Y. Wu; D. L. Olynick; A. Goodyear; C. Peroz; S. Dhuey; X. Liang; S. Cabrini

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Phytoplankton photosynthetic response to solar ultraviolet irradiance ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phytoplankton photosynthetic response to solar ultraviolet irradiance in the Ross Sea Polynya: Development and evaluation of a time-dependent model with ...

127

Ultraviolet photodissociation enhances top?down mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet photodissociation enhances top-down mass spectrometry as demonstrated on green fluorescent protein variants Xibei Dang 1,2 and Nicolas L. Young 1 1 Ion Cyclotron...

128

Benchmarking EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4 x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Gunion, R.F.

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Actinic EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno. B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, S.

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

Microgap ultra-violet detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Microgap ultra-violet detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4,000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap is disclosed. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse. 2 figs.

Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Soft Lithography Using Acryloxy Perfluoropolyether Composite Tu T. Truong, Rongsheng Lin, Seokwoo Jeon, Hee Hyun Lee, Joana Maria,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft Lithography Using Acryloxy Perfluoropolyether Composite Stamps Tu T. Truong, Rongsheng Lin composite patterning elements that use a commercially available acryloxy perfluoropolyether (a

Rogers, John A.

133

Submitted to Biosystems 6.12.2003 A MODEL OF VISUAL BACKWARD MASKING.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connections, which turn out to support prolonged self-sustained activity. Masking is assumed to arise from

Bugmann, Guido

134

Printing microchips Lithography is used in the manufacture of integrated circuits (ICs) to transfer circuit patterns from a mask to the silicon wafer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; - manufactured and assembled to maximize the imaging efficiency and to reduce distortion; Laser - a high power visible and EUV illumination; Condenser Optics - collects and shapes the EUV beam into a field of 114

135

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video@usc.edu, (213) 740-7829 ABSTRACT Additive manufacturing (AM) processes based on mask image projection and resolution of built components. KEYWORDS Additive manufacturing, Solid freeform fabrication, Mask image

Chen, Yong

136

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

137

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in Six National Parks Stephen A. Diamond,1 ABSTRACT Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280­320-nm wave- lengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates

Knapp, Roland

138

Ultraviolet studies of interacting binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interacting Binaries consist of a variety of stellar objects in different stages of evolution and those containing accreting compact objects still represent a major challenge to our understanding of not only close binary evolution but also of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. These end-points of binary star evolution are ideal laboratories for the study of accretion and outflow processes, and provide insight on matter under extreme physical conditions. One of the key-questions of fundamental relevance is the nature of SNIa progenitors. The study of accreting compact binary systems relies on observations over the entire electromagnetic spectrum and we outline here those unresolved questions for which access to the ultraviolet range is vital, as they cannot be addressed by observations in any other spectral region.

B. T. Gaensicke; D. de Martino; T. R. Marsh; C. A. Haswell; C. Knigge; K. S. Long; S. N. Shore

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ultraviolet divergences in cosmological correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is developed for dealing with ultraviolet divergences in calculations of cosmological correlations, which does not depend on dimensional regularization. An extended version of the WKB approximation is used to analyze the divergences in these calculations, and these divergences are controlled by the introduction of Pauli-Villars regulator fields. This approach is illustrated in the theory of a scalar field with arbitrary self-interactions in a fixed flat-space Robertson-Walker metric with arbitrary scale factor a(t). Explicit formulas are given for the counterterms needed to cancel all dependence on the regulator properties, and an explicit prescription is given for calculating finite regulator-independent correlation functions. The possibility of infrared divergences in this theory is briefly considered.

Weinberg, Steven [Theory Group, Department of Physics, University of Texas Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Formation of Hierarchical Nanoparticle Pattern Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography and Two-Step Self-Assembly: Microspheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Hierarchical Nanoparticle Pattern Arrays Using Colloidal Lithography and Two-Step Self of hierarchical nanoparticle arrays and film patterns using a novel combination of colloidal lithography (CL), two-step self-assembly, and reactive-ion etching (RIE). In this approach, a uniform nanoparticle film (15-50 nm

New Mexico, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tetrachloroethylene Degradation by Dithionite with Ultraviolet Activation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This project has conducted research on degrading PCE with an ARP that combines dithionite and ultraviolet activation. The purpose of the project is to provide knowledge for the development of potential wastewater treatment technologies. Several control...

Zhang, Jingyuan

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Proton Beam Lithography at the University of Surrey's Ion Beam Centre , I. Gomez-Morilla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Ion Scan software developed by the National University of Singapore [4]. Simulations with the SRIM in photosensitive glass [3]. This technique has clear advantages in comparison with electron beam lithography and X energy protons have a long range and a low lateral spread making them ideal for exposing thick resist

Webb, Roger P.

144

Fabrication of 5 nm linewidth and 14 nm pitch features by nanoimprint lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of 5 nm linewidth and 14 nm pitch features by nanoimprint lithography Michael D. Austin pitch and feature sizes of these applications. Thus, presently, re- searchers have been largely pitch over a large area, its applications in nanogap metal contacts, and a study of fabrication yields

145

Reduction imaging with soft x rays for projection lithography A. A. MacDowell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments with a 20X reduction Schwarzschild optic produced features as small as 50 nm. It is considered multilayer coated mirrors to image soft x rays at/or near the diffraction limit on to resist coated wafers with projection x-ray lithography. This paper will describe our experimental work using a Schwarzschild camera

Bokor, Jeffrey

146

Mask locations in the SLC final focus region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The location of four sets of masks needed to shield against background in the final focus region of the SLC is shown. The main point of this note is to update the results of Miller and Sens taking into account the recent changes that have been made in the optics of the SLC beams. For the latest beam design we use the TRANSPORT output dated 5-13-83. This design assumes that the final bends will form an S about the interaction point and that the final quadrupoles will be superconducting and will be placed about 8 feet from the interaction point.

Cence, R.J.

1983-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

At-wavelength characterization of the extreme ultraviolet Engineering Test Stand Set-2 optic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At-wavelength interferometric characterization of a new 4x-reduction lithographic-quality extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical system is described. This state-of-the-art projection optic was fabricated for installation in the EUV lithography Engineering Test Stand (ETS) and is referred to as the ETS Set-2 optic. EUV characterization of the Set-2 optic is performed using the EUV phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. This is the same interferometer previously used for the at-wavelength characterization and alignment of the ETS Set-1 optic. In addition to the PS/PDI-based full-field wavefront characterization, we also present wavefront measurements performed with lateral shearing interferometry, the chromatic dependence of the wavefront error, and the system-level pupil-dependent spectral-bandpass characteristics of the optic; the latter two properties are only measurable using at-wavelength interferometry.

Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.; Batson, Phillip; Denham, Paul E.; Jackson, Keith H.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Rekawa, Senajith; Bokor, Jeffrey

2001-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

SU?FF?J?38: High Precision Mask Based Patient Positioning System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: Island mask with infrared (IR) markers is designed for camera based high precision patient positioning system. This system is suitable to monitor head and neck IMRT edentulous and pediatric patents' inter?fractional and intra?fractional movement where current industrial standard bite plate system is not able to apply on the above described patients. Method and Materials: Thermoplastic and Styrofoam are used to make an island mask with the following procedures: First cut the thermoplastic into a predefined template shape; Styrofoam cut into wedge shape with 1 inch in height and has area at least 9×9cm2 for supporting five IR markers. Second put the upper portion of template between philtrum and forehead and wrap the lower portion of template around with the Styrofoam wedge in it. Third make two ear straps to fix the mask through the ears. Exactrac (BrainLAB Inc.) IR camera system is used for this study. The positioning reproducibility of mask system is examined against the bite plate system. The shrinkage of mask and optimal position of placing IR markers are also assessed. Results: The shrinkage of mask is within 1 mm and become stable 30 minutes after the mask has been cooled down. The positioning reproducibility of individual marker is worse for the marker located near the peripheral of the mask and also symmetric pattern of markers is not allowed due to the “ambiguity” of the IR camera system. Therefore the pattern of markers is an irregular shape and markers are located at the flat platform near the center of the mask. The overall positioning reproducibility of mask is within 1.4mm on five non?patient subjects. Conclusion: Our study shows that this mask based patient positioning system is an alternative of patient who can not use bite plate system but needs inter?fractional and intra?fractional movement monitoring.

P Tsai; S Kim; B Lu; J Palta; C Liu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Transmission Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The transmission of tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases in health-care buildings has been a recognized hazard for decades. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) of upper room air is used as an engineering control method to prevent the spread of airborne infectious disease. Under full-scale conditions, the efficacy of UVGI for inactivating airborne bacterial spores and active cells was evaluated. A test room fitted with a modern UVGI system was used to conduct bio-aerosol inactivation experiments. UVGI efficacy can be affected by environmental factors such as relative humidity (RH), and air mixing

151

Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly(methyl methacrylate) as a negative resist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing high-resolution resists and processes for electron-beam lithography is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen ...

Berggren, Karl K.

152

Graphene Edge Lithography Guibai Xie, Zhiwen Shi, Rong Yang, Donghua Liu, Wei Yang, Meng Cheng, Duoming Wang, Dongxia Shi,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene Edge Lithography Guibai Xie, Zhiwen Shi, Rong Yang, Donghua Liu, Wei Yang, Meng Cheng: Fabrication of graphene nanostructures is of importance for both investigating their intrinsic physical approach for graphene nanostructures. Compared with conventional lithographic fabrication techniques

Zhang, Guangyu

153

2D and 3D periodic templates through holographic interference lithography : photonic and phononic crystals and biomimetic microlens arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis a simple technique for controlling structure via holographic interference lithography was established and implemented. Access to various space groups including such important structures as the level set ...

Ullal, Chaitanya K. (Chaitanya Kishore)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

MUTATIONS INDUCED BY ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT WITHOUT ATTENDANT LETHALITY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resistance by doses of ultraviolet...exposure to the radiation. With these...followed. The estimation of the extent...by noncidal doses of ultraviolet...dependent upon the dose of radiation. REFERENCES...quantitative estimation of radiation...

Thomas S. Matney; Delbert M. Shankel; Orville Wyss

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Orthogonal Direct Sum Masking A Smartcard Friendly Computation Paradigm in a Code,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis (FA) are nowadays well known and most designers of secure embedded systems are aware of them of masks used). A recent line of works known as Low-Entropy Masking Schemes (LEMS) has investigated could be a set of codewords, to reduce the overhead in terms of computational resources and entropy

156

Optimisation of masked ion irradiation damage profiles in YBCO thin films by Monte Carlo simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimisation of masked ion irradiation damage profiles in YBCO thin films by Monte Carlo simulation production with a given mask structure. The results suggest that minimum ion scattering broadening tails with beam energy up to a few hundred keV, though the throughput is intrinsically low [1]. A combination

Webb, Roger P.

157

Auditory Time-Frequency Masking: Psychoacoustical Data and Application to Audio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auditory Time-Frequency Masking: Psychoacoustical Data and Application to Audio Representations models of TF masking currently implemented in some percep- tual audio codecs. In the context of audio models currently implemented in some perceptual audio codecs like MP3 and develop a perceptually relevant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

Bjorkholm, John E. (Pleasanton, CA); Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Gullikson, Eric M. (Oakland, CA); Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA)

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

Fiorito, R. B. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Zhang, H. D. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Corbett, W. J. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, A. S. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mok, W. Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tian, K. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Douglas, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, F. G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Mitsuhashi, T. M. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Shkvarunets, A. G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gamma-Ray Imaging with the Coded Mask IBIS Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IBIS telescope onboard INTEGRAL, the ESA gamma-ray space mission to be launched in 2002, is a soft gamma-ray (20 keV - 10 MeV) device based on a coded aperture imaging system. We describe here basic concepts of coded masks, the imaging system of the IBIS telescope, and the standard data analysis procedures to reconstruct sky images. This analysis includes, for both the low-energy detector layer (ISGRI) and the high energy layer (PICSIT), iterative procedures which decode recorded shadowgrams, search for and locate sources, clean for secondary lobes, and then rotate and compose sky images. These procedures will be implemented in the Quick Look and Standard Analysis of the INTEGRAL Science Data Center (ISDC) as IBIS Instrument Specific Software.

Goldwurm, A; Gros, A; Stephen, J; Foschini, L; Gianotti, F; Natalucci, L; De Cesare, G; Santo, M D

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

"A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors ..--.. Manfred Bitter, Kenneth Hill, Philip Efthimion. This invention is a new x-ray scheme for stigmatic imaging. The scheme consists of one convex spherically bent crystal and one concave spherically bent crystal. The radii of curvature and Bragg reflecting lattice planes of the two crystals are properly matched to eliminate the astigmatism, so that the conditions for stigmatic imaging are met for a particular wavelength. The magnification is adjustable and solely a function of the two Bragg angles or angles of incidence. Although the choice of Bragg angles is constrained by the availability of crystals, this is not a severe limitation for the imaging of plasmas, since a particular wavelength can be

162

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer from Ho3 + ions Ying Yu October 2010 Accepted 28 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Ultraviolet emission Upconversion Energy transfer a b s t r a c t Ultraviolet (UV) upconversion (UC) emissions of Gd3+ ion were

Cao, Wenwu

163

Printability and inspectability of Defects on the EUV Mask for sub32nm Half Pitch HVM Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategies for 32-nm half-pitch and beyond", Proc. o f SPIEEUV Mask for sub32nm Half Pitch H V M Application Sungminof phase defect as half pitch, scanner condition and mask

Huh, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Galex Ultraviolet Variability (GUVV) Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Version 1.0 of the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet variability catalog (GUVV) that contains information on 84 time-variable and transient sources gained with simultaneous near and far ultraviolet photometric observations. These time-variable sources were serendipitously revealed in the various 1.2 degree star fields currently being surveyed by the GALEX satellite in two ultraviolet bands (NUV 1750-2750A, FUV 1350-1750A) with limiting AB magnitudes of 23-25. The largest-amplitude variable objects presently detected by GALEX are M-dwarf flare stars, which can brighten by 5-10 mag in both the NUV and FUV bands during short duration (< 500s) outbursts. Other types of large-amplitude ultraviolet variable objects include ab-type RR Lyrae stars, which can vary periodically by 2-5mag in the GALEX FUV band. This first GUVV catalog lists galactic positions and possible source identifications in order to provide the astronomical community with a list of time-variable objects that can now be repeatedly observed at other wavelengths. We expect the total number of time-variable source detections to increase as the GALEX mission progresses, such that later version numbers of the GUVV catalog will contain substantially more variable sources.

Barry Y. Welsh; Jonathan M. Wheatley; Kenneth Heafield; Mark Seibert; Stanley E. Browne; Samir Salim; R. Michael Rich; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; D. Christopher Martin; Bruno Milliard; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Ted K. Wyder

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Phantom tones and suppressive masking by active nonlinear oscillation of the hair-cell bundle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...masking (1). Second, a person listening simultaneously to two pure tones f1...linear combinations of f1 and f2 . Any device evinces nonlinearity when...high-fidelity sound receiver (1). A person listening simultaneously to two pure tones...

Jérémie Barral; Pascal Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

New MS-Windows-Based Educational Software for Teaching the Sunpath Diagram and Shading Mask Protractor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mask 1 Degrees South Latitude. This combined le sunpath diagram and shading mask yrurr uuurjur u gertical surface facing 30 degrees east of south. FIGURE 7: Data Input Summaryfor the Partial Shading Device. The dimensions of the partial shading..., the shac similarly dimensioned device published in thc In Figure 7 and 8 the front shade is actually the has been rotated 90 degrees, re-sized and moved 1 directly below the horizontal shade. Architectural Graphics Standard is shown in Figure 9...

Oh, J. K. W.; Haberl, J. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Resist trimming technique in CF4/O2 high-density plasmas for sub-0.1 µm MOSFET fabrication using 248-nm lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resist trimming process using CF4/O2 has been developed for sub-0.1 µm polysilicon gate patterning using conventional 248-nm lithography. This process allows the successful fabrication of 80-nm MOS devices. The trimming step ... Keywords: 248-nm lithography, CF4/O2, critical dimension (CD), polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), polysilicon gate, resist trimming

Chian-Yuh Sin; Bing-Hung Chen; W. L. Loh; J. Yu; P. Yelehanka; L. Chan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Photonic assisted light trapping integrated in ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells by nanoimprint lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the fabrication of two-dimensional periodic photonic nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography and dry etching, and their integration into a 1-{\\mu}m-thin mono-crystalline silicon solar cell. Thanks to the periodic nanopatterning, a better in-coupling and trapping of light is achieved, resulting in an absorption enhancement. The proposed light trapping mechanism can be explained as the superposition of a graded index effect and of the diffraction of light inside the photoactive layer. The absorption enhancement is translated into a 23% increase in short-circuit current, as compared to the benchmark cell, resulting in an increase in energy-conversion efficiency.

Trompoukis, Christos; Depauw, Valérie; Gordon, Ivan; Poortmans, Jef; 10.1063/1.4749810.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Elevating optical activity: Efficient on-edge lithography of three-dimensional starfish metamaterial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an approach for extremely fast, wafer-scale fabrication of chiral starfish metamaterials based on electron beam- and on-edge lithography. A millimeter sized array of both the planar chiral and the true 3D chiral starfish is realized, and their chiroptical performances are compared by circular dichroism measurements. We find optical activity in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, where the 3D starfish clearly outperforms the planar design by almost 2 orders of magnitude, though fabrication efforts are only moderately increased. The presented approach is capable of bridging the gap between high performance optical chiral metamaterials and industrial production by nanoimprint technology.

Dietrich, K., E-mail: dietrich.kay@uni-jena.de; Menzel, C.; Lehr, D.; Puffky, O.; Pertsch, T.; Tünnermann, A.; Kley, E.-B. [Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Hübner, U. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Straße 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Comparison of Photoresist Resolution Metrics using 193 nm and EUV Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Image blur due to chemical amplification represents a fundamental limit to photoresist performance and manifests itself in many aspects of lithographic performance. Substantial progress has been made in linking image blur with simple resolution metrics using EUV lithography. In this presentation, they examine performance of 193 nm resist and EUV resist systems using modulation transfer function, corner rounding, and other resolution metrics. In particular, they focus on cross-comparisons in which selected EUV and 193 nm resist are evaluated using both EUV and 193 nm lithography. Simulation methods linking 193 nm and EUV performance will be described as well. Results from simulation indicate that image blur in current generation 193 nm photoresists is comparable to that of many EUV resists, but that ultra-low diffusion materials designs used in very high resolution EUV resists can result in substantially lower blur. In addition to detailing correlations between EUV and 193 nm experimental methods, they discuss their utility in assessing performance needs of future generation photoresists.

Jones, Juanita; Pathak, Piyush; Wallow, Thomas; LaFontaine, Bruno; Deng, Yunfei; Kim, Ryoung-han; Kye, Jongwook; Levinson, Harry; Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Chris

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nano-imprinting lithography of P(VDF–TrFE–CFE) for flexible freestanding MEMS devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermoplastic nano-imprinting lithography (T-NIL) has been used for the first time as a method of creating freestanding smooth and patterned membranes of micron scale thickness using poly (vinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene–chlorofluoroethylene) [P(VDF–TrFE–CFE)]. PVDF and its copolymers and terpolymers cannot be processed using classical lithography techniques because it is incompatible with most solvents and photoresist developers. In this work, patterning at micron scale resolution and creating freestanding layers is facilitated by means of a hydrophobic dodecyltrichlorosilane layer deposited on the silicon (Si) prior to imprinting. This surface treatment reduces the adhesion between the polymer and Si substrate or stamp, aiding with mould release. A sacrificial layer beneath a spin-coated layer of P(VDF–TrFE–CFE) is presented as an alternative method of creating freestanding membranes. The latter method was used in conjunction with exploiting the thermoplastic properties of P(VDF–TrFE–CFE) during T-NIL to improve the quality of the patterned freestanding layers. The cured membrane thicknesses ranged from 0.4–5.8 ?m with diameters of centimeters order of magnitude. The processes presented here comprise a basis for integrating P(VDF–TrFE–CFE) as an active material in three dimensional electro-active polymeric microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices.

Jenny Shklovsky; Leeya Engel; Yelena Sverdlov; Yosi Shacham-Diamand; Slava Krylov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ultra-lightweight nanorelief networks : photopatterned microframes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lightweight nano-network structures in polymers have been fabricated and investigated for their mechanical properties. Fabrication techniques via holographic interference lithography and phase mask lithography were implemented ...

Choi, Taeyi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ultraviolet Exposure and Mortality among Women in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...questions using detailed data on solar and artificial UV exposure during...843 subjects with a total energy intake outside the 1st and 99th...Risks to Humans Volume 55: Solar and Ultraviolet Radiation...Boscoe FP , Schymura MJ.Solar ultraviolet-B exposure and...

Ling Yang; Marie Lof; Marit Bragelien Veierød; Sven Sandin; Hans-Olov Adami; and Elisabete Weiderpass

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Femtosecond laser nanomachining initiated by ultraviolet multiphoton ionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond laser nanomachining initiated by ultraviolet multiphoton ionization Xiaoming Yu,1) femtosecond laser pulse initiated by an ultraviolet (UV) pulse. With both pulses at a short (~60 fs) delay.g. XUV and X-ray, with the required fluence below their normal threshold. ©2013 Optical Society

Van Stryland, Eric

175

THORIUM-BASED MIRRORS IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET Nicole Farnsworth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THORIUM-BASED MIRRORS IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET by Nicole Farnsworth Submitted to Brigham Young Ultraviolet and Thorium-based Mirrors . . . 1 1.2 Project Background the Optical Constants of Thorium Oxide 34 3.1 Reflectance and Transmittance Measurements

Hart, Gus

176

Fully scaled 0.5 ?m MOS cicuits by synchroton X-ray lithography: Resist systems and line width control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To test the line width control of typical resist systems in x-ray lithography, we have developed and utilized x-ray resist processes for all levels in the fabrication of NMOS and CMOS devices with 0.5 ?m ground rules. Results from line width control studies will be discussed along with the process latitude from the resist systems.

D. Seeger; K. Kwietniak; D. Crockatt; A. Wilson; J. Warlaumont

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fabrication of large area 100 nm pitch grating by spatial frequency doubling and nanoimprint lithography for subwavelength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of large area 100 nm pitch grating by spatial frequency doubling and nanoimprint nm pitch gratings over a large area 10 cm2 using a simple, low-cost, fast process. This method doubling and 2 pattern replication using nanoimprint lithography. The form birefringence of a 100 nm pitch

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ultraviolet radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2002). Ultraviolet Radiation Session CS36. ASLO 2002 Summer Meeting, Victoria, B.C., Canada. Summary: UV Bibliography (2002). Ultraviolet Radiation Session CS36. ASLO 2002...

179

Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nano-Enabled Titanium Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide

180

Printed wax masks for 254 nm deep-UV pattering of PMMA-based microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a new technique for masking deep-UV exposure of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using a printed wax mask. This technique provides an inexpensive and bulk fabrication method for PMMA structures. The technique involves the direct printing of the mask onto a polymer sheet using a commercial wax printer. The wax layer was then transferred to a PMMA substrate using a thermal laminator, exposed using deep-UV (with a wavelength of 254 nm), developed in an IPA:water solution, and completed by bonding on a PMMA cap layer. A sample microfluidic device fabricated with this method is also presented, with the microchannel as narrow as 50 µm. The whole process is easy to perform without the requirement for any microfabrication facilities.

Yiqiang Fan; Yang Liu; Huawei Li; Ian G Foulds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of a hard mask for formation of gate and dielectric via nanofilament field emission devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device in which a via in a dielectric layer is self-aligned to gate metal via structure located on top of the dielectric layer. By the use of a hard mask layer located on top of the gate metal layer, inert to the etch chemistry for the gate metal layer, and in which a via is formed by the pattern from etched nuclear tracks in a trackable material, a via is formed by the hard mask will eliminate any erosion of the gate metal layer during the dielectric via etch. Also, the hard mask layer will protect the gate metal layer while the gate structure is etched back from the edge of the dielectric via, if such is desired. This method provides more tolerance for the electroplating of a nanofilament in the dielectric via and sharpening of the nanofilament.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design and Synthesis of a Photoaromatization-Based Two-Stage Photobase Generator for Pitch Division Lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and Synthesis of a Photoaromatization-Based Two-Stage Photobase Generator for Pitch Division in such a resist has twice the pitch of the projected mask image. Unfortunately, when sub-100 nm features

Turro, Nicholas J.

183

Organic solvent-free water-developable sugar resist material derived from biomass in green lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have demonstrated an organic solvent-free water-developable branched sugar resist material derived from biomass for its use in green electron beam lithography. This emphasizes the use of plant products instead of conventionally used tetramethylammonium hydroxide and organic solvents. The rationally designed water-developable branched sugar resist material developed in this study can be patterned with an excellent sensitivity of 7 ?C/cm2 and a resolution of 50–200 nm lines. In addition, it indicated sufficient thermal stability at ?180 °C, acceptable CF4 etch selectivity with a hardmask material, 42–53% rate of chemical reaction of acryloyl groups affected by the tacticity of branched sugar chain polymers, and developable in pure water at 23 °C for 60 s.

Satoshi Takei; Akihiro Oshima; Takumi Ichikawa; Atsushi Sekiguchi; Miki Kashiwakura; Takahiro Kozawa; Seiichi Tagawa; Tomoko G. Oyama; Syoji Ito; Hiroshi Miyasaka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Study of nano imprinting using soft lithography on Krafty glue and PVDF polymer thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work reveals soft lithography strategy based on self assembly and replica molding for carrying out micro and nanofabrication. It provides a convenient, effective and very low cost method for the formation and manufacturing of micro and nano structures. Al-layer of compact disc (sony CD-R) used as a stamp with patterned relief structures to generate patterns and structures with pattern size of 100nm height, 1.7 ?m wide. In literature, PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) solution is widely used to get negative copy of the Al-layer. In this work, we have used inexpensive white glue (Polyvinylacetate + water), 15gm (?5) and PVDF (Polyvinylidene difluoride) spin coated films and successfully transferred the nano patterns of Al layer on to white glue and PVDF films.

Sankar, M. S. Ravi, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu; Gangineni, Ramesh Babu, E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Puducherry - 605014 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fabrication and performance of nanoscale ultra-smooth programmeddefects for EUV Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed processes for producing ultra-smooth nanoscale programmed substrate defects that have applications in areas such as thin film growth, EUV lithography, and defect inspection. Particle, line, pit, and scratch defects on the substrates between 40 and 140 nm wide 50 to 90 nm high have been successfully produced using e-beam lithograpy and plasma etching in both Silicon and Hydrosilsequioxane films. These programmed defect substrates have several advantages over those produced previously using gold nanoparticles or polystyrene latex spheres--most notably, the ability to precisely locate features and produce recessed as well as bump type features in ultra-smooth films. These programmed defects were used to develop techniques for film defect mitigation and results are discussed.

Olynick, D.L.; Salmassi, F.; Liddle, J.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Spiller, E.; Baker, S.L.; Robinson, J.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Gd plasma source modeling at 6.7 nm for future lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas containing gadolinium have been proposed as sources for next generation lithography at 6.x nm. To determine the optimum plasma conditions, atomic structure calculations have been performed for Gd{sup 11+} to Gd{sup 27+} ions which showed that n = 4 - n = 4 resonance transitions overlap in the 6.5-7.0 nm region. Plasma modeling calculations, assuming collisional-radiative equilibrium, predict that the optimum temperature for an optically thin plasma is close to 110 eV and that maximum intensity occurs at 6.76 nm under these conditions. The close agreement between simulated and experimental spectra from laser and discharge produced plasmas indicates the validity of our approach.

Li Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan)

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Theory of masking with codewords in hardware: low-weight dth-order correlation-immune Boolean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, d = 4) and (n = 10, d {4, 5}). These results set new bounds for the minimal number of lines difficulty when design- ing a masking scheme is to pass through the substitution boxes (sboxes). Clas- sical with the entropy. In this article, we are interested in a masking solution with- out timing overhead and a limited

188

Tuning the work function of graphene by ultraviolet irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene layers grown by chemical vapor deposition were, respectively, irradiated for 0, 20, 40, and 60 min by an ultraviolet light source in order to experimentally study the change in the work function of graphene. The dependences of the work function and carrier concentration upon ultraviolet irradiation have been found. It is shown that ultraviolet irradiation may lead to oxygen desorption, thus reducing the hole density and work function of graphene. Based on the well-known expression for the Fermi energy of Dirac fermions, the Fermi velocity of graphene was extracted to be about 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} m/s.

Lin, Yow-Jon; Zeng, Jian-Jhou [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Wednesday, 30 March 2011 00:00 As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

190

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

191

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

192

Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned masks for the sub-22 Abbas Rastegar*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove 28 nm SiO2 particlesParticle removal challenges with EUV patterned masks for the sub-22 nm HP node Abbas Rastegar.Rastegar@sematech.org ABSTRACT The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect

193

Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa #12;160 #12;161 Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa Abstract Duration of primary moult was similar in Cape Weavers and Southern Red Bishops (96 days

de Villiers, Marienne

194

Geographic structure of masked stingray in the Indo-Malay-Papua archipelago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the origin of the high marine biodiversity in the Indo-Malay-Papuan archipelago at the core of the Coral Triangle, which is the global epicentre for marine biodiversity (P.H. Barber, J. Biogeogr. 2009). DoesAssociationforTropicalBiologyandConservation,"Tropical biodiversity:survivingthefood,energyandclimatecrisis",19-23July2010,Denpasar The blue-spotted or masked

195

Investigation of user complaints of sound masking delivered from underfloor air distribution grilles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A LEED?Gold certified government building includes six floors of open?plan office space that are equipped with electronic sound masking delivered from a raised floor having under?floor air distribution (UFAD). Results of user polling show mixed results for acoustic satisfaction with significant complaints about speech privacy and noise from the systems interfering with users’ ability to work. This research focuses on this dissatisfaction the general conflict between speech privacy ease of verbal communication and acceptance of noise?generating treatments. Little research has been done on masking delivered via UFAD so it was also desired to further the understanding of this design as part of a larger research program by the Federal government on Green Buildings. Specific objectives were to develop and test possible remedies for this system and improve planning of future facilities that may have masking via UFAD. On?site measurements of masking and HVAC spectra as well as noise reduction and observations for various conditions were made. Post?measurement data analysis was conducted and experimental remedies were developed and tested. The results and recommendations will be presented.

Mark Rogers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Spatial release from masking of aerial tones in pinnipeds Marla M. Holta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as those of conspecifics, prey, or predators. In both air and water, pinnipeds seals, sea lions-located. In this study, SRM was investigated in a harbor seal, who naturally lacks pinnae, and California sea lion, who where co-located, masked thresholds were lower by as much as 19 and 12 dB in the harbor seal and sea

Reichmuth, Colleen

197

Improving Patch-Based Synthesis by Learning Patch Masks Nima Khademi Kalantari1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Patch-Based Synthesis by Learning Patch Masks Nima Khademi Kalantari1 Eli Shechtman2, Seattle, WA Abstract Patch-based synthesis is a powerful framework for nu- merous image and video editing applications such as hole- filling, retargeting, and reshuffling. In all these applica- tions, a patch

Sen, Pradeep

198

Planck CMB Anomalies: Astrophysical and Cosmological Foregrounds and the Curse of Masking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the origin of reported anomalies in the CMB is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. Their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in WMAP or Planck data. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical foregrounds (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analy...

Rassat, A; Paykari, P; Sureau, F; Bobin, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparison of level discrimination, increment detection, and comodulation masking release in the audio-and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the audio- and envelope-frequency domains Paul C. Nelson Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering for certain observations made in detection and masking experiments in the audio-frequency domain. Two; these variations are referred to as fine structure and are determined by the instantaneous audio fre- quency

Carney, Laurel H.

200

Low temperature a - Si : H photodiodes and flexible image sensor arrays patterned by digital lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-based image sensor arrays were fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate substrates with photodiodes optimized for process temperatures of 150 ° C . An optimal i -layer thickness was determined to minimize carrier recombination and to maintain sufficient light absorption and acceptable leakage current. Patterning of the thin-film transistor backplane was accomplished using ink-jet printed etch masks. A flexible image sensor is demonstrated with 75 dots ? in. resolution over 180 × 180 pixels and with sensitivity of 1.2 pW ? cm 2 .

Tse Nga Ng; Rene A. Lujan; Sanjiv Sambandan; Robert A. Street; Scott Limb; William S. Wong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of ultraviolet radiation on trophic interactions not detected?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation on periphyton and grazers in a ... As a result of varying solar angles, both eleva- ..... Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

Attenuation of ultraviolet radiation in mountain lakes: Factors ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-altitude lakes are exposed to high fluence rates of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR; 290–400 nm) ... Rimouski, Quebec, G5L 3A1 Canada (isabelle laurion@.

1910-00-90T23:59:59.000Z

204

High-speed low-voltage ultraviolet light source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel quasi-spark gap has been designed and constructed with high-speed and low-spark voltage characteristics. Ultraviolet light generating sparks can be operated at a rate of up to...

Huang, L; Hsu, S C; Kwok, H S

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ?}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States) [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States); Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Lamp for generating high power ultraviolet radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus is a gas filled ultraviolet generating lamp for use as a liquid purifier. The lamp is powred by high voltage AC, but has no metallic electrodes within or in contact with the gas enclosure which is constructed as two concentric quartz cylinders sealed together at their ends with the gas fill between the cylinders. Cooling liquid is pumped through the volume inside the inner quartz cylinder where an electrically conductive pipe spaced from the inner cylinder is used to supply the cooling liquid and act as the high voltage electrode. The gas enclosure is enclosed within but spaced from a metal housing which is connected to operate as the ground electrode of the circuit and through which the treated fluid flows. Thus, the electrical circuit is from the central pipe, and through the cooling liquid, the gas enclosure, the treated liquid on the outside of the outer quartz cylinder, and to the housing. The high voltage electrode is electrically isolated from the source of cooling liquid by a length of insulated hose which also supplies the cooling liquid.

Morgan, Gary L. (Elkridge, MD); Potter, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ultraviolet extrapolations in finite oscillator bases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of finite harmonic oscillator spaces in many-body calculations introduces both infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) errors. The IR effects are well approximated by imposing a hard-wall boundary condition at a properly identified radius L_eff. We show that duality of the oscillator implies that the UV effects are equally well described by imposing a sharp momentum cutoff at a momentum Lambda_eff complementary to L_eff. By considering two-body systems with separable potentials, we show that the UV energy corrections depend on details of the potential, in contrast to the IR energy corrections, which depend only on the S-matrix. An adaptation of the separable treatment to more general interactions is developed and applied to model potentials as well as to the deuteron with realistic potentials. The previous success with a simple phenomenological form for the UV error is also explained. Possibilities for controlled extrapolations for A > 2 based on scaling arguments are discussed.

S. König; S. K. Bogner; R. J. Furnstahl; S. N. More; T. Papenbrock

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dynamics of laser-produced Sn microplasma for a high-brightness extreme ultraviolet light source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUV light source is excessive in terms of power, cost, and size foot- print . An HVM lithography etendue on the order of 0.03 mm2 sr , and bright several watts of power . This means that the focal spot

Najmabadi, Farrokh

209

Alice: The Rosetta Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the design, performance and scientific objectives of the NASA-funded ALICE instrument aboard the ESA Rosetta asteroid flyby/comet rendezvous mission. ALICE is a lightweight, low-power, and low-cost imaging spectrograph optimized for cometary far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy. It will be the first UV spectrograph to study a comet at close range. It is designed to obtain spatially-resolved spectra of Rosetta mission targets in the 700-2050 A spectral band with a spectral resolution between 8 A and 12 A for extended sources that fill its ~0.05 deg x 6.0 deg field-of-view. ALICE employs an off-axis telescope feeding a 0.15-m normal incidence Rowland circle spectrograph with a concave holographic reflection grating. The imaging microchannel plate detector utilizes dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and employs a 2 D delay-line readout array. The instrument is controlled by an internal microprocessor. During the prime Rosetta mission, ALICE will characterize comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma, its nucleus, and the nucleus/coma coupling; during cruise to the comet, ALICE will make observations of the mission's two asteroid flyby targets and of Mars, its moons, and of Earth's moon. ALICE has already successfully completed the in-flight commissioning phase and is operating normally in flight. It has been characterized in flight with stellar flux calibrations, observations of the Moon during the first Earth fly-by, and observations of comet Linear T7 in 2004 and comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the 2005 Deep Impact comet-collision observing campaign

S. A. Stern; D. C. Slater; J. Scherrer; J. Stone; M. Versteeg; M. F. A'Hearn; J. L. Bertaux; P. D. Feldman; M. C. Festou; J. Wm. Parker; O. H. W. Siegmund

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Polythiophene-based charge dissipation layer for electron beam lithography of zinc oxide and gallium nitride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of thin polythiophene layers to dissipate accumulated charge in the electron beam lithography (EBL) of wide bandgap semiconductors such as zinc oxide and gallium nitride is demonstrated. A quick and inexpensive processing method is demonstrated for EBL exposure of dense and high-resolution patterns in a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) negative-tone resistdeposited on bulk ZnO samples and with GaN/AlN on sapphire substrates. For the former experimental results are given for three different cases: where no charge dissipation layer was used as well as cases where 40-nm-thick Al and 100-nm-thick conductive polymer layers were used on the top of the HSQ resist. For the latter material EBL exposure was investigated for pure HSQ and for HSQ with a thin conductive polymer layer on top. Based on the scanning electron microscope observations of the resulting photonic crystal(PhC) pattern conventional Al and the proposed polymer approach were compared. Good agreement between these results is reported while the new method considerably simplifies sample processing. Spin-coatable conducting polymer may be easily removed due to its solubility in water which makes it a perfect solution for the processing of amphoteric oxide samples i.e. zinc oxide. Gallium nitride processing also benefits from polymer dissipation layer usage due to extended exposure range and the avoidance of dense pattern overexposure in HSQ.

R. Dylewicz; S. Lis; R. M. De La Rue; F. Rahman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Resonance Effects in Photoemission from TiO2-capped Mo/Si Multilayer Mirrors for Extreme Ultraviolet Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the unbaked vacuum systems of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography steppers, oxide formation and carbon growth on Mo/Si multilayer mirrors (MLMs) are competing processes leading to reflectivity loss. A major contribution to this mirror degradation is a series of surface reactions that are thought to be driven in large part by photoemitted electrons. In this paper, we focus on the resonance effects in photoemission from Mo/Si MLMs protected by thin TiO{sub 2} cap layers. In the vicinity of the resonant energy of the mirror, the energy flux of the EUV radiation forming standing wave oscillates throughout the multilayer stack. As a result, light absorption followed by the emission of photoelectrons becomes a complex process that varies rapidly with depth and photon energy. The electron emission is characterized as a function of the EUV photon energy, the angle of incidence, and the position of the standing wave with respect to the solid/vacuum interface. In our experiments, the position of the standing wave was controlled both by deliberately varying the thickness of the Si terminating layer (of the Mo/Si stack) and by depositing C films of various thicknesses on the TiO{sub 2}. The experimental data are compared with model simulations to examine the changes in photoemission yield due to the presence of carbon and to the changes in the position of the standing wave. We find that carbon deposition can have a dramatic impact on the yield and, therefore, on the rates of electron mediated reactions at the surface.

N Faradzhev; B Yakshinskiy; E Starodub; T Madey; S Hill; S Grantham; T Lucatorto; S Yulin; E Vescovo; J Keister

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Lady Chatterley's Lover as a rhetorical response: justification for D. H. Lawrence's mask of Oliver Mellors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Robert Newman (Chairman of Committee) Sam Dra (Manber) Wil iam Owen (Nember) H in all ( a o f rtment) December 1988 Lady Chatterley's Lover as a Rhetorical Response: Justification for D. H. Lawrence's Mask of Oliver Nellors. (December 1988...) David Scott McCracken, B. A. ; Belxant College Chairman of Advisory Caranittee: Dr. Robert Newman Literary scholars debate whether or not Lawrence is worthy of the distinction of successfully combining the poet and the polemcist. Several critics...

McCracken, David Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

3D Printing Phosphonium Ionic Liquid Networks with Mask Projection Microstereolithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

3D Printing Phosphonium Ionic Liquid Networks with Mask Projection Microstereolithography ... Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, where objects are constructed in a layer-by-layer fashion, enables the design and creation of geometrically complex objects with tailored topology, and thus, functionality. ... Herein, we report photopolymerization strategies coupled with additive manufacturing to achieve 3D printed phosphonium PILs in order to demonstrate the first example of 3D printing of an ion-conducting polymer. ...

Alison R. Schultz; Philip M. Lambert; Nicholas A. Chartrain; David M. Ruohoniemi; Zhiyang Zhang; Chainika Jangu; Musan Zhang; Christopher B. Williams; Timothy E. Long

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Compton telescope with coded aperture mask: Imaging with the INTEGRAL/IBIS Compton mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compton telescopes provide a good sensitivity over a wide field of view in the difficult energy range running from a few hundred keV to several MeV. Their angular resolution is, however, poor and strongly energy dependent. We present a novel experimental design associating a coded mask and a Compton detection unit to overcome these pitfalls. It maintains the Compton performance while improving the angular resolution by at least an order of magnitude in the field of view subtended by the mask. This improvement is obtained only at the expense of the efficiency that is reduced by a factor of two. In addition, the background corrections benefit from the coded mask technique, i.e. a simultaneous measurement of the source and background. This design is implemented and tested using the IBIS telescope on board the INTEGRAL satellite to construct images with a 12' resolution over a 29 degrees x 29 degrees field of view in the energy range from 200 keV to a few MeV. The details of the analysis method and the resulting telescope performance, particularly in terms of sensitivity, are presented.

M. Forot; P. Laurent; F. Lebrun; O. Limousin

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

A transparent ultraviolet triggered amorphous selenium p-n junction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will introduce a semitransparent amorphous selenium (a-Se) film exhibiting photovoltaic effects under ultraviolet light created through a simple and inexpensive method. We found that chlorine can be doped into a-Se through electrolysis of saturated salt water, and converts the weak p-type material into an n-type material. Furthermore, we found that a p-n diode fabricated through this process has shown an open circuit voltage of 0.35 V toward ultraviolet illumination. Our results suggest the possibility of doping control depending on the electric current during electrolysis and the possibility of developing a simple doping method for amorphous photoconductors.

Saito, Ichitaro; Soga, Kenichi; Overend, Mauro; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Miyazaki, Wataru; Onishi, Masanori; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [Department of Physics, International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Kudo, Yuki [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yamada, Takatoshi [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Koh, Angel; Chua, Daniel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119077 (Singapore); Aono, Masami [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8686 (Japan)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-solid-state ultraviolet laser Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ultraviolet laser Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: all-solid-state ultraviolet laser Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 All-solid-state...

218

RESISTANCE TO ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT AS AN INDEX TO THE REPRODUCTION OF BACTERIOPHAGE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BENZER ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT INDEX IN BACTERIOPHAGE This result...intermediate stage without reaching completion. We can test for this by making...nutrient. 1ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT INDEX IN BACTERIOPHAGE T2r is adsorbed...BENZER 1]ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT INDEX IN BAUERIOPHAGE such a low...

S. Benzer

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

APPROXIMATE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF WIRELESS ULTRAVIOLET LINKS Zhengyuan Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the solar radiation observed outside the atmosphere shows a wavelength- dependent energy distribution due. INDEX TERMS Ultraviolet, line of sight, non-line of sight, link budget, solar blind. 1. INTRODUCTION advantages [8], such as huge unli- censed bandwidth, low-power and miniaturized transceiver, higher power

Xu, Zhengyuan "Daniel"

220

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) /  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Title Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-62202 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Report Number LBNL-62202 Abstract We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680 - 780 m3/h (400 - 460 cfm).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ALSNews Vol. 311  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior The role irradiation plays in high-exposure bone fracturing experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not fully understood. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers must understand the role of sustained irradiation damage at different size scales within bone. Using synchrotron radiation microtomography at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers investigated changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that this can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness. Read more... Contact: Robert O. Ritchie Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Printing computer chips using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will enable the production of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized, curved-mirror lenses to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, Berkeley Lab scientists worked with an international semiconductor industry consortium to create a unique Fresnel zoneplate microscope on ALS Beamline 11.3.2: The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Read more...

222

ALSNews Vol. 311  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior The role irradiation plays in high-exposure bone fracturing experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not fully understood. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers must understand the role of sustained irradiation damage at different size scales within bone. Using synchrotron radiation microtomography at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers investigated changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that this can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness. Read more... Contact: Robert O. Ritchie Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Printing computer chips using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will enable the production of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized, curved-mirror lenses to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, Berkeley Lab scientists worked with an international semiconductor industry consortium to create a unique Fresnel zoneplate microscope on ALS Beamline 11.3.2: The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Read more...

223

Line detection -The masks shown below can be used to detect lines at various orientations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

every mask over the image and we combine the responses: R(x, y) = max(|R1(x, y)|, |R2(x, y)|, |R3(x, y)|, |R4(x, y)|) If R(x, y) > T, then discontinuity -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 2 -1 -1 -1 -1 2 -1 -1 -1222 2 -1 -1-12 2 -1 2 2 2 2 -1 Original Image R1 R2 R3 R4 Convolved Image with R1 Convolved

Masci, Frank

224

Patterned graphene functionalization via mask-free scanning of micro-plasma jet under ambient condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a mask-free method is introduced for patterned nitrogen doping of graphene using a micro-plasma jet under ambient condition. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra indicate that nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the graphene lattice with the two-dimensional spatial distribution precisely controlled in the range of mm down to 10??m. Since the chemistry of the micro-plasma jet can be controlled by the choice of the gas mixture, this direct writing process with micro-plasma jet can be a versatile approach for patterned functionalization of graphene with high spatial resolution. This could have promising applications in graphene-based electronics.

Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao, E-mail: ensiyu@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Shu-Qun; Lu, Xin-Pei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Quantum States of Light Produced by a High-Gain Optical Parametric Amplifier for Use in Quantum Lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theoretical analysis of the properties of an unseeded optical parametic amplifier (OPA) used as the source of entangled photons for applications in quantum lithography. We first study the dependence of the excitation rate of a two-photon absorber on the intensity of the light leaving the OPA. We find that the rate depends linearly on intensity only for output beams so weak that they contain fewer than one photon per mode. We also study the use of an N-photon absorber for arbitrary N as the recording medium to be used with such a light source. We find that the contrast of the interference pattern and the sharpness of the fringe maxima tend to increase with increasing values of N, but that the density of fringes and thus the limiting resolution does not increase with N. We conclude that the output of an unseeded OPA exciting an N-photon absorber provides an attractive system in which to perform quantum lithography.

Girish S. Agarwal; Kam Wai Chan; Robert W. Boyd; Hugo Cable; Jonathan P. Dowling

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

The role of reverberation in release from masking due to spatial separation of sources in speech recognition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arbogast et al. [ARO Mtg. (2002)] found a large release from masking obtained by spatial separation of a target talker and competing speech masker. Both stimuli were sentences from the Coordinate Response Measure corpus [Bolia et al. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. (2000)] processed by extracting the envelopes of 15 narrow frequency bands and using the envelopes to modulate carrier tones at the center of each band. By playing nonoverlapping subsets (6–8) of bands from signal and masker they minimized the energetic component while maximizing the informational component of masking. This study extends that work to determine the interaction between reverberation masker type and spatial release from masking. Stimuli were processed and presented as above. The target sentence was played at 0?deg azimuth while the masker sentence was played at 0 or 90?deg azimuth. Noise–masker controls were also tested. The listening environment was an IAC booth having dimensions of 12 ft×13 ft. Acoustic extremes were achieved using PlexiglasTM (highly reflective) or foam (highly absorptive). The results indicated that the amount of masking and the spatial release from masking depend both on the characteristics of the room and masker type. Discussion will center on the acoustic and perceptual factors affecting performance. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Effect of Obstacles Close to the Anemometer Mask located on a Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Effect of Obstacles Close to the Anemometer Mask located on a Building The Effect of Obstacles Close to the Anemometer Mask located on a Building on Wind Flow in the WAsP Model Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) is a powerful software package which is used for wind energy assessment for any location using the data of a nearby location under the same climatic condition. In this work WAsP has been used to predict potential areas of Kutubdia, an Island of Bangladesh, for installation of wind generators. As the mast is on the roof of Bangladesh Meteorological Department (BMD) station the hill effect has been introduced. If full heights of obstacles are used the predicted speed for another location becomes high and therefore the height parameter of the obstacles has been adjusted. It appears that those with height below or equal to the slope should not be considered and an obstacle with height greater then the slope should be taken as around h/2 where h is the height above the slope towards the wind direction. The computation shows that the speed difference for one year period between the measured and predicted annual values is 0.3m/s.

228

I n s i t u thermal oxidation for surface cleaning and mask generation prior to selective area epitaxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry thermal oxidation of GaAs and AlAs has been carried out in an organometallic chemical vapor deposition system. This i n s i t u process performed either before or after an epitaxialgrowth serves the purposes of surface cleaning and mask generation for selective area epitaxy of various III?V semiconductors.AlAsoxidized immediately after growth and patterned for the next regrowth provides better oxide?semiconductor interfaces and minimizes wafer handling. Pre?epitaxy oxidation at 435?°C on a patterned wafer with AlAs/GaAs areas resulted in a selective oxide mask. Since thermal oxides of GaAssublime at temperatures >600?°C a 700?°C pregrowth annealing thus thermally cleans the oxidizedGaAs areas while the oxides of AlAs remain as a mask for the following regrowth. Photoluminescence results indicate that high quality regrown interfaces have been obtained.

Stephen H. Jones; Kei May Lau

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reduction of turkey hatching egg shell contamination with ultraviolet irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS VI VI I LIST OF FIGURES IX LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW Introduction Potential Egg Sanitizers Ultraviolet Light as an Egg Sanitizer TREATMENT OF TURKEY HATCHING EGGS... of organic material entering a hatchery is the eggs (Coufal, 2000), eggshell sanitation is considered a critical control point (CCP) in the hatching process. It is considered a CCP because eggshell sanitation is critical in preventing hatchery pathogen...

Russo, Rebecca Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

On the ultraviolet behaviour of quantum fields over noncommutative manifolds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By exploiting the relation between Fredholm modules and the Segal-Shale-Stinespring version of canonical quantization, and taking as starting point the first-quantized fields described by Connes' axioms for noncommutative spin geometries, a Hamiltonian framework for fermion quantum fields over noncommutative manifolds is introduced. We analyze the ultraviolet behaviour of second-quantized fields over noncommutative 3-tori, and discuss what behaviour should be expected on other noncommutative spin manifolds.

Varilly, J C; Varilly, Joseph C.; Gracia-Bondia, Jose M.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Richardson, Robert W. (Pelham, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

Reed, Scott (Albuquerue, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerue, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerue, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerue, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Science & Technology Review September/October 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue has the following articles: (1) Answering Scientists Most Audacious Questions--Commentary by Dona Crawford; (2) Testing the Accuracy of the Supernova Yardstick--High-resolution simulations are advancing understanding of Type Ia supernovae to help uncover the mysteries of dark energy; (3) Developing New Drugs and Personalized Medical Treatment--Accelerator mass spectrometry is emerging as an essential tool for assessing the effects of drugs in humans; (4) Triage in a Patch--A painless skin patch and accompanying detector can quickly indicate human exposure to biological pathogens, chemicals, explosives, or radiation; and (5) Smoothing Out Defects for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography--A process for smoothing mask defects helps move extreme ultraviolet lithography one step closer to creating smaller, more powerful computer chips.

Bearinger, J P

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

A NEW ALGORITHM FOR RADIOISOTOPE IDENTIFICATION OF SHIELDED AND MASKED SNM/RDD MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection and identification of shielded and masked nuclear materials is crucial to national security, but vast borders and high volumes of traffic impose stringent requirements for practical detection systems. Such tools must be be mobile, and hence low power, provide a low false alarm rate, and be sufficiently robust to be operable by non-technical personnel. Currently fielded systems have not achieved all of these requirements simultaneously. Transport modeling such as that done in GADRAS is able to predict observed spectra to a high degree of fidelity; our research is focusing on a radionuclide identification algorithm that inverts this modeling within the constraints imposed by a handheld device. Key components of this work include incorporation of uncertainty as a function of both the background radiation estimate and the hypothesized sources, dimensionality reduction, and nonnegative matrix factorization. We have partially evaluated performance of our algorithm on a third-party data collection made with two different sodium iodide detection devices. Initial results indicate, with caveats, that our algorithm performs as good as or better than the on-board identification algorithms. The system developed was based on a probabilistic approach with an improved approach to variance modeling relative to past work. This system was chosen based on technical innovation and system performance over algorithms developed at two competing research institutions. One key outcome of this probabilistic approach was the development of an intuitive measure of confidence which was indeed useful enough that a classification algorithm was developed based around alarming on high confidence targets. This paper will present and discuss results of this novel approach to accurately identifying shielded or masked radioisotopes with radiation detection systems.

Jeffcoat, R.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

A magnetotelluric survey on Manitoulin Island and Bruce Peninsula along GLIMPCE seismic line J: black shales mask the Grenville Front  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Geological Survey, 1985. Oil shale assessment project drillholes...GLIMPCE seismic line J: black shales mask the Grenville Front M...highly conductive layer of black shales of limited extent, precludes...y believed to be caused by anisotropic effects associated with thick......

M. Mareschal; R. D. Kurtz; M. Chouteau; R. Chakridi

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write Photomask Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which form an etch resistant material at ~7 mJ/cm2 laser exposures with near wavelength invariance fromWavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write Photomask Material Glenn Chapman1 , Yuqiang Tu and Jun Peng School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser

Chapman, Glenn H.

237

Fast Yield-Driven Fracture for Variable Shaped-Beam Mask Andrew B. Kahng, Xu Xu and Alex Zelikovsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Yield-Driven Fracture for Variable Shaped-Beam Mask Writing Andrew B. Kahng, Xu Xu and Alex process generation have collectively presented new challenges for current fracture tools, which-dimension errors. Some commercial tools are available for handling the sliver minimization problem in fracture

Zelikovsky, Alexander

238

The effect of ultraviolet B on phytoplankton populations in clear and ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E4L 1G6, Canada ... from the National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada. ...... Ecosystem response to solar ultraviolet-B radiation: Influence.

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Gamma Ray Burst Constraints on Ultraviolet Lorentz Invariance Violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a unified general formalism for ultraviolet Lorentz invariance violation (LV) testing through electromagnetic wave propagation, based on both dispersion and rotation measure data. This allows for a direct comparison of the efficacy of different data to constrain LV. As an example we study the signature of LV on the rotation of the polarization plane of $\\gamma$-rays from gamma ray bursts in a LV model. Here $\\gamma$-ray polarization data can provide a strong constraint on LV, 13 orders of magnitude more restrictive than a potential constraint from the rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization proposed by Gamboa, L\\'{o}pez-Sarri\\'{o}n, and Polychronakos (2006).

Tina Kahniashvili; Grigol Gogoberidze; Bharat Ratra

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gate-controlled ultraviolet photo-etching of graphene edges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical reactivity of graphene under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation is investigated under positive and negative gate electric fields. Graphene edges are selectively etched when negative gate voltages are applied while the reactivity is significantly suppressed for positive gate voltages. Oxygen adsorption onto graphene is significantly affected by the Fermi level of the final state achieved during previous electrical measurements. UV irradiation after negative-to-positive gate sweeps causes predominant oxygen desorption while UV irradiation after gate sweeps in the opposite direction causes etching of graphene edges.

Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Nouchi, Ryo [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)] [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Flaring Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extreme ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature and density sensitive line ratios, Doppler shifted emission lines and nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, and continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this paper I shall review some of the advances made in recent years using these techniques, focusing primarily on studies that have utilized data from Hinode/EIS and SDO/EVE, while also providing some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

Milligan, Ryan O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Extreme ultraviolet interferometric measurements of diffraction-limited optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At-wavelength interferometric measurements of recently fabricatedextreme ultraviolet(EUV) microstepper projection optics have revealed the highest performance for prototype EUV lithographic systems observed to date. The phase-shifting point diffractioninterferometer is used to measure and align these two-mirror multilayer-coated Schwarzschild optical systems designed with a numerical aperture of 0.088 and operating at 13.4 nm wavelength. Root-mean-square wave front error magnitudes as small as 0.60 nm have been achieved actually exceeding the design tolerance set for these objectives.

Kenneth A. Goldberg; Patrick Naulleau; Jeffrey Bokor

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Extreme ultraviolet interferometric measurements of diffraction-limited optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At-wavelength interferometric measurements of recently fabricated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microstepper projection optics have revealed the highest performance for prototype EUV lithographic systems observed to date. The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer is used to measure and align these two-mirror, multilayer-coated Schwarzschild optical systems designed with a numerical aperture of 0.088 and operating at 13.4 nm wavelength. Root-mean-square wave front error magnitudes as small as 0.60 nm have been achieved, actually exceeding the design tolerance set for these objectives. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Naulleau, Patrick [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bokor, Jeffrey [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits operating at ultraviolet wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN) has recently emerged as a promising material for integrated photonics due to a large bandgap and attractive optical properties. Exploiting the wideband transparency, we demonstrate waveguiding in AlN-on-Insulator circuits from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths using nanophotonic components with dimensions down to 40?nm. By measuring the propagation loss over a wide spectral range, we conclude that both scattering and absorption of AlN-intrinsic defects contribute to strong attenuation at short wavelengths, thus providing guidelines for future improvements in thin-film deposition and circuit fabrication.

Stegmaier, M.; Ebert, J.; Pernice, W. H. P., E-mail: wolfram.pernice@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Meckbach, J. M.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M. [Institute of Micro- und Nanoelectronic Systems, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ultraviolet Divergences and Factorization for Coordinate-Space Amplitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the coordinate-space matrix elements that correspond to fixed-angle scattering amplitudes involving partons and Wilson lines in coordinate space, working in Feynman gauge. In coordinate space, both collinear and short-distance limits produce ultraviolet divergences. We classify singularities in coordinate space, and identify neighborhoods associated unambiguously with individual subspaces (pinch surfaces) where the integrals are singular. The set of such regions is finite for any diagram. Within each of these regions, coordinate-space soft-collinear and hard-collinear approximations reproduce singular behavior. Based on this classification of regions and approximations, we develop a series of nested subtraction approximations by analogy to the formalism in momentum space. This enables us to rewrite each amplitude as a sum of terms to which gauge theory Ward identities can be applied, factorizing them into hard, jet and soft factors, and to confirm the multiplicative renormalizability of products of lightlike Wilson lines. We study in some detail the simplest case, the color-singlet cusp linking two Wilson lines, and show that the logarithm of this amplitude, which is a sum of diagrams known as webs, is closely related to the corresponding subtracted amplitude order by order in perturbation theory. This enables us to confirm that the logarithm of the cusp can be written as the integral of an ultraviolet-finite function over a surface. We study to what extent this result generalizes to amplitudes involving multiple Wilson lines.

Ozan Erdo?an; George Sterman

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

Ben-Zvi, I. (ed.)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Association between Ambient Ultraviolet Radiation and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Boscoe FP , Schymura MJ.Solar ultraviolet-B exposure and...Spain with respect to indices of solar UVB irradiance and smoking...a case-control study in Mexico.Oncology 2002;63:151-7...suggest that higher exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR...

Bich Tran; Susan J. Jordan; Robyn Lucas; Penelope M. Webb; and Rachel Neale

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Context-based automated defect classification system using multiple morphological masks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Automatic detection of defects during the fabrication of semiconductor wafers is largely automated, but the classification of those defects is still performed manually by technicians. This invention includes novel digital image analysis techniques that generate unique feature vector descriptions of semiconductor defects as well as classifiers that use these descriptions to automatically categorize the defects into one of a set of pre-defined classes. Feature extraction techniques based on multiple-focus images, multiple-defect mask images, and segmented semiconductor wafer images are used to create unique feature-based descriptions of the semiconductor defects. These feature-based defect descriptions are subsequently classified by a defect classifier into categories that depend on defect characteristics and defect contextual information, that is, the semiconductor process layer(s) with which the defect comes in contact. At the heart of the system is a knowledge database that stores and distributes historical semiconductor wafer and defect data to guide the feature extraction and classification processes. In summary, this invention takes as its input a set of images containing semiconductor defect information, and generates as its output a classification for the defect that describes not only the defect itself, but also the location of that defect with respect to the semiconductor process layers.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Hunt, Martin A. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life -Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution/ultraviolet.php 1 of 2 8/7/2007 1:45 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life - Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution Water E Coli UVB Sunscreen #12;Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life - Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution/ultraviolet.php 2 of 2 8/7/2007 1:45 PM Home | About | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise on This Site

Blaustein, Andrew R.

251

Spectral Dependencies of Killing, Mutation, and Transformation in Mammalian Cells and Their Relevance to Hazards Caused by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to Hazards Caused by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation...States Department of Energy, Contract W-31-109-ENG-38...to hazards caused by solar ultraviolet radiation...to Hazards Caused by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation1...States Department of Energy, Contract W-31-109...

F. Suzuki; A. Han; G. R. Lankas; H. Utsumi; and M. M. Elkind

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Improved repeat identification and masking in Dipterans Christopher D. Smith1,2,,*, Robert C. Edgar3,, Mark D. Yandell4, Douglas R. Smith5, Susan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved repeat identification and masking in Dipterans Christopher D. Smith1,2,,*, Robert C. Edgar3,, Mark D. Yandell4, Douglas R. Smith5, Susan E. Celniker2, Eugene W. Myers6,7, and Gary H. Karpen2

Yandell, Mark

253

Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard A. Frey, Steven A. Ackerman, Yinghui Liu, Kathleen I. Strabala, Hong Zhang,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard.frey@ssec.wisc.edu August 2007 #12;ABSTRACT Significant improvements have been made to the MODIS cloud mask (MOD35 and MYD35 to the 3.9-12 m and 11-12 m cloud tests. More non-MODIS ancillary input data has been added. Land and sea

Sheridan, Jennifer

254

Laser plasma formation assisted by ultraviolet pre-ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental and modeling studies of air pre-ionization using ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses and its effect on laser breakdown of an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) pulse. Experimental studies are conducted with a 266?nm beam (fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG) for UV pre-ionization and an overlapped 1064?nm NIR beam (fundamental of Nd:YAG), both having pulse duration of ?10?ns. Results show that the UV beam produces a pre-ionized volume which assists in breakdown of the NIR beam, leading to reduction in NIR breakdown threshold by factor of >2. Numerical modeling is performed to examine the ionization and breakdown of both beams. The modeled breakdown threshold of the NIR, including assist by pre-ionization, is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

Yalin, Azer P., E-mail: ayalin@engr.colostate.edu; Dumitrache, Ciprian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Wilvert, Nick [Sandia Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Joshi, Sachin [Cummins Inc., Columbus, Indiana 47201 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM SUN-GRAZING COMETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed two Sun-grazing comets as they passed through the solar atmosphere. Both passages resulted in a measurable enhancement of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiance in several of the AIA bandpasses. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Molecules in the comet rapidly sublimate as it approaches the Sun. They are then photodissociated by the solar radiation field to create atomic species. Subsequent ionization of these atoms produces a higher abundance of ions than normally present in the corona and results in EUV emission in the wavelength ranges of the AIA telescope passbands.

Bryans, P. [ADNET Systems Inc., NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pesnell, W. D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80 eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene is not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, par...

Gao, A; Bijkerk, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Extreme ultraviolet induced defects on few-layer graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Raman spectroscopy to show that exposing few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5 nm) radiation, i.e., relatively low photon energy, results in an increasing density of defects. Furthermore, exposure to EUV radiation in a H{sub 2} background increases the graphene dosage sensitivity, due to reactions caused by the EUV induced hydrogen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the sp{sup 2} bonded carbon fraction decreases while the sp{sup 3} bonded carbon and oxide fraction increases with exposure dose. Our experimental results confirm that even in reducing environment oxidation is still one of the main source of inducing defects.

Gao, A.; Zoethout, E.; Lee, C. J. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)] [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Rizo, P. J.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Banine, V. [ASML, De Run 6501, 5504DR Veldhoven (Netherlands)] [ASML, De Run 6501, 5504DR Veldhoven (Netherlands); Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands) [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Holographic screens in ultraviolet self-complete quantum gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the geometry and the thermodynamics of a holographic screen in the framework of the ultraviolet self-complete quantum gravity. To achieve this goal we construct a new static, neutral, non-rotating black hole metric, whose outer (event) horizon coincides with the surface of the screen. The space-time admits an extremal configuration corresponding to the minimal holographic screen and having both mass and radius equalling the Planck units. We identify this object as the space-time fundamental building block, whose interior is physically unaccessible and cannot be probed even during the Hawking evaporation terminal phase. In agreement with the holographic principle, relevant processes take place on the screen surface. The area quantization leads to a discrete mass spectrum. An analysis of the entropy shows that the minimal holographic screen can store only one byte of information while in the thermodynamic limit the area law is corrected by a logarithmic term.

Piero Nicolini; Euro Spallucci

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ultraviolet Divergences and Factorization for Coordinate-Space Amplitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the coordinate-space matrix elements that correspond to fixed-angle scattering amplitudes involving partons and Wilson lines in coordinate space, working in Feynman gauge. In coordinate space, both collinear and short-distance limits produce ultraviolet divergences. We classify singularities in coordinate space, and identify neighborhoods associated unambiguously with individual subspaces (pinch surfaces) where the integrals are singular. The set of such regions is finite for any diagram. Within each of these regions, coordinate-space soft-collinear and hard-collinear approximations reproduce singular behavior. Based on this classification of regions and approximations, we develop a series of nested subtraction approximations by analogy to the formalism in momentum space. This enables us to rewrite each amplitude as a sum of terms to which gauge theory Ward identities can be applied, factorizing them into hard, jet and soft factors, and to confirm the multiplicative renormalizability of products o...

Erdo?an, Ozan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or x- ray laser pulses of short duration. An ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulse of long duration is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier, by a streaming plasma that is produced by illuminating a solid target with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation. The short pulse of ultraviolet or x-ray laser radiation, which may be amplified to high power, is separated out by passage through a slit aperture in the opaque barrier.

MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Trebes, J.E.

1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses of short duration (32). An ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulse of long duration (12) is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier (28), by a streaming plasma (22) that is produced by illuminating a solid target (16, 18) with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation (20). The short pulse of ultraviolet or X-ray laser radiation (32), which may be amplified to high power (40, 42), is separated out by passage through a slit aperture (30) in the opaque barrier (28).

MacGowan, Brian J. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently undertaking research into nano-enabled titanium dioxide (TiO2) ultraviolet (UV) protective layers for cool-color roofing applications. Project Description This project entails optimizing and scaling up silicon dioxide-coated TiO2 nanocrystal synthesis and functionalization in aqueous solution in order to formulate a 10 gallon waterborne clear UV protective nanocomposite coating material. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between DOE and Nanotrons, a Massachusetts-based company that uses nano-engineering technologies to

264

Toward resistant vacuum-ultraviolet coatings for free-electron lasers down to 150 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development are currently trying to run a storage ring free-electron laser down to 150 nm with robust optics. Vacuum-ultraviolet fluoride optics with protected oxide layers and enhanced metallic mirrors are investigated.

Gatto, Alexandre; Yang Minghong; Kaiser, Norbert; Guenster, Stefan; Ristau, Detlev; Trovo, Mauro; Danailov, Miltcho

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Direct Detection of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation for Nonmetal Determinations with a Helium Microwave-Induced Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the determination of metals, nonmetals, and metalloids (F, Cl, Br, I, S, P, Se, As, Sb, and Pb) in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region with a kilowatt-plus helium...

Alvarado, Jorge; Carnahan, Jon W

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ultraviolet vortex generation using periodically bonded ?-BaB2O4 device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the first demonstration of ultraviolet (266nm) vortex generation using the combination of a frequency-doubled nanosecond green laser, a spiral phase plate, and a...

Sasaki, Yuta; Koyama, Mio; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Ariga, Yoshimi; Onda, Tomomi; Shoji, Ichiro; Omatsu, Takashige

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Should we believe the results of ultraviolet–millimetre galaxy spectral energy distribution modelling?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......its star formation history (SFH), its stellar, gas, and metal content, and the physical conditions of its interstellar medium (ISM). The number of galaxies, both local and high-redshift, with well-sampled ultraviolet (UV) to millimetre (mm......

Christopher C. Hayward; Daniel J. B. Smith

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Microbial Reduction on Eggshell Surfaces by the use of Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in combination with ultraviolet light (UV) as an egg sanitization process on eggshell surfaces was studied. Preliminary experiments were conducted to develop an optimized methodology for eggshell disinfection that will be an effective and efficient way to reduce...

Gottselig, Steven Michael

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ultraviolet-ozone-treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultraviolet-ozone-treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)was used as the anode buffer layer in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene-based solar cells. The power conversion e...

Zisheng Su; Lidan Wang; Yantao Li; Haifeng Zhao; Bei Chu…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - algan-based deep ultraviolet Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GanAlgan- Based Laser Diodes with Modulation-Doped Strained... in ultraviolet optoelectronics2-4 , room temperature lasing5-8 , and solar cells applications9... -LEDs and...

271

Tryptophan Cluster Protects Human ?D-Crystallin from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant risk factor for age-related cataract, a disease of the human lens and the most prevalent cause of blindness in the world. Cataract pathology involves protein misfolding ...

Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

272

THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV transiting planet studies, including searches for O{sub 3} on Earth-like planets. Finally, we observe relatively bright H{sub 2} fluorescent emission from four of the M dwarf exoplanetary systems (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, and GJ 832). Additional modeling work is needed to differentiate between a stellar photospheric or possible exoplanetary origin for the hot (T(H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 2000-4000 K) molecular gas observed in these objects.

France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tian, Feng [Center for Earth System Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Center for Earth System Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Desert, Jean-Michel [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela [Instituto de Astronomsica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto de Astronomsica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Walkowicz, Lucianne M., E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ultraviolet light absorbers having two different chromophors in the same molecule  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to novel ultraviolet light absorbers having two chromophors in the same molecule, and more particularly to benzotriazole substituted dihydroxybenzophenones and acetophenones. More particularly, this invention relates to 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone which are particularly useful as an ultraviolet light absorbers.

Vogl, O.; Li, S.

1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Low-pressure microwave plasma ultraviolet lamp for water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-pressure mercury lamps are commonly used for germicidal applications. The germicidal effect is due to the emission of light at 254 nm, which leads to the destruction of the most waterborne bacteria and viruses. The microwave plasma ultraviolet (UV) lamp (MPUVL) is a new technology for generating a high-intensity UV light and that can be also controlled to operate at 185 nm; irradiation is in air at this wavelength produces ozone. The microwave power is injected into a resonant cavity and the surface wave excitation takes place within the cavity through that part of the discharge tube (fused silica) protruding inside it. The MPUVL has many advantages over conventional lamps, which are limited to an output power in the region of 30 W m-1, while MPUVL can deliver any amount of power per unit length and the tube can be of any shape, length or diameter. This paper describes the design of the MPUVL and compares its efficiency with that of conventional lamps through spectral analysis. Other results, which include the effects of temperature and different power inputs, are also discussed.

A I Al-Shamma'a; I Pandithas; J Lucas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Swift-UVOT ultraviolet and visible grism calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the calibration of the Swift UVOT grisms, of which there are two, providing low-resolution field spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and optical bands respectively. The UV grism covers the range 1700-5000 Angstrom with a spectral resolution of 75 at 2600 Angstrom for source magnitudes of u=10-16 mag, while the visible grism covers the range 2850-6600 Angstrom with a spectral resolution of 100 at 4000 Angstrom for source magnitudes of b=12-17 mag. This calibration extends over all detector positions, for all modes used during operations. The wavelength accuracy (1-sigma) is 9 Angstrom in the UV grism clocked mode, 17 Angstrom in the UV grism nominal mode and 22 Angstrom in the visible grism. The range below 2740 Angstrom in the UV grism and 5200 Angstrom in the visible grism never suffers from overlapping by higher spectral orders. The flux calibration of the grisms includes a correction we developed for coincidence loss in the detector. The error in the coincidence loss correction is less than 20%. The...

Kuin, N P M; Breeveld, A A; Page, M J; James, C; Lamoureux, H; Mehdipour, M; Still, M; Yershov, V; Brown, P J; Carter, M; Mason, K O; Kennedy, T; Marshall, F; Roming, P W A; Siegel, M; Oates, S; Smith, P J; De Pasquale, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Ultraviolet Sky: An Overview from the GALEX Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed the first surveys of the sky in the Ultraviolet (UV). Its legacy is an unprecedented database with more than 200 million source measurements in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), as well as wide-field imaging of extended objects, filling an important gap in our view of the sky across the electromagnetic spectrum. The UV surveys offer unique sensitivity for identifying and studying selected classes of astrophysical objects, both stellar and extra-galactic. We examine the overall content and distribution of UV sources over the sky, and with magnitude and color. For this purpose, we have constructed final catalogs of UV sources with homogeneous quality, eliminating duplicate measurements of the same source. Such catalogs can facilitate a variety of investigations on UV-selected samples, as well as planning of observations with future missions. We describe the criteria used to build the catalogs, their coverage and completeness. We included observations in which bo...

Bianchi, Luciana; Shiao, Bernie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Femtosecond photoelectron and photoion spectrometer with vacuum ultraviolet probe pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a setup to study ultrafast dynamics in gas-phase molecules using time-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) probe pulses are generated via strong field high-order harmonic generation from infrared femtosecond laser pulses. The band pass characteristic in transmission of thin indium (In) metal foil is exploited to isolate the $9^{\\text{th}}$ harmonic of the 800 nm fundamental (H9, 14 eV, 89 nm) from all other high harmonics. The $9^{\\text{th}}$ harmonic is obtained with high conversion efficiencies and has sufficient photon energy to access the complete set of valence electron levels in most molecules. The setup also allows for direct comparison of VUV single-photon probe with 800 nm multi-photon probe without influencing the delay of excitation and probe pulse or the beam geometry. We use a magnetic bottle spectrometer with high collection efficiency for electrons, serving at the same time as a time of flight spectrometer for ions. Characterization measurem...

Koch, Markus; Grilj, Jakob; Sistrunk, Emily; Gühr, Markus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Growth of individual carbon nanotubes on an array of TiN/Ni nanodots patterned by e-beam lithography and defined by dry etching for field emission application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Individual vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, Electron-beam lithography, Dry etching, Field emission and uniform electronic emission, cathodes based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are patternedGrowth of individual carbon nanotubes on an array of TiN/Ni nanodots patterned by e

Boyer, Edmond

280

Nanoimprint Lithography | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrument ID: 34143 Availability: 10 hours a day, 5 days a week Quick Specs Science Contact Science Highlights Publications Custodians Ryan Kelly (509) 371-6525 ryan.kelly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ultraviolet radiation as disinfection for fish surgical tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelomic cavity of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When fish are implanted consecutively, as in large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. To determine the efficacy for this application, ultraviolet (UV) radiation was used to disinfect surgical tools exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica, causative agents of furunculosis, coldwater disease, bacterial kidney disease, and saprolegniasis (water mold), respectively. Four experiments were conducted to address the question of UV efficacy. In the first experiment, forceps were exposed to the three bacteria at three varying concentrations. After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods – 2, 5, or 15 min. UV radiation exposures at all durations were effective at killing all three bacteria on forceps at the highest bacteria concentrations. In the second experiment, stab scalpels, sutures, and needle holders were exposed to A. salmonicida using the same methodology as used in Experiment 1. UV radiation exposure at 5 and 15 min was effective at killing A. salmonicida on stab scalpels and sutures but not needle holders. In the third experiment, S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV radiation was effective at killing the water mold at all three exposure durations. Collectively, this study shows that UV radiation appears to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique to chemical disinfectants (e.g., ethanol) for some surgical tools. However, we do not recommend using this method for tools such as needle holders having overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be exposed directly to UV radiation

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Geist, David R.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

283

Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band Speaker(s): Forrest Fencl Date: April 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Mr. Forrest Fencl of UV Resources, Inc. will discuss how air conditioning system operation, maintenance, and utilization influence system cooling capacity and indoor air quality. The use of ultraviolet germicidal radiation to clean heat exchangers and maintain their efficiency will be reviewed and energy savings estimates will be provided. Additionally, he will discuss why UV-C is considered the "green" cleaner and how widely it is used today as an engineering strategy for precluding the growth, dissemination and recirculation of microbial contaminants. For more information about this seminar, please contact: Bill Fisk(510) 486-591

284

Action Spectrum for Growth Delay Induced in Escherichia coli B/r by Far-Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by Far-Ultraviolet Radiation Hiraku Takebe 1 John...University, Osaka 530, Japan. An action spectrum...by far-ultraviolet radiation (230 to 295 nm) was...suspension. Near-UV radiation induces extensive growth...University, Osaka 530, Japan. ducing little killing...

Hiraku Takebe; John Jagger

1969-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Studying the Mechanisms of Titanium Dioxide as Ultraviolet-Blocking Additive for Films and Fabrics by an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying the Mechanisms of Titanium Dioxide as Ultraviolet-Blocking Additive for Films and Fabrics November 2003 ABSTRACT: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has good ultraviolet (UV)-blocking power and is very: inorganic UV-blocking agents; additives; films; adsorption; light scattering INTRODUCTION More frequent

Pan, Ning

286

Carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces under extreme ultraviolet radiation: An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces under extreme ultraviolet radiation: An x 2012) Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation-induced carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces modification during EUV exposure. XPS analysis showed that total carbon contamination (C 1s peak

Harilal, S. S.

287

Effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on fluid intake during exercise in chemical protective gear. Report for January-May 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on voluntary fluid consumption. Eighteen male volunteers walked on a treadmill (4.02 km/hr, 0 deg. grade, 50 min/hr for 6 hr) in a climatic chamber (dry bulb=32.6 deg C, wet bulb=17.5 deg C, 20.4% relative humidity, and windspeed=8.05 km/hr, producing a WBGT of 22.1 deg C). Subjects wore chemical protective gear (trousers, jacket, boots, gloves, and M17A1 protective mask) and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask drinking systems: CS (n=9), the current gravity fed system or MDS (n=9), a prototype hand-pump drinking system. Because decontamination of the mask and drinking connections was performed prior to drinking, the overall use of the CS was rated significantly more difficult during both work and rest than the MDS. Failure to decontaminate connections prior to drinking was noted early in the trial in 2 soldiers using the CS suggesting an increase risk of accidental contamination associated with this system. Drinking with the MDS had no measurable adverse effect on hydration status of the test subjects: water intake rate, 0.36 L/hr (CS) and 0.42 L/hr (MDS); sweat rate, 0.63 L/hr (CS) and 0.67 L/hr (MDS); body weight loss, 0.32 %/hr (CS) and 0.31 %/hr (MDS).

Szlyk, P.C.; Sils, I.V.; Tharion, W.J.; Francesconi, R.P.; Mahnke, R.B.

1989-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investigation of ultraviolet response enhanced PV cell with silicon-based SINP configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we report on the realization of ultraviolet response enhancement in PV cells through the structure of ITO/SiO2/np-Silicon frame (named as SINP), which was fabricated by the state of the art process...

Bo He; ZhongQuan Ma; Lei Zhao; NanSheng Zhang…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Phase effects owing to multilayer coatings in a two-mirror extreme-ultraviolet Schwarzschild objective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase effects owing to multilayer coatings in a two-mirror extreme-ultraviolet Schwarzschild effects in the two-mirror Schwarzschild objective with point diffraction interferometry. The chromatic the interferometry data on the two-mirror optical system are compared with previously reported coating properties

290

Extremely fine-pitch printing with a 10 Schwarzschild optic at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(NA), all reflective systems. Two-mirror, 10Ã?-demagnification Schwarzschild optical systems have beenExtremely fine-pitch printing with a 10Ã? Schwarzschild optic at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths wavelength, 10Ã?-demagnification Schwarzschild optical system to expose high- resolution test patterns

Bokor, Jeffrey

291

Slow neutron detection without 3He: far ultraviolet noble-gas-excimer radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow neutron detection without 3He: far ultraviolet noble-gas-excimer radiation induced by neutron (NIST) 3 Nuclear Engineering Program, UMD 4 Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and UMD Slow neutron detection without 3He Eighth Ultracold Neutron Workshop Saint Petersburg ­ Moscow, June 2011 #12;Summary We have

Titov, Anatoly

292

AMLR program: Ultraviolet and visible solar irradiance around Elephant Island, Antarctica, January to March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the discovery of the seasonal ozone hole over Antarctica, great efforts have been made in measuring incident ultraviolet radiation at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, as well as the impact that enhanced UV-B radiation could have on terrestrial and aquatic environments. The measurements described in this article were conducted on board the NOAA ship Surveyor. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Helbling, E.W.; Holm-Hansen, O. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Moran, P. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnosticExperimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution July 2008 We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities

Scharer, John E.

294

Signatures of the Protein Folding Pathway in Two-Dimensional Ultraviolet Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Signatures of the Protein Folding Pathway in Two-Dimensional Ultraviolet Spectroscopy Jun Jiang of the signals provides a quantitative marker of protein folding status, accessible by both theoretical calculations and experiments. SECTION: Biophysical Chemistry and Biomolecules Protein folding is an important

Mukamel, Shaul

295

Extreme ultraviolet carrier-frequency shearing interferometry of a lithographic four-mirror optical system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme ultraviolet carrier-frequency shearing interferometry of a lithographic four-mirror optical of an EUV Schwarzschild objective.13 Direct comparison of this LSI to the PS/PDI has demon- strated a root-grating, carrier- frequency LSI for testing a lithographic four-mirror EUV optical system. The tests were performed

296

Near-infrared femtosecond laser machining initiated by ultraviolet multiphoton ionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared femtosecond laser machining initiated by ultraviolet multiphoton ionization X. Yu, Q://apl.aip.org/features/most_downloaded Information for Authors: http://apl.aip.org/authors #12;Near-infrared femtosecond laser machining initiated, and the near-infrared pulse utilizes these electrons to cause damage by avalanche ionization. VC 2013 American

Van Stryland, Eric

297

A LIBRARY OF THEORETICAL ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF MASSIVE, HOT STARS FOR EVOLUTIONARY SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We computed a comprehensive set of theoretical ultraviolet spectra of hot, massive stars with the radiation-hydrodynamics code WM-Basic. This model atmosphere and spectral synthesis code is optimized for computing the strong P Cygni type lines originating in the winds of hot stars, which are the strongest features in the ultraviolet spectral region. The computed set is suitable as a spectral library for inclusion in evolutionary synthesis models of star clusters and star-forming galaxies. The chosen stellar parameters cover the upper left Hertzsprung-Russell diagram at L {approx}> 10{sup 2.75} L {sub sun} and T {sub eff} {approx}> 20,000 K. The adopted elemental abundances are 0.05 Z {sub sun}, 0.2 Z {sub sun}, 0.4 Z {sub sun}, Z {sub sun}, and 2 Z {sub sun}. The spectra cover the wavelength range from 900 to 3000 A and have a resolution of 0.4 A. We compared the theoretical spectra to data of individual hot stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer satellites and found very good agreement. We built a library with the set of spectra and implemented it into the evolutionary synthesis code Starburst99 where it complements and extends the existing empirical library toward lower chemical abundances. Comparison of population synthesis models at solar and near-solar composition demonstrates consistency between synthetic spectra generated with either library. We discuss the potential of the new library for the interpretation of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies. Properties that can be addressed with the models include ages, initial mass function, and heavy-element abundance. The library can be obtained both individually or as part of the Starburst99 package.

Leitherer, Claus [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ortiz Otalvaro, Paula A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, MedellIn (Colombia); Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lo Faro, Barbara [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 2, 35122 Padova (Italy); Pauldrach, Adalbert W. A. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Pettini, Max [University of Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Rd., Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Rix, Samantha A., E-mail: leitherer@stsci.ed, E-mail: pauortizo@gmail.co, E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: barbara.lofaro@gmail.co, E-mail: uh10107@usm.uni-muenchen.d, E-mail: pettini@ast.cam.ac.u, E-mail: srix@ing.iac.e [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Apartado de Correos 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Canary Islands (Spain)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

High silicon content silylating reagents for dry-developed positive-tone resists for extreme ultraviolet (13.5 nm) and deep ultraviolet (248 nm) microlithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent results in the use of disilanes as silylating reagents for near-surface imaging with deep-UV (248 nm) and EUV (13.5 nm) lithography are reported. A relatively thin imaging layer of a photo-cross-linking resist is spun over a thicker layer of hard-baked resist that functions as a planarizing layer and antireflective coating. Photoinduced acid generation and subsequent heating crosslinks and renders exposed areas impermeable to an aminodisilane that reacts with the unexposed regions. Subsequent silylation and reactive ion etching afford a positive-tone image. The use of disilanes introduces a higher concentration of silicon into the polymer than is possible with silicon reagents that incorporate only one silicon atom per reactive site. The higher silicon content in the silylated polymer increases etching selectivity between exposed and unexposed regions and thereby increases the contrast. Additional improvements that help to minimize flow during silylation are also discussed, including the addition of bifunctional disilanes. We have resolved high aspect ratio, very high quality 0.20 {mu}m line and space patterns at 248 nm with a stepper having a numerical aperture (NA)= 0.53, and have resolved {<=} 0.15 {mu}m line and spaces at 13.5 nm.

Wheeler, D.; Scharrer, E.; Kubiak, G. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quality and Sensory Attributes of Shell Eggs Sanitized with a Combination of Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the combination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet light (UV) as an alternative eggshell sanitization procedure for shell egg processing. In each experiment, two cases of eggs (720 total) were...

Woodring, Kristy Senise

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Response of natural phytoplankton assemblages to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) in the coastal water, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variability in the effect of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) on primary productivity of ... water off Manazuru Harbor, Sagami Bay, central Japan for two full years during the period...13C method. Size distribu...

Takashi Sugawara; K. Hamasaki; T. Toda; T. Kikuchi; Satoru Taguchi

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Inactivation of carotenoid-producing and albino strains of Neurospora crassa by visible light, blacklight, and ultraviolet radiation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DNA, Bacterial radiation effects Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation Haemophilus influenzae...involved in the estimation of average fluence...R. W. 1956. Dose-effect curves...of' ultraviolet radiation on carotenoid containing...

P L Blanc; R W Tuveson; M L Sargent

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Broadband extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirror for supercontinuum light at a photon energy of 35-65 eV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a broadband multilayer mirror for photon energies between 35 and 65 eV. This extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mirror has an almost flat reflectivity profile at normal...

Hatayama, Masatoshi; Takenaka, Hisataka; Gullikson, Eric M; Suda, Akira; Midorikawa, Katsumi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

O VI RECOMBINATION LINES IN ULTRAVIOLET AND VISIBLE SPECTRA OF RR TELESCOPII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen recombination lines of O VI are identified in ultraviolet and visible spectra of the symbiotic nova RR Telescopii at wavelengths between 1122 and 6203 A. Only three of the lines have previously been reported from astronomical spectra, and eight lines have never been reported from either astronomical or laboratory spectra. The lines represent transitions between levels with principal quantum numbers up to 13, and the strongest lines by flux occur at 1124.82, 2070.90, and 3434.66 A, corresponding to transitions 4-5, 5-6, and 6-7. As the lines are produced by recombination onto O VII, they potentially allow O VII emitting regions in astrophysical plasmas to be probed at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths that otherwise can only be studied at X-ray wavelengths.

Young, P. R., E-mail: pyoung9@gmu.edu [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

DNA synthesis in pigmented and non-pigmented mutants of Serratia marcescens after ultra-violet irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA SYNTHESIS IN PIGNENTED AND NON-PIGKENTED MUTANTS OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS AFTER ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION A Thesis by SALVADORE NILLIAM RUSSO, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Biochemistry DNA SYNTHESIS IN PIGMENTED AND NON-PIGMENTED MUTANTS OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS AFTER ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION A' Thesis by SALVADORE WILLIAM RUSSO, JR. Approved...

Russo, Salvadore William

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Temperature Dependent Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Ultraviolet Emitting Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 780 © 2003 Materials Research Society Y1.4.1 #12;Of the MS:Te systems, CdS of ~ 4.32 eV. When doped with tellurium (Te), ultraviolet emission occurs at 360 nm (for Tes singletS- Te-SrS multi-layer structures on Si substrates. The Te doping was incorporated by conventional

Fitz-Gerald, James M.

307

Damage of multilayer optics with varying capping layers induced by focused extreme ultraviolet beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet Mo/Si multilayers protected by capping layers of different materials were exposed to 13.5 nm plasma source radiation generated with a table-top laser to study the irradiation damage mechanism. Morphology of single-shot damaged areas has been analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy. Threshold fluences were evaluated for each type of sample in order to determine the capability of the capping layer to protect the structure underneath.

Jody Corso, Alain; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Nardello, Marco; Guglielmina Pelizzo, Maria [National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnology, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy) [National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnology, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Zuppella, Paola [National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnology, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy)] [National Research Council of Italy, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnology, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Barkusky, Frank [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V, Goettingen (Germany) [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V, Goettingen (Germany); KLA-Tencor, 5 Technology Dr., Milpitas, California 95035 (United States); Mann, Klaus; Mueller, Matthias [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V, Goettingen (Germany)] [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V, Goettingen (Germany)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solar ultraviolet-B radiation and vitamin D: a cross-sectional population-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)D for the population. Conclusions: In Canada, cumulative exposure to ambient solar UV-B has a small but significantSolar ultraviolet-B radiation and vitamin D: a cross-sectional population-based study using dataAUR 17326E125C4(7E3E3C7E>4(72B43.EE7D4" 7D4":BE27B725CE9393BE647 #12;RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Solar

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

309

Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6° through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350?mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo, E-mail: tbwei@semi.ac.cn; Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin [Semiconductor Lighting Technology Research and Development Center, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Diverse Properties of the Most Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies Discovered by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the properties of a sample of ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs) selected by matching the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Surveys with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. Out of 25362 galaxies between 0.02x10^10 L_solar at 1530 Angstroms (observed wavelength). The properties of this population are well correlated with ultraviolet surface brightness. We find that the galaxies with low UV surface brightness are primarily large spiral systems with a mixture of old and young stellar populations, while the high surface brightness galaxies consist primarily of compact starburst systems. In terms of the behavior of surface brightness with luminosity, size with luminosity, the mass-metallicity relation, and other parameters, the compact UVLGs clearly depart from the trends established by the full sample of galaxies. The subset of compact UVLGs with the highest surface brightness (``supercompact UVLGs'') have characteristics that are remarkably similar to Lyman Break Galaxies at higher redshift. They are much more luminous than typical local ultraviolet-bright starburst galaxies and blue compact dwarf galaxies. They have metallicities that are systematically lower than normal galaxies of the same stellar mass, indicating that they are less chemically evolved. In all these respects, they are the best local analogs for Lyman Break Galaxies.

Charles G. Hoopes; Timothy M. Heckman; Samir Salim; Mark Seibert; Christy A. Tremonti; David Schiminovich; R. Michael Rich; D. Christopher Martin; Stephane Charlot; Guinevere Kauffmann; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Bruno Milliard; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Sukyoung K. Yi

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Properties of Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies at the Current Epoch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the first matched set of GALEX and SDSS data to investigate the properties of a sample of 74 nearby galaxies with far-ultraviolet luminosities chosen to overlap the luminosity range of typical high-z Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). GALEX deep surveys have shown that ultraviolet-luminous galaxies (UVLGs) similar to these are the fastest evolving component of the UV galaxy population. Model fits to the combined GALEX and SDSS photometry yield typical FUV extinctions similar to LBGs. The implied star formation rates are SFR ~ 3 to 30 solar mass per year. This overlaps the range of SFRs for LBGs. We find a strong inverse correlation between galaxy mass and far-ultraviolet surface brightness, and on this basis divide the sample into ``large'' and ``compact'' UVLGs. The compact UVLGs have half-light radii of a few kpc or less (similar to LBGs). They are relatively low mass galaxies (~10 billion solar masses) with typical velocity dispersions of 60 to 150 km/s. They span a range in metallicity from 0.3 to 1 times solar, have blue optical-UV colors, and are forming stars at a rate sufficient to build the present galaxy in ~a Gigayear. In all these respects they appear similar to the LBG population. These ``living fossils'' may therefore provide an opportunity for detailed investigation of the physical processes occurring in typical star forming galaxies in the early universe.

Timothy M. Heckman; Charles G. Hoopes; Mark Seibert; Christopher Martin; Samir Salim; R. Michael Rich; Guinevere Kauffmann; Stephane Charlot; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; Bruno Milliard; Patrick F. Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

High-energy picosecond near-vacuum ultraviolet pulses generated by sum-frequency mixing of an amplified Ti:sapphire laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate high-energy picosecond near-vacuum ultraviolet laser pulse generation. Frequency quadrupling is achieved by noncollinear sum-frequency mixing of the fundamental and the...

Zhu, Jiangfeng; Ling, Weijun; Wang, Zhaohua; Wang, Peng; Sun, Jinghua; Wei, Zhiyi; Zhang, Dacheng; Ma, Xinwen; Zhan, Wenlong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Magneto-transport properties of InAs nanowires laterally-grown by selective area molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (110) masked substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We prepared InAs nanowires (NWs) by lateral growth on GaAs (110) masked substrates in molecular beam epitaxy. We measured magneto-transport properties of the InAs NWs. In spite of parallel-NW multi-channels, we observed fluctuating magneto-conductance. From the fluctuation, we evaluated phase coherence length as a function of measurement temperature, and found decrease in the length with increase in the temperature. We also evaluate phase coherence length as a function of gate voltage.

Akabori, M.; Yamada, S. [Center for Nano-Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optimization of neon soft X-rays emission from 200 J fast miniature dense plasma focus device: A potential source for soft X-ray lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The neon soft X-ray (SXR) emission characteristics of a Fast Miniature Plasma Focus (FMPF-3) device have been investigated. The FMPF-3 device used for our experiment is of sub-kilojoule energy capacity, which is an order of magnitude lesser than the other well established plasma focus devices. The influence of different geometrical parameters of the anode and the pressure of the filling gas on the SXR emission was investigated to optimize the neon SXR yield and thereby make it a potential source for X-ray lithography. The SXR signal, solely from the desired, characteristic spectral range (900–1600) eV was selectively extracted and acquired using appropriate X-ray absorption filters on diode X-ray spectrometer. It was found that the neon SXR emission from 17 mm long cylindrical anode, which produced best neutron yields, was rather poor, in a very narrow pressure range and that too at low operating pressure. With decrease in the length of cylindrical anode, the optimum operating pressure shifts to higher pressure side, the working pressure range widens and the SXR yield also increases until the anode length is reduced to 12 mm, after which, the SXR yield and working pressure range start to degrade. The highest neon SXR yield of 1.1 J/shot, corresponding to a wall plug efficiency of 0.57%, was obtained for 12 mm long cylindrical anode. The tapered anodes with different length were also designed and tested, but they did not show any significant improvement in neon SXR yield.

S.M.P. Kalaiselvi; T.L. Tan; A. Talebitaher; P. Lee; R.S. Rawat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

GALEX Ultraviolet Photometry of Globular Clusters in M31: Three Year Results and a Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ultraviolet (UV) photometry of M31 globular clusters (GCs) found in 23 Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) images covering the entirety of M31. We detect 485 and 273 GCs (and GC candidates) in the near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2267 A) and far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1516 A), respectively. Comparing M31 data with those of Galactic GCs in the UV with the aid of population models, we find that the age ranges of old GCs in M31 and the Galactic halo are similar. Three metal-rich ([Fe/H]>-1) GCs in M31 produce significant FUV flux making their FUV-V colors unusually blue for their metallicities. These are thought to be analogs of the two peculiar Galactic GCs NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 with extended blue HB stars. Based on the models incorporating helium enriched subpopulations in addition to the majority of the population that have a normal helium abundance, we suggest that even small fraction of super-helium-rich subpopulations in GCs can reproduce the observed UV bright metal-rich GCs. Young clusters in M31 show distinct UV and optical properties from GCs in Milky Way. Population models indicate that their typical age is less than ~ 2 Gyrs. A large fraction of young GCs have the kinematics of the thin, rapidly rotating disk component. However, a subset of the old GCs also shares the thin-disk kinematics of the younger clusters. The existence of young GCs on the outskirts of M31 disk suggests the occurrence of a significant recent star formation in the thin-disk of M31. Old thin-disk GCs may set constraints on the epoch of early formation of the M31 thin-disk. We detect 12 (10) intermediate-age GC candidates in NUV (FUV). We suggest that some of spectroscopically identified intermediate-age GCs may not be truly intermediate in age, but rather older GCs that possess developed HB.

Soo-Chang Rey; R. Michael Rich; Sangmo T. Sohn; Suk-Jin Yoon; Chul Chung; Sukyoung K. Yi; Young-Wook Lee; Jaehyon Rhee; Luciana Bianchi; Barry F. Madore; Kyungsook Lee; Tom A. Barlow; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Christopher Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Mark Seibert; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Jose Donas; Timothy M. Heckman; Bruno Milliard; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ultraviolet radiation produced in low-energy Ar + Ar and Kr + Kr collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute cross sections for the emission of ultraviolet resonance line radiations from Ar and Kr atoms resulting from Ar + Ar and Kr + Kr collisions are reported. The energy range covered extends from near the reaction thresholds to 150 eV in the center-of-mass system. The emission cross sections are found to have energy dependencies very similar to those exhibited by the total ionization cross sections for the same reactants. The techniques used to make the measurements are described and the results are discussed in terms of a current theoretical model of the interactions.

H. L. Rothwell; Jr.; R. C. Amme; B. Van Zyl

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Construction and characterization of ultraviolet acousto-optic based femtosecond pulse shapers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present all the information necessary for construction and characterization of acousto optic pulse shapers, with a focus on ultraviolet wavelengths, Various radio-frequency drive configurations are presented to allow optimization via knowledgeable trade-off of design features. Detailed performance characteristics of a 267 nm acousto-optic modulator (AOM) based pulse shaper are presented, Practical considerations for AOM based pulse shaping of ultra-broad bandwidth (sub-10 fs) amplified femtosecond pulse shaping are described, with particular attention paid to the effects of the RF frequency bandwidth and optical frequency bandwidth on the spatial dispersion of the output laser pulses.

Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Rotationally resolved Fano effect of HI molecules: An experimental study using coherent vacuum-ultraviolet radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experiment studying the influence of molecular rotation in HI on photoelectron-spin polarization is presented. The experiment is highly wavelength selective since a laser-based vacuum-ultraviolet-radiation source with a bandwidth of 0.5×10-4 nm is applied to produce circularly polarized light. Although in the Fano effect the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons is not analyzed, rotational structure is resolved via narrow-band excitation of autoionization resonances. The photoelectron-spin polarization is found to be strongly affected by the rotational substructure, leading to changes in both magnitude and sign for different rotational lines.

T. Huth-Fehre; A. Mank; M. Drescher; N. Böwering; U. Heinzmann

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Single shot extreme ultraviolet laser imaging of nanostructures with wavelength resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated near-wavelength resolution microscopy in the extreme ultraviolet. Images of 50 nm diameter nanotubes were obtained with a single {approx}1 ns duration pulse from a desk-top size 46.9 nm laser. We measured the modulation transfer function of the microscope for three different numerical aperture zone plate objectives, demonstrating that 54 nm half-period structures can be resolved. The combination of near-wavelength spatial resolution and high temporal resolution opens myriad opportunities in imaging, such as the ability to directly investigate dynamics of nanoscale structures.

Jones, Juanita; Brewer, Courtney A.; Brizuela, Fernando; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Martz, Dale H.; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Attwood, David T.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Artyukov, Igor A.; Ponomareko, Alexander G.; Kondratenko, Valeriy V.; Marconi, Mario C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Total to Selective Extinction Ratios and Visual Extinctions from Ultraviolet Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present determinations of the total to selective extinction ratio R_V and visual extinction A_V values for Milky Way stars using ultraviolet color excesses. We extend the analysis of Gnacinski and Sikorski (1999) by using non-equal weights derived from observational errors. We present a detailed discussion of various statistical errors. In addition, we estimate the level of systematic errors by considering different normalization of the extinction curve adopted by Wegner (2002). Our catalog of 782 R_V and A_V values and their errors is available in the electronic form on the World Wide Web.

Anna Geminale; Piotr Popowski

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Extreme ultraviolet source at 6.7 nm based on a low-density plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for operation at {lambda} = 6.7 nm by optimizing the optical thickness of gadolinium (Gd) plasmas. Using low initial density Gd targets and dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed a maximum EUV conversion efficiency (CE) of 0.54% for 0.6% bandwidth (BW) (1.8% for 2% BW), which is 1.6 times larger than the 0.33% (0.6% BW) CE produced from a solid density target. Enhancement of the EUV CE by use of a low-density plasma is attributed to the reduction of self-absorption effects.

Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Li Bowen; Kilbane, Deirdre; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Direct writing of ferroelectric domains on strontium barium niobate crystals using focused ultraviolet laser light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report ferroelectric domain inversion in strontium barium niobate (SBN) single crystals by irradiating the surface locally with a strongly focused ultraviolet (UV) laser beam. The generated domains are investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. We propose a simple model that allows predicting the domain width as a function of the irradiation intensity, which indeed applies for both SBN and LiNbO{sub 3}. Evidently, though fundamentally different, the domain structure of both SBN and LiNbO{sub 3} can be engineered through similar UV irradiation.

Boes, Andreas; Crasto, Tristan; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Mitchell, Arnan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ARC Center for Ultra-High Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ARC Center for Ultra-High Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Wade, Scott [Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)] [Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Frohnhaus, Jakob; Soergel, Elisabeth [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Random quasi-phase-matched nonlinear optical conversion of supercontinuum to the ultraviolet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of fs supercontinuum to the ultraviolet (UV) range from 260 to 305?nm in nonlinear photonic crystal of strontium tetraborate is obtained. Spectral shape of generated UV radiation is governed by the shape of supercontinuum spectrum, focusing conditions and phase mismatch in the material of nonlinear photonic crystal. Maximum integral UV power of 2.6??W was obtained in the case of weaker focusing, and peaks with the spectral width 1–3?nm dominate in the spectrum. Using tight focusing, broadband radiation in the range 265–300?nm was obtained.

Aleksandrovsky, A. S., E-mail: aleksandrovsky@kirensky.ru; Vyunishev, A. M.; Zaitsev, A. I. [L.V.Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation) [L.V.Kirensky Institute of Physics, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, 660079 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Slabko, V. V. [Siberian Federal University, 660079 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)] [Siberian Federal University, 660079 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Silicon photodiode with selective Zr/Si coating for extreme ultraviolet spectral range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The procedure of manufacturing silicon photodiodes with an integrated Zr/Si filter for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range is developed. A setup for measuring the sensitivity profile of detectors with spatial resolution better than 100 {mu}m is fabricated. The optical properties of silicon photodiodes in the EUV and visible spectral ranges are investigated. Some characteristics of SPD-100UV diodes with Zr/Si coating and without it, as well as of AXUV-100 diodes, are compared. In all types of detectors a narrow region beyond the operating aperture is found to be sensitive to the visible light. (photodetectors)

Aruev, P N; Barysheva, Mariya M; Ber, B Ya; Zabrodskaya, N V; Zabrodskii, V V; Lopatin, A Ya; Pestov, Alexey E; Petrenko, M V; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, Nikolai N; Sukhanov, V L; Chkhalo, Nikolai I

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Highly reproducible and reliable metal/graphene contact by ultraviolet-ozone treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resist residue from the device fabrication process is a significant source of contamination at the metal/graphene contact interface. Ultraviolet Ozone (UVO) treatment is proven here, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman measurement, to be an effective way of cleaning the metal/graphene interface. Electrical measurements of devices that were fabricated by using UVO treatment of the metal/graphene contact region show that stable and reproducible low resistance metal/graphene contacts are obtained and the electrical properties of the graphene channel remain unaffected.

Li, Wei [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Hacker, Christina A.; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, A. R.; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J., E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Liang, Yiran; Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei, E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Peng, Lianmao [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 ?s. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)] [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada)] [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)] [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10{sup 6} frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs.

Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Applied Physics, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Multilayer coating and tests of a 10x extreme ultraviolet lithographc camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new set of mirrors for the SANDIA I OX microstepper has been fabricated. The optics have been tested by optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy, EUV reflectometry and EUV scattering. These measurements allow one to predict the performance of the camera. Mo/Si multilayer coatings with the required thickness profile were produced by DC magnetron sputtering using shadow masks in front of the rotating substrates. The failure errors of the new mirrors (0.6 nm) are considerably smaller than those obtained previously, while mid-spatial frequency roughness still needs improvement. This roughness reduces mostly the throughput of the system; i. e. most of the scattered light occurs outside the field of the camera and there is only a small reduction of contrast or resolution.

Spiller, E.; Weber, F.J.; Montcalm, C.; Baker, S.L.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.H.

1998-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

ultraviolet | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lee JH, JK Fredrickson, RK Kukkadapu, MI Boyanov, KM Kemner, X Lin, DW Kennedy, BN Bjornstad, A Konopka, DA Moore, CT Resch, and JL Phillips.2012."Microbial Reductive...

331

CAN A NANOFLARE MODEL OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCES DESCRIBE THE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoflares, the basic units of impulsive energy release, may produce much of the solar background emission. Extrapolation of the energy frequency distribution of observed microflares, which follows a power law to lower energies, can give an estimation of the importance of nanoflares for heating the solar corona. If the power-law index is greater than 2, then the nanoflare contribution is dominant. We model a time series of extreme-ultraviolet emission radiance as random flares with a power-law exponent of the flare event distribution. The model is based on three key parameters: the flare rate, the flare duration, and the power-law exponent of the flare intensity frequency distribution. We use this model to simulate emission line radiance detected in 171 A, observed by Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed light curves are matched with simulated light curves using an Artificial Neural Network, and the parameter values are determined across the active region, quiet Sun, and coronal hole. The damping rate of nanoflares is compared with the radiative losses cooling time. The effect of background emission, data cadence, and network sensitivity on the key parameters of the model is studied. Most of the observed light curves have a power-law exponent, {alpha}, greater than the critical value 2. At these sites, nanoflare heating could be significant.

Tajfirouze, E.; Safari, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Remote measurement of sulfur dioxide emissions using an ultraviolet light sensitive video system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote measurements of SO/sub 2/ emissions and plume velocities were made with a portable ultraviolet light-sensitive video system and compared with EPA in-stack compliance measurement methods. The instrument system measures the ultraviolet light absorption of SO/sub 2/ and movement of SO/sub 2/ fluctuations in the effluent plume and relates these measurements to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and velocity of the plume. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to establish the potential for using this technique for rapid surveillance of SO/sub 2/ emissions. The effects caused by submicron aerosols also were investigated. The field tests were performed on two occasions. On the first occasion, SO/sub 2/ and plume velocity measurements were made at a typical coal-fired power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) controls (concentrations ranged from 80 to 365 ppm). The second occasion involved participation in an urban particulate modeling study, which resulted in routine SO/sub 2/ emission measurements performed at 12 industrial sites. The results of smoke generator and field tests indicate that the sulfur dioxide concentration of smoke stack emissions can be made with an accuracy less than +/-120 ppm (relative to the EPA stack test compliance method), provided the particulate opacity of the emissions is less than 22 percent. The velocity measurement feature of the instrument correlated poorly with the EPA compliance method for stack gas velocity.

McElhoe, H.B.; Conner, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Transiting the Sun: The impact of stellar activity on X-ray and ultraviolet transits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transits of hot Jupiters in X-rays and the ultraviolet have been shown to be both deeper and more variable than the corresponding optical transits. This variability has been attributed to hot Jupiters having extended atmospheres at these wavelengths. Using resolved images of the Sun from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spanning 3.5 years of Solar Cycle 24 we simulate transit light curves of a hot Jupiter to investigate the impact of Solar like activity on our ability to reliably recover properties of the planet's atmosphere in soft X-rays (94 {\\AA}), the UV (131-1700 {\\AA}), and the optical (4500 {\\AA}). We find that for stars with similar activity levels to the Sun, the impact of stellar activity results in the derived radius of the planet in soft X-ray/EUV to be underestimated by up-to 25% or overestimated by up-to 50% depending on whether the planet occults active regions. We also find that in up-to 70% of the X-ray light curves the planet transits over bright star spots. In the far ultraviolet (1600 &am...

Llama, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Effects of Ultraviolet Irradiation on Large Populations of Certain Water-Borne Bacteria in Motion: I. The Development of Adequate Agitation to Provide an Effective Exposure Period  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...survival in 21 naturally occuring waters after treatment...data from tests with 21 naturally occurring contami...culture B. subtilis or naturally occurring mixed populations...of some ultraviolet radiations as produced by the continuous...effect of ultra-violet radiation. J. Bacteriol...

J. R. Cortelyou; M. A. McWhinnie; M. S. Riddiford; J. E. Semrad

1954-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps and all other mercury containing labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re

Baker, Chris I.

337

Activation of the Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway and Recombination Repair in the Cellular Response to Solar Ultraviolet Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the Cellular Response to Solar Ultraviolet Light Jessica Dunn...School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts Recombination repair plays...primary skin cells exposed to solar-simulated light. UV-induced...integrity of their genome, solar UV light plays a pivotal role...

Jessica Dunn; Marisa Potter; Adam Rees; and Thomas M. Rünger

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Absorption Spectra of Ethylene, Deutero-Ethylene and Some Alkyl-Substituted Ethylenes in the Vacuum Ultra-Violet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 February 1940 research-article The Absorption Spectra of Ethylene, Deutero-Ethylene and Some Alkyl-Substituted Ethylenes in the Vacuum Ultra-Violet W. C. Price W. T. Tutte The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize...

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops Utilization of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation on ornamental plants for disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floriculture and Greenhouse Crops Utilization of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation on ornamental Bridgen and Clay Davis Location: Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center Plants use, effects of UC-C light are not seen on plants. UV-C irradiation has been successfully used in the food

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

340

All-solid-state laser system tunable in deep ultraviolet based on sum-frequency generation in CLBO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alexandrite laser/alexandrite-laser-pumped LiF:FÃ?Ã? 2 color-center laser (CCL) system. F 2 CC consists and the high energy storage alexandrite laser. Due to a high gain and short CCL built-up time the systemAll-solid-state laser system tunable in deep ultraviolet based on sum-frequency generation in CLBO

Mirov, Sergey B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares, and tongues of hot gas leaping into space. Though they look like burns in the face of the Sun, sunspots circle in the center of the photo--allows scientists to see the solar wind streaming away from the Sun

Christian, Eric

342

High-Resolution Spectroscopy of G191-B2B in the Extreme Ultraviolet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a high-resolution (R=3000-4000) spectroscopic observation of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B in the extreme ultraviolet band 220-245 A. A low- density ionised He component is clearly present along the line-of-sight, which if completely interstellar implies a He ionisation fraction considerably higher than is typical of the local interstellar medium. However, some of this material may be associated with circumstellar gas, which has been detected by analysis of the C IV absorption line doublet in an HST STIS spectrum. A stellar atmosphere model assuming a uniform element distribution yields a best fit to the data which includes a significant abundance of photospheric He. The 99-percent confidence contour for the fit parameters excludes solutions in which photospheric He is absent, but this result needs to be tested using models allowing abundance gradients.

R. G. Cruddace; M. P. Kowalski; D. J. Yentis; C. M. Brown; H. Gursky; M. A. Barstow; N. P. Bannister; G. W. Fraser; J. E. Spragg; J. S. Lapington; J. A. Tandy; B. Sanderson; J. L. Culhane; T. W. Barbee; J. F. Kordas; W. Goldstein; G. G. Fritz

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

USING HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER TO CONFIRM A SEISMOLOGICALLY INFERRED CORONAL TEMPERATURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the HINODE satellite is used to examine the loop system described in Marsh et al. by applying spectroscopic diagnostic methods. A simple isothermal mapping algorithm is applied to determine where the assumption of isothermal plasma may be valid, and the emission measure locii technique is used to determine the temperature profile along the base of the loop system. It is found that, along the base, the loop has a uniform temperature profile with a mean temperature of 0.89 +- 0.09 MK which is in agreement with the temperature determined seismologically in Marsh et al., using observations interpreted as the slow magnetoacoustic mode. The results further strengthen the slow mode interpretation, propagation at a uniform sound speed, and the analysis method applied in Marsh et al. It is found that it is not possible to discriminate between the slow mode phase speed and the sound speed within the precision of the present observations.

Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W., E-mail: mike.s.marsh@gmail.co [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Enhanced Nonlinear Double Excitation of He in Intense Extreme Ultraviolet Laser Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear, three-photon double excitation of He in intense extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser fields ({approx}24.1 eV, {approx}5 TW/cm{sup 2}) is presented. Resonances to the doubly excited states converging to the He{sup +} N=3 level are revealed by the shot-by-shot photoelectron spectroscopy and identified by theoretical calculations based on the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the two-electron atom under a laser field. It is shown that the three-photon double excitation is enhanced by intermediate Rydberg states below the first ionization threshold, giving a greater contribution to the photoionization yields than the two-photon process by more than 1 order of magnitude.

Hishikawa, A.; Matsuda, A. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Fushitani, M. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Hikosaka, Y. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Environmental Science, Niigata University, Niigata, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Liu, C.-N. [Department of Physics, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei 24205, Taiwan (China); Morishita, T. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shigemasa, E. [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nagasono, M.; Ishikawa, T. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tono, K.; Togashi, T.; Senba, Y. [JASRI/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Yabashi, M. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); JASRI/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Phase effects owing to multilayer coatings in a two-mirror extreme-ultraviolet Schwarzschild objective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aberrations of a multilayer-coated reflective Schwarzchild objective, which are influenced both by mirror surface profiles and by multilayer coatings, are evaluated with a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer operating in the extreme ultraviolet. Using wave-front measurements at multiple wavelengths near 13.4 nm, we observed chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent transmission changes that were due to molybdenum{endash}silicon multilayer coatings. The effects of chromatic vignetting due to limited multilayer reflection passbands on the imaging performance of the Schwarzchild optic are considered. The coating characteristics extracted from the interferometry data on the two-mirror optical system are compared with previously reported coating properties measured on individual mirror substrates. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

Tejnil, E.; Goldberg, K.A.; Bokor, J. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear dynamics in dissociative multiple ionization processes of diatomic molecules exposed to extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses is studied theoretically using the Monte Carlo wave packet approach. By simulated detection of the emitted electrons, the model reduces a full propagation of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O{sub 2} is studied as an example, and good agreement with published experimental data is obtained by simulating the dynamics on ten different electronic Born-Oppenheimer curves.

Leth, Henriette Astrup; Madsen, Lars Bojer [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Intensity enhancement of O VI ultraviolet emission lines in solar spectra due to opacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opacity is a property of many plasmas, and it is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depth. Previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, and here we investigate the spatially-resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 A)/I(1038 A) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (...

Keenan, F P; Madjarska, M S; Rose, S J; Bowler, L A; Britton, J; McCrink, L; Mathioudakis, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Enhanced ultraviolet photoconductivity in semiconducting ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the conductivity and photoconductivity response of undoped and Li-doped ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} epitaxial films grown using pulsed-laser deposition. A significant enhancement of the ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse is observed with Li doping that also correlates with an enhanced luminescent intensity. The wavelength dependence observed for creation of free carriers under UV excitation suggests that the transition is either band-to-band or involves a defect level near the band edge. Moderate n-type dark conductivity is observed for undoped films processed under reducing conditions. With Li doping, dark conductivity is reduced, suggesting that lithium ions in the zinc gallate lattice serve as deep acceptors. In addition, Li doping effectively eliminates persistent photoconductivity that is commonly observed in undoped films, suggesting the possible use of Li-doped ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a visible wavelength blind UV photodetector.

Lee, Yong Eui; Norton, David P.; Budai, John D.; Wei, Yayi

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Response of a SiC Photodiode to Extreme Ultraviolet through Visible Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responsivity of a type 6H-SiC photodiode in the 1.5-400 nm wavelength range was measured using synchrotron radiation. The responsivity was 0.20 A/W at 270 nm and was less than 0.10 A/W in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. The responsivity was calculated using a proven optical model that accounted for the reflection and absorption of the incident radiation and the variation of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) with depth into the device. The CCE was determined from the responsivity measured in the 200-400 nm wavelength range. By use of this CCE and the effective pair creation energy (7.2 eV) determined from x-ray absorption measurements, the EUV responsivity was accurately modeled with no free parameters. The measured visible-light sensitivity, although low compared with that of a silicon photodiode, was surprisingly high for this wide bandgap semiconductor.

Seely,J.; Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Holland, G.; Korde, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloonborne ultraviolet photometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon-borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the result of a flight using this instrument. The second part of this thesis describes the modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. The results of these flights are described in detail.

Harder, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Extreme ultraviolet diagnosis of a neutral-beam-heated mirror machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet emissions from the LLL 2XIIB fusion research experiment have been studied. (2XIIB was a magnetic-mirror-plasma-confinement device; beams of high-energy (20 keV) neutral deuterium created a high-density, high-temperature plasma.) A normal-incidence concave-grating monochromator, equipped with a windowless photomultiplier tube, was used to measure emissions in the spectral region from 400 Angstrom to 1600 A. Emissions of oxygen, titanium, carbon, nitrogen, and deuterium were identified; the oxygen brightnesses at times exceeded 10/sup 18/ ph-s/sup -1/-cm/sup -2/-sr/sup -1/. A survey of the emission characteristics found the oxygen concentration was 3%, the other impurities had concentrations near 0.4%. The radiated power loss was about 5% of the deposited neutral beam power.

Drake, R.P.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Effect of high-energy neutral particles on extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy in large helical device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectra measured by an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer frequently suffer large spike noise when Large Helical Device is operated in low-density range ({<=}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) with neutral beam injection (NBI). The spike noise completely disappears in electron cyclotron heating discharges. In order to examine the effect of NBI, a carbon filter with thickness of 150 nm was installed in the EUV spectrometer. As a result, the spike noise was reduced by an order of magnitude. It is experimentally verified that the spike noise is caused by escaping high-energy neutral particles resulting from the circulating high-energy hydrogen ions borne from NBI.

Dong Chunfeng; Sakaue, Hiroyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Tokitani, Masayuki; Goto, Motoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Wang, Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Zushi, Hideki [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system, which does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling, has great importance for implementing transportable optical lattice clocks, and is also useful for investigations on condensed matter physics or quantum information processing using cold atoms.

Toshiyuki Hosoya; Martin Miranda; Ryotaro Inoue; Mikio Kozuma

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ultraviolet-B radiation enhancement in dielectric barrier discharge based xenon chloride exciplex source by air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single barrier dielectric barrier discharge tube of quartz with multi-strip Titanium-Gold (Ti-Au) coatings have been developed and utilized for ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation production peaking at wavelength 308?nm. The observed radiation at this wavelength has been examined for the mixtures of the Xenon together with chlorine and air admixtures. The gas mixture composition, chlorine gas content, total gas pressure, and air pressure dependency of the UV intensity, has been analyzed. It is found that the larger concentration of Cl{sub 2} deteriorates the performance of the developed source and around 2% Cl{sub 2} in this source produced optimum results. Furthermore, an addition of air in the xenon and chlorine working gas environment leads to achieve same intensity of UV-B light but at lower working gas pressure where significant amount of gas is air.

Gulati, P., E-mail: pgulati1512@gmail.com [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CEERI), Pilani, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Department of Physics, Banasthali University, P.O. Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan 304022 (India); Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N.; Kumar, M. [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CEERI), Pilani, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Vyas, V. [Department of Physics, Banasthali University, P.O. Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan 304022 (India)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiative Hydrodynamic Models of the Optical and Ultraviolet Emission from Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on radiative hydrodynamic simulations of moderate and strong solar flares. The flares were simulated by calculating the atmospheric response to a beam of non-thermal electrons injected at the apex of a one-dimensional closed coronal loop, and include heating from thermal soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet and ultraviolet (XEUV) emission. The equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium were treated in non-LTE and solved for numerous transitions of hydrogen, helium, and Ca II allowing the calculation of detailed line profiles and continuum emission. This work improves upon previous simulations by incorporating more realistic non-thermal electron beam models and includes a more rigorous model of thermal XEUV heating. We find XEUV backwarming contributes less than 10% of the heating, even in strong flares. The simulations show elevated coronal and transition region densities resulting in dramatic increases in line and continuum emission in both the UV and optical regions. The optical continuum reaches a peak increase of several percent which is consistent with enhancements observed in solar white light flares. For a moderate flare (~M-class), the dynamics are characterized by a long gentle phase of near balance between flare heating and radiative cooling, followed by an explosive phase with beam heating dominating over cooling and characterized by strong hydrodynamic waves. For a strong flare (~X-class), the gentle phase is much shorter, and we speculate that for even stronger flares the gentle phase may be essentially non-existent. During the explosive phase, synthetic profiles for lines formed in the upper chromosphere and transition region show blue shifts corresponding to a plasma velocity of ~120 km/s, and lines formed in the lower chromosphere show red shifts of ~40 km/s.

J. C. Allred; S. L. Hawley; W. P. Abbett; M. Carlsson

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Study on the connectivity of heavy oil reservoirs by ultraviolet spectrum technique in the western part of the QHD32-6 oilfield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a new method, the ultraviolet spectrum technique is applied to studying the connectivity of biodegradable heavy oil reservoirs. The similarity of crude oils can be judged according to the extinction coeffic...

Yaohui Xu; Dan Chen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Systematic investigation of self-absorption and conversion efficiency of 6.7 nm extreme ultraviolet sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the dependence of the spectral behavior and conversion efficiencies of rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources with peak emission at 6.7 nm on laser wavelength and the initial target density. The maximum conversion efficiency was 1.3% at a laser intensity of 1.6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} at an operating wavelength of 1064 nm, when self-absorption was reduced by use of a low initial density target. Moreover, the lower-density results in a narrower spectrum and therefore improved spectral purity. It is shown to be important to use a low initial density target and/or to produce low electron density plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet sources when using high-Z targets.

Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 Japan (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, Dresden D-01328 (Germany)

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ultraviolet emission from a multi-layer graphene/MgZnO/ZnO light-emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on ultraviolet emission from a multi-layer graphene (MLG)/MgZnO/ZnO light-emitting diodes (LED). The p-type MLG and MgZnO in the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED are used as transparent hole injection and electron blocking layers, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics of the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED show that current transport is dominated by tunneling processes in the MgZnO barrier layer under forward bias conditions. The holes injected from p-type MLG recombine efficiently with the electrons accumulated in ZnO, and the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED shows strong ultraviolet emission from the band edge of ZnO and weak red-orange emission from the deep levels of ZnO.

Kang, Jang-Won; Choi, Yong-Seok; Goo Kang, Chang; Hun Lee, Byoung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byeong-Hyeok [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); Park, Seong-Ju, E-mail: sjpark@gist.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

A passive measurement of dissociated atom densities in atmospheric pressure air discharge plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation degree of atmospheric pressure air discharges by measuring the self-absorption characteristics of vacuum ultraviolet radiation from O and N atoms in the plasma. The atom densities are determined by modeling the amount of radiation trapping present in the discharge, without the use of typical optical absorption diagnostic techniques which require external sources of probing radiation into the experiment. For an 8.0?mm spark discharge between needle electrodes at atmospheric pressure, typical peak O atom densities of 8.5?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} and peak N atom densities of 9.9?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} are observed within the first ?1.0?mm of plasma near the anode tip by analyzing the OI and NI transitions in the 130.0–132.0?nm band of the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum.

Laity, George [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Applied Science and Technology Maturation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Frank, Klaus [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University at Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Tuning the Optical Properties of Nanoscale Materials on Surfaces Through Controlled Exchange Reactions on Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots and Patterning of Gold and QD Nanoparticle Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination between the use of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular linker and PS mask fabricated via polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-stamp was also discussed briefly. Particle lithography is a versatile method and can be used to fabricate pattern...

Pravitasari, Arika

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of ?-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped ?-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2?x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

Cardillo, Dean [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Konstantinov, Konstantin, E-mail: konstan@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Devers, Thierry [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, Institut de Physique, site de Chartres, Université d’Orléans (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

1 MODELING THE PERFORMANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET REACTOR IN EULERIAN AND LAGRANGIAN FRAMEWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CFD models for simulating the performance of ultraviolet (UV) reactors for micro-organism inactivation were developed in Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks, taking into account hydrodynamics, kinetics, and radiation field within UV reactor. In the Lagrangian framework, micro-organisms were treated as discrete particles where the trajectory was predicted by integrating the force balance on the particle. In the Eulerian framework, the conservation equation of species (microorganisms) was solved along with the transport equations. The fluid flow was characterized experimentally using particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualization techniques and modeled using CFD for a UV reactor prototype model. The performance of annular UV reactors with an inlet parallel and perpendicular to the reactor axis were investigated. The results indicated that the fluid flow distribution within the reactor volume can significantly affect the reactor performance. Both the Eulerian and Lagrangian models were used to obtain complimentary information on the reactors; while the Lagrangian method provided an estimation of the UV-fluence distribution and the trajectory of species, the Eulerian approach showed the concentration distribution and local photo-reaction rates. The combined information can be used to predict and monitor reactor performance and to improve the reactor design.

Angelo Sozzi; Fariborz Taghipour

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

TEMPERATURE AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET INTENSITY IN A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY AND STREAMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the temperature and EUV line emission of a coronal cavity and surrounding streamer in terms of a morphological forward model. We use a series of iron line ratios observed with the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on 2007 August 9 to constrain temperature as a function of altitude in a morphological forward model of the streamer and cavity. We also compare model predictions to the EIS EUV line intensities and polarized brightness (pB) data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) Mark 4 K-coronameter. This work builds on earlier analysis using the same model to determine geometry of and density in the same cavity and streamer. The fit to the data with altitude-dependent temperature profiles indicates that both the streamer and cavity have temperatures in the range 1.4-1.7 MK. However, the cavity exhibits substantial substructure such that the altitude-dependent temperature profile is not sufficient to completely model conditions in the cavity. Coronal prominence cavities are structured by magnetism so clues to this structure are to be found in their plasma properties. These temperature substructures are likely related to structures in the cavity magnetic field. Furthermore, we find that the model overestimates the EUV line intensities by a factor of 4-10, without overestimating pB. We discuss this difference in terms of filling factors and uncertainties in density diagnostics and elemental abundances.

Kucera, T. A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Tripathi, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag-4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vacuum ultraviolet reflectivities of LiF, NaF, and KF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution normal-incidence (9°) reflectivities of lithium-fluoride, sodium-fluoride, and potassium-fluoride single crystals were investigated between 6 and 35 eV at room temperature, 100 and 30 K using a minicomputer-controlled vacuum ultraviolet reflectometer at the Winconsin Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Data were taken on surfaces cleaved and maintained in high vacuum. Reflectivity data were Kramers-Kronig analyzed to yield the dielectric functions of the materials and various energy and temperature derivatives were calculated as an aid to interpretation. In all materials, considerable new structure is reported with broad, general agreement with earlier work on LiF and KF. We report the first reflectivity data between 12 and 35 eV for NaF. Computed values of -Im(1?) were in good agreement with electron-energy-loss experiments of Creuzburg. It is only possible to provide detailed interpretation of optical features in special cases, but a general discussion is provided in the conventional framework.

K. Kameswara Rao; T. J. Moravec; J. C. Rife; R. N. Dexter

1975-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT MASS FLOW OUTBURST IN U CEPHEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer taken in 1989 September over one full orbital period of U Cephei (U Cep, HD 5796) are analyzed. The TLUSTY and SYNSPEC stellar atmospheric simulation programs are used to generate synthetic spectra to which U Cep continuum levels are normalized. Absorption lines attributed to the photosphere are divided out to isolate mass flow and accretion spectra. A radial velocity curve is constructed for conspicuous gas stream features, and shows evidence for a transient flow during secondary eclipse with outward velocities ranging between 200 and 350 km s{sup –1}, and a number density of (3 ± 2) × 10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}. The validity of C IV 1548 and 1550 and Si IV 1393 and 1402 lines are re-examined in the context of extreme rotational blending effects. A G-star to B-star mass transfer rate of (5 ± 4) × 10{sup –9} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1} is calculated as an approximate upper limit, and a model system is presented.

Tupa, Peter R.; DeLeo, Gary G.; McCluskey, George E. [Physics Department, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Kondo, Yoji [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sahade, Jorge [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA-La Plata (Argentina); Giménez, Alvaro [Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC/INTA, Carretera de Torrejon a Ajalvir, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz (Madrid) (Spain); Caton, Daniel B., E-mail: pet205@lehigh.edu [Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy transport in short-pulse-laser-heated targets measured using extreme ultraviolet laser backlighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accurate characterization of thermal electron transport and the determination of heating by suprathermal electrons in laser driven solid targets are both issues of great importance to the current experiments being performed at the National Ignition Facility, which aims to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition using lasers. Ionization, induced by electronic heat conduction, can cause the opacity of a material to drop significantly once bound-free photoionization is no longer energetically possible. We show that this drop in opacity enables measurements of the transmission of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser pulses at 13.9 nm to act as a signature of the heating of thin (50 nm) iron layers with a 50-nm thick parylene-N (CH) overlay irradiated by 35-fs pulses at irradiance 3×1016 Wcm?2. Comparing EUV transmission measurements at different times after irradiation to fluid code simulations shows that the target is instantaneously heated by hot electrons (with approximately 10% of the laser energy), followed by thermal conduction with a flux limiter of ?0.05.

L. A. Wilson; G. J. Tallents; J. Pasley; D. S. Whittaker; S. J. Rose; O. Guilbaud; K. Cassou; S. Kazamias; S. Daboussi; M. Pittman; O. Delmas; J. Demailly; O. Neveu; D. Ros

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7?nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p?3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Varian Semiconductor Equipment, Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, MA 01939 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

NANOSTRUCTURED HIGH PERFORMANCE ULTRAVIOLET AND BLUE LIGHT EMITTING DIODES FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the first 12 month contract period include (1) new means of synthesizing zero- and one-dimensional GaN nanostructures, (2) establishment of the building blocks for making GaN-based microcavity devices, and (3) demonstration of top-down approach to nano-scale photonic devices for enhanced spontaneous emission and light extraction. These include a demonstration of eight-fold enhancement of the external emission efficiency in new InGaN QW photonic crystal structures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Strong quantum interferences in frequency up-conversion towards short vacuum-ultraviolet radiation pulses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present experimental data on quantum interferences in resonantly enhanced frequency up-conversion towards the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral regime. The process is driven in xenon atoms by ultrashort (picosecond) laser pulses. We use two simultaneous frequency conversion pathways via an excited intermediate state, i.e., fifth harmonic generation of the fundamental wavelength and four-wave mixing of the fundamental and two photons of its second harmonic wavelength. Both conversion pathways yield radiation at 102 nm. The two pathways interfere, depending on the relative phase of the fundamental and second harmonic. By appropriate choice of the phase we get constructive interference (resulting in increased conversion efficiency) or destructive interference (resulting in reduced conversion efficiency). The total conversion yield shows very pronounced constructive and destructive quantum interference with a visibility of roughly 90%. A stable and highly accurate phase control setup enables such strong quantum interferences for more than 260 oscillation cycles. In an extension of the experiment, simultaneously to frequency conversion we also monitor laser-induced fluorescence as a measure for the excitation probability to the excited intermediate state. Also, in the excitation probability we observe strong quantum interferences. As an interesting feature, a small phase lag occurs between the quantum interference patterns of frequency conversion and population transfer. This is due to an additional atomic phase acquired during frequency conversion.

Patric Ackermann; Alexander Scharf; Thomas Halfmann

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the results of a flight using this instrument. The second part describes modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. Photometric measurements of ozone in the atmosphere can be accomplished by exploiting 253.65 nanometer absorption feature of ozone. Using a single light source and beam splitting optics, matched optical paths can be generated through two absorption cells. The ozonesonde data gave a very clear picture of the development of the Ozone Hole. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Depletion occurs between about 12 and 20 km. (2) The most efficient region of ozone depletion decreases in altitude with time. Height profiles show subregions where ozone removal is highly efficient. (3) At 18 km, the ozone mixing ratio decays with a half-life of 25 days.

Harder, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Response of five tropical plant species to natural solar ultraviolet-B radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tropical latitudes currently receive high solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) even without ozone depletion. Thus, the influence of natural, present-day UV-B irradiance was examined for three native rainforest tree species and two economically important species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama (9[degrees] N). Solar UV-B radiation conditions were obtained using a UV-B excluding plastic film or a near-ambient UV-B transmitting film over potted plants in a small clearing. Significant differences were often exhibited as increased foliar UV-B absorbing compounds, increased leaf mass pre area, and reduced leaf blade length for plants receiving solar UV-B radiation. Plant height was typically reduced under solar UV-B, but some variation among species in response was seen. Biomass and photosystem II function were generally unaffected. The results provide evidence that tropical vegetation responds to the present level of Solar UV-B radiation. This suggests even a small increase in UV-B radiation with ozone depletion may have biological implications.

Searles, P.S.; Caldwell, M.M. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)); Winter, K. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa (Panama))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Study of impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment using extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) have been studied using extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. Three time-resolving absolutely-calibrated normal-incidence monochromators, one on each section of TMX, were used to study the impurity emissions in the wavelength range of 300 A to 1600 A. The instruments on the east end cell and central cell were each capable of obtaining spatially-resolved profiles from 22 chords of the plasma simultaneously while the instrument on the west end cell monitored the central chord. The impurities identified in TMX were carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and titanium. Emphasis was placed upon determining the impurity densities and radiated power losses of the central cell; results indicate that the impurity concentrations were low - less than 0.4% for each species - and that less than 10% of the total net trapped neutral beam power was lost to radiation. The use of titanium gettering on the central cell walls was observed to decrease the brightnesses of singly- and doubly-ionized carbon and oxygen in the central cell plasma. In the end cells, oxygen was the main impurity with a concentration of about 1.5% and was injected by the neutral beams; the other impurities had concentrations of about 0.5%. Radiation losses from the end cells were negligible.

Strand, O.T.

1982-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Design of a High Flux Vacuum-Ultraviolet Beamline for Circular Dichroism Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vacuum-ultraviolet bending-magnet beamline for circular dichroism (CD) experiments has been designed. To maximize the photon flux and minimize the focused beam size, a cylindrical mirror and a cylindrical grating with independent optical functions are utilized. The beamline can collect a 30 mrad horizontal by 7 mrad vertical solid angle of synchrotron radiation. By using a 600 grooves/mm grating, the calculated photon flux is greater than 1x10{sup 13} photons/sec and the focused beam size is 0.4 mmx0.65 mm for the spectral range from 130 nm to 330 nm with the energy resolving power set at 1000. The linear polarization degree is better than 75% and can be increased to 90% by reducing the vertical acceptance angle down to 2 mrad. In addition to the high flux mode described above, this beamline can also be operated in a high resolution mode. By using a 1200 grooves/mm grating, a resolving power greater than 10,000 can be achieved for the spectral range from 180 to 330 nm. This beamline can provide photon flux as high as the best synchrotron CD beamlines in the world while offers simultaneously a smaller focused beam size.

Fu, H. W.; Fung, H. S.; Chung, S. C.; Huang, L. J.; Chen, C. T. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

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381

On the Nature of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Late Phase of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase of solar flares is a second peak of warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI) for many minutes to a few hours after the GOES soft X-ray peak. It was first observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The late phase emission originates from a second set of longer loops (late phase loops) that are higher than the main flaring loops. It is suggested as being caused by either additional heating or long-lasting cooling. In this paper, we study the role of long-lasting cooling and additional heating in producing the EUV late phase using the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops" (EBTEL) model. We find that a long cooling process in late phase loops can well explain the presence of the EUV late phase emission, but we cannot exclude the possibility of additional heating in the decay phase. Moreover, we provide two preliminary methods based on the UV and EUV emissions from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO to...

Li, Y; Guo, Y; Dai, Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

Stephens, J.R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development of substrate-removal-free vertical ultraviolet light-emitting diode (RefV-LED)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vertical ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) that does not require substrate removal is developed. Spontaneous via holes are formed in n-AlN layer epitaxially grown on a high conductive n+Si substrate and the injected current flows directly from the p-electrode to high doped n{sup +} Si substrate through p-AlGaN, multi-quantum wells, n-AlGaN and spontaneous via holes in n-AlN. The spontaneous via holes were formed by controlling feeding-sequence of metal-organic gas sources and NH{sub 3} and growth temperature in MOCVD. The via holes make insulating n-AlN to be conductive. We measured the current-voltage, current-light intensity and emission characteristics of this device. It exhibited a built-in voltage of 3.8 V and emission was stated at 350 nm from quantum wells with successive emission centered at 400?nm. This UV LED can be produced, including formation of n and p electrodes, without any resist process.

Kurose, N., E-mail: kurose@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp; Aoyagi, Y. [The Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [The Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Shibano, K.; Araki, T. [Department of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [Department of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Soft x ray/extreme ultraviolet images of the solar atmosphere with normal incidence multilayer optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first high resolution Soft X-Ray/Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) images of the Sun with normal incidence multilayer optics were obtained by the Standford/MSFC Rocket X-Ray Spectroheliograph on 23 Oct. 1987. Numerous images at selected wavelengths from 8 to 256 A were obtained simultaneously by the diverse array of telescopes flown on-board the experiment. These telescopes included single reflection normal incidence multilayer systems (Herschelian), double reflection multilayer systems (Cassegrain), a grazing incidence mirror system (Wolter-Schwarzschild), and hybrid systems using normal incidence multilayer optics in conjunction with the grazing incidence primary (Wolter-Cassegrain). Filters comprised of approximately 1700{Angstrom} thick aluminum supported on a nickel mesh were used to transmit the soft x ray/EUV radiation while preventing the intense visible light emission of the Sun from fogging the sensitive experimental T-grain photographic emulsions. These systems yielded high resolution soft x ray/EUV images of the solar corona and transition region, which reveal magnetically confined loops of hot solar plasma, coronal plumes, polar coronal holes, supergranulation, and features associated with overlying cool prominences. The development, testing, and operation of the experiments, and the results from the flight are described. The development of a second generation experiment, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, which is scheduled to fly in the summer of 1990, and a recently approved Space Station experiment, the Ultra-High Resolution XUV Spectroheliograph, which is scheduled to fly in 1996 are also described.

Lindblom, J.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Activation of tat-defective human immunodeficiency virus by ultraviolet light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet light (UV) is known to cause activation of gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter. To address the question of whether tat-defective HIV-1 provirus could be rescued by UV irradiation we examined its effect on HeLa cells containing integrated proviruses with tat mutations. Exposure of these cells to an optimal dose of UV resulted in the production of infectious viruses. The degree of UV activation and reversion to infectious virus appeared to depend on the nature of the original tat mutation. Two of the mutants required cocultivation with tat-expressing cells to fully generate replication competent viruses, while a third mutant required only cocultivation with H9 cells. Sequencing of cDNA from cells infected with this last mutant demonstrated that the parental mutant sequence was retained and that genotypic revertants to the wild-type as well as new mutant sequences were generated. These results suggest that tat-defective HIV-1 provirus can be activated by UV and can subsequently revert to wild-type virus. This study raises the possibility that UV exposure of immune cells in the skin plays a role in the activation of defective HIV-1 in vivo.

Sadaie, M.R.; Tschachler, E.; Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M.; Felber, B.K.; Pavlakis, G.N.; Klotman, M.E.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Swift-UVOT captures the earliest ultraviolet spectrum of a Gamma Ray Burst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the earliest ever ultraviolet spectrum of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) as observed with the Swift-UVOT. The spectrum of GRB 081203A was observed for 50 seconds with the UV grism starting 251 seconds after the Swift-BAT trigger when the GRB was of u ~13.4 mag and still rising to its peak optical brightness. The UV grism spectrum shows a damped Ly-alpha line, Ly-beta, and the Lyman continuum break at a redshift z = 2.05 +/- 0.01. A model fit to the Lyman absorption implies log N(HI) = 22.0 +/- 0.2 cm-2, which is typical for GRB host galaxies with damped Ly-alpha absorbers. This observation of GRB 081203A demonstrates that for GRBs brighter than v ~14 mag and with 0.5 < z < 3.5 the UVOT will be able to provide redshifts, and probe for damped Ly-alpha absorbers within 4-6 minutes from the time of the Swift-BAT trigger.

Kuin, N P M; Page, M J; Schady, P; Still, M; Breeveld, A A; De Pasquale, M; Brown, P J; Carter, M; James, C; Curran, P A; Cucciara, A; Gronwall, C; Holland, S T; Hoversten, E; Hunsberger, S; Kennedy, T; Koch, S; Lamoureux, H; Marshall, F E; Oates, S R; Parsons, A; Palmer, D; Roming, P; Smith, P J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10?nm at 355?nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

Melnikov, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Mandelis, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noise ratio Keck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopy for a sample of 36 events at intermediate redshift (z=0.5) discovered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We introduce a new method for removing host galaxy contamination in our spectra, exploiting the comprehensive photometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and their host galaxies, thereby providing the first quantitative view of the UV spectral properties of a large sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrum has not evolved significantly over the past 40percent of cosmic history, precise evolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of a comparable sample of high-quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum of our z~;;=0.5 SNe Ia and its dispersion is tabulated for use in future applications. Within the high-redshift sample, we discover significant UV spectral variations and exclude dust extinction as the primary cause by examining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitor metallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see are much larger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expected patterns. An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelength of selected UV features with phase. We also demonstrate systematic differences in the SN Ia spectral features with SN light curve width in both the UV and the optical. We show that these intrinsic variations could represent a statistical limitation in the future use of high-redshift SNe Ia for precision cosmology. We conclude that further detailed studies are needed, both locally and at moderate redshift where the rest-frame UV can be studied precisely, in order that future missions can confidently be planned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

Nugent, Peter E; Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Polarization study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission from helium following electron impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental results are presented on the degree of linear polarization of the extreme-ultraviolet emission of neutral and ionized helium following electron-impact excitation and ionization excitation of helium. The polarization of the photon emission from the decay of He (1snp) 1Po states with wavelengths of 517 to 584 Å has been extended to electron-impact energies of 1500 eV, and compared with theory for electron-impact excitation of neutral helium. In addition, the polarization of a number of the He+ decays with wavelengths between 256 and 1640 Å have been measured. Particular attention has been paid to the (2p) 2Po?(1s) 2S and (3p) 2Po?(1s) 2S decays with wavelengths of 304 and 256 Å, respectively. These have been measured from threshold (66 and 73 eV, respectively) to 1500 eV using a characterized molybdenum/silicon multilayer mirror polarimeter whose reflection and polarization characteristics have been optimized at 304 Å He+(2p) 2Po results are compared with a recent threshold alignment measurement and distorted-wave Born-approximation calculation for the (e-,2e-) reaction of ionization excitation. Very good agreement with the threshold theoretical predictions is obtained. These results indicate that near threshold, partial waves with L>0 contribute substantially to the two-electron wave function of the escaping electrons. Measurements on the unresolved multiplets at 1215 and 1640 Å, made using a more conventional reflection-type polarization analyzer, indicate that relative fine-structure cross sections are quite different than predicted by some theories.

H. Merabet, M. Bailey, R. Bruch, D. V. Fursa, I. Bray, J. W. McConkey, and P. Hammond

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

THE FIRST STRAY LIGHT CORRECTED EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES OF SOLAR CORONAL HOLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coronal holes are the source regions of the fast solar wind, which fills most of the solar system volume near the cycle minimum. Removing stray light from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun's corona is of high astrophysical importance, as it is required to make meaningful determinations of temperatures and densities of coronal holes. EUV images tend to be dominated by the component of the stray light due to the long-range scatter caused by the microroughness of telescope mirror surfaces, and this component has proven very difficult to measure in pre-flight characterization. In-flight characterization heretofore has proven elusive due to the fact that the detected image is simultaneously nonlinear in two unknown functions: the stray light pattern and the true image that would be seen by an ideal telescope. Using a constrained blind deconvolution technique that takes advantage of known zeros in the true image provided by a fortuitous lunar transit, we have removed the stray light from solar images seen by the EUVI instrument on STEREO-B in all four filter bands (171, 195, 284, and 304 A). Uncertainty measures of the stray light corrected images, which include the systematic error due to misestimation of the scatter, are provided. It is shown that in EUVI, stray light contributes up to 70% of the emission in coronal holes seen on the solar disk, which has dramatic consequences for diagnostics of temperature and density and therefore estimates of key plasma parameters such as the plasma {beta} and ion-electron collision rates.

Shearer, Paul; Gilbert, Anna C. [Department of Mathematics, 2074 East Hall, University of Michigan, 530 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043 (United States); Frazin, Richard A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Hero III, Alfred O., E-mail: shearerp@umich.edu, E-mail: annacg@umich.edu, E-mail: rfrazin@umich.edu, E-mail: hero@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The College of Engineering, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2122 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF THE NOVA-LIKE VARIABLE KQ MONOCEROTIS: A NEW SW SEXTANTIS STAR?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New optical spectra obtained with the SMARTS 1.5 m telescope and archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of the nova-like variable KQ Mon are discussed. The optical spectra reveal Balmer lines in absorption as well as He I absorption superposed on a blue continuum. The 2011 optical spectrum is similar to the KPNO 2.1 m IIDS spectrum we obtained 33 years earlier except that the Balmer and He I absorption is stronger in 2011. Far-ultraviolet IUE spectra reveal deep absorption lines due to C II, Si III, Si IV, C IV, and He II, but no P Cygni profiles indicative of wind outflow. We present the results of the first synthetic spectral analysis of the IUE archival spectra of KQ Mon with realistic optically thick, steady-state, viscous accretion-disk models with vertical structure and high-gravity photosphere models. We find that the photosphere of the white dwarf (WD) contributes very little FUV flux to the spectrum and is overwhelmed by the accretion light of a steady disk. Disk models corresponding to a WD mass of {approx}0.6 M {sub Sun }, with an accretion rate of order 10{sup -9} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and disk inclinations between 60 Degree-Sign and 75 Degree-Sign , yield distances from the normalization in the range of 144-165 pc. KQ Mon is discussed with respect to other nova-like variables. Its spectroscopic similarity to the FUV spectra of three definite SW Sex stars suggests that it is likely a member of the SW Sex class and lends support to the possibility that the WD is magnetic.

Wolfe, Aaron; Sion, Edward M. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Bond, Howard E., E-mail: awolfe03@villanova.edu, E-mail: edward.sion@villanova.edu, E-mail: bond@stsci.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Spectral-phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction applied to seeded extreme-ultraviolet free-electron lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a setup for complete characterization of femtosecond pulses generated by seeded free-electron lasers (FEL's) in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region. Two delayed and spectrally shifted replicas are produced and used for spectral phase interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER). We show that it can be achieved by a simple arrangement of the seed laser. Temporal shape and phase obtained in FEL simulations are well retrieved by the SPIDER reconstruction, allowing to foresee the implementation of this diagnostic on existing and future sources. This will be a significant step towards an experimental investigation and control of FEL spectral phase.

Mahieu, Benoît; De Ninno, Giovanni; Dacasa, Hugo; Lozano, Magali; Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Zeitoun, Philippe; Garzella, David; Merdji, Hamed

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

THE GALEX TIME DOMAIN SURVEY. I. SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF OVER A THOUSAND ULTRAVIOLET VARIABLE SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in {approx}40 deg{sup 2} of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of {approx}3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5{sigma} level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to |{Delta}m| = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |{Delta}m| > 0.2 mag of {approx}8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg{sup -2} for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the UV for transient sources, using the effective survey time at the cadence appropriate to each class, of {approx}15 and 52 deg{sup -2} yr{sup -1} for M dwarfs and extragalactic transients, respectively.

Gezari, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Morrissey, P.; Wyder, T. K. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Huber, M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Neff, S. G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 90095 (United States)] [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 90095 (United States); Schiminovich, D. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: suvi@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined provide a complete picture of unobscured and obscured star formation occurring in these systems. We present IR and UV photometry and estimated equivalent continuous SFRs for a sample of BCGs.

Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States); Barthelemy, R. S., E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu, E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hicksam@msu.edu, E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Observations of the Temperature Structure of the Quiet Corona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T ~ 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

David H. Brooks; Harry P. Warren; David R. Williams; Tetsuya Watanabe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

A DETAILED FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL ATLAS OF O-TYPE STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a spectral atlas covering the wavelength interval 930-1188 A for O2-O9.5 stars using Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer archival data. The stars selected for the atlas were drawn from three populations: Galactic main-sequence (classes III-V) stars, supergiants, and main-sequence stars in the Magellanic Clouds, which have low metallicities. For several of these stars, we have prepared FITS files comprised of pairs of merged spectra for user access via the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST). We chose spectra from the first population with spectral types O4, O5, O6, O7, O8, and O9.5 and used them to compile tables and figures with identifications of all possible atmospheric and interstellar medium lines in the region 949-1188 A. Our identified line totals for these six representative spectra are 821 (500), 992 (663), 1077 (749), 1178 (847), 1359 (1001), and 1798 (1392) lines, respectively, where the numbers in parentheses are the totals of lines formed in the atmospheres, according to spectral synthesis models. The total number of unique atmospheric identifications for the six main-sequence O-star template spectra is 1792, whereas the number of atmospheric lines in common to these spectra is 300. The number of identified lines decreases toward earlier types (increasing effective temperature), while the percentages of 'missed' features (unknown lines not predicted from our spectral syntheses) drop from a high of 8% at type B0.2, from our recently published B-star far-UV atlas, to 1%-3% for type O spectra. The percentages of overpredicted lines are similar, despite their being much higher for B-star spectra. We discuss the statistics of line populations among the various elemental ionization states. Also, as an aid to users we list those isolated lines that can be used to determine stellar temperatures and the presence of possible chemical anomalies. Finally, we have prepared FITS files that give pairs of merged spectra for stars in our population sequences, for access via MAST.

Smith, Myron A., E-mail: msmith@stsci.edu [Catholic University of America, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultraviolet lithography mask" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TWO TYPES OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHTENINGS IN AR 10926 OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated seven extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightenings in the active region AR 10926 on 2006 December 2 observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft. We have determined their Doppler velocities and non-thermal velocities from 15 EUV spectral lines (log T = 4.7 - 6.4) by fitting each line profile to a Gaussian function. The Doppler velocity maps for different temperatures are presented to show the height dependence of the Doppler shifts. It is found that the active region brightenings show two distinct Doppler shift patterns. The type 1 brightening shows a systematic increase of Doppler velocity from -68 km s{sup -1} (strong blueshift) at log T = 4.7 to -2 km s{sup -1} (weak blueshift) at log T = 6.4, while the type 2 brightenings have Doppler velocities in the range from -20 km s{sup -1} to 20 km s{sup -1}. The type 1 brightening point is considered to sit in an upward reconnection outflow whose speed decreases with height. In both types of brightenings, the non-thermal velocity is found to be significantly enhanced at log T = 5.8 compared to the background region. We have also determined electron densities from line ratios and derived temperatures from emission measure loci using the CHIANTI atomic database. The electron densities of all brightenings are comparable to typical values in active regions (log N{sub e} = 9.9-10.4). The emission measure loci plots indicate that these brightenings should be multi-thermal whereas the background is isothermal. The differential emission measure as a function of temperature shows multiple peaks in the EUV brightening regions, while it has only a single peak (log T = 6.0) in the background region. Using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms, we have found that the type 1 brightening is associated with a canceling magnetic feature with a flux canceling rate of 2.4 x 10{sup 18} Mx hr{sup -1}. We also found the canceling magnetic feature and chromospheric brightenings in the type 1 brightening from the Hinode SOT and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer data. This observation corroborates our argument that brightening is caused by magnetic reconnection in a low atmosphere.

Lee, K.-S. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Y.-J.; Choe, G. S. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Imada, S., E-mail: lksun@khu.ac.kr [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dry Etching with Photoresist Masks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typical etch gases for SiO2 -etching are mixtures of Cx Fy Hz , e. g. CF4 (1) Formation of Fluoric-radicals by impact ionization: e- + CF4 CF3 + F + e- (2) Formation of volatile silicon compounds: SiO2 + 4F SiF4 + O2 Typical etch gases for Si-etching are mixtures of Cx Fy Clz , e. g. CF4 (1) Formation of Fluoric

Yoo, S. J. Ben

403

A programmable droplet-based microfluidic device applied to multiparameter analysis of single microbes and microbial communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bottom of the device and the slide (Harrick Plasma). Photo-lithography masks were designed by using AutoCAD software (Autodesk) and used to generate high-resolution (20,000 dpi) transparency masks (CAD/Art Services). Molds were fabricated...

Kaston Leung; Hans Zahn; Timothy Leaver; Kishori M. Konwar; Niels W. Hanson; Antoine P. Pagé; Chien-Chi Lo; Patrick S. Chain; Steven J. Hallam; Carl L. Hansen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

CANDELS: THE EVOLUTION OF GALAXY REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET COLORS FROM z = 8 TO 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the evolution of galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) colors in the epoch 4 {approx}< z {approx}< 8. We use new wide-field near-infrared data in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South field from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) 2009, and Early Release Science programs to select galaxies via photometric redshift measurements. Our sample consists of 2812 candidate galaxies at z {approx}> 3.5, including 113 at z {approx_equal} 7-8. We fit the observed spectral energy distribution to a suite of synthetic stellar population models and measure the value of the UV spectral slope ({beta}) from the best-fit model spectrum. We run simulations to show that this measurement technique results in a smaller scatter on {beta} than other methods, as well as a reduced number of galaxies with catastrophically incorrect {beta} measurements (i.e., {Delta}{beta} > 1). We find that the median value of {beta} evolves significantly from -1.82{sup +0.00}{sub -0.04} at z = 4 to -2.37{sup +0.26}{sub -0.06} at z = 7. Additionally, we find that faint galaxies at z = 7 have {beta} -2.68{sup +0.39}{sub -0.24} ({approx} -2.4 after correcting for observational bias); this is redder than previous claims in the literature and does not require 'exotic' stellar populations (e.g., very low metallicities or top-heavy initial mass functions) to explain their colors. This evolution can be explained by an increase in dust extinction, from low amounts at z = 7 to A{sub V} {approx} 0.5 mag at z = 4. The timescale for this increase is consistent with low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars forming the bulk of the dust. We find no significant (<2{sigma}) correlation between {beta} and M{sub UV} when measuring M{sub UV} at a consistent rest-frame wavelength of 1500 A. This is particularly true at bright magnitudes, though our results do show evidence for a weak correlation at faint magnitudes when galaxies in the HUDF are considered separately, hinting that dynamic range in sample luminosities may play a role. We do find a strong correlation between {beta} and the stellar mass at all redshifts, in that more massive galaxies exhibit redder colors. The most massive galaxies in our sample have similarly red colors at each redshift, implying that dust can build up quickly in massive galaxies and that feedback is likely removing dust from low-mass galaxies at z {>=} 7. Thus, the stellar-mass-metallicity relation, previously observed up to z {approx} 3, may extend out to z = 7-8.

Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Bassett, Robert [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A.; Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Conselice, Christopher J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lai, Kamson [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hathi, Nimish P. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo, E-mail: stevenf@astro.as.utexas.edu [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); and others

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

EXPLORING THE ORIGIN AND FATE OF THE MAGELLANIC STREAM WITH ULTRAVIOLET AND OPTICAL ABSORPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of ionization and metal enrichment in the Magellanic Stream (MS), the nearest gaseous tidal stream, using Hubble Space Telescope/STIS and FUSE ultraviolet spectroscopy of two background active galactic nuclei. The targets are NGC 7469, lying directly behind the MS with log N(H I){sub MS} = 18.63 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst), and Mrk 335, lying 24.{sup 0}7 away with log N(H I){sub MS} = 16.67 {+-} 0.05. For NGC 7469, we include optical spectroscopy from VLT/UVES. In both sight lines, the MS is detected in low-ion (O I, C II, C III, Si II, Si III, Al II, Ca II) and high-ion (O VI, C IV, Si IV) absorption. Toward NGC 7469, we measure an MS oxygen abundance [O/H]{sub MS} = [O I/H I] = -1.00 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst), supporting the view that the Stream originates in the Small Magellanic Cloud rather than the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use CLOUDY to model the low-ion phase of the Stream as a photoionized plasma using the observed Si III/Si II and C III/C II ratios. Toward Mrk 335, this yields an ionization parameter between log U = -3.45 and -3.15, a gas density log (n {sub H}/cm{sup -3}) between -2.51 and -2.21, and a hydrogen ionization fraction of 98.9%-99.5%. Toward NGC 7469, we derive sub-solar abundance ratios for [Si/O], [Fe/O], and [Al/O], indicating the presence of dust in the MS. The high-ion column densities are too large to be explained by photoionization, but also cannot be explained by a single-temperature collisional ionization model (equilibrium or non-equilibrium). This suggests that the high-ion plasma is multi-phase, with an Si IV region, a hotter O VI region, and C IV potentially contributing to each. Summing over the low-ion and high-ion phases, we derive conservative lower limits on the ratio N(total H II)/N(H I) of {approx}>19 toward NGC 7469 and {approx}>330 toward Mrk 335, showing that along these two directions the vast majority of the Stream has been ionized. The presence of warm-hot plasma together with the small-scale structure observed at 21 cm provides evidence for an evaporative interaction with the hot Galactic corona. This scenario, predicted by hydrodynamical simulations, suggests that the fate of the MS will be to replenish the Galactic corona with new plasma, rather than to bring neutral fuel to the disk.

Fox, Andrew J.; Smoker, Jonathan V. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Wakker, Bart P.; Savage, Blair D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Richter, Philipp [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Haus 28, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476, Potsdam (Germany); Sembach, Kenneth R., E-mail: afox@eso.or [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation(UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680-780 m{sup 3}/h (400-460 cfm). A set of experiments was conducted with common VOCs introduced into the UVPCO device individually and in mixture. Compound conversion efficiencies and the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined by comparison of compound concentrations upstream and downstream of the reactor. There was general agreement between compound conversions efficiencies determined individually and in the mixture. This suggests that competition among compounds for active sites on the photocatalyst surface will not limit the performance of the UVPCO device when the total VOC concentration is low. A possible exception was the very volatile alcohols, for which there were some indications of competitive adsorption. The results also showed that formaldehyde was produced from many commonly encountered VOCs, while acetaldehyde was generated by specific VOCs, particularly ethanol. The implication is that formaldehyde concentrations are likely to increase when an effective UVPCO air cleaner is used in buildings containing typical VOC sources. The magnitude of the expected increase will depend upon a number of interrelated factors. Series of experiments were conducted to determine if the oxidizer, sodium permanganate (NaMnO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O), has sufficient reaction rates and capacity to counteract formaldehyde and acetaldehyde production and enable a 50 % reduction in building ventilation rate without net increases in indoor aldehyde concentrations. A commercially produced filter element and two laboratory-fabricated media beds containing NaMnO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O chemisorbent media were evaluated. The effectiveness of a device for removal of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and other VOCs was determined by measurement of concentrations immediately upstream and downstream of the device. In some experiments, conversion efficiencies and byproduct generation by the UVPCO device also were determined. Six experiments were conducted with the commercial filter element installed downstream of the UVPCO reactor. Eleven experiments were conducted with a single panel media bed (30 cm by 61 cm by 2.5 cm deep) installed downstream of the UVPCO reactor; in these, the effects of temperature and air residence time on conversion efficiency were examined. Two experiments were conducted with a four-panel, folded, media bed (approximately four times the size of the single panel bed) installed downstream of the reactor. Because the commercial unit contained activated carbon as an additional component, it was effective at removing lower volatility compounds that typically have low oxidation rates in the UVPCO reactor. The filter element also met the minimum efficiency objective for formaldehyde. However, the removal of acetaldehyde was less than required. The air residence time in the single panel bed was not optimized as the removal efficiencies for both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were strongly inversely related to the air flow rate through the device. In addition, the acetaldehyde removal efficiency decreased to less than 10% with extended use of the device. The fold

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk,William J.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-05-06 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUV lithography (EUVL) source, soft x-ray source, and research relevant to laser fusion etc by research on laser fusion and x-ray lasers [4][5] . However, because of the large variety of materials in specific applications of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), soft x-ray sources, and laser plasma

Najmabadi, Farrokh

408

Development of photo-patterned composite structures in microchannels for oil reservoir research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from unstructured glass microchannels, we develop a new method of micromodel fabrication. We build composite structures in a bottom-up manner with ultraviolet projection lithography where the composite structures ...

Lee, Hyundo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Phys. Med. Biol. 45 (2000) 18631868. Printed in the UK PII: S0031-9155(00)10622-0 Ultraviolet radiation dosimetry with radiochromic film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation dosimetry with radiochromic film Martin J Butson¶, Tsang Cheung, Peter K N Yu, Donna Abbati, NSW 2500, Australia § Wollongong Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Crown Street, Wollongong radiation produced by a solar simulator and examined for dosimetry in ultraviolet radiation. Results show

Yu, K.N.

410

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...DNA damage induced by solar ultraviolet exposure...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Violet to deep-ultraviolet InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN quantum structures for UV electroabsorption modulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on the demonstration of ultraviolet UV optoelectronic devices. Such devices hold promise, material related problems complicate the growth of such optoelectronic devices oper- ating at short wavelengths. With the use of InGaN/GaN quantum structures, optoelectronic devices operating in vis- ible

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

412

Time-delay compensated monochromator for the spectral selection of extreme-ultraviolet high-order laser harmonics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and the characterization of a monochromator for the spectral selection of ultrashort high-order laser harmonics in the extreme ultraviolet are presented. The instrument adopts the double-grating configuration to preserve the length of the optical paths of different diffracted rays, without altering the extremely short duration of the pulse. The gratings are used in the off-plane mount to have high efficiency. The performances of the monochromator have been characterized in terms of spectral response, efficiency, photon flux, imaging properties, and temporal response. In particular, the temporal characterization of the harmonic pulses has been obtained using a cross-correlation method: Pulses as short as 8 fs have been measured at the output of the monochromators, confirming the effectiveness of the time-delay compensated configuration.

Poletto, Luca; Villoresi, Paolo; Frassetto, Fabio [Laboratory for UV and X-Ray Optical Research, CNR-INFM and Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, Padova 35131 (Italy); Calegari, Francesca; Ferrari, Federico; Lucchini, Matteo; Sansone, Giuseppe; Nisoli, Mauro [National Laboratory for Ultrafast and Ultraintense Optical Science, CNR-INFM and Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multiphoton Double Ionization of Ar in Intense Extreme Ultraviolet Laser Fields Studied by Shot-by-Shot Photoelectron Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoelectron spectroscopy has been performed to study the multiphoton double ionization of Ar in an intense extreme ultraviolet laser field (h{nu}{approx}21 eV, {approx}5 TW/cm{sup 2}), by using a free electron laser (FEL). Three distinct peaks identified in the observed photoelectron spectra clearly show that the double ionization proceeds sequentially via the formation of Ar{sup +}: Ar+h{nu}{yields}Ar{sup +}+e{sup -} and Ar{sup +}+2h{nu}{yields}Ar{sup 2+}+e{sup -}. Shot-by-shot recording of the photoelectron spectra allows simultaneous monitoring of FEL spectrum and the multiphoton process for each FEL pulse, revealing that the two-photon ionization from Ar{sup +} is significantly enhanced by intermediate resonances in Ar{sup +}.

Hikosaka, Y. [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Fushitani, M.; Hishikawa, A. [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsuda, A. [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tseng, C.-M. [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shigemasa, E. [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Togashi, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Senba, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

High blue-near ultraviolet photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene-MoS{sub 2}-metal heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study on the photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures in which MoS{sub 2} layers are doped with various plasma species. In comparison with undoped heterostructures, such doped ones exhibit significantly improved quantum efficiencies in both photovoltaic and photoconductive modes. This indicates that plasma-doping-induced built-in potentials play an important role in photocurrent generation. As compared to indium-tin-oxide/ MoS{sub 2}/metal structures, the presented graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced quantum efficiencies in the blue-near ultraviolet region, which is attributed to the low density of recombination centers at graphene/MoS{sub 2} heterojunctions. This work advances the knowledge for making photo-response devices based on layered materials.

Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Liu, Amy C.; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan, E-mail: xiaoganl@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Positive-tone silylated, dry-developed, deep ultraviolet resist with 0. 2 [mu]m resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a surface-imaging process for a positive-tone silylated, dry-developed bilayer resist which has 0.2 [mu]m resolution and an aspect ratio of 4.5 using deep-UV (248 nm) exposure. The many processing variables such as thermal treatment parameters, silylation conditions, and etching conditions were examined to determine their effects on lithographic performance in terms of resolution, feature size linearity, focus latitude, and sensitivity. Critical to the success of the process are: the bilayer structure which restricts diffusion of the Si, the use of a disilane reagent to increase the Si content of the masking layer, limiting migration of photogenerated acid by the appropriate choice of softbake and post-exposure bake temperatures, initial etching with an Ar/Cl[sub 2] mixture to remove the thin layer of silylated resist in the exposed areas, and employing CO[sub 2] instead of O[sub 2] as the etching gas to eliminate lateral etching of the features. With this process we have obtained good critical dimension linearity down to 0.25 [mu]m for bright-field and dark-field lines and spaces as well as isolated lines and isolated spaces. The dose required is [similar to]75 mJ/cm[sup 2] and the dose latitude is [plus minus]6%. Focus latitude is at least [plus minus]0.4 [mu]m. We also observe no environmental effects on sensitivity or resolution.

Hutton, R.S.; Stein, S.M.; Boyce, C.H.; Cirelli, R.A.; Taylor, G.N. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)); Baiocchi, F.A.; Kovalchick, J. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18103 (United States)); Wheeler, D.R. (Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Developing clear-sky, cloud and cloud shadow mask for producing clear-sky composites at 250-meter spatial resolution for the seven MODIS land bands over Canada and North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new technology was developed at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) for generating Canada-wide and North America continental scale clear-sky composites at 250 m spatial resolution for all seven MODIS land spectral bands (B1–B7). The MODIS Level 1B (MOD02) swath level data are used as input to circumvent the problems with image distortion in the mid latitude and polar regions inherent to the global sinusoidal (SIN) projection utilized for the standard MODIS data products. The MODIS 500 m land bands B3 to B7 are first downscaled to 250 m resolution using an adaptive regression and normalization scheme for compatibility with the 250 m bands B1 and B2. A new method has been developed to produce the mask of clear-sky, cloud and cloud shadow at 250 m resolution. It shows substantial advantages in comparison with the MODIS 250 m standard cloud masks. The testing of new cloud mask showed that it is in reasonable agreement with the MODIS 1-km standard product once it is aggregated to 1-km scale, while the cloud shadow detection looks more reliable with the new methodology. Nevertheless, more quantitative analyses of the presented scene identification technique are required to understand its performance over the range of input scenes in various seasons. The new clear-sky compositing scheme employs a scene-dependent decision matrix. It is demonstrated that this new scheme provides better results than any others based on a single compositing criterion, such as maximum NDVI or minimum visible reflectance. To account for surface bi-directional properties, two clear-sky composites for the same time period are produced by separating backward scattering and forward scattering geometries, which separate pixels with the sun-satellite relative azimuth angles within 90°–270° and outside of this range. Comparison with Landsat imagery and with MODIS standard composite products demonstrated the advantage of the new technique for screening cloud and cloud shadow, and generating high spatial resolution MODIS clear-sky composites. The new data products are mapped in the Lambert Conformal Conic (LCC) projection for Canada and the Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area (LAEA) projection for North America. Presently this activity is limited to MODIS/TERRA due to known problems with band-to-band registration and noisy SWIR channels on MODIS/AQUA.

Yi Luo; Alexander P. Trishchenko; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Studies of allogeneic bone marrow and spleen cell transplantation in a murine model using ultraviolet-B light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet irradiation inhibits alloreactive and mitogen-induced responses and might reduce both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reactions after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We have studied proliferative responses to mitogens and reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture after irradiation with ultraviolet (UV)-B light using splenocytes from Balb/c (H-2d) and CBA (H-2k) mice. Response to mitogens and in MLC was strongly inhibited by 20 J/m{sup 2} and abolished at 50 J/m{sup 2}. Clonogenic cell recovery (CFU-GM; CFU-S) after UV-B irradiation was also reduced. When bone marrow and spleen cells were transplanted from parent (Balb/c) animals into F1 hybrid (Balb/c X CBA) recipients, all animals died with features indicative of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in 34 days. If the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2} of UV-B at a mean wavelength of 310 nm, then 76% survived to day 80 when they were killed and shown to have normal marrow cellularity. The remainder died in marrow aplasia or of GVHD. H-2 typing in a group of surviving recipients showed either donor hematopoiesis only (8 of 15), mixed allogeneic chimerism (5 of 15), or recipient type hematopoiesis (2 of 15). Higher doses (200 to 300 J/m{sup 2}) were detrimental to survival with 88% of recipients dying in marrow aplasia. Syngeneic BMT in Balb/c mice showed slower hematopoietic reconstitution when the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2}. After BMT from Balb/c to CBA mice all recipients of unirradiated grafts died within 54 days. By contrast, after graft irradiation with 100 J/m{sup 2} survival of recipient animals to day 80 was 59%. If these grafts were treated with 50 J/m{sup 2} survival was only 26% with an increase in deaths due to GVHD. Hematopoiesis at day 80 in a group of survivors studied by Ig heavy chain allotyping indicated donor type hematopoiesis in 6 of 10 (50 J/m{sup 2}) and 2 of 9 (100 J/m{sup 2}).

Pamphilon, D.H.; Alnaqdy, A.A.; Godwin, V.; Preece, A.W.; Wallington, T.B. (South Western Regional Transfusion Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Out-of-band exposure characterization with the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA microfield exposure tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), discharge or laser produced, pulsed plasma light sources are being considered. These sources are known to emit into a broad range of wavelengths that are collectively referred to as the out-of-band (OOB) radiation by lithographers. Multilayer EUV optics reflect OOB radiation emitted by the EUV sources onto the wafer plane resulting in unwanted background exposure of the resist (flare) and reduced image contrast. The reflectivity of multilayer optics at the target wavelength of 13.5 nm is comparable to that of their reflectivity in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) and UV regions from 100-350 nm. The aromatic molecular backbones of many of the resists used for EUV are equally absorptive at specific DUV wavelengths as well. In order to study the effect of these wavelengths on imaging performance in a real system, we are in the process of integrating a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Microfield Exposure Tool (MET). The MET plays an active role in advanced research in resist and mask development for EUVL and as such, we will utilize this system to systematically evaluate the imaging impact of DUV wavelengths in a EUV system. In this paper, we present the optical design for the new DUV component and the simulation-based imaging results predicting the potential impact of OOB based on known resist, mask, and multilayer conditions. It should be noted that because the projection optics work equally well as imaging optics at DUV wavelengths, the OOB radiation cannot be treated simply as uniform background or DC flare.

George, Simi A.; Nauleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Gullikson, Eric; Kemp, Charles D.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Note: Laser-induced acoustic desorption/synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry for analysis of fragile compounds and heavy oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we coupled synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization (SVUV PI) method with the laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) technique for mass spectrometric analysis. The LIAD technique is a “soft” desorption method which could avoid the degradation of analytes during desorption process. Meanwhile SVUV PI is an efficient “soft” ionization source. The new combination of the “soft” desorption technique and “soft” photoionization method is well suitable to reduce the difficulty for interpreting the mass spectra of the fragile compounds and heavy oils.

Liangyuan Jia; Junjie Weng; Zhongyue Zhou; Fei Qi; Wenyue Guo; Lianming Zhao; Juan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

An upper limit on the ratio between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the bolometric luminosities of stars hosting habitable planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types has already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape along with hydrogen, I present an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-t...

Sengupta, Sujan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Bright CEMP-no Star BD+44 493  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an elemental-abundance analysis, in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectral range, for the extremely metal-poor star BD+44 493, a 9th magnitude sub-giant with [Fe/H] = -3.8 and enhanced carbon, based on data acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This star is the brightest example of a class of objects that, unlike the great majority of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, does not exhibit over-abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements (CEMP-no). In this paper, we validate the abundance determinations for a number of species that were previously studied in the optical region, and obtain strong upper limits for beryllium and boron, as well as for neutron-capture elements from zirconium to platinum, many of which are not accessible from ground-based spectra. The boron upper limit we obtain for BD+44 493, logeps(B) < -0.70, the first such measurement for a CEMP star, is the lowest yet found for very and extremely metal-poor stars. In addition, we ob...

Placco, Vinicius; Roederer, Ian; Cowan, John; Frebel, Anna; Filler, Dan; Ivans, Inese I; Lawler, James E; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Sobeck, Jennifer; Aoki, Wako; Smith, Verne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

GALEX Observations of an Energetic Ultraviolet Flare on the dM4e Star GJ 3685A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite has obtained high time resolution ultraviolet photometry during a large flare on the M4 dwarf star GJ 3685A. Simultaneous NUV (1750 - 2800A) and FUV (1350 - 1750A) time-tagged photometry with time resolution better than 0.1 s shows that the overall brightness in the FUV band increased by a factor of 1000 in 200 s. Under the assumption that the NUV emission is mostly due to a stellar continuum, and that the FUV flux is shared equally between emission lines and continuum, then there is evidence for two distinct flare components for this event. The first flare type is characterized by an exponential increase in flux with little or no increase in temperature. The other involves rapid increases in both temperature and flux. While the decay time for the first flare component may be several hours, the second flare event decayed over less than 1 minute, suggesting that there was little or no confinement of the heated plasma.

Richard D. Robinson; Jonathan M. Wheatley; Barry Y. Welsh; Karl Forster; Patrick Morrissey; Mark Seibert; R. Michael Rich; Samir Salim; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; D. Christopher Martin; Bruno Milliard; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Ted K. Wyder

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE STRUCTURES OF BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bright-rimmed cloud SFO 22 was observed with the 45 m telescope of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0), {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0), and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) lines, where well-developed head-tail structure and small line widths were found. Such features were predicted by radiation-driven implosion models, suggesting that SFO 22 may be in a quasi-stationary equilibrium state. We compare the observed properties with those from numerical models of a photoevaporating cloud, which include effects of magnetic pressure and heating due to strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from an exciting star. The magnetic pressure may play a more important role in the density structures of bright-rimmed clouds than the thermal pressure that is enhanced by the FUV radiation. The FUV radiation can heat the cloud surface to near 30 K; however, its effect is not enough to reproduce the observed density structure of SFO 22. An initial magnetic field of 5 {mu}G in our numerical models produces the best agreement with the observations, and its direction can affect the structures of bright-rimmed clouds.

Motoyama, Kazutaka [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)] [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Umemoto, Tomofumi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 191-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 191-8588 (Japan); Shang, Hsien; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: motoyama@nii.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 6078471 (Japan)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and modeling of Cu on the SSPX Spheromak and laser plasma “Sparky”a)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impurities play a critical role in magnetic fusion research. In large quantities impurities can cool and dilute plasma creating problems for achieving ignition and burn; however in smaller amounts the impurities could provide valuable information about several plasma parameters through the use of spectroscopy. Many impurity ions radiate within the extreme ultraviolet(EUV) range. Here we report on spectra from the silver flat field spectrometer which was implemented at the Sustained Spheromak Physics experiment (SSPX) to monitor ion impurity emissions. The chamber within the SSPX was made of Cu which makes M-shell Cu a prominent impurity signature. The Spect3D spectral analysis code was utilized to identify spectral features in the range of 115–315 Å and to more fully understand the plasma conditions. A second set of experiments was carried out on the compact laser-plasma x-ray/EUV facility “Sparky” at UNR with Cu flat targets used. The EUVspectra were recorded between 40–300 Å and compared with results from SSPX.

M. E. Weller; A. S. Safronova; J. Clementson; V. L. Kantsyrev; U. I. Safronova; P. Beiersdorfer; E. E. Petkov; P. G. Wilcox; G. C. Osborne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

FORMATION OF GLYCINE ON ULTRAVIOLET-IRRADIATED INTERSTELLAR ICE-ANALOG FILMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR AMINO ACIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of glycine on interstellar ice-analog films composed of water, methylamine (MA), and carbon dioxide under irradiation of ultraviolet (UV) photons. Analysis of the UV-irradiated ice films by in situ mass spectrometric methods revealed glycine and other isomers as photochemical products. Deuterium-labeling experiments were conducted to determine the structures of the photoproducts and to examine their formation pathways. The reactions occur via photocleavages of C-H and N-H bonds in MA, followed by subsequent reactions of the nascent H atom with CO{sub 2}, leading to the formation of HOCO and then to glycine and carbamic acid. The photochemical synthesis of glycine occurs efficiently at the ice surfaces, and the competing photosynthesis and photodestruction processes can reach a steady-state kinetic balance at an extended UV exposure, maintaining a substantial population level of glycine. The observation suggests that interstellar amino acids can be created on ice grains, and that they can also be stored in the ices by maintaining a kinetic balance under interstellar UV irradiation. As such, the transport of amino acids in interstellar space may be possible without depleting the net abundance of amino acids in the ices but rather increasing the structural diversity of the molecules.

Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Joon-Ki; Moon, Eui-Seong; Kang, Heon [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747, Republic of Korea (H.K.) (Korea, Republic of); Minh, Y. C. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 838 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: surfion@snu.ac.kr

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

New Regulators for Quantum Field Theories with Compactified Extra Dimensions. II: Ultraviolet Finiteness and Effective Field Theory Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous companion paper [arXiv:0712.3532], we proposed two new regulators for quantum field theories in spacetimes with compactified extra dimensions. Unlike most other regulators which have been used in the extra-dimension literature, these regulators are specifically designed to respect the original higher-dimensional Lorentz and gauge symmetries that exist prior to compactification, and not merely the four-dimensional symmetries which remain afterward. In this paper, we use these regulators in order to develop a method for extracting ultraviolet-finite results from one-loop calculations. This method also allows us to derive Wilsonian effective field theories for Kaluza-Klein modes at different energy scales. Our method operates by ensuring that divergent corrections to parameters describing the physics of the excited Kaluza-Klein modes are absorbed into the corresponding parameters for zero modes, thereby eliminating the need to introduce independent counterterms for parameters characterizing different Kaluza-Klein modes. Our effective field theories can therefore simplify calculations involving Kaluza-Klein modes, and be compared directly to potential experimental results emerging from collider data.

Sky Bauman; Keith R. Dienes

2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improving the performance of the actinic inspection tool with an optimized alignment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy is an important tool for the investigation of the performance of EUV masks, for detecting the presence and the characteristics of defects, and for evaluating the effectiveness of defect repair techniques. Aerial image measurement bypasses the difficulties inherent to photoresist imaging and enables high data collection speed and flexibility. It provides reliable and quick feedback for the development of masks and lithography system modeling methods. We operate the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), a EUV microscope installed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AIT is equipped with several high-magnification Fresnel zoneplate lenses, with various numerical aperture values, that enable it image the reflective mask surface with various resolution and magnification settings. Although the AIT has undergone significant recent improvements in terms of imaging resolution and illumination uniformity, there is still room for improvement. In the AIT, an off-axis zoneplate lens collects the light coming from the sample and an image of the sample is projected onto an EUV-sensitive CCD camera. The simplicity of the optical system is particularly helpful considering that the AIT alignment has to be performed every time that a sample or a zoneplate is replaced. The alignment is sensitive to several parameters such as the lens position and orientation, the illumination direction and the sample characteristics. Since the AIT works in high vacuum, there is no direct access to the optics or to the sample during the alignment and the measurements. For all these reasons the alignment procedures and feedback can be complex, and in some cases can reduce the overall data throughput of the system. In this paper we review the main strategies and procedures that have been developed for quick and reliable alignments, and we describe the performance improvements we have achieved, in terms of aberration magnitude reduction.

Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K.A.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, Sungmin

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advanced flow lithography and barcoded particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic multifunctional particles have drawn much attention, leading to wide ranges of applications from biomedical areas to electronics. Despite their enormous potentials, particles with geometrically and chemically ...

Bong, Ki Wan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Patterning Organic Electronics Based on Nanoimprint Lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 3. 2. The fabrication process of OMESFETs with a self-aligned gate electrode. (a) Spin-coat an imprinting resist (PMMA or Teflon) on the Au/Cr surface. (b) Thermally imprint the resist. (c) Remove...-AF film. (d) Remove the Teflon-AF residue layer by oxygen RIE. (e) Spin-coat the PMMA solution on Teflon-AF. (f) Remove the PMMA residue layer by oxygen RIE. (g) Dissolve Teflon-AF by FC-72...

Lo, Yi-Chen

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

432

Sequential Infiltration Synthesis Advances Lithography (IN-10...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications and Industries SIS application areas include microelectronics, optoelectronics, plasmonics, nanofluidics, high-density storage media, advanced sensors and...

433

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

TAMING THE INVISIBLE MONSTER: SYSTEM PARAMETER CONSTRAINTS FOR {epsilon} AURIGAE FROM THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET TO THE MID-INFRARED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have assembled new Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC observations of the mysterious binary star {epsilon} Aurigae, along with archival far-ultraviolet to mid-infrared data, to form an unprecedented spectral energy distribution (SED) spanning 3 orders of magnitude in wavelength from 0.1 {mu}m to 100 {mu}m. The observed SED can be reproduced using a three-component model consisting of a 2.2{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} M{sub sun} F-type post-asymptotic giant branch star, and a 5.9 {+-} 0.8 M{sub sun} B5{+-}1 type main-sequence star that is surrounded by a geometrically thick, but partially transparent, disk of gas and dust. At the nominal HIPPARCOS parallax distance of 625 pc, the model normalization yields a radius of 135 {+-} 5 R{sub sun} for the F star, consistent with published interferometric observations. The dusty disk is constrained to be viewed at an inclination of i {approx_gt} 87{sup 0}, and has an effective temperature of 550 {+-} 50 K with an outer radius of 3.8 AU and a thickness of 0.95 AU. The dust content of the disk must be largely confined to grains larger than {approx}10 {mu}m in order to produce the observed gray optical-infrared eclipses and the lack of broad dust emission features in the archival Spitzer mid-infrared spectra. The total mass of the disk, even considering a potential gaseous contribution in addition to the dust that produces the observed infrared excess, is <<1 M{sub sun}. We discuss evolutionary scenarios for this system that could lead to the current status of the stellar components and suggest possibilities for its future evolution, as well as potential observational tests of our model.

Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howell, S. B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Stencel, R. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae:Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum ofType Ia Supernovae(SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noiseKeck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopyfor a sample of 36 events at intermediateredshift (z=0.5) discoveredby the Canada-France-Hawaii TelescopeSupernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). Weintroduce a new method for removinghost galaxy contamination in our spectra,exploiting the comprehensivephotometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and theirhost galaxies, therebyproviding the first quantitative view of the UV spectralproperties of alarge sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrumhas notevolved significantly over the past 40 percent of cosmic history,preciseevolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of acomparable sample ofhigh quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum ofour z 0.5 SNe Ia and itsdispersion is tabulated for use in futureapplications. Within the high-redshiftsample, we discover significant UVspectral variations and exclude dust extinctionas the primary cause byexamining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitormetallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see aremuchlarger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expectedpatterns.An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelengthof selected UVfeatures with phase. We also demonstrate systematicdifferences in the SN Iaspectral features with SN lightcurve width inboth the UV and the optical. Weshow that these intrinsic variations couldrepresent a statistical limitation in thefuture use of high-redshift SNeIa for precision cosmology. We conclude thatfurther detailed studies areneeded, both locally and at moderate redshift wherethe rest-frame UV canbe studied precisely, in order that future missions canconfidently beplanned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam,A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.G.; Conley,A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ultraviolet absorption by interstellar gas near the LMC star HD 36402 in the interstellar bubble N51D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied ultraviolet high-dispersion IUE spectra of the LMC star HD 36402 in the nebulosity N51D. Apart from absorption due to Milky Way gas, we find four interstellar absorption components associated with the immediate surroundings of HD 36402. The absorption at 305 km/sup -1/ originates in low-density, n(e)roughly-equal0.1 cm/sup -3/, 10/sup 4/ K gas. At 280 km s/sup -1/, strong absroption from the excited fine-structure level of carbon points to densities n(e)>1 cm/sup -3/ at 10/sup 4/ K. The velocity and density structure agree with that derived from visual emission lines. Additional weak absorption by common interstellar ions is seen near 260 km s/sup -1/. From a fit to the observed Lv..cap alpha.. profile, it is found that there is N(H)roughly-equal10/sup 20.2/ cm/sup -2/ in front of HD 36402, while the large N(H)roughly-equal10/sup 21.3/ cm/sup -2/ from 21 cm data clearly places most of the neutral gas behind N51D. The fourth component near 270 km s/sup -1/ shows strong N V, C IV, and Si IV, more than is consistent with a wind-blown interstellar bubble; hence there is additional absorption outside the bubble. The overall pattern of absorbtion-line strengths suggests solar abundance ratios for the metals. The earlier evolution of the large stellar association LH 77 may have induced star formation leading to bright nebulosities around LH 77, one of them being the bubble N51D.

de Boer, K.S.; Nash, A.G.

1982-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

THE SPACE DENSITY OF EXTENDED ULTRAVIOLET (XUV) DISKS IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GAS ACCRETION ONTO GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results of the first unbiased search for extended ultraviolet (XUV)-disk galaxies undertaken to determine the space density of such galaxies. Our sample contains 561 local (0.001 < z < 0.05) galaxies that lie in the intersection of available Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) deep imaging (exposure time >1.5 x 10{sup 4} s) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 footprints. We explore modifications to the standard classification scheme for our sample that includes both disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies. Visual classification of each galaxy in the sample reveals an XUV-disk frequency of up to 20% for the most nearby portion of our sample. On average over the entire sample (out to z = 0.05) the frequency ranges from a hard limit of 4%-14%. The GALEX imaging allows us to detect XUV disks beyond 100 Mpc. The XUV regions around XUV-disk galaxies are consistently bluer than the main bodies. We find a surprisingly high frequency of XUV emission around luminous red (NUV-r > 5) and green valley (3 < NUV-r < 5) galaxies. The XUV-disk space density in the local universe is >(1.5-4.2) x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Using the XUV emission as an indicator of recent gas accretion, we estimate that the cold gas accretion rate onto these galaxies is >(1.7-4.6) x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. The number of XUV disks in the green valley and the estimated accretion rate onto such galaxies points to the intriguing possibility that 7%-18% of galaxies in this population are transitioning away from the red sequence.

Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Thilker, David; Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Treyer, Marie A. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, F-13376 Marseille (France); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jenna@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Direct photoetching of polymers using radiation of high energy density from a table-top extreme ultraviolet plasma source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet(EUV)radiation a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-driven EUV plasma source utilizing a solid Au target. By 10× demagnified imaging of the plasma a maximum pulse energy density of ? 0.73 ? J / cm 2 at a wavelength of 13.5 nm can be achieved in the image plane of the objective at a pulse duration of 8.8 ns. In this paper we present EUV photoetching rates measured for polymethyl methacrylate polycarbonate and polytetrafluoroethylene at various fluence levels. A linear dependence between etch depth and applied EUV pulse number could be observed without the necessity for any incubation pulses. By evaluating the slope of these data etch rates were determined revealing also a linear behavior for low fluences. A threshold energy density could not be observed. The slope of the linear etch regime as well as deviations from the linear trend at higher energy densities are discussed and compared to data known from deep UV laser ablation. Furthermore the surface roughness of the structuredpolymers was measured by atomic force microscopy and compared to the nonirradiated polymer surface indicating a rather smooth etch process (roughness increase of 20%–30%). The different shapes of the etch craters observed for the three polymers at high energy densities can be explained by the measured fluence dependence of the etch rates having consequences for the proper use of polymerablation for beam profiling of focused EUVradiation.

Frank Barkusky; Armin Bayer; Christian Peth; Klaus Mann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Direct photoetching of polymers using radiation of high energy density from a table-top extreme ultraviolet plasma source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-driven EUV plasma source utilizing a solid Au target. By 10x demagnified imaging of the plasma a maximum pulse energy density of {approx}0.73 J/cm{sup 2} at a wavelength of 13.5 nm can be achieved in the image plane of the objective at a pulse duration of 8.8 ns. In this paper we present EUV photoetching rates measured for polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene at various fluence levels. A linear dependence between etch depth and applied EUV pulse number could be observed without the necessity for any incubation pulses. By evaluating the slope of these data, etch rates were determined, revealing also a linear behavior for low fluences. A threshold energy density could not be observed. The slope of the linear etch regime as well as deviations from the linear trend at higher energy densities are discussed and compared to data known from deep UV laser ablation. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the structured polymers was measured by atomic force microscopy and compared to the nonirradiated polymer surface, indicating a rather smooth etch process (roughness increase of 20%-30%). The different shapes of the etch craters observed for the three polymers at high energy densities can be explained by the measured fluence dependence of the etch rates, having consequences for the proper use of polymer ablation for beam profiling of focused EUV radiation.

Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Peth, Christian; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium-Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Influence of ultraviolet light irradiation on corrosion behavior of weathering steel with and without TiO2-coating in 3 mass% NaCl solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the influence of ultraviolet (UV) light on the corrosion behavior of weathering steel with and without TiO2 coating has been investigated in 3% NaCl solution, using anodic polarization, dipping and dropping tests. In polarization tests a large negative shift of corrosion potential appeared for the TiO2-coated specimen in UV light. The weight loss of the steels with and without TiO2 film increased under UV light in the dipping test, while they decreased in the dropping test. The rust formed on the weathering steel showed a semiconductor like behavior, similar to that shown by TiO2 film.

Manal G. Mahmoud; Rongguang Wang; Masahiko Kato; Keijiro Nakasa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach n{sub c}/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 {le} k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ii} {le} {infinity}) and ZT{sub e}/T{sub i}, where k{sub ia} is the ion- acoustic wave number, {lambda}{sub ii} is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and T{sub e}, T{sub i} are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ei}, k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ee} {ge} 1), and quasineutrality holds, ({alpha} {much_gt}1), where {alpha} = 1/k{lambda}{sub DE} and {lambda}{sub DE} is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

Tracy, M.D.

1993-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

443

CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s{sup -1} upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s{sup -1} upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)] [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

THE MID-INFRARED AND NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS EMISSIONS OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES ON THE RED SEQUENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the mid-infrared (IR) and near-ultraviolet (UV) excess emissions of spectroscopically selected quiescent galaxies on the optical red sequence. We use the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV data for a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to study the possible connection between quiescent red-sequence galaxies with and without mid-IR/near-UV excess. Among 648 12 {mu}m detected quiescent red-sequence galaxies without H{alpha} emission, 26% and 55% show near-UV and mid-IR excess emissions, respectively. When we consider only bright (M{sub r} < -21.5) galaxies with an early-type morphology, the fraction of galaxies with recent star formation is still 39%. The quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions are optically fainter and have slightly smaller D{sub n} 4000 than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions. We also find that mid-IR weighted mean stellar ages of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR excess are larger than those with near-UV excess, and smaller than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess. The environmental dependence of the fraction of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess seems strong even though the trends of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess differ from those with mid-IR excess. These results indicate that the recent star formation traced by near-UV ({approx}< 1 Gyr) and mid-IR ({approx}< 2 Gyr) excess is not negligible among nearby, quiescent, red, early-type galaxies. We suggest a possible evolutionary scenario of quiescent red-sequence galaxies from quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess to those with mid-IR excess to those without near-UV and mid-IR excess.

Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sohn, Young-Jong, E-mail: jwko@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Swift X-ray and ultraviolet observations of the shortest orbital period double-degenerate system RX J0806.3+1527 (HM Cnc)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RX J0806.3+1527 (HM Cnc) is a pulsating X-ray source with 100 per cent modulation on a period of 321.5 s (5.4 min). This period reflects the orbital motion of a close binary system consisting of two interacting white dwarfs. Here we present a series of simultaneous X-ray (0.2-10 keV) and near-ultraviolet (2600 angstrom and 1928 angstrom) observations carried out with the Swift satellite. In the near-ultraviolet the counterpart of RX J0806.3+1527 was detected at flux densities consistent with a blackbody with temperature 27E+3 K. We found that the emission at 2600 angstrom is modulated at the 321.5-s period, with the peak ahead of the X-ray one by 0.28 cycles and coincident, within 0.05 cycles, with the optical. This phase-shift measurement confirms that the X-ray hot spot (located on the primary white dwarf) is at about 80-100 degrees from the direction connecting the two white dwarfs. Albeit at lower significance, the 321.5-s signature is present also in the 1928-angstrom data; at this wavelength, however, t...

Esposito, P; Dall'Osso, S; Covino, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

RESONANCES IN THE PHOTOIONIZATION CROSS SECTIONS OF ATOMIC NITROGEN SHAPE THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF THE BRIGHT STAR IN 47 TUCANAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Ly{beta}, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A; none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s {sup 2} 2p {sup 3} {sup 2} D {sup 0} and {sup 2} P {sup 0}). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre, E-mail: dixon@stsci.edu, E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-Ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by LTE models at wavelengths longer than Lyman beta, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A, none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s$^2$ 2p$^3$ $^2$D$^0$ and $^2$P$^0$). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon ab...

Dixon, William V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365?nm (3.4?eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240?nm (>5.2?eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

Verma, Jai, E-mail: jverma@nd.edu; Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electronic spectrum of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 near the fermi level from results of numerical calculations and ultraviolet (8.43 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the spectrum of the partial density of filled states of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 in the range E b<4 eV, obtained by ultraviolet (hv=8.43 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy was compared with that...

A. M. Aprelev; A. A. Lisachenko

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Comparative Study of Manufacturing Techniques for Coronagraphic Binary Pupil Masks: Masks on Substrates and Free-Standing Masks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Society for the Promotion of Science, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan...W., Swinyard B. M. Poster presented at IAU Symp...Kalas P. , et al 2008, Science, 322, 1345. Kataza H......

Keigo Enya; Kanae Haze; Takayuki Kotani; Lyu Abe

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

High Mg-content wurtzite MgZnO alloys and their application in deep-ultraviolet light-emitters pumped by accelerated electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Mg-content single-phase wurtzite MgZnO alloys with a bandgap of 4.35?eV have been obtained on sapphire substrate by introducing a composition-gradient Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O buffer layer. By employing the accelerated electrons obtained in a solid-state structure as an excitation source, an emission at around 285?nm, which is originated from the near-band-edge emission of the Mg{sub 0.51}Zn{sub 0.49}O active layer, has been observed. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to high performance deep-ultraviolet light-emitting devices by bypassing the challenging doping issues of wide bandgap semiconductors.

Ni, Pei-Nan [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shan, Chong-Xin, E-mail: shancx@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: shendz@ciomp.ac.cn; Li, Bing-Hui; Shen, De-Zhen, E-mail: shancx@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: shendz@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Spatiotemporal discrimination model predicts temporal masking functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be given a name corresponding to a specific physiological or optica rocessing stage even though the filter

453

Relaxed Energy Outlook Masks Continuing Uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Domestic crude oil production has held up well...million barrels per day (mbd) in 1970...in Alaskan oil production,.from just...back up to its 1973 peak, but the...then-not a bad per-formance...from members of OPEC (Organization...

Hans H. Landsberg

1982-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

454

Behind the mask of the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and indeed all scientists, should rejoice that the advent of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has become a significant cultural event. Dubbed the 'Big Bang machine', the ... jamboree. The most obvious is the temptation for hype and false promises about what the LHC will achieve, as though all the secrets of creation are about to come tumbling ...

Philip Ball

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

455

Creating Precise 3D Microstructures Using Laser Direct-write Bimetallic Thermal Resist Grayscale Photomasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research demonstrated Sn/In and Bi/In bimetallic thermal resists are promising new materials for direct/In bimetallic thermal resists as a masking material, we used a modified form of interference lithographyCreating Precise 3D Microstructures Using Laser Direct-write Bimetallic Thermal Resist Grayscale

Chapman, Glenn H.

456

SINGLE AND DUAL LAYER THIN FILM BULGE TESTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

film windows that are used in Next Generation Lithography masks and certain MEMS devices. The bulge testing method measures the mechanical properties of a thin film by isolating it in a thin film window of the system. Figure 6 Dual Layer Thin Film Membrane Window For a dual layer membrane the effective total

Huston, Dryver R.

457

Bulge testing of single and dual layer thin films Dryver R. Huston*ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a thin film window. By comparing the pressure- displacement relation with a mechanical model, the elastic structures, such as the thin film windows that are used in Next Generation Lithography masks and certain MEMS it in a thin film window. Thin film windows are fabricated by removing the thick substrate out from underneath

Huston, Dryver R.

458

Anisotropic particles align perpendicular to the flow direction in narrow microchannels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microfluidic device is fabricated using optical lithography (27). The microchannel network is designed in AutoCAD 2011 (Autodesk) and printed on a mask foil with a UV-absorbent ink (Zitzmann GmbH). An inverse black and white image of the device design...

Martin Trebbin; Dagmar Steinhauser; Jan Perlich; Adeline Buffet; Stephan V. Roth; Walter Zimmermann; Julian Thiele; Stephan Förster

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Repair of 254 nm ultraviolet-induced (6-4) photoproducts: monoclonal antibody recognition and differential defects in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A, D, and variant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repair kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced (6-4) photoproducts in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A, D, and variant cells were studied by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against (6-4) photoproducts, together with unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and loss of T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (ESS). Group AXP35KO cells completely failed to repair both ESS (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts until tested 24 h after irradiation, and had 2% early-time UDS. Group DXP43KO cells showed about 10% removal of both (6-4) photoproducts and ESS in 24 h, despite showing a residually higher level of 40% early-time and cumulative UDS. Thus, the results substantiated the extreme UV hypersensitivity of XP group A and D cells. However, XP52KO variant cells exhibited the normal level of UDS and ESS loss, but a slightly reduced repair of antibody-recognizing (6-4) photoproducts at 6 and 12 h after irradiation, which may account for a small UV hypersensitivity of the XP variant cells.

Hiramoto, T.; Matsunaga, T.; Ichihashi, M.; Nikaido, O.; Fujiwara, Y.; Mishima, Y. (Kobe Univ. (Japan))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

Zhu, Di [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin (China); Song, Le, E-mail: songle@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Xiong [School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Kajiyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

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