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Sample records for ultrafast physics molecular

  1. New 'Molecular Movie' Reveals Ultrafast Chemistry in Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minitti, Michael

    2015-06-22

    Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled. Ring-shaped molecules are abundant in biochemistry and also form the basis for many drug compounds. The study points the way to a wide range of real-time X-ray studies of gas-based chemical reactions that are vital to biological processes.

  2. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  3. QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of model atoms in fields Milonni, P.W. 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; OPTICAL MODELS; QUANTUM MECHANICS;...

  4. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  5. PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; ELECTRONS; HELIUM; LIGHT SOURCES; RADIATIONS; STORAGE RINGS; SYNCHROTRONS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SYNCHROTRONLIGHT SOURCES QUANTUM CHAOS...

  6. Navigating Space-Time with Ultrafast Exciton Photolithography or

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scintillating Near-fields to Follow Dynamic Processes in Molecular Materials | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Navigating Space-Time with Ultrafast Exciton Photolithography or Scintillating Near-fields to Follow Dynamic Processes in Molecular Materials May 5, 2015 at 4:30pm/ rm: 4-370 Naomi Ginsberg University of California/Department of Chemistry and Physics nsginsberg abstract: A cross-cutting theme in my research group is to examine dynamic processes in spatially-heterogeneous condensed

  7. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  8. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  9. From Ultrafast Electron Transfer to Single Molecule Spectroscopy: Forces Driving Contemporary Themes in Physical Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landes, Christy

    2011-08-28

    The goal of the current proposal is to obtain partial support for an upcoming symposium planned for the Fall 2011 American Chemical Society national meeting. The symposium is designed to honor the deceased senior physical chemist and Department of Energy Principle Investigator, Professor Paul Barbara. The primary use of support from DOE’s Basic Energy Sciences division would be to fund registration for postdoctoral and junior scientists, as well as registration and travel support for principle investigators from Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs). Professor Barbara was particularly adept at mentoring postdoctoral scholars in their transition to independent researchers. DOE support would help to promote the participation of these early career scientists in this symposium. Professor Barbara undertook many projects of considerable importance to the Nation’s energy program; it is hoped that the symposium, beyond honoring him, will also provide an opportunity to discuss the best ways to move forward the unfinished science he initiated with his collaborators.

  10. Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Energetic-Material Ignition Mechanisms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Physics-Based Model Development. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Energetic-Material Ignition Mechanisms: Tools for Physics-Based ...

  11. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tianqi

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  12. MAUI: Modeling, Analysis, and Ultrafast Imaging | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interfaces. Our goal is to integrate ultrafast time-resolved imaging with large-scale molecular dynamics modeling and in situ data analysis and visualization. This will allow...

  13. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation...

  14. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  15. Ultrafast Laser Facility | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

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    Ultrafast Laser Facility Ultrafast Laser Facility Click for an Overview of the Ultrafast Laser Facility The PARC Ultrafast Laser Facility, under the direction of Associate Director ...

  16. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  17. Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour December 10, 2015 Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour A look at the technology and science in the Ultrafast lab PARC Research Scientist ...

  18. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers Authors:...

  19. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Print Because a large proportion of ALS experiments are "physics" experiments, it's useful to separate them into two categories - one focused on Materials/Condensed Matter, and this one, with a dual focus on AMO (atomic, molecular, and optical) physics and accelerator physics. Light sources such as the ALS have opened up research frontiers that may hold the answers to fundamental questions about structure and dynamics in AMO physics. The advanced spectroscopies that

  20. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Wednesday, 22 February 2006 00:00 A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in

  1. Ultrafast studies of solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Callender, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fast chemical dynamics generally must be initiated photochemically. This limits the applicability of modern laser methods for following the structural changes that occur during chemical and biological reactions to those systems that have an electronic chromophore that has a significant yield of photoproduct when excited. This project has developed a new and entirely general approach to ultrafast initiation of reactions in solution: laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump). The results open entire new fields of study of ultrafast molecular dynamics in solution. The authors have demonstrated the T-jump technique on time scales of 50 ps and longer, and have applied it to study of the fast events in protein folding. They find that a general lifetime of alpha-helix formation is ca 100 ns, and that tertiary folds (in apomyoglobin) form in ca 100 {mu}s.

  2. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Print Because a large proportion of ALS experiments are "physics" experiments, it's useful to separate them into two categories - one focused on Materials/Condensed Matter, and this one, with a dual focus on AMO (atomic, molecular, and optical) physics and accelerator physics. Light sources such as the ALS have opened up research frontiers that may hold the answers to fundamental questions about structure and dynamics in AMO physics. The advanced spectroscopies that have been

  3. Spectroscopy of complex molecular systems: Physics on an exciton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials, University of Groningen, Netherlands jknoester Abstract: The concept of ... Physics at the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands, in 1983 and 1987, respectively. ...

  4. Spectroscopy of complex molecular systems: Physics on an exciton cake-walk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics of complex molecular systems: Physics on an exciton cake-walk November 29, 2011 at 3pm/36-428 Jasper Knoester Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Netherlands j_knoester Abstract: The concept of excitons, collective excited states, is well-known in solid-state physics. It was first developed by Frenkel in the 1930's to explain the absorption spectrum of perfect molecular crystals, in which case the excitons are simple Bloch

  5. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science(36) Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Abstract...

  6. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers have recently carried out a range of ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and scattering experiments at three x-ray light sources, including the ALS, to obtain an atomic-level, ...

  7. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print Wednesday, 29 January 2014 00:00 A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other.

  8. Molecular photoionization studies of nucleobases and correlated systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poliakoff, Erwin D.

    2015-03-11

    We proposed molecular photoionization studies in order to probe correlated events in fundamental scattering phenomena. In particular, we suggested that joint theoretical-experimental studies would provide a window into the microscopic aspects that are of central importance in AMO and chemical physics generally, and would generate useful data for wide array of important DOE topics, such as ultrafast dynamics, high harmonic generation, and probes of nonadiabatic processes. The unifying theme is that correlations between electron scattering dynamics and molecular geometry highlight inherently molecular aspects of the photoelectron behavior.

  9. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared Internal Exciton Transitions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared ... Carbon Nanotubes Citation Details In-Document ... Carbon Nanotubes We report a femtosecond midinfrared ...

  10. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  11. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  12. Ultrafast Nanoplasmonics: Toward Coherently Controlled Chemistry at the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time-space Limit | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Ultrafast Nanoplasmonics: Toward Coherently Controlled Chemistry at the Time-space Limit November 3, 2015 at 4:30 PM/ RLE Allen 36-462* Tamar Seideman Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Illinois seideman Electronics has long reached the molecular scale; not only do single-molecule junctions exhibit interesting conduction behaviors that have no analog in macroscopic electronics, they can also be tailored to induce a variety

  13. Physical aspects of the structure and function of helicases as rotary molecular motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2009-11-15

    Helicases were shown to have common physical properties with rotary molecular motors, such as F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and type I restriction-modification (RM) enzymes. The necessary conditions for action of molecular motors are chirality, the presence of the C{sub 2} (or lower) symmetry axis within rather large atomic groups, and polarization properties. The estimates were made for the material parameters of helicases, which translocate DNA due to moving chiral kinks without DNA cleavage and are characterized by higher viscosity, low mobility, and smaller chiral kinetic coefficients than type II RM enzymes. This paper discusses the efficiency of helicases with opposite polarities that drive DNA translocation in opposite directions.

  14. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  15. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  16. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  17. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  18. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  19. Surface modified CFx cathode material for ultrafast discharge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surface modified CFx cathode material for ultrafast discharge and high energy density Prev Next Title: Surface modified CFx cathode material for ultrafast discharge and high...

  20. Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational ...

  1. Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping Capability for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping Capability for CINT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping...

  2. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOepatents Search Results Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope Title: Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope A new ...

  3. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope Title: Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope A new ...

  4. Ultrafast laser diagnostics for studies of shock initiation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast laser diagnostics for studies of shock initiation in energetic materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast laser diagnostics for studies of shock ...

  5. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Authors: ...

  6. Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of interfacial magnetoelectric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of interfacial magnetoelectric coupling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of ...

  7. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast ... This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles ...

  8. Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping Capability for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping Capability for CINT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Laser Fabrication: a Rapid Prototyping ...

  9. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibrandt, D. R. Heidecker, J.

    2015-12-15

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of {sup 27}Al{sup +} in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  10. Phonon-assisted tunneling and two-channel Kondo physics in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias Da Silva, Luis G; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between vibrational modes and Kondo physics is a fundamental aspect of transport properties of correlated molecular conductors. We present theoretical results for a single molecule in the Kondo regime connected to left and right metallic leads, creating the usual coupling to a conduction channel with left-right parity even. A center-of-mass vibrational mode introduces an additional phonon-assisted tunneling through the antisymmetric odd channel. A non-Fermi-liquid fixed point, reminiscent of the two-channel Kondo effect, appears at a critical value of the phonon-mediated coupling strength. Our numerical renormalization-group calculations for this system reveal non-Fermi-liquid behavior at low temperatures over lines of critical points. Signatures of this strongly correlated state are prominent in the thermodynamic properties and in the linear conductance.

  11. Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast...

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    Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast Spectroscopy goes Ultra-Sensitive Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A...

  12. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic ...

  13. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; et al

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  14. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

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    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  15. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  16. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  17. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  18. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  19. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  20. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group (PDG) Organizations American Institute of Physics (AIP) American Physical Society (APS) Institute of Physics (IOP) SPIE - International society for optics and photonics Top...

  1. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  2. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  3. Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics in BiFeO 3 YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 bilayers Authors: Springer, D. ; Nair, Saritha K. ; He, Mi ; Lu, C. L. ; Cheong, S. ...

  4. An ultrafast carbon nanotube terahertz polarisation modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Docherty, Callum J.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Joyce, Hannah J.; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2014-05-28

    We demonstrate ultrafast modulation of terahertz radiation by unaligned optically pumped single-walled carbon nanotubes. Photoexcitation by an ultrafast optical pump pulse induces transient terahertz absorption in nanowires aligned parallel to the optical pump. By controlling the polarisation of the optical pump, we show that terahertz polarisation and modulation can be tuned, allowing sub-picosecond modulation of terahertz radiation. Such speeds suggest potential for semiconductor nanowire devices in terahertz communication technologies.

  5. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Wednesday, 25 April 2012 00:00 Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material

  6. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Our science answers questions about the nature of the universe and delivers solutions for national security concerns. Contact Us Division Leader David Meyerhofer Deputy Division Leader Scott Wilburn Division Office (505) 667-4117 For more than 70 years-from the Manhattan Project to today-Physics Division researchers have been performing groundbreaking fundamental and applied research. For more than 70 years-from the Manhattan Project to today-Physics Division researchers have

  7. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-05-31

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  8. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast ...

  9. Electronic/photonic interfaces for ultrafast data processing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and hybrid integration processes, two key elements of an ultrafast data processor. ... TRANSMISSION; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT Numerical analysis-Data processing.; ...

  10. UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

  11. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1979-September 1980: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inokuti, Mitio; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Dehmer, J. L.; Stockbauer, Roger; Dill, Dan; Parr, A. C.; Jackson, K. H.; Zare, R. N.; Person, J. C.; Nicole, P. P.; Fowler, D. E.; Codling, K.; West, J. B.; Ederer, D. L.; Cole, B. E.; Loomba, D.; Wallace, Scott; Swanson, J. R.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Spence, David; Chupka, W. A.; Stevens, C. M.; Shyn, W. T.; Sharp, W. E.; Kim, Y. K.; Eggarter, E.; Baer, T.; Hanson, J. D.; Shimamura, Isao; Dillon, Michael A.

    1981-09-01

    Research is reported on the physics and chemistry of atoms, ions, and molecules, especially their interactions with external agents such as photons and electrons. Individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. Ultrafast pulse radiolysis using a terawatt laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oulianov, Dmitri A.; Crowell, Robert A.; Gosztola, David J.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Korovyanko, Oleg J.; Rey-de-Castro, Roberto C.

    2007-03-01

    We report ultrafast pulse radiolysis transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy measurements from the Terawatt Ultrafast High Field Facility (TUHFF) at Argonne National Laboratory. TUHFF houses a 20 TW Ti:sapphire laser system that generates 2.5 nC subpicosecond pulses of multi-mega-electron-volt electrons at 10 Hz using laser wakefield acceleration. The system has been specifically optimized for kinetic TA measurements in a pump-probe fashion. This requires averaging over many shots which necessitates stable, reliable generation of electron pulses. The latter were used to generate excess electrons in pulse radiolysis of liquid water and concentrated solutions of perchloric acid. The hydronium ions in the acidic solutions react with the hydrated electrons resulting in the rapid decay of the transient absorbance at 800 nm on the picosecond time scale. Normalization of the TA signal leads to an improvement in the signal to noise ratio by a factor of 5 to 6. Due the pointing instability of the laser this improvement was limited to a 5 to 10 min acquisition period, requiring periodic recalibration and realignment. Time resolution, defined by the rise time of TA signal from hydrated electron in pulse radiolysis of liquid water, of a few picoseconds, has been demonstrated. The current time resolution is determined primarily by the physical dimensions of the sample and the detection sensitivity. Subpicosecond time resolution can be achieved by using thinner samples, more sensitive detection techniques, and improved electron beam quality.

  13. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  14. Ultrafast photodetectors allow direct observation of multiple electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generated by a single photon Ultrafast photodetectors Ultrafast photodetectors allow direct observation of multiple electrons generated by a single photon The new technique involves monitoring photocurrent transients in specially engineered photodetectors that provide very high temporal resolution of only 50 picoseconds. September 11, 2015 Andrew Fidler of Los Alamos National Laboratory examines an ultrafast photodetector used to measure quantum dot carrier multiplication in real time.

  15. Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast excitation triggers a sub-picosecond dynamics exposing the synchronous ... Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ...

  16. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes ...

  17. Ultrafast Structural Rearrangements in the MLCT Excited State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast Structural Rearrangements in the MLCT Excited State for Copper(I) ... previous laser-initiated time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (LITR-XAS) results. ...

  18. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to shock compression in an oxygen-balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock ...

  19. Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Studies of Shock Initiation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Studies of Shock Initiation in Energetic Materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Studies of Shock Initiation in Energetic Materials. ...

  20. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an ...

  1. Ultrafast Shock Initiation of Exothermic Chemistry in Hydrogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shock Initiation of Exothermic Chemistry in Hydrogen Peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Shock Initiation of Exothermic Chemistry in Hydrogen Peroxide ...

  2. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: Materials Science(36) Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full Text View Full ...

  3. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution....

  4. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bismuth doped iron garnet thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron ...

  5. Ultrafast Charge Dynamics Initiated by High-Intensity, Ultrashort...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast Charge Dynamics Initiated by High-Intensity, Ultrashort Laser-Matter Interaction Citation ... We report results of recent experiment in which such charge ...

  6. New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes New Algorithm Enables Faster ... Academy of Sciences, have developed a new real-time time-dependent density function ...

  7. Ultrafast Structural Rearrangements in the MLCT Excited State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Copper(I) bis-Phenanthrolines in Solution Ultrafast excited state structural ... Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of the American Chemical ...

  8. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Urban of the Molecular. Both of these positions involved the application of his laser physics and chemistry knowledge to implement various spectroscopic imaging techniques. ...

  10. Quantum Transport Effects and Coherent Ultrafast Multidimensional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy of Light Harvesting Photosynthetic Complexes | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Transport Effects and Coherent Ultrafast Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Light Harvesting Photosynthetic Complexes March 16, 2010 at 3pm/36-428 Shaul Mukamel Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine shaul_001 abstract: The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. Whether quantum effects persist in the energy transport is

  11. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme

  12. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme

  13. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Peter M.

    2014-03-31

    The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecules structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecules structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of

  14. Intracavity terahertz generation inside a high-energy ultrafast soliton fiber laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthaeus, Gabor; Ortac, Buelend; Limpert, Jens; Nolte, Stefan; Hohmuth, Rico; Voitsch, Martin; Richter, Wolfgang; Pradarutti, Boris; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-12-29

    Intracavity terahertz emission inside a high-energy ultrafast Yb-doped fiber laser is presented. The terahertz radiation is generated by a transient photocurrent induced at the surface of a saturable InGaAs multiquantum well grown by molecular beam epitaxy on top of a semiconductor Bragg reflector. This device simultaneously works as the saturable absorber mirror for initiating and managing the passive mode locking required for the ultrashort pulse operation of the laser system. The maximum terahertz average power achieved is 4.2 {mu}W, which reveals a net conversion efficiency of 3.1x10{sup -5}.

  15. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, C.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  16. Observing Structure and Motion in Molecules with Ultrafast Strong Field and Short Wavelength Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2011-04-13

    The term "molecular movie" has come to describe efforts to track and record Angstrom-scale coherent atomic and electronic motion in a molecule. The relevant time scales for this range cover several orders of magnitude, from sub-femtosecond motion associated with electron-electron correlations, to 100-fs internal vibrations, to multi-picosecond motion associated with the dispersion and quantum revivals of molecular reorientation. Conventional methods of cinematography do not work well in this ultrafast and ultrasmall regime, but stroboscopic "pump and probe" techniques can reveal this motion with high fidelity. This talk will describe some of the methods and recent progress in exciting and controlling this motion, using both laboratory lasers and the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source x-ray free electron laser, and will further try to relate the date to the goal of molecular movies.

  17. Ultrafast transient reflectance of epitaxial semiconducting perovskite thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolin, S. Y.; Guglietta, G. W.; Baxter, J. B. E-mail: smay@coe.drexel.edu; Scafetta, M. D.; May, S. J. E-mail: smay@coe.drexel.edu

    2014-07-14

    Ultrafast pump-probe transient reflectance (TR) spectroscopy was used to study carrier dynamics in an epitaxial perovskite oxide thin film of LaFeO{sub 3} (LFO) with a thickness of 40 unit cells (16?nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (LSAT). TR spectroscopy shows two negative transients in reflectance with local maxima at ?2.5?eV and ?3.5?eV which correspond to two optical transitions in LFO as determined by ellipsometry. The kinetics at these transients were best fit with an exponential decay model with fast (540 ps), medium (?200 ps), and slow (??3?ns) components that we attribute mainly to recombination of photoexcited carriers. Moreover, these reflectance transients did not completely decay within the observable time window, indicating that ?10% of photoexcited carriers exist for at least 3?ns. This work illustrates that TR spectroscopy can be performed on thin (<20?nm) epitaxial oxide films to provide a quantitative understanding of recombination lifetimes, which are important parameters for the potential utilization of perovskite films in photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications.

  18. Apparatus and method for characterizing ultrafast polarization varying optical pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smirl, Arthur; Trebino, Rick P.

    1999-08-10

    Practical techniques are described for characterizing ultrafast potentially ultraweak, ultrashort optical pulses. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of signals from nonlinear optical materials characterization experiments, whose signals are generally too weak for full characterization using conventional techniques.

  19. Ultra-Fast Quantum Efficiency Solar Cell Test - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultra-Fast Quantum Efficiency Solar Cell Test National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Real-Time QE quickly measures how each solar cell responds to ...

  20. New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes Opens the Door for Real-Time Simulations in Atomic-Level Materials Research February 20, 2015 Contact: Rachel Berkowitz, 510-486-7254, rberkowitz@lbl.gov femtosecondalgorithm copy Model of ion (Cl) collision with atomically thin semiconductor (MoSe2). Collision region is shown in blue and zoomed in; red points show initial positions of Cl. The simulation calculates the

  1. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface.

  2. Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of interfacial magnetoelectric coupling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of interfacial magnetoelectric coupling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast all-optical manipulation of interfacial magnetoelectric coupling Authors: Sheu, Yu-Miin [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-04-24 OSTI Identifier: 1129830 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-22829 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos

  3. Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experience at FACET (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is an accelerator R&D test facility that has been recently constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility provides 20 GeV,

  4. An ultrafast silicon nanoplasmonic ballistic triode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greig, S. R. Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2014-12-15

    A nanoscale three terminal silicon based nanoplasmonic triode is proposed as a nanometer transistor. The device is suitable for monolithic integration with complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. Due to the highly spatially inhomogeneous, highly confined nanoplasmonic mode, electrons generated through two-photon absorption in the silicon are ponderomotively accelerated towards the copper anode producing an output current. Application of a negative grid voltage allows for control of the output current. The nanoplasmonic triode is able to achieve output current as high as 628?mA/?m on an ultrafast timescale of 150 fs in a compact footprint of 0.07??m{sup 2}. Reduction of the plasmonic field strength allows for a CMOS compatible current of 11.7?mA/?m. The results demonstrate the potential for the compact optical control of current useful for applications in high-speed, high current switching, and amplification.

  5. Ultrafast carriers dynamics in filled-skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Liang; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.

    2015-06-08

    Carrier dynamics of filled-skutterudites, an important class of thermoelectric materials, is investigated using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. By tuning the wavelength of the probe laser, charge transfers at different electronic energy levels are interrogated. Analysis based on the Kramers-Kronig relation explains the complex spectroscopy data, which is mainly due to band filling caused by photo-excited carriers and free carrier absorption. The relaxation time of hot carriers is found to be about 0.4–0.6 ps, depending on the electronic energy level, and the characteristic time for carrier-phonon equilibrium is about 0.95 ps. These studies of carrier dynamics, which fundamentally determines the transport properties of thermoelectric material, can provide guidance for the design of materials.

  6. Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in TbTe 3 ... Title: Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in ...

  7. Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX...

  8. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the properties of all. In disciplines such as condensed matter or plasma physics, one force often dominates over the others, allowing smaller forces to be neglected in physical...

  9. In the OSTI Collections: Ultrafast Processes | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Ultrafast Processes Article Acknowledgement: Dr. William N. Watson, Physicist DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information Examples of ultrafast chemical and electronic processes Further examples of electronic processes Chemical reactions from shock waves Ultrafast instruments References Research Organizations Reports available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Patent available through OSTI's DOepatents Additional References Because the atoms

  10. A density-functional and molecular-dynamics study on the physical properties of yttrium-doped tantalum oxynitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, H.; Schilling, H.; Lerch, M.; Dronskowski, R. . E-mail: drons@HAL9000.ac.rwth-aachen.de

    2006-08-15

    Fluorite-type phases in the system Y-Ta-O-N have been studied using both first-principle electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamic simulations to validate the structural data and to explain unusual asymmetric reflection profiles observed in the experimental X-ray diffraction patterns. We provide evidence that the compounds may be macroscopically described as to represent cubic fluorite-type defect structures despite the fact that DFT calculations clearly show that all crystallographic unit cells appear as triclinically distorted. Additionally, we find that there is a minute (but hardly significant) tendency for anionic ordering at absolute zero temperature but none under reaction conditions. - Graphical abstract: Structural result of a room-temperature molecular-dynamic simulation of a supercell of Y{sub 0.125}Ta{sub 0.875}O{sub 0.875}N{open_square}{sub 0.125}.

  11. All-Optical Molecular Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oda, Keita; Hita, Masafumi; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    We report clear evidence of all-optical orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules with an intense nonresonant two-color laser field in the adiabatic regime. The technique relies on the combined effects of anisotropic hyperpolarizability interaction and anisotropic polarizability interaction and does not rely on the permanent dipole interaction with an electrostatic field. It is demonstrated that the molecular orientation can be controlled simply by changing the relative phase between the two wavelength fields. The present technique brings researchers a new steering tool of gaseous molecules and will be quite useful in various fields such as electronic stereodynamics in molecules and ultrafast molecular imaging.

  12. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  13. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUD CORE DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) IN CORONA AUSTRALIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.; Sipilae, O.; Hotzel, S.

    2013-01-20

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1, 1-0) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct comparison to the dust component of the cloud core and provide evidence for gas phase depletion of CO at the highest extinctions. The dust color temperature in the core calculated from Herschel maps ranges from roughly 10.7 to 14.0 K. This range agrees with the previous determinations from Infrared Space Observatory and Planck observations. The column density profile of the core can be fitted with a Plummer-like density distribution approaching n(r) {approx} r {sup -2} at large distances. The core structure deviates clearly from a critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Instead, the core appears to be gravitationally bound and to lack thermal and turbulent support against the pressure of the surrounding low-density material: it may therefore be in the process of slow contraction. We test two chemical models and find that a steady-state depletion model agrees with the observed C{sup 18}O column density profile and the observed N(C{sup 18}O) versus A{sub V} relationship.

  14. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  15. LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments:Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, J.; Boutet, S.; Castagna, J-C.; Chapman, H.; Feng, Y.; Foyt, W.; Fritz, D.M.; Gaffney, K.J.; Gr|bel, G.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.B.; Kurita, N.; Larsson, J.; Ludwig, K.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miao, J.; Reis, D.A.; Robert, A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Tschentscher, Th.; van Bakel, N.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /DESY /Lund Inst. Tech. /Boston U. /UCLA /Michigan U. /Argonne

    2007-10-16

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), along with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility, which will operate in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This FEL, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac will be used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons will be transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which will house a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength will be tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS will include two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing three X-ray instruments in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of this new LCLS facility. The technical objective of the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS three hard X-ray instruments that will complement the initial instrument included in the LCLS construction. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation needs to be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The LCLS instrument concepts have been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a

  16. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai; Liang, Linagbo

    2016-05-10

    Here, the success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherentmore » charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanofabrication Our facility strives to gain insight into fundamental nanofabrication processes, as well as the generation of structures that control light, electron, or energy flow, and how those, and other, nanoscale structures interact with light on ultrafast time scales. Measuring plasmonic structures High yield and performance optical transformers are fabricated by nanoimprint lithography for near-field probe and ultra-resolution sub-surface imaging (a). The new ultrafast laser lab uses

  18. Apparatus and method for characterizing ultrafast polarization varying optical pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smirl, A.; Trebino, R.P.

    1999-08-10

    Practical techniques are described for characterizing ultrafast potentially ultraweak, ultrashort optical pulses. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of signals from nonlinear optical materials characterization experiments, whose signals are generally too weak for full characterization using conventional techniques. 2 figs.

  19. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Strmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called molecular movie within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  20. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; et al

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore » the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  1. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other approach is to develop a detector that is fast enough to resolve

  2. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other approach is to develop a detector that is fast enough to resolve

  3. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other approach is to develop a detector that is fast enough to resolve

  4. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the

  5. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other approach is to develop a detector that is fast enough to resolve

  6. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall into Focus Print Studying the world of the ultrasmall and the ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other approach is to develop a detector that is fast enough to resolve

  7. Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Injection Process and Diesel Sprays Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection Process and Diesel Sprays 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions ...

  8. Ultrafast electron transport across nano gaps in nanowire circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-07-31

    In this Program we aim for a closer look at electron transfer through single molecules. To achieve this, we use ultrafast laser pulses to time stamp an electron tunneling event in a molecule that is connected between two metallic electrodes, while reading out the electron current. A key aspect of this project is the use of metallic substrates with plasmonic activity to efficiently manipulate the tunneling probability. The first Phase of this program is concerned with developing highly sensitive tools for the ultrafast optical manipulation of tethered molecules through the evanescent surface field of plasmonic substrates. The second Phase of the program aims to use these tools for exercising control over the electron tunneling probability.

  9. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de

    2015-08-15

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported.

  10. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  11. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide (Conference) | SciTech Connect kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Authors: Armstrong, M R ; Zaug, J M ; Grant, C D ; Crowhurst, J C ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-24 OSTI Identifier: 1149544 Report Number(s):

  12. Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrah, Nora

    2015-10-13

    This grant supported a Single Investigator and Small Group Research (SISGR) application to enable multi-user research in Ultrafast Science using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray free electron laser (FEL) which lased for the first time at 1.5 Å on April 20, 2009. The goal of our proposal was to enable a New Era of Science by requesting funds to purchase and build Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science (AIUS), to utilize the intense, short x-ray pulses produced by the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will allow peer review selected users to probe the ultrasmall and capture the ultrafast. These tools will expand on the investment already made in the construction of the light source and its instrumentation in both the LCLS and LUSI projects. The AIUS will provide researchers in the AMO, Chemical, Biological and Condensed Matter communities with greater flexibility in defining their scientific agenda at the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will complement and significantly augment the present AMO instrument (funded through the LCLS project) through detectors and capabilities not included in the initial suite of instrumentation at the facility. We have built all of the instrumentations and they have been utilized by scientists. Please see report attached.

  13. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone ofmore » only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.« less

  14. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone of only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.

  15. Ultra-fast Laser Synthesis of Nanopore Arrays in Silicon for Bio-molecule Separation and Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, J W; Ileri, N; Letant, S E; Stroeve, P; Shirk, M; Zaidi, S; Balhorn, R L; Siders, C W

    2008-02-07

    We demonstrate that interference of ultra-fast pulses of laser light can create regular patterns in thin silicon membranes that are compatible with the formation of a uniform array of nanopores. The spacing and size of these pores can be tuned by changing the laser energy, wavelength and number of ultra-short pulses. Short pulses and wavelengths ({approx}550 nm and smaller) are needed to define controllable nanoscale features in silicon. Energy must be localized in time and space to produce the etching, ablation or amorphization effects over the {approx}100 nm length scales appropriate for definition of single pores. Although in this brief study pattern uniformity was limited by laser beam quality, a complementary demonstration reported here used continuous-wave interferometric laser exposure of photoresist to show the promise of the ultra-fast approach for producing uniform pore arrays. The diameters of these interferometrically-defined features are significantly more uniform than the diameters of pores in state-of-the-art polycarbonate track etch membranes widely used for molecular separations.

  16. Identification of the dominant photochemical pathways and mechanistic insights to the ultrafast ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 to Fe(CO)4EtOH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Rajkovic, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Beye, M.; Weniger, C.; Grübel, S.; Scholz, M.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2016-02-09

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and ab initio theory to study the transient electronic structure and the photoinduced molecular dynamics of a model metal carbonyl photocatalyst Fe(CO)5 in ethanol solution. We propose mechanistic explanation for the parallel ultrafast intra-molecular spin crossover and ligation of the Fe(CO)4 which are observed following a charge transfer photoexcitation of Fe(CO)5 as reported in our previous study [Wernet et al., Nature 520, 78 (2015)]. We find that branching of the reaction pathway likely happens in the 1A1 state of Fe(CO)4. A sub-picosecond time constant of the spin crossover from 1B2 tomore » 3B2 is rationalized by the proposed 1B2 → 1A1 → 3B2 mechanism. Ultrafast ligation of the 1B2 Fe(CO)4 state is significantly faster than the spin-forbidden and diffusion limited ligation process occurring from the 3B2 Fe(CO)4 ground state that has been observed in the previous studies. We propose that the ultrafast ligation occurs via 1B2 → 1A1 → 1A' Fe(CO)4EtOH pathway and the time scale of the 1A1 Fe(CO)4 state ligation is governed by the solute-solvent collision frequency. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the interaction of molecular excited states with the surrounding environment to explain the relaxation pathways of photoexcited metal carbonyls in solution.« less

  17. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  18. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  19. Driving magnetic order in a manganite by ultrafast lattice excitation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forst, M.; Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Moore, R.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Trigo, M.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Hill, J. P.; Cavalleri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Femtosecond midinfrared pulses are used to directly excite the lattice of the single-layer manganite La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. Magnetic and orbital orders, as measured by femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction with an x-ray free-electron laser, are reduced within a few picoseconds. This effect is interpreted as a displacive exchange quench, a prompt shift in the equilibrium value of the magnetic- and orbital-order parameters after the lattice has been distorted. Control of magnetism through ultrafast lattice excitation may be of use for high-speed optomagnetism.

  20. Ultrafast laser control of backward superfluorescence towards standoff sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-13

    We study infrared backward cooperative emission in a rubidium vapor induced by ultrafast two-photon optical excitations. The laser coherent control of the backward emission is demonstrated by using a pair of 100 fs pulses with a variable time delay. The temporal variation (quantum beat) of the backward beam intensity due to interference of atomic transitions in the rubidium atomic level system 5S-5P-5D is produced and controlled. Based on the obtained experimental results, we discuss possible applications of the developed approach for creation of an effective “guide star” in the sodium atomic layer in the upper atmosphere (mesosphere)

  1. Ultrafast carrier capture in InGaAs quantum posts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbayev, Diyar; Taylor, Antoinette J; Stehr, D; Morris, C M; Wagner, M; Kim, H C; Schneider, H; Petroff, P M; Sherwin, M S

    2009-01-01

    To explore the capture dynamics of photoexcited carriers in semiconductor quantum posts, optical pump - THz probe and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy were performed. The results of the THz experiment show that after ultrafast excitation, electrons relax within a few picoseconds into the quantum posts, which are acting as efficient traps. The saturation of the quantum post states, probed by photoluminescence, was reached approximately at ten times the quantum post density in the samples. The results imply that quantum posts are posts highly attractive nanostructures for future device applications.

  2. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-02-15

    We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. Furthermore, the ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems.

  3. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a super pressing state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  4. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes ofmore » materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.« less

  5. High-Energy and Ultrafast X-Ray Imaging Technologies and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MaRIE High-energy and Ultrafast X-Ray Imaging Technologies and Applications Date : August 2-3, 2016 Hotel venue: Hilton Santa Fe at Buffalo Thunder The goal of this workshop is to gather leading experts in the fields related to ultrafast high-energy photon imaging and prioritize the path forward for ultrafast hard x-ray imaging technology development, identify important applications in the next 5-10 years, and establish foundations for near-term R&D collaboration. This workshop is one in a

  6. High-energy and Ultrafast X-Ray Imaging Technologies and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August » High-energy and Ultrafast X-Ray Imaging Technologies and Applications High-energy and Ultrafast X-Ray Imaging Technologies and Applications WHEN: Aug 02, 2016 8:00 AM - Aug 03, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Hilton Santa Fe at Buffalo Thunder CONTACT: Zhehui (Jeff) Wang (505) 665-5353 CATEGORY: Community Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description The goal of this workshop is to gather leading experts in the fields related to ultrafast high-energy photon imaging and

  7. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  8. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses such as free-electron lasers and slicing sources, which will provide the ultrafast temporal information. The other ...

  9. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  10. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ...

  11. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Appl. Phys. Lett.; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 25 Research ...

  12. Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process and Diesel Sprays | Department of Energy Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection Process and Diesel Sprays Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection Process and Diesel Sprays 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_wang.pdf (980 KB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using

  13. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Authors: Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2015-03-12 OSTI Identifier: 1172825 Report Number(s): LA-UR-15-21802 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: UCRP Country of Publication: United

  14. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials Authors: Shu, Michael J. ; Zalden, Peter ; Chen, Frank ; Weems, Ben ; Chatzakis, Ioannis ; Xiong, Feng ; Jeyasingh, Rakesh ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. ; Pop, Eric ; Wong, H.-S.Philip ; Wuttig, Matthias ; Lindenberg, Aaron M. Publication Date: 2014-07-08 OSTI

  15. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  16. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  17. Ultrafast transient grating radiation to optical image converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, Richard E; Vernon, Stephen P; Steel, Paul T; Lowry, Mark E

    2014-11-04

    A high sensitivity transient grating ultrafast radiation to optical image converter is based on a fixed transmission grating adjacent to a semiconductor substrate. X-rays or optical radiation passing through the fixed transmission grating is thereby modulated and produces a small periodic variation of refractive index or transient grating in the semiconductor through carrier induced refractive index shifts. An optical or infrared probe beam tuned just below the semiconductor band gap is reflected off a high reflectivity mirror on the semiconductor so that it double passes therethrough and interacts with the radiation induced phase grating therein. A small portion of the optical beam is diffracted out of the probe beam by the radiation induced transient grating to become the converted signal that is imaged onto a detector.

  18. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, Darcie; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a two year early career LDRD project, which has focused on the development of ultrafast diagnostics to measure temperature, pressure and chemical change during the shock initiation of energetic materials. We compare two single-shot versions of femtosecond rotational CARS to measure nitrogen temperature: chirped-probe-pulse and ps/fs hybrid CARS thermometry. The applicability of measurements to the combustion of energetic materials will be discussed. We have also demonstrated laser shock and particle velocity measurements in thin film explosives using stretched femtosecond laser pulses. We will discuss preliminary results from Al and PETN thin films. Agreement between our results and previous work will be discussed.

  19. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  20. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X.; Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D.

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  1. Physics Division annual report - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-09-07

    Summaries are given of progress accomplished for the year in the following areas: (1) Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Research; (2) Operation and Development of Atlas; (3) Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics Research; (4) Theoretical Physics Research; and (5) Atomic and Molecular Physics Research.

  2. Ultrafast observation of shocked states in a precompressed material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ... MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

  3. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2015-01-06

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  4. PULSE at Stanford University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging Single-Shot Nanoscale Imaging Ultrafast Chemical Processes Ultrafast Magnetic Switching Contact Us Office of Science/U.S. DOE Ultrafast Center PULSE (Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering) is based on a remarkable new venture at SLAC/Stanford – the construction of the world’s first x-ray free electron

  5. Isotopically Enriched Films and Nanostructures by Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pronko

    2004-12-13

    This project involved a systematic study to apply newly discovered isotopic enrichment effects in laser ablation plumes to the fabrication of isotopically engineered thin films, superlattices, and nanostructures. The approach to this program involved using ultrafast lasers as a method for generating ablated plasmas that have preferentially structured isotopic content in the body of the ablation plasma plumes. In examining these results we have attempted to interpret the observations in terms of a plasma centrifuge process that is driven by the internal electro-magnetic fields of the plasma itself. The research plan involved studying the following phenomena in regard to the ablation plume and the isotopic mass distribution within it: (1) Test basic equations of steady state centrifugal motion in the ablation plasma. (2) Investigate angular distribution of ions in the ablation plasmas. (3) Examine interactions of plasma ions with self-generated magnetic fields. (3) Investigate ion to neutral ratios in the ablation plasmas. (5) Test concepts of plasma pumping. (6) Fabricate isotopically enriched nanostructures.

  6. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  7. Ultrafast band engineering and transient spin currents in antiferromagnetic oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-04-29

    Here, we report a dynamic structure and band engineering strategy with experimental protocols to induce indirect-to-direct band gap transitions and coherently oscillating pure spin-currents in three-dimensional antiferromagnets (AFM) using selective phononic excitations. In the Mott insulator LaTiO3, we show that a photo-induced nonequilibrium phonon mode amplitude destroys the spin and orbitally degenerate ground state, reduces the band gap by 160 meV and renormalizes the carrier masses. The time scale of this process is a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Then in the hole-doped correlated metallic titanate, we show how pure spin-currents can be achieved to yield spin-polarizations exceeding those observed inmore » classic semiconductors. Last, we demonstrate the generality of the approach by applying it to the non-orbitally degenerate AFM CaMnO3. These results advance our understanding of electron-lattice interactions in structures out-of-equilibrium and establish a rational framework for designing dynamic phases that may be exploited in ultrafast optoelectronic and optospintronic devices.« less

  8. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  9. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown...

  10. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waters If you look deeply enough at even the stillest of waters, as deep as the molecular level, you will find a surprisingly turbulent, dynamic universe. The water...

  11. Ultrafast thermionic emission from metal irradiated using a femtosecond laser and an electric field in combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dinan; Chen, Anmin E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn; Jin, Mingxing E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Ultrafast thermionic emission from gold film irradiated with a femtosecond laser pulse in the presence of an additional electric field is analyzed using a two-temperature equation combined with a modified Richardson equation. The calculated results show that the duration of the emission is below 1 ps. Supplying an additional electric field is found to change the emission from the metal surface. Given the same laser fluence, this additional field reduces the work function of the metal, and thus improves the efficiency of thermionic emission. These results help to understand the mechanism and suggest ways to improve emissions in the context of ultrafast thermalized electron systems.

  12. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Laser-induced short-range disorder in aluminum revealed by ultrafast electron diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Jie; Li, Runze; Chen, Long; Cao, Jianming; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie; Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190

    2013-12-02

    We report ultrafast electron diffuse scattering intensity (DSI) measurement in order to study the structural response of aluminum to femtosecond laser excitation. In this measurement, the evolutions of DSI and Bragg peak intensities after the laser excitation are measured and compared in the time domain. Their differences suggest that two kinds of lattice disorder, short-range and long-range, are triggered simultaneously. The former, induced by electron excitation, arises and decays with a faster rate than the latter which is subject to lattice heating. The results presented show that the time-resolved DSI measurements provide complementary insights to the ultrafast diffraction measurements.

  14. Simultaneous investigation of ultrafast structural dynamics and transient electric field by sub-picosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Run-Ze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Long; Chen, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Cao, Jianming

    2014-05-14

    The ultrafast structure dynamics and surface transient electric field, which are concurrently induced by laser excited electrons of an aluminum nanofilm, have been investigated simultaneously by the same transmission electron diffraction patterns. These two processes are found to be significantly different and distinguishable by tracing the time dependent changes of electron diffraction and deflection angles, respectively. This study also provides a practical means to evaluate simultaneously the effect of transient electric field during the study of structural dynamics under low pump fluence by transmission ultrafast electron diffraction.

  15. REVEALING THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR GAS IN ORION WITH A LARGE-SCALE SURVEY IN J = 2-1 LINES OF {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, AND C{sup 18}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Atsushi; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kimura, Kimihiro; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hideo; Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikita-machi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mizuno, Akira [Solar-terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: atsushi.nishimura@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present fully sampled ?3' resolution images of {sup 12}CO(J=2-1), {sup 13}CO(J=2-1), and C{sup 18}O(J=2-1) emission taken with the newly developed 1.85 m millimeter-submillimeter telescope over the entire area of the Orion A and B giant molecular clouds. The data were compared with J=1-0 of the {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O data taken with the Nagoya 4 m telescope and the NANTEN telescope at the same angular resolution to derive the spatial distributions of the physical properties of the molecular gas. We explore the large velocity gradient formalism to determine the gas density and temperature using line combinations of {sup 12}CO(J=2-1), {sup 13}CO(J=2-1), and {sup 13}CO(J=1-0) assuming a uniform velocity gradient and abundance ratio of CO. The derived gas density is in the range of 500 to 5000 cm{sup 3}, and the derived gas temperature is mostly in the range of 20 to 50 K along the cloud ridge with a temperature gradient depending on the distance from the star forming region. We found that the high-temperature region at the cloud edge faces the H II region, indicating that the molecular gas is interacting with the stellar wind and radiation from the massive stars. In addition, we compared the derived gas properties with the young stellar objects distribution obtained with the Spitzer telescope to investigate the relationship between the gas properties and the star formation activity therein. We found that the gas density and star formation efficiency are positively well correlated, indicating that stars form effectively in the dense gas region.

  16. Molecular Dynameomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynameomics Molecular Dynameomics DaggettHiResWhitebg.png Key Challenges: Perform molecular dynamics simulations to characterize both native (i.e. biologically active) and...

  17. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recoverymore » time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.« less

  18. Decoupling Bulk and Surface Contributions in Water- Splitting Photocatalysts by In Situ Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Mingzhao, Liu; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2015-05-10

    By performing ultrafast emission spectroscopy in an operating, bias-controlled photoelectrochemical cell, we distinguish between bulk (charge transport) and surface (chemical reaction) recombination processes in a nanostructured photocatalyst and correlate its electronic properties directly with its incident-photon-to-current efficiency.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  20. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of liquid water: Energy relaxation and transfer processes of the OH stretch and the HOH bend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

    2015-08-27

    The vibrational energy relaxation and transfer processes of the OH stretching and the HOH bending vibrations in liquid water are investigated via the theoretical calculation of the pump-probe spectra obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with the TTM3-F interaction potential. The excitation of the OH stretch induces an instantaneous response of the high frequency librational motions in the 600-1000 cm-1 range. In addition, the excess energy of the OH stretch of a water molecule quickly transfers to the OH stretches of molecules in its first hydration shell with a time constant of ~50 fs, followed by relaxation to the HOH bends of the surrounding molecules with a time constant of 230 fs. The excitation of the HOH bend also results in the ultrafast excitation of the high frequency librational motions. The energy of the excited HOH bend of a water molecule decays, with a time constant of 200 fs, mainly to the relaxation of the HOH bends of its surrounding molecules. The energies of the HOH bends were found to transfer quickly to the intermolecular motions via the coupling with the high frequency librational motions. The excess energy of the OH stretch or the HOH bend relaxes to the high frequency intermolecular librational motions and eventually to the hot ground state with a time scale of ~1 ps via the coupling with the librational and translational motions. The energy relaxation and transfer processes were found to depend on the local hydrogen bonding network; the relaxations of the excess energy of the OH stretch and the HOH bend of four- and five-coordinated molecules are faster than those of a three-coordinated molecule due to the delocalization of the vibrational motions of the former (four- and five-coordinated molecules) compared to those of the later (three-coordinated molecules). The present results highlight the importance of the high frequency intermolecular librational modes in facilitating the ultrafast energy relaxation process in

  2. PHYSICAL SCIENCES, Physics Phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCES, Physics Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome I. M. Vishik, 1, 2 M Hashimoto, 3 R.-H. He, 4 W. S. Lee, 1, 2 F. Schmitt, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. G. Moore, 1...

  3. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMISTRY;...

  4. Ultrafast Terahertz Probes of Interacting Dark Excitons inChirality...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC02-07CH11358 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 114; Journal ...

  5. Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    e.g. fluctuating charge stripes whose role in high-Tc superconductivity is under debate. ... Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS ...

  6. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core...

  7. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATION; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRONS; EVOLUTION; EXPANSION; FOILS; ION ...

  8. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Univ. of Palermo (Italy). Dept. of Physics. Univ. of Grenoble Alpes and Institute of Structural Biology (France) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (Untied ...

  9. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.A., Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, China, 1986-1990 M.S., Theoretical Physics (General relativity and gauge theory), Lanzhou University, China, 1990-1993, Advisor: ...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education 2002 Ph.D., Physics, University College Cork, Ireland 1999 B.Sc., Physics and Mathematics, University College Cork, Ireland Research Interests My research focuses on ...

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike Brady ed_barnard Joint Molecular Foundry/ALS Project Scientist mabrady@lbl.gov 510.486.6548

  13. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  14. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, vol. 118, no. 32, August 14, 2014, pp. ...

  15. Ultrafast Shock Initiation of Exothermic Chemistry in Hydrogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, na, na, October 8, 2013, pp. 13051 Research ...

  16. Ultrafast observation of shocked states in a precompressed material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 108, no. 2, July 27, 2010, pp. 023511 Research ...

  17. Ultrafast Power Processor for Smart Grid Power Module Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAITRA, ARINDAM; LITWIN, RAY; lai, Jason; Syracuse, David

    2012-12-30

    This project’s goal was to increase the switching speed and decrease the losses of the power semiconductor devices and power switch modules necessary to enable Smart Grid energy flow and control equipment such as the Ultra-Fast Power Processor. The primary focus of this project involves exploiting the new silicon-based Super-GTO (SGTO) technology and build on prototype modules already being developed. The prototype super gate-turn-off thyristor (SGTO) has been tested fully under continuously conducting and double-pulse hard-switching conditions for conduction and switching characteristics evaluation. The conduction voltage drop measurement results indicate that SGTO has excellent conduction characteristics despite inconsistency among some prototype devices. Tests were conducted with two conditions: (1) fixed gate voltage and varying anode current condition, and (2) fixed anode current and varying gate voltage condition. The conduction voltage drop is relatively a constant under different gate voltage condition. In terms of voltage drop as a function of the load current, there is a fixed voltage drop about 0.5V under zero current condition, and then the voltage drop is linearly increased with the current. For a 5-kV voltage blocking device that may operate under 2.5-kV condition, the projected voltage drop is less than 2.5 V under 50-A condition, or 0.1%. If the device is adopted in a converter operating under soft-switching condition, then the converter can achieve an ultrahigh efficiency, typically above 99%. The two-pulse switching test results indicate that SGTO switching speed is very fast. The switching loss is relatively low as compared to that of the insulated-gate-bipolar-transistors (IGBTs). A special phenomenon needs to be noted is such a fast switching speed for the high-voltage switching tends to create an unexpected Cdv/dt current, which reduces the turn-on loss because the dv/dt is negative and increases the turn-off loss because the dv/dt is

  18. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, K.J.

    1989-08-01

    This document discusses the following main topics: Research at Atlas; Operation and Development of Atlas; Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics and Weak Interactions; Theoretical Nuclear Physics; Interactions of Fast Atomic and Molecular Ions with Solid and Gaseous Targets; Atomic Physics at Synchrotron Light Sources; Atomic Physics at Atlas and the ECR Source; Theoretical Atomic Physics; High-Resolution Laser-rf Spectroscopy of Atomic and Molecular Beams; and Fast Ion-Beam/Laser Studies of Atomic and Molecular Structure.

  19. Morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes with varying spot size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Polek, M. P.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-04

    We investigated the role of spot size on plume morphology during ultrafast laser ablation of metal targets. Our results show that the spatial features of fs LA plumes are strongly dependent on the focal spot size. Two-dimensional self-emission images showed that the shape of the ultrafast laser ablation plumes changes from spherical to cylindrical with an increasing spot size from 100 to 600 ?m. The changes in plume morphology and internal structures are related to ion emission dynamics from the plasma, where broader angular ion distribution and faster ions are noticed for the smallest spot size used. The present resultsmoreclearly show that the morphological changes in the plume with spot size are independent of laser pulse width.less

  20. Time-domain sampling of x-ray pulses using an ultrafast sample response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R.; Schick, D.; Herzog, M.; Bojahr, A.; Goldshteyn, J.; Navirian, H. A.; Leitenberger, W.; Vrejoiu, I.; Khakhulin, D.; Wulff, M.; Bargheer, M.

    2012-12-10

    We employ the ultrafast response of a 15.4 nm thin SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown epitaxially on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to perform time-domain sampling of an x-ray pulse emitted from a synchrotron storage ring. Excitation of the sample with an ultrashort laser pulse triggers coherent expansion and compression waves in the thin layer, which turn the diffraction efficiency on and off at a fixed Bragg angle during 5 ps. This is significantly shorter than the duration of the synchrotron x-ray pulse of 100 ps. Cross-correlation measurements of the ultrafast sample response and the synchrotron x-ray pulse allow to reconstruct the x-ray pulse shape.

  1. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  2. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong; State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Lattice and Carrier Dynamics in Quantum-Confined Materials on Ultrafast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Timescales | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Lattice and Carrier Dynamics in Quantum-Confined Materials on Ultrafast Timescales April 3, 2014 at 3pm/36-428 Richard Schaller Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Argonne National Laboratory richard-schaller_000 Abstract: Excess carrier energy, which many aim to utilize for advanced energy conversion technologies, rapidly dissipates from electrons and holes in both bulk and quantum confined semiconductors despite expectation of

  4. Physics Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as Institute of Physics Fellow January 18, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 18, ... simulation, and computation, has been selected as a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. ...

  5. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  6. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Theoretical Physics Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get ... HEP Theory at Los Alamos The Theoretical High Energy Physics group at ...

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS Subatomic Microscopy Key to Building New Classes of Materials Molecular Foundry users from Penn State University and Cornell University have worked with staff to describe the first atomic scale evidence for strain-induced ferroelectricity in a layered oxide. [MORE] Molecular Foundry User Featured in MIT's Technology Review Cyclotron Road's Kendra Kuhl Featured in '35 Innovators Under 35' for 2016. [MORE] Foundry Fall Seminar Series Begins September 13 The next Molecular Foundry seminar

  8. Physics Division annual review, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, W.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report contains brief discusses on topics in the following areas: Research at atlas; operation and development of atlas; medium-energy nuclear physics and weak interactions; theoretical nuclear physics; and atomic and molecular physics research.

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branden Brough Branden Director of Strategy and External Relations bbrough@lbl.gov 510.486.4206 Biography Branden Brough is the Molecular Foundry's Director of Strategy and...

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Molecular Foundry as a Scientific Engineering Associate since 2007. Expertise Tracy's main focus is assisting users with their research projects (helping design reactions ...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu's research aims to achieve coherent control of functionality and properties across different scales through molecular level design and synthesis. With the developed materials ...

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources, as well as lasers that can be used in total internal reflectance mode (TIRF). ... to aid in work with biomolecules, microbes, molecular biology techniques and cell culture. ...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Guide Download the complete Users' Guide (PDF) Submit a Proposal Learn about the Molecular Foundry and its user program Explore Foundry capabilities and plan your proposal...

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility RLGarcia@lbl.gov 510.486.4125 Biography Education B.A. Molecular Biology, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, 2005 Previous Professional Positions Principal...

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flatter and Faster: Transition Metal Dichalcogendies at the Molecular Foundry (Part II) Brain Imaging and Optical Manipulation Active Nanointerfaces for Electrochemistry SAXS-WAXS...

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dmitry Soustin dmitry User Program Administrator dsoustin@lbl.gov 510.486.7687 Biography Dmitry Soustin is the Molecular Foundry's User Program Administrator. In this role, Dmitry...

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory of Nanostructured Materials jbneaton@lbl.gov 510.486.4527 personal website Biography Jeffrey B. Neaton is Director of the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy...

  18. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda March 24, 2016 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory AGENDA Registration 8:30 am - 9:00 am The Molecular Foundry's History and Impact 9:00 am - 10:30 am Jeff Neaton, Molecular Foundry Welcome Paul Alivisatos, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley The Creation of the Molecular Foundry Michael Witherell, Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Impact Brian Schowengerdt, Magic Leap Industry Impact Representative Mike Honda (D-CA) National Impact Break 10:30 am - 11:00 am Session 1: Functional Nanointerfaces 11:00 am -

  20. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  1. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang; EFree Staff

    2011-05-01

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  2. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang (Director, Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments); EFree Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic understanding of this nature is required to achieve the mission of the Molecular Foundry, the atomic-level design, creation and control of energy-relevant materials. My group ...

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seminars occur on Tuesdays at 11:00 am, in Building 67, Room 3111 unless otherwise noted. To be added to the Molecular Foundry's seminar mailing list, please email Jason Sweet. ...

  5. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meg Holm Meg Senior Administrator mcholm@lbl.gov 510.486.5135 Biography Meg is the Molecular Foundry's Senior Administrator. In this role, she supervises the Foundry budget...

  6. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alison Hatt allison User Program Director ajhatt@lbl.gov 510.486.7154 Biography Alison Hatt is the Director of the User Program at the Molecular Foundry and a former Foundry...

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gil Torres Gil Torres gjtorres@lbl.gov 510.486.4395 Biography Gil is the Building Manager for MSD in buildings 62, 66, 2, 30, JCAP and the Molecular Foundry. Gil supports Foundry...

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    natural sciences and his habilitation in physics performing spectroscopic studies on defects in semiconductors at the University of Cologne, Germany in 1985 and 1990, respectively. ...

  9. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures afweber-bargioni@lbl.gov 510.486.4026 personal website Biography Education University of Konstanz, Germany Physics B.S., ...

  10. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Physics World Webinar March 26 event will focus on recent advances in nanoscale etching and atomic layer deposition, featuring the Foundry's Deirdre Olynick and Kim Lee from...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microfabrication techniques including physical and chemical vapor deposition, chemical etching, and optical and electron beam lithography. He is also proficient in analysis...

  12. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab; Professor of Physics UC Berkeley 66 Auditorium 9:30 am Keynote Address The BRAIN Initiative and Nanoscience abstract Ralph Greenspan Director, Center for Brain...

  13. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry Molecular Foundry HOME REGISTRATION AGENDA SYMPOSIA POSTERS EXHIBITOR INFO TRAVEL & LODGING Molecular Foundry User Meeting: August 11-12, 2016 This conference focuses on frontier research topics in nanoscale science, providing a forum for discussion and development of new results and ideas. Whether you are a returning user, a prospective user, or someone who is curious about the Foundry, you are encouraged to attend the User Meeting. Participants are invited to submit abstracts for

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media and Resources MEDIA Molecular Foundry Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Youtube Channel Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Webcam The Molecular Foundry and its users benefit from its location at Berkeley Lab within the Bay Area's vibrant scientific ecosystem. The expansive views serve to fuel the imagination and build connections among the Foundry's diverse research community. Baycam Click here for a full screen view from our webcam. RESOURCES Style Guide PDF 308 KB Logos Signature Preferred 41 KB ZIP

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Advanced Materials Special Issue » The Molecular Foundry publication database lists peer-reviewed work that has resulted from internal and user research. New publications can be added to the database here. All published work resulting from the use of this facility must acknowledge the Molecular Foundry, regardless of whether Foundry staff are included as authors. Proper acknowledgement text can be found here. Citation Year Facility User Loading data from server

  17. Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang

    2006-10-07

    A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

  18. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  19. Differential ultrafast all-optical switching of the resonances of a micropillar cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thyrrestrup, Henri Yce, Emre; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Claudon, Julien; Grard, Jean-Michel

    2014-09-15

    We perform frequency- and time-resolved all-optical switching of a GaAs-AlAs micropillar cavity using an ultrafast pump-probe setup. The switching is achieved by two-photon excitation of free carriers. We track the cavity resonances in time with a high frequency resolution. The pillar modes exhibit simultaneous frequency shifts, albeit with markedly different maximum switching amplitudes and relaxation dynamics. These differences stem from the non-uniformity of the free carrier density in the micropillar, and are well understood by taking into account the spatial distribution of injected free carriers, their spatial diffusion and surface recombination at micropillar sidewalls.

  20. Ultrafast spectroscopy of super high frequency mechanical modes of doubly clamped beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ristow, Oliver; Merklein, Moritz; Grossmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Barretto, Elaine C. S.; Grebing, Jochen; Erbe, Artur; Mounier, Denis; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2013-12-02

    We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to study the mechanical vibrations in the time domain of doubly clamped silicon nitride beams. Beams with two different clamping conditions are investigated. Finite element method calculations are performed to analyse the mode spectra of both structures. By calculating the strain integral on the surface of the resonators, we are able to reproduce the effect of the detection mechanism and identify all the measured modes. We show that our spectroscopy technique combined with our modelling tools allow the investigation of several different modes in the super high frequency range (3-30?GHz) and above, bringing more information about the vibration modes of nanomechanical resonators.

  1. Ultrafast dynamics of liquid water: Frequency fluctuations of the OH stretch and the HOH bend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

    2013-07-28

    Frequency fluctuations of the OH stretch and the HOH bend in liquid water are reported from the third-order response function evaluated using the TTM3-F potential for water. The simulated two-dimensional infrared (IR) spectra of the OH stretch are similar to previously reported theoretical results. The present study suggests that the frequency fluctuation of the HOH bend is faster than that of the OH stretch. The ultrafast loss of the frequency correlation of the HOH bend is due to the strong couplings with the OH stretch as well as the intermolecular hydrogen bond bend.

  2. Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX Authors: Zaug, J M ; Armstrong, M R ; Crowhurst, J C ; Feranti, L ; Swan, R ; Gross, R ; Teshlich, N E ; Wall, M ; Austin, R A ; Fried, L E Publication Date: 2014-06-30 OSTI Identifier: 1149550 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-656341 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  3. Ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in GaAs: Separation of surface and bulk contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Christian B. Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Bieler, Mark; Tarasenko, Sergey A.

    2015-04-06

    We induce ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in a GaAs crystal employing interband excitation with femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature and non-invasively separate surface and bulk contributions to the overall current response. The separation between the different symmetry contributions is achieved by measuring the simultaneously emitted terahertz radiation for different sample orientations. Excitation intensity and photon energy dependences of the magneto-photocurrents for linearly and circularly polarized excitations reveal an involvement of different microscopic origins, one of which is the inverse spin Hall effect. Our experiments are important for a better understanding of the complex momentum-space carrier dynamics in magnetic fields.

  4. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  5. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  6. Physics and Chemistry of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Physics and Chemistry of Materials Developing new science and technologies needed for the national security of the United States by understanding how basic forces operating at the atomic level manifest themselves in the properties of matter at the macroscopic level. Molecular docking simulations The influence of small organic molecules on the operation and mechanism of electron transfer in enzymatic anodes. Molecular docking simulations The influence of small organic molecules on the operation

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Research Themes Discovering the Future, Atom by Atom The six-story, 94,000 square-foot Molecular Foundry building at LBNL overlooks the UC Berkeley campus and, from a distance, the San Francisco Bay. Directly adjacent to the Foundry is the NCEM complex that was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron microscopy with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. Merged with the Molecular Foundry in 2014 to take advantage of

  8. Capturing ultrafast photoinduced local structural distortions of BiFeO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, Haidan; Sassi, Michel JPC; Luo, Zhenlin; Adamo, Carolina; Schlom, Darrell; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zhang, Xiaoyi

    2015-10-14

    The interaction of light with materials is an intensively studied research forefront, in which the coupling of radiation energy to selective degrees of freedom offers contact-free tuning of functionalities on ultrafast time scales. Capturing the fundamental processes and understanding the mechanism of photoinduced structural rearrangement are essential to applications such as photo-active actuators and efficient photovoltaic devices. Using ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy aided by density functional theory calculations, we reveal the local structural arrangement around the transition metal atom in a unit cell of the photoferroelectric archetype BiFeO3 film. The out-of-plane elongation of the unit cell is accompanied by themore » in-plane shrinkage with minimal change of interaxial lattice angles upon photoexcitation. This uniaxial elastic deformation of the unit cell is driven by localized electric field as a result of photoinduced charge separation, in contrast to a global lattice constant increase and lattice angle variations as a result of heating. The finding of a photoinduced elastic unit cell deformation elucidates a microscopic picture of photocarrier-mediated nonequilibrium processes in polar materials.« less

  9. Direct observation of a photoinduced Wolff rearrangement in PMMA using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippert, T.; Koskelo, A.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1996-02-14

    As part of a program to develop diagnostics for laser-driven reaction in polymer matrices, we have investigated the photoinduced decomposition of 5-diazo-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (5-diazo Meldrum`s acid, DM) in a PMMA matrix. This particular diazoketone is sensitive to deep UV (200-260nm), making it suitable for high-resolution lithographic applications. It has historically been difficult to study the chemistry of such resists as many of the intermediates are short-lived and absorb only in the UV. Recent advances in ultrafast infrared spectroscopy, however, now allow us to directly examine the initial steps occurring in UV photoresists with infrared spectroscopy. Herein, we describe the first room temperature observation of intermediates in the photochemistry of DM with utlrafast infrared spectroscopy. In summary, these experiments have provided the first example of how ultrafast infrared spectroscopy may be used to examine laser-driven reactions in polymeric matrices. We have determined that the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement of DM in a PMMA matrix is complete within 20 ps. The IR band assignable to the ketene is centered at 2161 cm{sup -1} and has a width of 29 cm{sup -1}. The rapid formation of the ketene is a key element of the high quantum yield of carboxylic acid formation and a key element as well for the use of DM as an ablation sensitizer. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Capturing ultrafast photoinduced local structural distortions of BiFeO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Haidan; Sassi, Michel JPC; Luo, Zhenlin; Adamo, Carolina; Schlom, Darrell; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zhang, Xiaoyi

    2015-10-14

    The interaction of light with materials is an intensively studied research forefront, in which the coupling of radiation energy to selective degrees of freedom offers contact-free tuning of functionalities on ultrafast time scales. Capturing the fundamental processes and understanding the mechanism of photoinduced structural rearrangement are essential to applications such as photo-active actuators and efficient photovoltaic devices. Using ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy aided by density functional theory calculations, we reveal the local structural arrangement around the transition metal atom in a unit cell of the photoferroelectric archetype BiFeO3 film. The out-of-plane elongation of the unit cell is accompanied by the in-plane shrinkage with minimal change of interaxial lattice angles upon photoexcitation. This uniaxial elastic deformation of the unit cell is driven by localized electric field as a result of photoinduced charge separation, in contrast to a global lattice constant increase and lattice angle variations as a result of heating. The finding of a photoinduced elastic unit cell deformation elucidates a microscopic picture of photocarrier-mediated nonequilibrium processes in polar materials.