Sample records for ultimate ranking score

  1. Empirical Evidence for the Relevance of Fractional Scoring in the Calculation of Percentile Rank Scores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional scoring has been proposed to avoid inconsistencies in the attribution of publications to percentile rank classes. Uncertainties and ambiguities in the evaluation of percentile ranks can be demonstrated most easily with small datasets. But for larger datasets an often large number of papers with the same citation count leads to the same uncertainties and ambiguities which can be avoided by fractional scoring. This is demonstrated for four different empirical datasets with several thousand publications each which are assigned to 6 percentile rank classes. Only by utilizing fractional scoring the total score of all papers exactly reproduces the theoretical value in each case.

  2. Percentile rank scores are congruous indicators of relative performance, or aren't they?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousseau, Ronald

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Percentile ranks and the I3 indicator were introduced by Bornmann, Leydesdorff, Mutz and Opthof. These two notions are based on the concept of percentiles (or quantiles) for discrete data. As several definitions for these notions exist we propose one that we think is suitable in this context. Next we show that if the notion of relative congruous indicators is carefully defined then percentile rank scores are congruous indicators of relative performance. The I3 indicator is a strictly congruous indicator of absolute performance.

  3. Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel A 10 1 NE/L011328/1 Christopher Davies University of Leeds A New Energy Budget for Earth's Core and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel Rethinking carbonate diagenesis: clues to past carbon cycling from an overlooked carbon sink IRF OCT13 Panel of Criegee Biradical Chemistry IRF OCT13 Panel B 8 3 NE/L011166/1 James Brearley NERC British Antarctic

  4. Ranking Outlier Nodes in Subspaces of Attributed Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antwerpen, Universiteit

    . Our graph outlier ranking (GOutRank) introduces scoring functions based on these selected subgraphs by looking at the most promising objects first. They 1http://www.ipd.kit.edu/~muellere/GOutRank/ allow users

  5. Ultimate Energy Densities for Electromagnetic Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate electric and magnetic energy densities that can be attained by bandlimited electromagnetic pulses in free space are calculated using an ab initio quantized treatment, and the quantum states of electromagnetic fields that achieve the ultimate energy densities are derived. The ultimate energy densities also provide an experimentally accessible metric for the degree of localization of polychromatic photons.

  6. Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo integration cycle Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates The Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate DeviceV Thermo Scientific MAT 253 or the 3-kV DELTA V isotope ratio mass spectrometer meets the requirements

  7. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate...

  8. Evaluating ranking methods on heterogeneous digital library collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canévet, Olivier; Marian, Ludmila; Chonavel, Thierry

    In the frame of research in particle physics, CERN has been developing its own web-based software /Invenio/ to run the digital library of all the documents related to CERN and fundamental physics. The documents (articles, photos, news, thesis, ...) can be retrieved through a search engine. The results matching the query of the user can be displayed in several ways: sorted by latest first, author, title and also ranked by word similarity. The purpose of this project is to study and implement a new ranking method in Invenio: distributed-ranking (D-Rank). This method aims at aggregating several ranking scores coming from different ranking methods into a new score. In addition to query-related scores such as word similarity, the goal of the work is to take into account non-query-related scores such as citations, journal impact factor and in particular scores related to the document access frequency in the database. The idea is that for two equally query-relevant documents, if one has been more downloaded for inst...

  9. Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

  10. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  11. Top-K Queries on Uncertain Data: On Score Distribution and Typical Answers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Tingjian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertain data arises in a number of domains, including data integration and sensor networks. Top-k queries that rank results according to some user-defined score are an important tool for exploring large uncertain data ...

  12. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  13. Ultimate Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSOdatabase[1]Ultimate Biofuels

  14. Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and New Scoring Tool Release Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text-alternative version of...

  15. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Guide to journal rankings 1. What are journal rankings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCusker, Guy

    Opus Guide to journal rankings 1. What are journal rankings? Journal rankings are metrics that provide information on how a journal performs in comparison with other journals in the same discipline. Articles in high impact journals are more likely to be cited. Good citation counts are often considered

  17. Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade Find Mřlholt Jensen Risř-PhD-34(EN) ISBN 978 2008 #12;#12;Author: Find Mřlholt Jensen Title: Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction

  18. Ris-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines Gunner Chr. Larsen, Knut Ronold, Hans E analysis as well as a wind turbine reliability study. In the wind climate analysis, the distribution to analyse wind turbine components with respect to failure in ultimate loading, and in addition to establish

  19. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  20. Astronomy Ranking Task: Stellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Cloud of Gas and Dust C Neutron Star I White Dwarf D Supernova Type II J Black Hole E Nothing K Supernova Type I F Giant L Nova M Gravity Collapse of Gas/Dust Cloud A) Ranking Instructions: Rank, from

  1. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (and-eventually, spray ponds) that are proposed to be used as ultimate heat sinks in nuclear power plant emergency core cooling systems. The need is derived from the concern...

  2. Predicting sports scoring dynamics with restoration and anti-persistence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peel, Leto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professional team sports provide an excellent domain for studying the dynamics of social competitions. These games are constructed with simple, well-defined rules and payoffs that admit a high-dimensional set of possible actions and nontrivial scoring dynamics. The resulting gameplay and efforts to predict its evolution are the object of great interest to both sports professionals and enthusiasts. In this paper, we consider two online prediction problems for team sports:~given a partially observed game Who will score next? and ultimately Who will win? We present novel interpretable generative models of within-game scoring that allow for dependence on lead size (restoration) and on the last team to score (anti-persistence). We then apply these models to comprehensive within-game scoring data for four sports leagues over a ten year period. By assessing these models' relative goodness-of-fit we shed new light on the underlying mechanisms driving the observed scoring dynamics of each sport. Furthermore, in both p...

  3. PageRank of integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Frahm; A. D. Chepelianskii; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We build up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers.

  4. The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology Editorial overview to provide a landscape of current research at the interface between outstanding ecological questions to the biotechnologist for mining enzymatic activities from unusual environments. It is a fact that, despite many

  5. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Virginia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  6. Robust Rankings for College Football

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 11, 2011 ... tournament at the end of a season to determine the best team (or national champion). ?Department of Management Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, ... practice. One such method, which is one of six computer rankings used ...... inconsequential set I. One could also manually choose a completely ...

  7. POLYTOPES OF MINIMUM POSITIVE SEMIDEFINITE RANK 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    M ? rank M. In Exam- ple 2.3 we saw that the first inequality may be strict. We now ..... Let Si denote the ith row of SP . Since rank SP = n+ 1, we have ? n+2.

  8. Energy Performance Score Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program. Energy Performance Score Report example More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Sample Report Be a Smart and Engaged Homeowner Building America Best...

  9. Investor Pitch Scoring Rubric Team: _______________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Investor Pitch Scoring Rubric Team: _______________________________ Judge, 2=fair, 1=poor WHY YOU? Does the individual or team have the ability, skills, and passion or production of a prototype, does someone on the team have the skill to do it? 5 4 3 2 1 Team in place, all

  10. The Continuous Ranked Probability Score for Circular Variables and its Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    D Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) pro- gram administered by the Office of Naval Research under direction mit- ig

  11. Coal rank trends in eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of coal rank (by vitrinite maximum reflectance) for eastern Kentucky coals has revealed several regional trends. Coal rank varies from high volatile C (0.5% R/sub max/) to medium volatile bituminous (1.1% R/sub max/), and generally increases to the southeast. One east-west-trending rank high and at least four north-south-trending rank highs interrupt the regional increase. The east-west-trending rank high is associated with the Kentucky River faults in northeastern Kentucky. It is the only rank high clearly associated with a fault zone. The four north-south-trending rank highs are parallel with portions of major tectonic features such as the Eastern Kentucky syncline. Overall, though, the association of north-south-trending rank highs with tectonic expression is not as marked as that with the anomaly associated with the Kentucky River faults. It is possible that the rank trends are related to basement features with subdued surface expression. Rank generally increases with depth, and regional trends observed in one coal are also seen in overlying and underlying coals. The cause of the regional southeastward increase in rank is likely to be the combined influence of greater depth of burial and proximity to late Paleozoic orogenic activity. The anomalous trends could be due to increased depth of burial, but are more likely to have resulted from tectonic activity along faults and basement discontinuities. The thermal disturbances necessary to increase the coal rank need not have been great, perhaps on the order of 10-20/sup 0/C (18-36/sup 0/F) above the metamorphic temperatures of the lower rank coals.

  12. Proceedings of the EPA workshop on the environmental scoring of chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Welch, J. (comps.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental scoring of chemicals is viewed by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a tool to assist in the ranking or ordering of the universe of chemicals that are under the jurisdiction of the Toxic Substances Control Act. The purpose of scoring is to identify most of the chemicals that have a high probability for requiring review for regulation or testing. This report describes a three-day workshop held in Washington, DC, August 13 to 15, 1979, to develop an environmental scoring system. Initial discussions centered on the determination of a safety factor (calculated as the concentration at which an effect is observed divided by environmental concentration) that would allow a numerical score to be assigned to a chemical to reflect its potential hazard. Further discussion, however, indicated that the environmental concentration of a chemical is usually not available and that the estimation of an environmental concentration is not readily accomplished; therefore, a scoring system was developed that does not require environmental concentrations. This system relates environmental exposure to toxicity by using a multiplier (3x, 2x, or 1x) which is assigned on the basis of the concentration xt which an effect is observed. The applicability of the scoring system is demonstrated by scoring selected chemicals.

  13. RANK-SPARSITY INCOHERENCE FOR MATRIX DECOMPOSITION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2009 ... nuclear norm of the components. We develop a notion of rank-sparsity incoherence, expressed as an uncertainty principle between the sparsity ...

  14. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Asset Scoring Tool will guide your data collection, store your building information, and generate Asset Scores and system evaluations for your building envelope and building systems. The Asset...

  15. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE conducted its first pilot test of the Asset Score in 2012. Findings from that pilot led to improvements in the overall program and the Asset Scoring Tool. The tool was updated to include the...

  16. Top for economics Rank Business School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Top for economics Rank Business School 1 University of Chicago: Booth Rutgers Business School University of Toronto: Rotman Cranfield School of Management University of California at Irvine: Merage University of Rochester: Simon Columbia/London Business School 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Rank Business School 1

  17. (psd) rank of a nonnegative matrix w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    at least k and we pose the problem of deciding whether the psd rank is exactly k. Using geometry ... referred to as the psd rank of P) is exactly the smallest k such that P is the linear image of an ..... References. [1] J. Bochnak, M. Coste, M. Roy.

  18. Universal Emergence of PageRank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Frahm; B. Georgeot; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The PageRank algorithm enables to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter $\\alpha \\in ]0,1[$. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of PageRank vector at its emergence when $\\alpha \\rightarrow 1$. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For $ \\alpha \\rightarrow 1$ the PageRank converges to a universal power law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at $ \\alpha \\rightarrow 1$ is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix which are extremely close to unity leading to large relaxation times as for example in spin glasses.

  19. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Score: 2013 Pilot Overview Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview provides an overview of the 2013 pilot for the commercial building energy asset score...

  20. TVA Partner Utilities- eScore Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in partnership with local electric utilities offers eScore program, which provides homeowners financial incentives to increase the energy efficiency of existing...

  1. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  2. Provable Low-Rank Tensor Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2014 ... rank, which here we refer to as the sum-of-nuclear-norms (SNN), has been proposed in [23] and serves as a tractable measure of the tensor ...

  3. Penalty Decomposition Methods for Rank Minimization ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 22, 2010 ... In Section 2, we establish some technical results on a class of rank minimization ..... Without loss of generality, assume that {( ŻZk. X,. Ż. Zk ...... Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, 2009.

  4. CALIBRATION, COHERENCE, AND SCORING RULES* TEDDY SEIDENFELDt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    CALIBRATION, COHERENCE, AND SCORING RULES* TEDDY SEIDENFELDt Department of Philosophy Washington, I focus on one such aspirant: calibration. Cal- ibration requires an alignment of announced: (i) Surveys designed to display calibration curves, from which a recalibration is to be calculated

  5. What's the Score? Matrices, Documents, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    What's the Score? Matrices, Documents, and Queries Dianne P. O'Leary1 You have just been given and alternatives. 1 This case study is a supplement to Scientific Computing with Case Studies, Dianne P. O'Leary

  6. Age effects in L2 acquisition: ultimate attainment at the syntax-morphology interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Paulina

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a selective overview of studies that have examined age effects in second language (L2) acquisition. The focus was on adult second language learners and the L2 ultimate attainment at syntax-interface morphology, with particular...

  7. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  8. Computational Enhancements in Low-Rank Semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 12, 2004 ... ?Department of Management Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, .... Moreover, it has been observed in practice that the ... do not suggest that one particular version of the low-rank algorithm is best for all problem ...... Scientific Library Reference Manual, second edition. http://www.gnu.org/software/.

  9. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,370.00 0.32 72 ft3 solid rad waste; 35 gal of mixed waste; 108 gal of haz waste; 324 ft3 of rad DIS waste 6Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 waste 2 Replacement of Mercury Thermometers Basic Energy Sciences, Condensed Matter Physics & Material

  10. The generating rank of the symplectic grassmannians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blok, Rieuwert J.

    . Blok Department of Mathematics and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 U and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 Tel.: +1 (419) 372-7455 FAX : +1 (419) 372, the generating rank of a geometry equals the dimension of the universal embedding of that geometry, if it exists

  11. Link Analysis Ranking Algorithms, Theory, and Experiments #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    and the widespread accessibility of the Web has led to surge of research activity in the area of information retrieval on the World Wide Web. The seminal papers of Kleinberg [31], and Brin and Page [9] introduced Link Analysis Ranking, where hyperlink structures are used to determine the relative authority of a Web page

  12. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste 2 Motion Lights Energy Sciences & Technology, EENS (Dave Elling) $3,200 $7,000.00 0.46 Energy Light Source, NSLS (John Aloi) $1,500 $5,200.00 0.29 200 gallons corrosive waste 6 Electronic RecyclingRank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

  13. HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems Mark F. Adamsmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. HPLmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. When

  14. Quantifier rank spectrum of L-infinity-omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Nathaniel Leedom

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Part A we will study the quantifier rank spectrum of sentences of L!1,!. We will show that there are scattered sentences with models of arbitrarily high but bounded quantifier rank. We will also consider the case of ...

  15. Graded Relevance Ranking for Synonym Discovery Andrew Yates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the pointwise mutual information (PMI) between the 16-term windows that a given pair of terms appear in. When used to rank synonym candidates, this method ranks them by the PMI between a target term and each

  16. Building Energy Asset Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 Building America Update - November 13, 2014Innovations

  17. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Frequently Asked Questions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Frequently Asked Questions Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Frequently Asked Questions The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Commercial Building Energy Asset Score program...

  18. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Real Estate and Design Professionals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score Webinar Slides: Real Estate and Design Professionals The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  19. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Energy Efficiency Services Companies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score Webinar Slides: Energy Efficiency Services Companies The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  20. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory One of the primary market...

  1. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update The webinar was held on April 16, 2014, to share the findings...

  2. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface slides from June 14,...

  3. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training Session Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training Session overview of the June 18, 2013 pilot training session for the...

  4. Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score Program, Building Technologies Office What are the key facts? Home Energy Score is a free tool from the Department of Energy that provides an energy...

  5. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Credential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Credential Requirements for Assessors...

  6. Commercial Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Informatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information: February 2013 webinar Commercial Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information: February 2013 webinar...

  7. Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Beth

    Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews Northwestern University September 7, 2011 Abstract We consider a rank-based technique for estimating GARCH model parameters, some of which are scale transformations of conventional GARCH parameters. The estimators are obtained by minimizing a rank-based residual

  8. Clustering with the Fisher Score Koji Tsuda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    clustering with the Fisher score, K-Means type methods are obviously inappropriate because they make use such as biological sequences [2] are especially challenging, because efficient clustering algorithms e.g. K-Means [6 of unnecessary nuisance dimensions. So K-Means type clustering [6] is obviously inappropriate because it takes

  9. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Web Service (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Geoffrey; Wang, Na

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Documentation of the DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score application programming interface (API).

  10. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abalin, S. S.; Alekseev, P. N.; Ignat'ev, V. V.; Kolyaskin, O. E.; Men'shikov, L. I.; Mostovoi, V. I.; Prusakov, V. N.; Subbotin, S. A.; Krasnykh, A. K.; Popov, Yu. P.; Rudenko, V. T.; Somov, L. N.; Dikansky, N. S.; Novokhatsky, A. V.; Dovbnia, A. N. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kharkov Physical Technical Institute, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the ''ultimate safety reactor'' using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R and D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  11. Predicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis of AE signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on ``testing'' the real structure rather than trying to model it. Experiments on reinforced concrete (RC) beamsPredicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis the unloading and loading phases of a cycle test and it showed a clear correlation with the bending failure load

  12. he mobile world depends on lithium-ion batteries --today's ultimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    T he mobile world depends on lithium- ion batteries -- today's ultimate rechargeable energy store -- a performance roughly on a par with the best Li-ion batteries. His batteries are based on lithium­sulphur (Li is applied to reverse the electron flow, which also drives the lithium ions back. In a Li­S battery

  13. Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible Energy Source" John D. Moody, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" " Presented to: MIT ­ PSFC IAP 2014" " January 15, 2014" This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

  14. The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*. Tools difficult macromolecule to analyse. Now it is possible to determine the nucleotide sequence at a rate of several hundred nucleotide a day. (August 2005: 1011 bases) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; = 0.283 #12

  15. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment of EnergyNoticeFacility Risk Ranking

  16. Ranking forestry journals using the h-index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanclay, Jerome K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert ranking of forestry journals was compared with journal impact factors and h-indices computed from ISI and internet-based data. Citations reported by Google Scholar appear to offer the most efficient way to rank all journals objectively, in a manner consistent with other indicators. A ranking of 180 forestry journals is presented, on the basis of an h-index computed from data supplied by Google Scholar.

  17. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

  18. Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

  19. ALGEBRAS OF REAL RANK ZERO M. Dadarlat and G. Gong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sweeping conjecture of Elliott asserts that the simple nuclear C*-algebras ... The results available so far suggest that the nuclear C*-algebras of real rank.

  20. Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingchen Kong

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix ...

  1. Finding approximately rank-one submatrices with the nuclear norm ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a convex optimization formulation with the nuclear norm and l1-norm to find a large approximately rank-one submatrix of a given nonnegative matrix ...

  2. Finding approximately rank-one submatrices with the nuclear norm ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 8, 2010 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the nuclear norm and $\\ell_1$-norm to find a large approximately rank-one ...

  3. RECOVERING LOW-RANK AND SPARSE COMPONENTS OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 31, 2009 ... a convex relaxation problem where the widely-acknowledged nuclear norm and l1 norm are utilized to induce low-rank and sparsity.

  4. SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... is -hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix variable. In this paper, we extend the ...

  5. SPARSE AND LOW-RANK MATRIX DECOMPOSITION VIA ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    relaxation problem where the l1 norm and the nuclear norm are utilized for being surrogates of the sparsity and low-rank. Numerically, this convex relaxation ...

  6. Lowest-rank Solutions of Continuous and Discrete Lyapunov ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziyan Luo

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Abstract: The low-rank solutions of continuous and discrete Lyapunov equations are of great importance but generally difficult to achieve in ...

  7. An automated scoring system for educational testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verret, Erik Phillip

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accurately and quickly. . . . Unless the whole program is care- fully planned, there is danger that the scoring of tests will be allowed to drag over a period of several months until the faculty and administration, as well as the students, have , 3 lost... for Develop- ment of Computer Test Grading and Computer Naintained Course Gradebook", p. l. 3 Grossman, Alvin and Howe, Robert L. , Data Processin for Educators, pp. 152-153. 4 Op. cit. , Hedges and Hope, p. 2. Associate Professor of Chemistry. When...

  8. Home Energy Scoring Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation HessHirschmannScoring Tool Jump to:

  9. Analysis of Various Pumping Methods With Respect to the Lowest Achievable Ultimate Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Ganapati; Rao Myneni, Ganapati; Favale, Anthony; Poelker, Benard; Stutzman, Marcy

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Labzs CEBAF Accelerator Facility uses most of the currently available vacuum pumping systems for its successful operations.These vacuum systems include turbo, ion, NEG and cryo pumps.The theoretical lowest pressure obtainable with these pumps is different and also the effective pumping speeds of all these pumps at lowest pressures are likely to vary depending on the prevailing conditions. Consequently, the ultimate pressure of a given vacuum system pumped by each of the above mentioned pumps could be expected to vary under the same operating conditions. In this paper the results of the analysis of above pumps with respect to their lowest achievable ultimate pressures are presented.z This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

  10. INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score .11In class clicker score .02Lecture: · Correlations with effort/curricular elements are positive but not high, indicating no individual course reform

  11. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The new Home Energy Score pilot program provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The program also offers...

  12. Results from large scale ultimate strength tests of K-braced jacket frame structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolt, H.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 2 of the JIP Frames Project included four large scale collapse tests of K-braced frames in which both gap and overlap K joints were the critical components. The results are presented in this paper. The local failure modes differed from typical isolated component tests, yet were representative of structural damage observed following Hurricane Andrew. The frame test results therefore provide important insight to the ultimate response of offshore jacket structures.

  13. Pearson's Goodness of Fit Statistic as a Score Test Statistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Pearson's Goodness of Fit Statistic as a Score Test Statistic Gordon K. Smyth Abstract For any generalized linear model, the Pearson goodness of fit statistic is the score test statistic for testing and the residual deviance is therefore the relationship between the score test and the likelihood ratio test

  14. An Analysis of the Relationship between Principal Employment Interview Scores and the Achievement Scores of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostmeyer, Susan

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRINCIPAL EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW SCORES AND THE ACHIEVEMENT SCORES OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES BY SUSAN S. OSTMEYER Submitted to the graduate degree program in Educational Leadership... for SUSAN S. OSTMEYER certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: AN ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRINCIPAL EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW SCORES AND THE ACHIEVEMENT SCORES OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES...

  15. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  16. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  17. KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR \\Lambda Eduardo D. Sontag y SYCON was identified by Kalman as one of the cen­ tral properties determining system behavior. His simple rank assumptions were needed in establishing results on optimal control. However, it was not until Kalman's work

  18. KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    KALMAN'S CONTROLLABILITY RANK CONDITION: FROM LINEAR TO NONLINEAR Eduardo D. Sontag SYCON was identified by Kalman as one of the cen- tral properties determining system behavior. His simple rank assumptions were needed in establishing results on optimal control. However, it was not until Kalman's work

  19. Distribution of ranks of ?-decay half-lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Miguel Campanario

    2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I studied the distribution of ranks of values of 2949 {\\beta}-decay half-lives according to an empirical beta law with two exponents. {\\beta}-decay half-life ranks showed good fit to a beta function with two exponents.

  20. A fast, constantorder, symbol ranking text Peter Fenwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenwick, Peter

    capable of efficient hardware implementation. The compressor is based on a conventional setA fast, constant­order, symbol ranking text compressor Peter Fenwick Technical Report 145 ISSN 1173, New Zealand peter­f@cs.auckland.ac.nz Abstract Recent work on ``symbol ranking'' text compressors

  1. SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN RANK-ONE PERTURBATION PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poltoratski, Alexei

    SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN RANK-ONE PERTURBATION PROBLEMS with changing boundary condition. The general question of perturbation theory can be stated as follows the effect of rank-one perturbations on the asymptotics of the so-called survival probability. This notion

  2. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  3. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2) the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks; and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scores representing expert opinions or general information available from published materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate the three basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites. Application of the framework to the Rio Visa Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or model results in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improve the approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and tested by colleagues and collaborators.

  4. Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roppel, Thaddeus A.

    Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

  5. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  6. Automated aortic calcium scoring on low-dose chest computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isgum, Ivana; Rutten, Annemarieke; Prokop, Mathias; Staring, Marius; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Viergever, Max A.; Ginneken, Bram van [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans provide information about cardiovascular risk status. These scans are non-ECG synchronized, thus precise quantification of coronary calcifications is difficult. Aortic calcium scoring is less sensitive to cardiac motion, so it is an alternative to coronary calcium scoring as an indicator of cardiovascular risk. The authors developed and evaluated a computer-aided system for automatic detection and quantification of aortic calcifications in low-dose noncontrast-enhanced chest CT. Methods: The system was trained and tested on scans from participants of a lung cancer screening trial. A total of 433 low-dose, non-ECG-synchronized, noncontrast-enhanced 16 detector row examinations of the chest was randomly divided into 340 training and 93 test data sets. A first observer manually identified aortic calcifications on training and test scans. A second observer did the same on the test scans only. First, a multiatlas-based segmentation method was developed to delineate the aorta. Segmented volume was thresholded and potential calcifications (candidate objects) were extracted by three-dimensional connected component labeling. Due to image resolution and noise, in rare cases extracted candidate objects were connected to the spine. They were separated into a part outside and parts inside the aorta, and only the latter was further analyzed. All candidate objects were represented by 63 features describing their size, position, and texture. Subsequently, a two-stage classification with a selection of features and k-nearest neighbor classifiers was performed. Based on the detected aortic calcifications, total calcium volume score was determined for each subject. Results: The computer system correctly detected, on the average, 945 mm{sup 3} out of 965 mm{sup 3} (97.9%) calcified plaque volume in the aorta with an average of 64 mm{sup 3} of false positive volume per scan. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was {rho}=0.960 between the system and the first observer compared to {rho}=0.961 between the two observers. Conclusions: Automatic calcium scoring in the aorta thus appears feasible with good correlation between manual and automatic scoring.

  7. The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

  8. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy...

  9. TEST ARTICLE 3: Energy Department Updates Home Energy Scoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department's Building Technologies Office and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The Home Energy Score allows homebuyers to compare homes on an "apples-to-apples"...

  10. Energy Department Updates Home Energy Scoring Tool for Advancing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department's Building Technologies Office and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The Home Energy Score allows homebuyers to compare homes on an "apples to apples"...

  11. El Paso Electric Company- SCORE Plus Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The El Paso Electric (EPE) SCORE Plus Program is designed to help participants identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and to provide monetary incentives...

  12. Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Home Accomplishments History Better Buildings Partners Stories Interviews Videos Contact Us...

  13. Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Applied Physics Letters Astronomy & Astrophysics Astronomy and Astrophysics Review Astrophysical Journal European Physical Journal D. Atomic, Molecular

  14. On Equivalence Relationships Between Classification and Ranking Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    We demonstrate that there are machine learning algorithms that can achieve success for two separate tasks simultaneously, namely the tasks of classification and bipartite ranking. This means that advantages gained from ...

  15. Canada's top-ranked digestive health research institute opens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    network Canada's top-ranked digestive health research institute opens McMaster innovates the grand opening of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute. The creation of this unique

  16. Linear rank inequalities on five or more variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Randall; Zeger, Kenneth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ranks of subspaces of vector spaces satisfy all linear inequalities satisfied by entropies (including the standard Shannon inequalities) and an additional inequality due to Ingleton. It is known that the Shannon and Ingleton inequalities generate all such linear rank inequalities on up to four variables, but it has been an open question whether additional inequalities hold for the case of five or more variables. Here we give a list of 24 inequalities which, together with the Shannon and Ingleton inequalities, generate all linear rank inequalities on five variables. We also give a partial list of linear rank inequalities on six variables and general results which produce such inequalities on an arbitrary number of variables; we prove that there are essentially new inequalities at each number of variables beyond four (a result also proved recently by Kinser).

  17. Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels Re-direct Destination: A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum...

  18. Ranks of Elliptic Curves via Class Groups of Number Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    state-of-the art methods to compute the rank assuming there is no rational point of order ... p /? S of K, we have valuation ordp : K ?? Kp ? Z ? {?}. If L is a ...

  19. 2011-12 At A Glance RANKINGS & RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    " Civil Engineering"" " " 10 " Environmental Engineering" " 5 " Construction Management" " 4 " Computer Science & Engineering" 1 " Environmental Science & Engineering" 1 ALUMNI " 11,686 since 1914 FACULT Y2011-12 At A Glance RANKINGS & RECOGNITION Top Engineering Schools for Hispanics (Hispanic Business

  20. Low-rank matrix completion via preconditioned optimization on the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 20, 2015 ... Meyer et al. [28] and Absil et al. [3] propose a few quotient geometries for the manifold of fixed-rank matrices. In recent work, Mishra et al.

  1. Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com SECRET PLANS -Eagles of Death Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SECRET PLANS - Eagles of Death Metal It Secret Plans Midnight missions Wheels in motion Hoo Hoo Secret Plans Midnight mission With emotion Hou

  2. Ranking, Labeling, and Summarizing Short Text in Social Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khabiri, Elham

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    to do a better research. His motivation and suggestions were always with me through the completion of my PhD. Without his continuous help and support this work would not have been possible. Many thanks to my lab-mates for their support and much... KL- divergence means more discriminative power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 5.14 Compare PageRank with available graph based methods (Mead and LexRank). Higher NDCG is more desirable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.15 Compare the tf -idf...

  3. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  4. Lessons Learned in the Challenge: Making Predictions and Scoring Them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suomela, Jukka

    Lessons Learned in the Challenge: Making Predictions and Scoring Them Jukka Kohonen and Jukka.suomela@cs.helsinki.fi Abstract. In this paper we present lessons learned in the Evaluating Predictive Uncertainty Challenge. We probability score (CRPS). 1 Introduction In this paper we present lessons learned in the Evaluating Predictive

  5. Click Efficiency: A Unified Optimal Ranking for Online Ads and Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Raju

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally the probabilistic ranking principle is used to rank the search results while the ranking based on expected profits is used for paid placement of ads. These rankings try to maximize the expected utilities based on the user click models. Recent empirical analysis on search engine logs suggests a unified click models for both ranked ads and search results. The segregated view of document and ad rankings does not consider this commonality. Further, the used models consider parameters of (i) probability of the user abandoning browsing results (ii) perceived relevance of result snippets. But how to consider them for improved ranking is unknown currently. In this paper, we propose a generalized ranking function---namely "Click Efficiency (CE)"---for documents and ads based on empirically proven user click models. The ranking considers parameters (i) and (ii) above, optimal and has the same time complexity as sorting. To exploit its generality, we examine the reduced forms of CE ranking under different ...

  6. Men open with No.8 ranked Trinity Western PRINCE GEORGE, BC -The men's soccer team will open at home with CIS No.8 ranked team, the Trinity Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Men open with No.8 ranked Trinity Western PRINCE GEORGE, BC - The men's soccer team will open at home with CIS No.8 ranked team, the Trinity Western Spartans. Kickoff is set for 2:15 p.m. Sept. 22 into their first CIS home opener taking on the No.8 CIS ranked team, the Trinity Western Spartans. The stakes

  7. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zoi, Cathy

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Acting Under Secretary Cathy Zoi talks about the new Home Energy Score pilot program that was announced today by Vice President Biden and U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The report also includes customized, cost-effective recommendations that will help to reduce their energy costs and improve the comfort of their homes.

  8. Using Lotkaian Informetrics for Ranking in Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaer, Philipp

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to propose the use of models, theories and laws in bibliometrics and scientometrics to enhance information retrieval processes, especially ranking. A common pattern in many man-made data sets is Lotka's Law which follows the well-known power-law distributions. These informetric distributions can be used to give an alternative order to large and scattered result sets and can be applied as a new ranking mechanism. The polyrepresentation of information in Digital Library systems is used to enhance the retrieval quality, to overcome the drawbacks of the typical term-based ranking approaches and to enable users to explore retrieved document sets from a different perspective.

  9. Accounting for the Uncertainty in the Evaluation of Percentile Ranks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper entitled "Inconsistencies of Recently Proposed Citation Impact Indicators and how to Avoid Them," Schreiber (2012, at arXiv:1202.3861) proposed (i) a method to assess tied ranks consistently and (ii) fractional attribution to percentile ranks in the case of relatively small samples (e.g., for n percentile rank classes used in the Science and Engineering Indicators of the U.S. National Science Board, and thus missed, in my opinion, the point that fractional attribution at the level of hundred percentiles-or equivalently quantiles as the continuous random variable-is only a linear, and therefore much less complex problem. Given the quantile-values, the non-linear a...

  10. PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chakhmakhchyan; D. Shepelyansky

    2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks, generated by the intermittency map and the typical Chirikov map. The Ulam networks generated by these maps have certain similarities with such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW), showing an algebraic decay of the PageRank probability. We find that the opinion formation process on Ulam networks have certain similarities but also distinct features comparing to the WWW. We attribute these distinctions to internal differences in network structure of the Ulam and WWW networks. We also analyze the process of opinion formation in the frame of generalized Sznajd model which protects opinion of small communities.

  11. Enhancing Invenio Digital Library With An External Relevance Ranking Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauner, Patrick Oliver

    Invenio is a comprehensive web-based free digital library software suite originally developed at CERN. In order to improve its information retrieval and word similarity ranking capabilities, the goal of this thesis is to enhance Invenio by bridging it with modern external information retrieval systems. In the first part a comparison of various information retrieval systems such as Solr and Xapian is made. In the second part a system-independent bridge for word similarity ranking is designed and implemented. Subsequently, Solr and Xapian are integrated in Invenio via adapters to the bridge. In the third part scalability tests are performed. Finally, a future outlook is briefly discussed.

  12. Rank-ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chang; Cheng-chin Wu

    2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method that is both physically explicable and quantitatively accurate in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events based on groupings of rank-ordered fluctuations. The generic nature of such rank-ordered spectrum leads it to a natural connection with the concept of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. We demonstrate this technique using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. The calculated spectrum suggests a crossover from the near Gaussian characteristics of small amplitude fluctuations to the extreme intermittent state of large rare events.

  13. The application of soft X-ray microscopy to the in-situ analysis of sporopollenin/sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wirick, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft X-ray imaging and carbon near edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS) has been used for the in-situ analysis of sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments extending from recent up to high volatile A bituminous coal. The acquisition of chemically based images (contrast based on the 1s - 1{pi}* transition of unsaturated carbon), revealed a homogeneous chemical structure in the spore exine. C-NEXAFS microanalysis indicates chemical structural evolution in sporopollenin/sporinite with increases in maturation. The most significant change in the C-NEXAFS spectrum is an increase in unsaturated carbon, presumably aromatic, with rank. The rate of aromatization in sporinite exceeds that of the surrounding vitrinite. Increases in the concentration of unsaturated carbon are compensated by losses of aliphatic and hydroxylated aliphatic carbon components. Carboxyl groups are present in low and variable concentrations. Absorption due to carboxyl persists in the most mature specimen in this series, a high volatile A rank coal. The reactions which drive sporopollenin chemical structural evolution during diagenesis presumably involve dehydration, Diels-Alder cyclo-addition, and dehydrogenation reactions which ultimately lead to a progressively aromatized bio/geopolymer.

  14. AEP (Central, SWEPCO and North)- SCORE Program for Schools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SCORE Program is designed to help K-12 public schools identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and to provide monetary incentives to help implement the...

  15. New Training Tool Broadens Pool of Home Energy Score Assessors...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessors February 5, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis Today, DOE announced the release of the Home Energy Score Simulation Training, a new online simulation tool that provides free,...

  16. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to use the data collection sheet, but it will tell you what you need to collect. But in terms of, I think they were asking how do we evaluate the data? Well, the Score is generated...

  17. CenterPoint Energy- SCORE and CitySmart Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SCORE Program is a market transformation program offered to K-12 school districts and higher education customers in the CenterPoint Energy, Inc. electric distribution service territory. The...

  18. Can we do without ranks in Burrows Wheeler transform compression?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Tony

    Wirth ¡ and Alistair Moffat ¢ Abstract: Compressors based on the Burrows Wheeler transform (BWT) convert of inefficiency. Instead of relying on symbol ranking, we examine the problem of directly encoding the symbols-based compressors. ¤ This work was supported by the Australian Research Council.¥ Department of Computer Science

  19. The blowup formula for higher rank Donaldson invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, Lucas Howard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study the relationship between the higher rank Donaldson invariants of a smooth 4-manifold X and the invariants of its blowup X#CP2 . This relationship can be expressed in terms of a formal power series ...

  20. Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yi

    Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering-qualified candidates with background in areas related to reactor power engineering and other nuclear applications

  1. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  2. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  3. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

  4. SampleRank: Training Factor Graphs with Atomic Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Andrew

    a user-provided loss function to distribute stochastic gradients across an MCMC chain. As a result, parameter updates can be computed between arbitrary MCMC states. Sam- pleRank is not only faster than CD- expensive gradients between the ground-truth and samples along an MCMC chain yielding a stochastic

  5. Lignites and Low Rank Coals Conference: Proceedings 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI and the Technische Vereinigung des Grosskraftswerkbetreiber (Technical Association of Large Power Plant Operators) (VGB) jointly held a Conference on Lignites and Low Rank Coals in Wiesbaden, Germany, May 16-18, 2001. These Proceedings include the plenary papers, technical session papers, and rapporteurs' summaries from the conference.

  6. Reduced-rank Vector Generalized Linear Models Thomas W. Yee,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    . Keywords: Canonical correspondence analysis; Linear discriminant analysis; Neural networks; Non- parametric the reduced-rank regression idea has been applied to non-Gaussian errors is the MLM. This was proposed such as neural networks, projection pursuit regression, linear discriminant analysis, canonical correspondence

  7. High School Math Contest Rankings November 16, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    2013 High School Math Contest Rankings November 16, 2013 Sweepstakes Sweepstakes Points School School of Advancement Isil Nal fourth 50 Quail Valley Middle School Isil Nal Fifth 49 Whatley Home School Willaim Whatley Sixth 43 Westwood High School Zheng Chen seventh 28 LASA Sarah Harrelson Eighth 27

  8. Multiple Faculty Positions, All Ranks Materials Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Faculty Positions, All Ranks Materials Science and Engineering Texas A&M University The interdisciplinary Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University invites applications. Applicants must have an earned doctorate in materials science and engineering or an appropriate, closely

  9. Scalable K-Means by Ranked Retrieval Andrei Broder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Scalable K-Means by Ranked Retrieval Andrei Broder Google 1600 Amphitheater Parkway Mountain View@google.com Srihari Venkatesan xAd 440 North Wolfe Road Sunnyvale, CA 94085 ABSTRACT The k-means clustering algorithm, a prohibitive cost when the number of clusters is large. In this paper we show how to reduce the cost of the k-means

  10. RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION OVER NUMBER FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION OVER NUMBER FIELDS JOHAN BOSMAN, PETER BRUIN of all elliptic curves over quadratic fields with torsion subgroup T is empty, or it contains curves number fields. More explicitly, we will be interested in the following question: given a torsion group

  11. AVERAGE RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES: TENSION BETWEEN DATA AND CONJECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    curves of conductor X} converge as X tends to infinity, and if so, what is the limit P = lim X PAVERAGE RANKS OF ELLIPTIC CURVES: TENSION BETWEEN DATA AND CONJECTURE BAUR BEKTEMIROV, BARRY MAZUR, and · to list them in order of increasing conductor, banking on the theorem that tells us that there are only

  12. Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion , Chaoqiang Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion Hui Ji , Chaoqiang Liu , Zuowei Shen video denoising algorithms assume a sin- gle statistical model of image noise, e.g. additive Gaussian white noise, which often is violated in practice. In this pa- per, we present a new patch-based video

  13. The PowerRank Web Link Analysis Algorithm , Benyu Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    , P.R. China {byzhang, zhengc, wyma}@microsoft.com 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State MN E r InD M n > > . 2) Suppose P denotes the markov matrix of the web, xk denotes the score vector

  14. Proximate and Ultimate Compositional Changes in Corn Stover during Torrefaction using Thermogravimetric Analyzer and Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The world is currently aiming to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is considered carbon neutral because the carbon dioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle. Increasing the use of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol. Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes, including thermochemical (direct combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation), or chemical (esterification) technologies. There are lot challenges in using biomass for energy applications. To name few low bulk density, high moisture content, irregular size and shape, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value. In commercial scale operation large quantities of biomass are needed and this will create problems associated with storage and transportation. Furthermore, grinding raw biomass with high moisture content is very challenging as there are no specific equipments and can increase the costs and in some cases it becomes highly impossible. All of these drawbacks led to development of some pretreatment techniques to make biomass more suitable for fuel applications. One of the promising techniques is torrefaction. Torrefaction is heating the biomass in an inert environment or reduced environment. During torrefaction biomass losses moisture, becomes more brittle and with increased energy density values. There are different techniques used for torrefaction of biomass. Fixed bed, bubbling sand bed and moving bed are the most common ones used. The use of microwaves for torrefaction purposes has not been explored. In the present study we looked into the torrefaction of biomass using the regular and microwaves and their effect on proximate and ultimate composition. Studies indicated that microwave torrefaction is a good way to torrefy the biomass in short periods of time. A maximum calorific value of 21 MJ/kg is achievable at 6 min residence time compared to 15 min using the dry torrefaction technique. Increasing the residence time increased the carbon content where a maximum carbon content of 52.20 % was achievable at lower residence time. The loss of volatiles is comparatively lower compared to dry torrefaction technique. Moisture content of microwave torrefied samples was in between 2-2.5 % (w.b).

  15. Analog Rank-Order Filter using multiple-winners-take-all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dake, Luthuli Edem

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an analog VLSI Rank Order Filter (ROF), capable of ranking a wide array of inputs. Implementation is achieved using two multiple-winners-take-all blocks that compute in parallel. Simulation and experimental results show good speed...

  16. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy February 6, 2015 - 4:18pm Addthis...

  17. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergy Efficiency andAnnualEnergy

  18. Finitely Generated Rank-Ordered Sets as a Model for Type: Dieter Spreen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spreen, Dieter

    by ESPRIT BRA 7232 1 #12;Rank-preserving functions are such that each approximation of a function value

  19. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  20. Efficient and Secure Ranked Multi-Keyword Search on Encrypted Cloud Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Efficient and Secure Ranked Multi-Keyword Search on Encrypted Cloud Data Cengiz Ă?rencik Faculty and reveal information about sensitive search terms. A related protocol, Private Information Retrieval (PIR-preserving ranked keyword search scheme based on PIR that allows multi-keyword queries with rank- ing capability

  1. Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianguo

    Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method Jianguo Lu Preprint submitted to Elsevier March 12, 2010 #12;Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture, Canada. email: jlu@uwindsor.ca Abstract Many deep web data sources are ranked data sources, i

  2. Elliptic curves with large torsion and positive rank over number fields of small degree and ECM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    Elliptic curves with large torsion and positive rank over number fields of small degree and ECM for construction of elliptic curves with large torsion group and positive rank over number fields of small degree). Keywords: Torsion group, rank, elliptic curves, number fields Mathematics Subject Classification (2010): 11

  3. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  4. Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) for Bayesian uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurko, J. P.; Buongiorno, J. [MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagating parameter uncertainty for a nuclear reactor system code is a challenging problem due to often non-linear system response to the numerous parameters involved and lengthy computational times; issues that compound when a statistical sampling procedure is adopted, since the code must be run many times. The number of parameters sampled must therefore be limited to as few as possible that still accurately characterize the uncertainty in the system response. A Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) was developed to accomplish this goal. The QPIRT consists of two steps: a 'Top-Down' step focusing on identifying the dominant physical phenomena controlling the system response, and a 'Bottom-Up' step which focuses on determining the correlations from those key physical phenomena that significantly contribute to the response uncertainty. The Top-Down step evaluates phenomena using the governing equations of the system code at nominal parameter values, providing a 'fast' screening step. The Bottom-Up step then analyzes the correlations and models for the phenomena identified from the Top-Down step to find which parameters to sample. The QPIRT, through the Top-Down and Bottom-Up steps thus provides a systematic approach to determining the limited set of physically relevant parameters that influence the uncertainty of the system response. This strategy was demonstrated through an application to the RELAP5-based analysis of a PWR Total Loss of main Feedwater Flow (TLOFW) accident, also known as feed and bleed' scenario, . Ultimately, this work is the first component in a larger task of building a calibrated uncertainty propagation framework. The QPIRT is an essential piece because the uncertainty of those selected parameters will be calibrated to data from both Separate and Integral Effect Tests (SETs and IETs). Therefore the system response uncertainty will incorporate the knowledge gained from the database of past large IETs. (authors)

  5. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, J.P.; Ochoa, E.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  6. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, Jan P. (West Lafayette, IN); Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed.

  7. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  8. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  9. Percentile Ranks and the Integrated Impact Indicator (I3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested Rousseau's (in press) recent proposal to define percentile classes in the case of the Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) so that the largest number in a set always belongs to the highest (100th) percentile rank class. In the case a set of nine uncited papers and one with citation, however, the uncited papers would all be placed in the 90th percentile rank. A lowly-cited document set would thus be advantaged when compared with a highly-cited one. Notwithstanding our reservations, we extended the program for computing I3 in Web-of-Science data (at http://www.leydesdorff.net/software/i3) with this option; the quantiles without a correction are now the default. As Rousseau mentions, excellence indicators (e.g., the top-10%) can be considered as special cases of I3: only two percentile rank classes are distinguished for the evaluation. Both excellence and impact indicators can be tested statistically using the z-test for independent proportions.

  10. SCORE: a Scalable Concolic Testing Tool for Reliable Embedded Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an automated fashion. One main task of concolic testing is to extract symbolic in- formation from a concrete cases in an automated manner. An alternative approach, concolic (CONCrete + symbOLIC) [17] testing (alsoSCORE: a Scalable Concolic Testing Tool for Reliable Embedded Software Yunho Kim and Moonzoo Kim

  11. comScore Networks 2007 1 10 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web 1 Web 21 comScore Networks 2007 1 10 1 Web Web Web Web Web Web Web Deep Web Web Web Web 2 Web Web Web Deep web, word email 2.1 [1] 1 Excel 2 "" 11 #12; 3Pay-as-you-go 4 5 Pay-as-you-go 2.2 Web Web RDBMS web 1 Dataspace web

  12. Building Statistical Models and Scoring with UDFs Carlos Ordonez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordonez, Carlos

    77204, USA ABSTRACT Multidimensional statistical models are generally computed outside a relational DBMS are computed inside the DBMS in a single table scan exploiting SQL and User-Defined Functions (UDFs into the Teradata DBMS. Two major database processing tasks are discussed: building a model and scoring a data set

  13. The Estimation of Statistical Parameters for Local Alignment Score Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894 2 Department. Altschul 1 , Ralf Bundschuh 2 , Rolf Olsen 2 and Terence Hwa 2 1 National Center for Biotechnology Abstract The distribution of optimal local alignment scores of random sequences plays a vital role

  14. Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

  15. Ranking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou

    printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrieval is essential scanners, 3D printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrievalRanking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model

  16. Ranking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou

    printers,... ­ User generated. T i bl 3D h· Trimble 3D warehouse... 3D model retrieval is essentialRanking on Cross Domain Manifold forRanking on Cross-Domain Manifold for Sketch-based 3D model Retrieval Takahiko FuruyaRyutarou Ohbuchi University of Yamanashi #12;IntroductionIntroduction 3D models

  17. Low-rank-coal study national needs for resource development. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, Dr., Martin A.; Hill, George R.; Jonakin, James; Crutchfield, Paul W.; Severson, Donald E.; White, David M.; Yeager, Kurt

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-rank coals - lignite and subbituminous - are those which have been subjected to the least amount of metamorphic change during the coal-forming process. As such, they retain greater fractions of moisture and volatile matter from the original peat material, and contain less fixed carbon, than the high-rank coals - bituminous and anthracite. The primary measure used to classify the lower ranks of coal is heating value. Other important characteristics which distinguish the low-rank coals from high-rank coals are discussed in this report. Low-rank coals represent a major, and largely untapped, energy resource for this country. Very extensive deposits of lignite and subbituminous coal exist in the western states, the Gulf coast, and Alaska. Major deposits of low-rank coal are also found in many other countries, most notably the USSR, Australia, Canada, and the central and eastern European nations. Worldwide coal statistics indicate that low-rank coals account for roughly one-third of the total resource and current production tonnages. This report recommends a comprehensive national research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program to enhance the development of low-rank coals. The major conclusion of this study is that the unique properties of these coals affect the technologies for their extraction, preparation, direct use, and conversion and justify a separate focus on low-rank coals in the national RD and D efforts.

  18. Neurointerventional Treatment in Acute Stroke. Whom to Treat? (Endovascular Treatment for Acute Stroke: Utility of THRIVE Score and HIAT Score for Patient Selection)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fjetland, Lars, E-mail: lars.fjetland@lyse.net; Roy, Sumit, E-mail: sumit.roy@sus.no; Kurz, Kathinka D., E-mail: kathinka.dehli.kurz@sus.no [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Norway); Solbakken, Tore, E-mail: tore.solbakken@sus.no [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Norway)] [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Norway); Larsen, Jan Petter, E-mail: jan.petter.larsen@sus.no; Kurz, Martin W., E-mail: martin.kurz@sus.no [The Norwegian Center for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital (Norway)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intra-arterial therapy (IAT) is used increasingly as a treatment option for acute stroke caused by central large vessel occlusions. Despite high rates of recanalization, the clinical outcome is highly variable. The authors evaluated the Houston IAT (HIAT) and the totaled health risks in vascular events (THRIVE) score, two predicting scores designed to identify patients likely to benefit from IAT. Methods: Fifty-two patients treated at the Stavanger University Hospital with IAT from May 2009 to June 2012 were included in this study. We combined the scores in an additional analysis. We also performed an additional analysis according to high age and evaluated the scores in respect of technical efficacy. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluated by the THRIVE score and 51 by the HIAT score. We found a strong correlation between the level of predicted risk and the actual clinical outcome (THRIVE p = 0.002, HIAT p = 0.003). The correlations were limited to patients successfully recanalized and to patients <80 years. By combining the scores additional 14.3 % of the patients could be identified as poor candidates for IAT. Both scores were insufficient to identify patients with a good clinical outcome. Conclusions: Both scores showed a strong correlation to poor clinical outcome in patients <80 years. The specificity of the scores could be enhanced by combining them. Both scores were insufficient to identify patients with a good clinical outcome and showed no association to clinical outcome in patients aged {>=}80 years.

  19. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inverse of the background distribution.

  20. On the Classification of Low-Rank Braided Fusion Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruillard, Paul Joseph

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE CLASSIFICATION OF LOW-RANK BRAIDED FUSION CATEGORIES A Dissertation by PAUL JOSEPH BRUILLARD Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...+=p . BFC Braided Fusion Category. C0 The M uger center of the category C. Cad The adjoint subcategory. Cpt The pointed subcategory. Cop Opposite (mirror) category to C. coevX Coevaluation I! X X . C2 (G;K ) 2-cochains of G with coe cients in K . C...

  1. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore »of the background distribution.« less

  2. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  3. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  4. Structure, constitution and utilization of low rank Indian coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyengar, M.S.; Iyengar, V.A. [M.S. Iyengar and Associates, New Delhi (India)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly reviews the work done on lignite and sub-bituminous coals. Surface area and moisture adsorption dependency on functional group is described. The role of hydrogen bonding in the briquetting of lignite and of alkyl groups in inducing caking properties are discussed. The dualistic behavior of abnormal coals as both a low and high rank coal is also discussed in relation to the nature of their sulphur groups. On the utilization side, processes are described for: (1) Utilization of non-caking coal in the reduction of iron ore. Coal is first briquetted using a lime-tar binder. It is then carbonized for reducing iron ore. The bar is recovered and recycled. (2) Production of carbon black from low rank coals. In this process, coal is carbonized at high temperature in a fluidized bed. Carbon black, for tire industry, is obtained with char as by-product. (3) Utilization of flue gases of industry is also discussed. In this new approach, the flue gas is reduced to synthesis gas by additional fuel and the inevitable surplus heat. The viability of the process is illustrated by details of a recent study in a cement plant. In addition to the above, the implication of recycling flue gas in automobile engines to make them more environment friendly and cost effective, is also discussed.

  5. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

  6. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic Zd-action is an action of Zd

  7. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational Broadbandof theCommercialDepartment ofScore

  8. Home Energy Score: Information for Homeowners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial ColdEnergySavvyResearchHome Energy Score:

  9. SunShot Prize Score Sheet Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety GoalsEnergy Begins Extended SolarDepartmentScore Sheet

  10. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartmentUpdate2345Score:Home

  11. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartmentUpdate2345Score:Homeof

  12. Assessing the relationships among PSAT and TAKS scores in selected Texas high schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Eric Daryl

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the relationships among PSAT scores and TAKS scores in selected Texas high schools in order to inform state policy makers, school district administrators and teachers ...

  13. The Relationship between Students’ Verbal and Nonverbal Test Scores within the Context of Poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaya, Fatih

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    –achievement relationship within the context of poverty. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the verbal and the nonverbal scores of students within the context of poverty. The study investigated how students’ verbal and nonverbal scores...

  14. Rear Admiral David A. Score Deputy Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizon oil spill response. Since his commission as a NOAA Corps officer in 1990, RDML Score has served Score commanded NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter, which conducted key research missions during the BP Deepwater

  15. One-dimensional Brownian particle systems with rank dependent drifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Soumik

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study interacting systems of linear Brownian motions whose drift vector at every time point is determined by the relative ranks of the coordinate processes at that time. Our main objective has been to study the long range behavior of the spacings between the particles in increasing order. For finite systems, we characterize drifts for which the spacing system remains stable, and show its convergence to a unique stationary joint distribution given by independent exponential distributions with varying means. We also study one particular countably infinite system, where only the minimum Brownian particle gets a constant upward drift, and prove that independent and identically distributed exponential spacings remain stationary under the dynamics of such a process. Some related conjectures in this direction have also been discussed.

  16. Ranking of sabotage/tampering avoidance technology alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Tabatabai, A.S.; Powers, T.B.; Daling, P.M.; Fecht, B.A.; Gore, B.F.; Overcast, T.D.; Rankin, W.R.; Schreiber, R.E.; Tawil, J.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study to evaluate alternatives to the design and operation of nuclear power plants, emphasizing a reduction of their vulnerability to sabotage. Estimates of core melt accident frequency during normal operations and from sabotage/tampering events were used to rank the alternatives. Core melt frequency for normal operations was estimated using sensitivity analysis of results of probabilistic risk assessments. Core melt frequency for sabotage/tampering was estimated by developing a model based on probabilistic risk analyses, historic data, engineering judgment, and safeguards analyses of plant locations where core melt events could be initiated. Results indicate the most effective alternatives focus on large areas of the plant, increase safety system redundancy, and reduce reliance on single locations for mitigation of transients. Less effective options focus on specific areas of the plant, reduce reliance on some plant areas for safe shutdown, and focus on less vulnerable targets.

  17. DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment Webinar-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment, presented in March 2015.

  18. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

  19. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

  20. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) determine the effects of permeability anisotropy on performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas, and (2) begin reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells. To evaluate the effects of permeability anisotropy on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds, we conducted deterministic reservoir modeling studies of 100% CO{sub 2} gas injection for the 6,200-ft depth base case (Case 1b) using the most likely values of the reservoir parameters. Simulation results show significant differences in the cumulative volumes of CH{sub 4} produced and CO{sub 2} injected due to permeability anisotropy, depending on the orientation of injection patterns relative to the orientation of permeability anisotropy. This indicates that knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of permeability anisotropy will be an important consideration in the design of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects. We continued discussions with Anadarko Petroleum regarding plans for additional coal core acquisition and laboratory work to further characterize Wilcox low-rank coals. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we submitted the paper SPE 100584 for presentation at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium to be held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on May 15-18, 2006.

  1. Hypertension . Author manuscript Validating the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score: results from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hypertension . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Validating the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score A promising hypertension risk prediction score using data from the United States Framingham Offspring study performance of the Framingham hypertension risk score in a European population, the Whitehall II study

  2. COMBINING FREE ENERGY SCORE SPACES WITH INFORMATION THEORETIC KERNELS: APPLICATION TO SCENE CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguiar, Pedro M. Q.

    COMBINING FREE ENERGY SCORE SPACES WITH INFORMATION THEORETIC KERNELS: APPLICATION TO SCENE recent and top performing tools in each of the steps: (i) the free energy score space; (ii) non embeddings can be found in [1, 2, 13]. A very recent approach, termed free energy score space (FESS) [13, 14

  3. Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Success of the Nuclear Norm Heuristic for Rank Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recht, Ben

    Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Success of the Nuclear Norm Heuristic for Rank Minimization that yield exact solutions. A popular heuristic algorithm replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm provide accurate predictions of the heuristic's performance in non-asymptotic scenarios. I. INTRODUCTION

  4. Determining factors behind the PageRank log-log plot Yana Volkovich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    - tion through a stochastic equation inspired by the original definition of PageRank. Further, we use agreement with experimental data on three different sam- ples of the Web. Keywords PageRank, Power law, Recursive stochastic equations, Re- gular variation, Web graph MSC 2000 90B15, 68P10, 60J80 1. INTRODUCTION

  5. Tenure-Track Faculty (All Ranks) Assistant Professor/Associate Professor/Full Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenure-Track Faculty (All Ranks) Assistant Professor/Associate Professor/Full Professor Mechanical for both teaching and research are being sought. Candidates for the rank of Assistant Professor should have- and nano-systems, advanced energy technologies, bio-inspired systems and robotics, and plasma science

  6. Preference Learning using the Choquet Integral: The Case of Multipartite Ranking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hüllermeier, Eyke

    learning methods [48]. While a number of different types of ranking problems have been introducedPreference Learning using the Choquet Integral: The Case of Multipartite Ranking Ali Fallah Tehrani on Fuzzy Systems Abstract We propose a novel method for preference learning or, more specifically, learn

  7. HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS JULIÁN AGUIRRE for the torsion group of elliptic curves dened over quadratic number elds. We present examples of high rank elliptic curves with given torsion group which give the current records for most of the torsion groups

  8. HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    99-57 HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES A. Accorsi', J.P. Pineau, A. Prats l. INERIS, Vemeuil-en-Halatte, France Key words : safety management System, ranking, health, safety, environment ABSTRACT ELF ATOCHEM and INERIS have

  9. ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION HUI JI, SIBIN HUANG, ZUOWEI SHEN, AND YUHONG XU Abstract. This paper presents a new video restoration scheme based domain, we formulate the video restoration problem as a joint sparse and low-rank matrix approximation

  10. Toward a Classification of the Ranks and Border Ranks of All (3,3,3) Trilinear Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allums, Derek

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    transformations. Ng?s classification is up to this action. The first step is to move the problem of classification into projective space so we consider P(A?B?C). Note that we can also have ? ? Hom(B?,A?C) or ? ? Hom(C?,A?B) so without loss of generality only...)?b1?c1 +a3?b3?c2 +(?a3)?b2?c3. Proposition .43. R(T ) ? 7,R(T ) = 5. Proof. The naive approach yields an upper bound of 7 for the rank. 33 CHAPTER IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Building on Ng?s classification of all ? ? C3?C3?C3 up to the action...

  11. Comparison of Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival Between Primary Gleason Score 3 and Primary Gleason Score 4 for Biopsy Gleason Score 7 Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)], E-mail: burdicm@ccf.org; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth [Glickman Urologic and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Altman, Andrew; Chehade, Nabil [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente Ohio, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the primary grade (PG) of biopsy Gleason score (GS) 7 prostate cancer (CaP) was predictive for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Most of the present data regarding the PG of GS7 CaP refer to surgical specimens. Our goal was to determine whether the biopsy GS used at the time of medical decision making predicted for the biochemical outcome. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the data from 705 patients with biopsy GS7 CaP, from a prospectively maintained database, who had been treated at our institution between September 1996 and March 2005 with radical prostatectomy (n = 310), external beam radiotherapy (n = 268), or prostate radioactive seed implantation (n = 127). The bRFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used for univariate and multivariate analyses examining these factors in relation to bRFS: PG of biopsy GS, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T stage, use of androgen deprivation, risk group (high or intermediate), and treatment modality. Results: The 5-year bRFS rate was 78% and 71% (p = 0.0108) for biopsy GS7 PG3 CaP and biopsy GS7 PG4 CaP, respectively. Comparing PG3 and PG4 within treatment modalities, only prostate implantation patients had a significant difference in the 5-year bRFS rate, 88% vs. 76%, respectively (p = 0.0231). On multivariate analysis, the PG of biopsy GS remained an independent predictor of bRFS, with PG3 having better bRFS than PG4 (relative risk, 0.655; 95% confidence interval, 0.472-0.909; p = 0.0113). Conclusion: Biopsy GS7 PG4 CaP carries a worse bRFS than biopsy GS7 PG3 CaP.

  12. The SED-TOX: Toxicity-directed management tool to assess and rank sediments based on their hazard -- concept and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bombardier, M.; Bermingham, N. [Environment Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article introduces the sediment Toxicity (SED-TOX) Index for the assessment and ranking of toxic hazards in sediment. Major features include expression of toxicity responses on a single scale of measurement (dry weight-based toxic units), consideration of multiple routes of exposure (pore water, organic extract, wet sediment, and whole sediment), application of differential treatments to toxicity data depending on the level of response, and use of weighting factors to discriminate sediment exposure phases and effect endpoints on the basis of sensitivity. A battery of seven bioassays with four test species (Vibrio fischeri, Escherichia coli, Lytechinus pictus, and Amphiporeia virginiana) was conducted on 49 marine sediment samples collected from six sites at Anse-a-Beaufils and Cap-aux-Meules, which are in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The SED-TOX scores were calculated for each sampling station and compared with sediment contaminant concentrations. Results indicate that physico-chemical characterization is not sufficient to assess contaminated-sediment hazard for organisms; furthermore, using several exposure phases and test species belonging to various trophic levels increases the possibility of correctly identifying toxic sediments. The results of this study indicate that the SED-TOX approach is valuable as a toxicity assessment and ranking tool for sediments. It could easily be combined with other measures of ecosystem disturbance to discriminate between polluted and unpolluted sites.

  13. Emotional intelligence and manipulation: Are those scoring higher on EI measures more likely to negatively manipulate others' for personal gains? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Sophie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The personality factors most associated with EI were Openness, Conscientiousness and Neuroticism. It was also found that higher scores on reassurance scores were the biggest predictor of scores on overall perceived social support although positive relationships...

  14. Upgrading low rank coal using the Koppelman Series C process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriam, N.W., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the K-Fuel technology began after the energy shortage of the early 1970s in the United States led energy producers to develop the huge deposits of low-sulfur coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. PRB coal is a subbituminous C coal containing about 30 wt % moisture and having heating values of about 18.6 megajoules/kg (8150 Btu/lb). PRB coal contains from 0.3 to 0.5 wt % sulfur, which is nearly all combined with the organic matrix in the coal. It is in much demand for boiler fuel because of the low-sulfur content and the low price. However, the low-heating value limits the markets for PRB coal to boilers specially designed for the high- moisture coal. Thus, the advantages of the low-sulfur content are not available to many potential customers having boilers that were designed for bituminous coal. This year about 250 million tons of coal is shipped from the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The high- moisture content and, consequently, the low-heating value of this coal causes the transportation and combustion of the coal to be inefficient. When the moisture is removed and the heating value increased the same bundle of energy can be shipped using one- third less train loads. Also, the dried product can be burned much more efficiently in boiler systems. This increase in efficiency reduces the carbon dioxide emissions caused by use of the low-heating value coal. Also, the processing used to remove water and restructure the coal removes sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and chlorides from the coal. This precombustion cleaning is much less costly than stack scrubbing. PRB coal, and other low-rank coals, tend to be highly reactive when freshly mined. These reactive coals must be mixed regularly (every week or two) when fresh, but become somewhat more stable after they have aged for several weeks. PRB coal is relatively dusty and subject to self-ignition compared to bituminous coals. When dried using conventional technology, PRB coal is even more dusty and more susceptible to spontaneous combustion than the raw coal. Also, PRB coal, if dried at low temperature, typically readsorbs about two- thirds of the moisture removed by drying. This readsorption of moisture releases the heat of adsorption of the water which is a major cause of self- heating of low-rank coals at low temperature.

  15. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue acquisition of data pertinent to coal characterization that would help in determining the feasibility of carbon dioxide sequestration. Structural analysis and detailed correlation of coal zones are important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Evaluation of existing well logs indicates local structural complexity that complicates interpretations of continuity of the Wilcox Group coal zones. Therefore, we have begun searching for published structural maps for the areas of potential injection CO{sub 2}, near the coal-fired power plants. Preliminary evaluations of data received from Anadarko Petroleum Corporation suggest that coal properties and gas content and chemical composition vary greatly among coal seams. We are assessing the stratigraphic and geographic distributions and the weight of coal samples that Anadarko has provided to select samples for further laboratory analysis. Our goal is to perform additional isotherm analyses with various pure and/or mixed gases to enhance our characterization model. Additionally, we are evaluating opportunities for field determination of permeability with Anadarko, utilizing one of their wells.

  16. Equation of motion for incompressible mixed fluid driven by evaporation and its application to online rankings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumiko Hattori; Tetsuya Hattori

    2008-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a unique classical solution to initial value problem for a system of partial differential equations for the densities of components of one dimensional incompressible fluid mixture driven by evaporation. Motivated by the known fact that the solution appears as an infinite particle limit of stochastic ranking processes, which is a simple stochastic model of time evolutions of e.g., Amazon Sales Ranks, we collected data from the web and performed statistical fits to our formula. The results suggest that the fluid equations and solutions may have an application in the analysis of online rankings.

  17. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to further characterize the three areas selected as potential CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Thus, we purchased 12 hardcopy well logs (in addition to 15 well logs obtained during previous quarter) from a commercial source and digitized them to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Thus, we correlated and mapped Wilcox Group subdivisions--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations, as well as the coal-bearing intervals of the Yegua and Jackson formations in well logs. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to Big Brown and Martin Lake coal mines. This quarter we also received CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses of the Sandow Mine samples, and we are assessing the results. GEM, a compositional simulator developed by the Computer Modeling Group (CMG), was selected for performing the CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CBM modeling tasks for this project. This software was used to conduct preliminary CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production simulations in a 5-spot injection pattern. We are continuing to pursue a cooperative agreement with Anadarko Petroleum, which has already acquired significant relevant data near one of our potential sequestration sites.

  18. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to further characterize the three areas selected as potential test sites, to begin assessing regional attributes of natural coal fractures (cleats), which control coalbed permeability, and to interview laboratories for coal sample testing. An additional objective was to initiate discussions with an operating company that has interests in Texas coalbed gas production and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential, to determine their interest in participation and cost sharing in this project. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Therefore, we purchased 15 well logs from a commercial source to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Log suites included gamma ray (GR), self potential (SP), resistivity, sonic, and density curves. Other properties of the coals in the selected areas were collected from published literature. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to a Jackson coal outcrop and visited Wilcox coal exposures at the Sandow surface mine. Coal samples at the Sandow mine were collected for CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses. We contacted several laboratories that specialize in analyzing coals and selected a laboratory, submitting the Sandow Wilcox coals for analysis. To address the issue of cost sharing, we had fruitful initial discussions with a petroleum corporation in Houston. We reviewed the objectives and status of this project, discussed data that they have already collected, and explored the potential for cooperative data acquisition and exchange in the future. We are pursuing a cooperative agreement with them.

  19. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to perform pressure transient testing to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. To perform permeability testing of the Wilcox coal, we worked with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in selecting the well and intervals to test and in designing the pressure transient test. Anadarko agreed to allow us to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well (Well APCT2). This well is located in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that we earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2} emissions. A service company, Pinnacle Technologies Inc. (Pinnacle) was contracted to conduct the tests in the field. Intervals tested were 2 coal beds with thicknesses of 3 and 7 feet, respectively, at approximately 4,100 ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. Analyses of pressure transient test data indicate that average values for coalbed methane reservoir permeability in the tested coals are between 1.9 and 4.2 mD. These values are in the lower end of the range of permeability used in the preliminary simulation modeling. These new coal fracture permeability data from the APCT2 well, along with the acquired gas compositional analyses and sorption capacities of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}, complete the reservoir description phase of the project. During this quarter we also continued work on reservoir and economic modeling to evaluate performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery.

  20. Multi-Pareto-Ranking Evolutionary Algorithm Wahabou Abdou, Christelle Bloch, Damien Charlet, and Francois Spies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Multi-Pareto-Ranking Evolutionary Algorithm Wahabou Abdou, Christelle Bloch, Damien Charlet to define the selection probability of each Pareto front hal-00940119,version1- #12;2 W. Abdou, C. Bloch, D

  1. Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities....

  2. ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12; 2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  3. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12;2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  4. Comparison of value-added models for school ranking and classification: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhongmiao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A “Value-Added” definition of school effectiveness calls for the evaluation of schools based on the unique contribution of schools to individual student academic growth. The estimates of value-added school effectiveness are usually used for ranking...

  5. Rank-1 accelerated illumination recovery in scanning diffractive imaging by transparency estimation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hau-Tieng

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Illumination retrieval in scanning diffractive imaging a.k.a. ptychography is challenging when the specimen is weakly scattering or surrounded by empty space. We describe a rank-1 acceleration method for weakly scattering or piecewise smooth specimens.

  6. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers in the quarterly technical progress report for the period April-June, 1984, of the Low-Rank Coal Research project have been entered individually into EDB and ERA (17 items). (LTN)

  7. An FPTAS for optimizing a class of low-rank functions over a polytope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Shashi

    We present a fully polynomial time approximation scheme (FPTAS) for optimizing a very general class of non-linear functions of low rank over a polytope. Our approximation scheme relies on constructing an approximate ...

  8. Tail universalities in rank distributions as an algebraic problem: the beta-like function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo G. Naumis; Germinal Cocho

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Although power laws of the Zipf type have been used by many workers to fit rank distributions in different fields like in economy, geophysics, genetics, soft-matter, networks etc., these fits usually fail at the tails. Some distributions have been proposed to solve the problem, but unfortunately they do not fit at the same time both ending tails. We show that many different data in rank laws, like in granular materials, codons, author impact in scientific journal, etc. are very well fitted by a beta-like function. Then we propose that such universality is due to the fact that a system made from many subsystems or choices, imply stretched exponential frequency-rank functions which qualitatively and quantitatively can be fitted with the proposed beta-like function distribution in the limit of many random variables. We prove this by transforming the problem into an algebraic one: finding the rank of successive products of a given set of numbers.

  9. A Low Patch-Rank Interpretation of Texture Hayden Schaeffer and Stanley Osher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    A Low Patch-Rank Interpretation of Texture Hayden Schaeffer and Stanley Osher University models have appeared in the literature, beginning with the work of Meyer [28], who first proposed

  10. Home Energy Score API User: United Illuminating Company and Connecticut Light and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Illuminating Company and Connecticut Light and Power, administering conservation, and load management programs funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, are Home Energy Score...

  11. DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Efficiency Services Companies Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Efficiency Services Companies, presented in March 2015.

  12. Texas-New Mexico Power Company- SCORE/CitySmart, Commercial Solutions, and Small Business Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The TNMP SCORE/CitySmart program helps school facilities and local governments identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and provides financial incentives ...

  13. Confluent KZ equations for sl_N with Poincare rank 2 at infinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Nagoya; Juanjuan Sun

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct confluent KZ equations with Poincare rank 2 at infinity for the case of sl_N and the integral representation for the solutions. Hamiltonians of these confluent KZ equations are derived from suitable quantization of dlog tau constructed in the theory of monodromy preserving deformation by Jimbo, Miwa and Ueno. Our confluent KZ equations may be viewed as a quantization of monodromy preserving deformation with Poincare rank 2 at infinity.

  14. Full Rank Rational Demand Systems Jeffrey T. LaFrance Rulon D. Pope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.

    n= = = p (1) where : ,n ik ++ :kh ++ , 1, , , 1, , .i n k K = = 3 Define the n×K ma- trix of price functions [ ]( ) ( )ik=A p p . The rank of (1) is the column rank of A(p), with nK (Gorman, 1981 of smooth demand systems are to solve the integrability problem for a set of demand equations or to use Roy

  15. CHAOTICITY OF THE STATIONARY DISTRIBUTION OF RANK-BASED INTERACTING DIFFUSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. The mean-field limit of systems of rank-based interacting diffusions is known to be described. For all n 1, consider the system of rank-based interacting diffusions, or particles, (1) i {1, . . ., n to the nonlinear (in McKean's sense) stochastic differential equation (2) dX(t) = b(Ft(X(t)))dt + dW(t), Ft(x) = P

  16. ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2 Audigane, P.1 , Brown, S.2 , Dimier A.3 , Frykman P.4 , Gherardi F.5 , Le Gallo Y.6 Recherches Géologiques et miničres - France 2 CO2SENSE limited, United Kingdom 3 EIFER, EIFER europaisches

  17. Low-rank coal research, Task 5.1. Topical report, April 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a topical progress report for Low-Rank Coal Research performed April 1986 - December 1992. Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research is described for Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains, and Hot-Gas Cleanup. Advanced Research and Technology Development was conducted on Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Combustion Research is described for Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Fuels (completed 10/31/90), Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals (completed 12/31/90), Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications (completed 10/31/90), Nitrous Oxide Emission, and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion. Liquefaction Research in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction is discussed. Gasification Research was conducted in Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coals and in Sulfur Forms in Coal.

  18. Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

  19. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on limited data suggest that sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed gas recovery should be located basinward of the Wilcox freshwater contour, where methane content is high and the freshwater aquifer can be avoided.

  20. Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

  1. Low-rank coal study : national needs for resource development. Volume 2. Resource characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive data are presented on the quantity, quality, and distribution of low-rank coal (subbituminous and lignite) deposits in the United States. The major lignite-bearing areas are the Fort Union Region and the Gulf Lignite Region, with the predominant strippable reserves being in the states of North Dakota, Montana, and Texas. The largest subbituminous coal deposits are in the Powder River Region of Montana and Wyoming, The San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in Northern Alaska. For each of the low-rank coal-bearing regions, descriptions are provided of the geology; strippable reserves; active and planned mines; classification of identified resources by depth, seam thickness, sulfur content, and ash content; overburden characteristics; aquifers; and coal properties and characteristics. Low-rank coals are distinguished from bituminous coals by unique chemical and physical properties that affect their behavior in extraction, utilization, or conversion processes. The most characteristic properties of the organic fraction of low-rank coals are the high inherent moisture and oxygen contents, and the correspondingly low heating value. Mineral matter (ash) contents and compositions of all coals are highly variable; however, low-rank coals tend to have a higher proportion of the alkali components CaO, MgO, and Na/sub 2/O. About 90% of the reserve base of US low-rank coal has less than one percent sulfur. Water resources in the major low-rank coal-bearing regions tend to have highly seasonal availabilities. Some areas appear to have ample water resources to support major new coal projects; in other areas such as Texas, water supplies may be constraining factor on development.

  2. A Score Predicting Posttreatment Ambulatory Status in Patients Irradiated for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Eppendorf (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood (United Kingdom); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a scoring system to predict ambulatory status after radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of a multivariate analysis of 2096 MSCC patients, a scoring system was developed. This included the five prognostic factors significantly associated with post-RT ambulatory status: primary tumor type, interval between tumor diagnosis and MSCC, visceral metastases, motor function before RT, and time developing motor deficits before RT. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the post-RT ambulatory rate (as a percentage) by 10. Total scores represented the sum of the scores for each factor and ranged between 21 and 44 points. Patients were divided into five groups according to this score. Results: The post-RT ambulatory rates were 6% (24 of 389) for patients with scores of {<=}28 points, 44% (121 of 278) for those with 29-31 points, 70% (212 of 303) for those with 32-34 points, 86% (315 of 266) for those with 35-37 points, and 99% (750 of 760) for those with {>=}38 points. The 3-month survival rates were 29%, 62%, 77%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The 6-months survival rates were 6%, 31%, 42%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Conclusions: Because patients with scores of {<=}28 points had poor functional outcome after RT and extraordinarily poor survival rates, short-course RT to decrease pain or best supportive care may be considered. Patients with scores of 29-37 points should be considered surgical candidates, because RT-alone results were not optimal. Patients with scores of {>=}38 points seem to have excellent results with RT alone.

  3. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of December. A preliminary report shows methane content values for the desorbed coal samples ranged between 330 and 388 scf/t., on ''as received'' basis. Residual gas content of the coals was not included in the analyses, which results in an approximate 5-10% underestimation of in-situ gas content. Coal maps indicate that total coal thickness is 40-70 ft in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of the Sam K. Seymour power plant. A conservative estimate indicates that methane in place for a well on 160-acre spacing is approximately 3.5 Bcf in Lower Calvert Bluff coal beds. When they receive sorption isotherm data from the laboratory, they will determine the amount of CO{sub 2} that it may be possible to sequester in Wilcox coals. In December, when the final laboratory and field test data are available, they will complete the reservoir model and begin to simulate CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CH{sub 4} production.

  4. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to perform reservoir simulation and economic sensitivity studies to (1) determine the effects of injection gas composition, (2) determine the effects of injection rate, and (3) determine the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection on CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas. To predict CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds for these three sensitivity studies, we constructed a 5-spot pattern reservoir simulation model and selected reservoir parameters representative of a typical depth, approximately 6,200-ft, of potential LCB coalbed reservoirs in the focus area of East-Central Texas. Simulation results of flue gas injection (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern (40-ac well spacing) indicate that LCB coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 0.46 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with a median ECBM recovery of 0.94 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 4,270 days (11.7 years). Simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicated that these same coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 1.75 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft with a median ECBM recovery of 0.67 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 1,650 days (4.5 years). Breakthrough was defined as the point when CO{sub 2} comprised 5% of the production stream for all cases. The injection rate sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to injection rate. The main difference is in timing, with longer breakthrough times resulting as injection rate decreases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 670 days (1.8 years) to 7,240 days (19.8 years) for the reservoir parameters and well operating conditions investigated. The dewatering sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection. As time to start CO{sub 2} injection increases, the time to reach breakthrough also increases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 850 days (2.3 years) to 5,380 days (14.7 years) for the reservoir parameters and well injection/production schedules investigated. Preliminary economic modeling results using a gas price of $7-$8 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits of $1.33 per ton CO{sub 2} indicate that injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) and 50% N{sub 2}-50% CO{sub 2} are more economically viable than injecting 100% CO{sub 2}. Results also indicate that injection rate and duration and timing of dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection have no significant effect on the economic viability of the project(s).

  5. Low rank approach to computing first and higher order derivatives using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J. A.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Utke, J. [Mathematics and Computer Science Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript outlines a new approach for increasing the efficiency of applying automatic differentiation (AD) to large scale computational models. By using the principles of the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM), low rank approximations of the derivatives for first and higher orders can be calculated using minimized computational resources. The output obtained from nuclear reactor calculations typically has a much smaller numerical rank compared to the number of inputs and outputs. This rank deficiency can be exploited to reduce the number of derivatives that need to be calculated using AD. The effective rank can be determined according to ESM by computing derivatives with AD at random inputs. Reduced or pseudo variables are then defined and new derivatives are calculated with respect to the pseudo variables. Two different AD packages are used: OpenAD and Rapsodia. OpenAD is used to determine the effective rank and the subspace that contains the derivatives. Rapsodia is then used to calculate derivatives with respect to the pseudo variables for the desired order. The overall approach is applied to two simple problems and to MATWS, a safety code for sodium cooled reactors. (authors)

  6. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score System: Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system that includes an energy asset score tool to help building owners evaluate their buildings with respect to the score system. The goal of the energy asset score system is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrade progress over time. The system can also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building operators, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from their operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset score tool. This report also describes alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach. Finally, this report describes a few features of the program where alternative approaches are still under evaluation.

  7. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

  8. Low-rank coal study. Volume 5. RD and D program evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A national program is recommended for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of improved technologies for the enviromentally acceptable use of low-rank coals. RD and D project recommendations are outlined in all applicable technology areas, including extraction, transportation, preparation, handling and storage, conventional combustion and environmental control technology, fluidized bed combustion, gasification, liquefaction, and pyrolysis. Basic research topics are identified separately, as well as a series of crosscutting research activities addressing environmental, economic, and regulatory issues. The recommended RD and D activities are classified into Priority I and Priority II categories, reflecting their relative urgency and potential impact on the advancement of low-rank coal development. Summaries of ongoing research projects on low-rank coals in the US are presented in an Appendix, and the relationships of these ongoing efforts to the recommended RD and D program are discussed.

  9. Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

  10. Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

  11. Bayesian Screening Procedure for Identification of Learning Disabled Adolescents: Administration, Scoring, and Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.; Warner, Michael M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Secondary Learning Disabilities Form of the Screening Procedure is described, and procedures for administration and scoring are detailed. In addition, interpretation guidelines are presented. Both the Revised Checklist ...

  12. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    score in RoboRAVE International at first try Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and...

  13. Media Scores : A framework for composing the modern-day Gesamtkunstwerk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torpey, Peter Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Media Scores provide a theoretical and technical means to orchestrate multiple modalities in the creation of expressive works of art and performance. New technologies afford numerous opportunities to tell stories and create ...

  14. Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle X: Frame Score, Frame Size, and Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.; Gill, Ronald J.

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Body size is an important genetic factor in beef cattle production. Size is most accurately estimated by considering several factors, such as weight, skeletal size and body condition. Frame Scores are a way of estimating skeletal size based on hip...

  15. The Effects of Handwriting, Spelling, and T-Units on Holistic Scoring with Implications for Dysgraphia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooten, Regina

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the relationship of holistic scoring with handwriting legibility, spelling accuracy and number of T-units within compositions written by children in grades 3 through 6 using path analysis. A sample of 223 compositions was rated...

  16. Moving Beyond Test Scores: A Study on How to Improve High Performing Non-Title I High Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabery, Chad Ellwood

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparable to the API standard of 85%, the percent ofin Norms and standards score and API score ? CorrelationStandards Test (CST) and California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), which account for nearly all of the API

  17. MMPI scores for criminal and non-criminal adult children of alcoholics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brill, Phyllis Rose

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MMPI SCORES FOR CRIMINAL AND NON-CRIMINAL ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ROSE BRILL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AS, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1988 Major Subject: Psychology MMPI SCORES FOR CRIMINAL AND NON-CRIMINAL ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ROSE BRILL Approved as to style and content by: Can ida . Lutes (Chairman of Committee) Robert R. Reilley (Member...

  18. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a voluntary national scoring system for commercial buildings to help building owners and managers assess a building’s energy-related systems independent of operations. The goal of the score is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system, known as the Commercial Building Energy Asset Score, will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrades over time. The system will also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building investors, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset scoring tool. The alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach are described in the Program Overview and Technical Protocol Version 1.0.

  19. On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sola Conde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhetta, Gianluca

    On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sol´a~NOZ, GIANLUCA OCCHETTA, AND LUIS E. SOL´A CONDE setting of rank two vector bundles on Fano manifolds of Picard

  20. LOW-COMPLEXITY MULTIUSER DETECTION AND REDUCED-RANK WIENER FILTERS FOR ULTRA-WIDEBAND MULTIPLE ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhi "Gerry"

    LOW-COMPLEXITY MULTIUSER DETECTION AND REDUCED-RANK WIENER FILTERS FOR ULTRA-WIDEBAND MULTIPLE the large user capacity planned for ultra- wideband (UWB) systems motivates multiuser detection (MUD of chip-rate samples. This model enables low-complexity MUD, of which we ex- amine a reduced-rank Wiener

  1. Building Fuzzy Thematic Clusters and Mapping Them to Higher Ranks in a Taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirkin, Boris

    , Moscow, RF 3 Computer Science Department and Centre for Artificial Intelligence (CENTRIA), Faculdade de as a query set. To lift a query set to higher ranks of the taxonomy, we develop an original recursive a framework for representation of the activities of an organization or any other system under consideration

  2. LOW RANK SOLUTION OF LYAPUNOV EQUATIONS JING-REBECCA LI AND JACOB WHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing-Rebecca

    @cims.nyu.edu). The research of this author was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Semiconductor Research of Technology, Room 36-817, Cam- bridge, MA 02139-4307 (white@mit.edu). 260 #12;LOW RANK SOLUTION OF LYAPUNOV

  3. Fast Kalman filtering and forward-backward smoothing via a low-rank perturbative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Fast Kalman filtering and forward-backward smoothing via a low-rank perturbative approach Eftychios A. Pnevmatikakis Kamiar Rahnama Rad Jonathan Huggins Liam Paninski October 15, 2012 Abstract Kalman implementations of the Kalman filter-smoother require O(d3) time and O(d2) space per timestep, where d

  4. Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

  5. Exploiting the Deep Web with DynaBot: Matching, Probing, and Ranking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caverlee, James

    Exploiting the Deep Web with DynaBot: Matching, Probing, and Ranking Daniel Rocco University, CA, USA critchlow1@llnl.gov ABSTRACT We present the design of Dynabot, a guided Deep Web discovery system. Dynabot's modular architecture sup- ports focused crawling of the Deep Web with an empha- sis

  6. inria-00269225,version1-2Apr2008 Using Data Compressors to Construct Rank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    inria-00269225,version1-2Apr2008 Using Data Compressors to Construct Rank Tests Daniil Ryabko, J compressors. For homogeneity testing the idea is to compress the binary string obtained by ordering the two show that such a test obtained from an ideal data compressor is valid against all alterna- tives

  7. CONTENT-ADAPTIVE SPEECH ENHANCEMENT BY A SPARSELY-ACTIVATED DICTIONARY PLUS LOW RANK DECOMPOSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    CONTENT-ADAPTIVE SPEECH ENHANCEMENT BY A SPARSELY-ACTIVATED DICTIONARY PLUS LOW RANK DECOMPOSITION.papadopoulos[at]lss.supelec.fr dpwe[at]ee.columbia.edu ABSTRACT One powerful approach to speech enhancement employs strong models, we proposed a speech enhancement model that decomposes the spectrogram into sparse activation

  8. Speech enhancement by low-rank and convolutive dictionary spectrogram decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    Speech enhancement by low-rank and convolutive dictionary spectrogram decomposition Zhuo Chen1 Computer Science Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA zc2204@columbia.edu Abstract A successful speech enhancement, performance will suffer. In previous work, we proposed a speech enhance- ment framework based on decomposing

  9. QoS-aware Optimization Strategy for Security Ranking in SSL Protocol , Zhe Tang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    QoS-aware Optimization Strategy for Security Ranking in SSL Protocol Fang Qi 1 , Zhe Tang 1 socket layer protocol (SSL) is to provide confidentiality and data integrity between two communicating entities. Since the most computationally expensive step in the SSL handshake protocol is the server's RSA

  10. AUTHORITY RANKINGS FROM HITS, PAGERANK, AND SALSA: EXISTENCE, UNIQUENESS, AND EFFECT OF INITIALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Lesley A.

    and authority weights consistent. Key words. Link analysis, web search, HITS algorithm, Kleinberg's algorithm, 15A18, 68R10. 1. Introduction. The rapid growth of the world wide web has created a need for search tools. In the past, search engines ranked pages using word frequency or similar measures. Recently, new

  11. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  12. THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM Abstract by National Security Agency, NSA grant award 101015. Song Heng Chan was partially supported by Nanyang of Education, Science and Technology (NRF2011-0009199). 1 #12;2 GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN

  13. Canonical correlation technique for rank estimation of excitation-emission matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major problems that has challenged analytical chemists for a long time is to determine the number of components in a multicomponent sample. Often the sample data occur in the form of a matrix whose rank, in the absence of noise, is equal to the number of components. The presence of random noise in the data, however, will generally cause the rank of the mixture matrix to exceed the number of components in the mixture. The problem then is to estimate what the rank would be if the noise were removed. An eigenanalysis in the form a singular value decomposition of the measured mixture matrix provides information that is useful for estimating rank. In this communication the authors report a new approach to this problem which incorporates eigenvector information without requiring prior expectations about the nature of the eigenvectors. It utilizes the multivariate statistical technique of canonical correlations. They present the methodology in the context of fluorescent mixtures and will also assume that the readers are familiar with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM).

  14. kenmerk 369.075 1 RULES FOR CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF STAFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    , a new job classification system (UFO) came into force. As a result of the introduction of UFO, old job jobs are ranked. At several levels the introduction of UFO has consequences for the classification for the application of UFO is the job. This is the `cluster of tasks to be performed by the employee based

  15. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

  16. Performance of low-rank coal in atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Technology transfer report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajicek, D.R.; Zobeck, B.J.; Mann, M.D.; Miller, B.G.; Ellman, R.C.; Benson, S.A.; Goblirsch, G.M.; Cooper, J.L.; Guillory, J.L.; Eklund, A.G.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents test data generated at GFETC and discusses the implications of this data in regard to the technical and economic feasibility of using low-rank coals in the AFBC. Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion offers a number of potential advantages over conventional pulverized coal combustion due to the intense turbulence in the fluidized bed and long residence times of solids in the bed without a long linear flow path. Advantages of the AFBC include flexibility to handle varying fuels, sulfur capture by limestone, high combustion efficiency, compact combustor size, lower NO/sub x/ emissions, and reduced slagging and fouling problems. Low-rank coals with high alkali-to-sulfur ratios offer a significant additional advantage: the ability to absorb significant sulfur on the alkaline ash. Results verify that AFBC is particularly well suited for the direct combustion of low-rank coals. With combustion temperatures above 1450/sup 0/F at 20% excess air or higher, the combustion efficiencies while burning low-rank coal were found to be above 98%, with efficiencies above 99% for most tests. The CO emissions were very low, typically below 0.05 lb/MMBtu or 50 ppMv. Overall heat transfer coefficients to water-cooled tubes while burning low-rank coals were comparable to those obtained with other fuels in AFBC, or 20 to 60 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. These are considerably higher than those obtained in conventional coal-fired systems which are typically 5 to 15 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. Factors influencing heat transfer included mass velocity, bed particle size, bed temperature, and ash recycle.

  17. Development of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOEDepartment of EnergySmallDesignDetecting

  18. Using a MaxEnt Classifier for the Automatic Content Scoring of Free-Text Responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukkarieh, Jana Z. [Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton NJ 08541 (United States)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticisms against multiple-choice item assessments in the USA have prompted researchers and organizations to move towards constructed-response (free-text) items. Constructed-response (CR) items pose many challenges to the education community - one of which is that they are expensive to score by humans. At the same time, there has been widespread movement towards computer-based assessment and hence, assessment organizations are competing to develop automatic content scoring engines for such items types - which we view as a textual entailment task. This paper describes how MaxEnt Modeling is used to help solve the task. MaxEnt has been used in many natural language tasks but this is the first application of the MaxEnt approach to textual entailment and automatic content scoring.

  19. Thirteenth biennial lignite symposium: technology and utilization of low-rank coals proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L. (ed.)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the collected manuscripts from the 1985 Lignite Symposium held at Bismarck, North Dakota on May 21-23, 1985. Sponsorship of the thirteenth biennial meeting was by the United States Department of Energy, the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center, and the Texas University Coal Research Consortium. Seven technical sessions plus two luncheons and a banquet were held during the two and a half day meeting. The final half day included tours of the Great Plains Gasification Plant; Basin Electric's Antelope Valley Power Station; and the Freedom Mine. Sessions covered diverse topics related to the technology and use of low-rank coals including coal development and public policy, combustion, gasification, environmental systems for low-rank coal utilization, liquefaction, beneficiation and coal mining and coal inorganics. All the papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  20. Thirteenth biennial lignite symposium: technology and utilization of low-rank coals proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L. (ed.)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the collected manuscripts from the 1985 Lignite Symposium held at Bismarck, North Dakota on May 21-23. Sponsorship of the thirteenth biennial meeting was by the United States Department of Energy, the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center, and the Texas University Coal Research Consortium. Seven technical sessions were held during the two and a half day meeting. The final half day included tours of the Great Plains Gasification Plant; Basin Electric's Antelope Valley Power Station; and the Freedom Mine. Sessions covered diverse topics related to the technology and use of low-rank coals including coal development and public policy, combustion, gasification, environmental systems for low-rank coal utilization, liquefaction, beneficiation and coal mining and coal inorganics. Twenty-four papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  2. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

  3. Impact of cost constraints on aesthetic ranking following Target Value Design exercises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybkowski, Zofia K.; Munankami, Manish; Gottipati, Udaya; Lavy, Sarel; Fernández-Solis, Jose

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACT OF COST CONSTRAINTS ON AESTHETIC RANKING FOLLOWING TARGET VALUE DESIGN EXERCISES Zofia K. Rybkowski1, Manish Munankami2, Udaya Gottipati3, Jose Fernández-Solís 4, and Sarel Lavy5 PURPOSE: Target Value Design (TVD) is a project... delivery subset that shares methodologies with Target Costing and Value Engineering, but is performed within the context of lean construction. TVD has been shown to generate first cost savings of approximately 20% on case study projects. A concern voiced...

  4. Private quantum codes: introduction and connection with higher rank numerical ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Kribs; S. Plosker

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief introduction to private quantum codes, a basic notion in quantum cryptography and key distribution. Private code states are characterized by indistinguishability of their output states under the action of a quantum channel, and we show that higher rank numerical ranges can be used to describe them. We also show how this description arises naturally via conjugate channels and the bridge between quantum error correction and cryptography.

  5. Effects of age, genotype and social rank on mating proficiency of beef bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ronald Gregg

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF AGE, GENOTYPE AND SOCIAL RANK ON MATING PROFICIENCY OF BEEF BULLS A Thesis by RONALD GREGG SMITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1994 Major Subject: Animal Science EFFECTS OF AGE, GENOTYPE AND SOCIAL ~ ON MATING PROFICIENCY OF BEEF BULLS A Thesis by RONALD GREGG SMITH Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  6. Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Shobha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

  7. Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. From Data Snore, to Data Score: Communicating Library Assessment Data Visually through Infographics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    will discuss different types of infographics, how academic libraries are using them, and tools and tipsFrom Data Snore, to Data Score: Communicating Library Assessment Data Visually through Infographics Cassi Pretlow, cassi.pretlow@ucdenver.edu, Auraria Library, Denver Introduction

  9. Double-Blind Scores of an Object-Oriented Modeling Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Double-Blind Scores of an Object-Oriented Modeling Survey by Raymond Sze Chun Yiu An essay declare that I am the sole author of this thesis. I authorize the University of Waterloo to lend this thesis to other institutions or individuals for the purpose of scholarly research. I further authorize

  10. DoubleBlind Scores of an ObjectOriented Modeling Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Double­Blind Scores of an Object­Oriented Modeling Survey by Raymond Sze Chun Yiu An essay declare that I am the sole author of this thesis. I authorize the University of Waterloo to lend this thesis to other institutions or individuals for the purpose of scholarly research. I further authorize

  11. Speeding up Scoring Module of Mass Spectrometry Based Protein Identification by GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xiaowen

    protein identification. It becomes very important to study how to speed up database search engines by GPUsSpeeding up Scoring Module of Mass Spectrometry Based Protein Identification by GPU You Li@comp.hkbu.edu.hk Abstract--Database searching is a main method for protein identification in shotgun proteomics, and many

  12. HYPERTENSION/2009/132373.R3 VALIDATING THE FRAMINGHAM HYPERTENSION RISK SCORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 May, 2009 HYPERTENSION/2009/132373.R3 VALIDATING THE FRAMINGHAM HYPERTENSION RISK SCORE: RESULTS, Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, UK. Short title: Validating the Framingham Hypertension manuscript, published in "Hypertension 2009;54(3):496-501" DOI : 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.109.132373 #12

  13. 2011 High School Math Contest Winners November 12, 2011 Sweepstakes School's Score Coach School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 High School Math Contest Winners November 12, 2011 Sweepstakes School's Score Coach School first 147 Harmony School of Excellence second 119 Westwood High School third 84 Amy Pool and Clara Ann Norman St. Marks School of Texas fourth 72 Caroline Hermann A&M Consolidated High School Fifth - Tie 50

  14. Step 2: Click on the test title Step 3: Click on the test score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Step 2: Click on the test title Step 3: Click on the test score Step 1: Click on "My Grades test results in HuskyCT Instructors apply settings that determine the extent of the feedback that students see after taking a test in HuskyCT and when that information becomes available. Minimal

  15. Evolving Fuzzy Rules for Goal-Scoring Behaviour in a Robot Soccer Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Evolving Fuzzy Rules for Goal-Scoring Behaviour in a Robot Soccer Environment A thesis submitted autonomous robots that are able to learn from the environment in which they operate in order to achieve their objectives is a need so far largely unsatisfied, especially for dynamic environments which change quickly

  16. EPICORE 2013 Annual Report EPICORE SCORes! -Supporting Clinical and Outcomes Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    EPICORE 2013 Annual Report EPICORE SCORes! - Supporting Clinical and Outcomes Research #12;TABLE optimistic that we will continue to serve our health research colleagues to produce clinical and outcomes the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials, health outcomes research and epidemiologic studies

  17. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series The Black-White Test Score Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #05-09 June 2005 The Black-White Test Score Gap This paper is available online at the National Poverty Center Working Paper Series index at: http of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the National Poverty Center or any sponsoring agency

  18. The Invariance of Score Tests to Measurement Error By CHI-LUN CHENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    for a Box-Cox power transformation. Under speci c constraints, we show that the score tests for measurement these estab- lished results when the true model is subject to measurement errors. It is known that ignoring variable xi is the true value i plus some random measurement error i: xi = i + i (i = 1 n) (1

  19. Adjusting for selection bias in Web surveys using propensity scores: the case of the Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schonlau, Matt

    Adjusting for selection bias in Web surveys using propensity scores: the case of the Health at the Joint Statistical Meetings, Toronto, August 2004. Abstract Many web surveys allow respondents to self as supplementary information about which subset of HRS respondents also responded to an additional web survey (web

  20. A MODEL FOR INTERACTIVE SCORES WITH TEMPORAL CONSTRAINTS AND CONDITIONAL BRANCHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), temporal relations (TR) and discrete interactive events. Examples of TOs are videos, sounds or audio processors. TOs can be triggered by interactive events (usually launched by the user) and several TOs can any kind of TOs, Allombert et al.'s model has inspired two applications: iScore [2] to compose

  1. Globally Linear Embedding of Biometric Scores: An Empirical Study Sudeep Sarkar and Pranab Mohanty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudeep

    Globally Linear Embedding of Biometric Scores: An Empirical Study Sudeep Sarkar and Pranab Mohanty performances for other biometric modalities [5]. There are also investigations that S. Sarkar is with Faculty, Florida 33620 sarkar@cse.usf.edu Pranab Mohanty was with University of South Florida and is now at Aware

  2. Finding the largest low-rank clusters with Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2014 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm to fi nd k largest approximately rank-one ...

  3. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  4. Variation of Neron-Severi ranks of reductions of K3 surfaces Edgar Costa and Yuri Tschinkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    Variation of N´eron-Severi ranks of reductions of K3 surfaces Edgar Costa and Yuri Tschinkel EDGAR COSTA AND YURI TSCHINKEL In these extreme cases, the primes in jump(X) can be understood

  5. ON THE COMPRESSION OF LOW RANK MATRICES H. CHENG, Z. GIMBUTAS, P. G. MARTINSSON, AND V. ROKHLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    ON THE COMPRESSION OF LOW RANK MATRICES H. CHENG, Z. GIMBUTAS, P. G. MARTINSSON, AND V. ROKHLIN (martins@cs.yale.edu, rokhlin@cs.yale.edu). 1389 #12;1390 CHENG, GIMBUTAS, MARTINSSON, ROKHLIN matrices (of

  6. Rank Petroleum

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 Weekly7a.7. Petroleum and

  7. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Lu [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thall, Peter F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need confirmation, IMRT should be considered for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  8. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single thereof or the Regents of the University of California. #12;1 The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified-based computer tool and method for providing an energy asset rating of single-family homes. The resulting Home

  9. Evaluation of 4-H and FFA Members Scores on the 2011-2012 Texas Quality Counts Verification Exam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grube, Brittany C.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas and it strives to teach youth how to produce a safe and wholesome livestock product for the consumer. An analysis of youth scores between 2011 and 2012 was done to determine how well youth were scoring on the Texas Quality Counts Verification Exam...

  10. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  11. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

    1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

  12. HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Mark; Brown, Jed; Shalf, John; Straalen, Brian Van; Strohmaier, Erich; Williams, Sam

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of the benchmark ? HPGMG ? for ranking large scale general purpose computers for use on the Top500 list [8]. We provide a rationale for the need for a replacement for the current metric HPL, some background of the Top500 list and the challenges of developing such a metric; we discuss our design philosophy and methodology, and an overview of the specification of the benchmark. The primary documentation with maintained details on the specification can be found at hpgmg.org and the Wiki and benchmark code itself can be found in the repository https://bitbucket.org/hpgmg/hpgmg.

  13. Estimating third -party examiners' scoring stability on selected applications to the Texas Award for Performance Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plunkett, Brandi Lyn

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTIMATING THIRD-PARTY EXAMINERS? SCORING STABILITY ON SELECTED APPLICATIONS TO THE TEXAS AWARD FOR PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE A Dissertation by BRANDI LYN PLUNKETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M... ON SELECTED APPLICATIONS TO THE TEXAS AWARD FOR PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE A Dissertation by BRANDI LYN PLUNKETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  14. Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Scoring Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.; Merket, N.; Polly, B.; Heaney, M.; Casey, S.; Robertson, J.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a series of assessments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed Home Energy Scoring Tool (HEST). This report is an assessment of the 4/27/2012 release of HEST. Predictions of electric and natural gas consumption were compared with weather-normalized utility billing data for a mixture of newer and older homes located in Oregon, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Carolina and Texas.

  15. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  16. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  17. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  18. Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  19. Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2)storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE)risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on theassumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basiccharacteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential forprimary containment by the target formation, (2) the potential forsecondary containment if the primary formation leaks, and (3) thepotential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primaryformation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework isimplemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scoresrepresenting expert opinions or general information available frompublished materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate thethree basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites.Application of the framework to the Rio Vista Gas Field, Ventura OilField, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements andextensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or modelresults in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improvethe approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and testedby colleagues and collaborators.

  20. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  1. An automated classification approach to ranking photospheric proxies of magnetic energy build-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the photospheric magnetic field of ~2000 active regions in solar cycle 23 to search for parameters indicative of energy build-up and subsequent release as a solar flare. We extract three sets of parameters: snapshots in space and time- total flux, magnetic gradients, and neutral lines; evolution in time- flux evolution; structures at multiple size scales- wavelet analysis. This combines pattern recognition and classification techniques via a relevance vector machine to determine whether a region will flare. We consider classification performance using all 38 extracted features and several feature subsets. Classification performance is quantified using both the true positive rate and the true negative rate. Additionally, we compute the true skill score which provides an equal weighting to true positive rate and true negative rate and the Heidke skill score to allow comparison to other flare forecasting work. We obtain a true skill score of ~0.5 for any predictive time window in the range 2-24hr, with ...

  2. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  3. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  4. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  5. A metadata-aware application for remote scoring and exchange of tissue microarray images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Lorna; Tsui, Andrew; Crichton, Charles; Harris, Steve; Maccallum, Peter H; Howat, William J; Davies, Jim; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and analysis. Although auto- mated techniques for the quantification of staining in images are being developed [3] manual scoring is con-and exchange of tissue m Lorna Morris1, Andrew Tsui4, Charles Crichton4, Steve Har James D Brenton1,2,3 and Carlos Caldas1,2,3... . BMC Bioinformatics 2013, 14:147 Page 3 of 10 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/14/147Table 1 Comparison of cancergrid common data elements informatics data exchange specification (DES) Cancergrid CDE name API DES XML Donor Tissue Block Identifier...

  6. Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartmentUpdate2345Score:

  7. 10213Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 43 / Friday, March 5, 2010 / Notices averaged to determine the total score for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addition to the evaluation criteria, the Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services may consider for Manufacturing and Services, and recommends which of the top applications should receive funding. If the amount recommends additional applications for funding in rank order. The selection panel's recommendation

  8. University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers to differences in ethnic, religious, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a sophisticated awareness · discusses personal experience within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a working

  9. Ranking the importance of nuclear reactions for activation and transmutation events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arter, Wayne; Relton, Samuel D; Higham, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pathways-reduced analysis is one of the techniques used by the Fispact-II nuclear activation and transmutation software to study the sensitivity of the computed inventories to uncertainties in reaction cross-sections. Although deciding which pathways are most important is very helpful in for example determining which nuclear data would benefit from further refinement, pathways-reduced analysis need not necessarily define the most critical reaction, since one reaction may contribute to several different pathways. This work examines three different techniques for ranking reactions in their order of importance in determining the final inventory, viz. a pathways based metric (PBM), the direct method and one based on the Pearson correlation coefficient. Reasons why the PBM is to be preferred are presented.

  10. Non-intrusive Low-Rank Separated Approximation of High-Dimensional Stochastic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Doostan; AbdoulAhad Validi; Gianluca Iaccarino

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a sampling-based (non-intrusive) approach within the context of low-rank separated representations to tackle the issue of curse-of-dimensionality associated with the solution of models, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, with high-dimensional random inputs. Under some conditions discussed in details, the number of random realizations of the solution, required for a successful approximation, grows linearly with respect to the number of random inputs. The construction of the separated representation is achieved via a regularized alternating least-squares regression, together with an error indicator to estimate model parameters. The computational complexity of such a construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs. The performance of the method is investigated through its application to three numerical examples including two ODE problems with high-dimensional random inputs.

  11. CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0.54%. Coal rank was high-volatile C to B bituminous. Comparison of the desorbed gas content (395 scf/ton, as received) at reservoir pressure (2,697 psi) with the sorption isotherm indicates that Lower Calvert Bluff coal at this well site is oversaturated, but lost gas may have been overestimated. This high gas content suggests that little or no depressurization would be required to initiate methane production. Sorption isotherms results indicate that the sorptive capacity of CO{sub 2} is about 2.5 times that of CH{sub 4} at 1,000 psia. This ratio is similar to that of higher rank bituminous coals from other basins (e.g., Carroll, and Pashin, 2003), and it is very low in comparison to results of other low-rank coals and to the values that we used in our preliminary reservoir modeling. If this value from the APCL2 well is representative, Wilcox coals in this area will sequester less CO{sub 2} on a per ton basis than we had earlier inferred. However, because measured methane contents are higher, enhanced coalbed methane production potential is greater than we earlier inferred. Pressure transient testing for determining coal fracture permeability will be conducted soon by Pinnacle Technologies. The data from these analyses will be used to finalize our coal model for the reservoir simulation phase of the project.

  12. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  14. Nuclear Pleomorphism Scoring by Selective Cell Nuclei Detection Jean-Romain Dalle Hao Li Chao-Hui Huang Wee Kheng Leow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Wee Kheng

    Nuclear Pleomorphism Scoring by Selective Cell Nuclei Detection Jean-Romain Dalle Hao Li Chao, National University Hospital pattcp@nus.edu.sg Abstract Scoring the nuclear pleomorphism for nuclear pleo- morphism scoring according to the Nottingham grading system. In contrast, most

  15. Simulation assessment of CO2 sequestration potential and enhanced methane recovery in low-rank coalbeds of the Wilcox Group, east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Arciniegas, Gonzalo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO2 disposal in high-rank coals. Low-rank coals in the Gulf Coastal plain, specifically in Texas, are possible targets for CO2 sequestration and enhanced methane...

  16. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement. Existing methods have two deficiencies for applying to the open col- lections like the deep web. First query in the deep web, the agreements between theses an- swer sets are likely to be helpful in assessing

  17. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement Tempe AZ USA 85287 rajub@asu.edu, rao@asu.edu ABSTRACT One immediate challenge in searching the deep web-similarity-based relevance assess- ment. When applied to the deep web these methods have two deficiencies. First

  18. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

  19. An Empirical Test of the Relationship between Sustainability and Urban Form Based on Indicator Comparisons using Sustainlane Sustainable City Rankings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Ah

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Street Network ......................................................................................... 9? Figure 5 Portland, OR City Chart ..................................................................................... 15? Figure 6 Mesa, AZ City... been not only highly simplistic characterizations of urban sprawl, but also wildly different estimates of which regions have the worst sprawl. As a result of 12 this research, Portland, Oregon, is ranked as the most compact region while Los Angeles...

  20. NYU's Chinese ACE 2005 EDR System Description Can Global Re-Ranking and Semantic Role Labeling help Chinese EDR?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NYU's Chinese ACE 2005 EDR System Description Can Global Re-Ranking and Semantic Role Labeling help Chinese EDR? Heng Ji Adam Meyers Ralph Grishman Proteus Project Department of Computer Science New York the overall architecture of the NYU Chinese ACE 2005 EDR (Entity Detection and Recognition) system, focussing

  1. Type of Diabetes Mellitus and the Odds of Gleason Score 8 to 10 Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Josephine, E-mail: jkang3@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Chen Minghui; Zhang Yuanye [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 21 Century Oncology, Inc., Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 21 Century Oncology, Inc., Fort Myers, FL (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: It has been recently shown that diabetes mellitus (DM) is significantly associated with the likelihood of presenting with high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) or Gleason score (GS) 8 to 10; however, whether this association holds for both Type 1 and 2 DM is unknown. In this study we evaluated whether DM Type 1, 2, or both are associated with high-grade PCa after adjusting for known predictors of high-grade disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2010, a total of 15,330 men diagnosed with PCa and treated with radiation therapy were analyzed. A polychotomous logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether Type 1 or 2 DM was associated with odds of GS 7 or GS 8 to 10 compared with 6 or lower PCa, adjusting for African American race, age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and digital rectal examination findings. Results: Men with Type 1 DM (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-3.27; p = 0.003) or Type 2 DM (AOR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.26-1.99; p < 0.001) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with GS 8 to 10 PCa compared with nondiabetic men. However this was not true for GS 7, for which these respective results were AOR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.93-1.82; p = 0.12 and AOR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.32; p = 0.10. Conclusion: Type 1 and 2 DM were associated with a higher odds of being diagnosed with Gleason score 8 to 10 but not 7 PCa. Pending validation, men who are diagnosed with Type I DM with GS 7 or lower should be considered for additional workup to rule out occult high-grade disease.

  2. Increasing your U.S. News and World Report graduate school rankings: a census of public affairs schools and their strategic communications efforts to create a tradition of distinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoefelmeyer, Karla Sue

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , and resourced properly, can increase each of these areas. Specifically, this research examined the top 50 ranked schools in public affairs to determine the relationship between top ranked schools and their communications departments and each of their uses...

  3. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Susan, E-mail: S.Gibbs@VUMC.nl [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Corsini, Emanuela [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Spiekstra, Sander W. [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galbiati, Valentina [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Universitŕ degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Fuchs, Horst W. [CellSystems GmbH, Troisdorf (Germany); DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew [MB Research Labs, Spinnerstown, PA (United States); Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Roggen, Erwin [3Rs Management and Consultancy (Denmark)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (?g/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency • EC50 (chemical concentration causing 50% decrease in cell viability) ranks potency • In vitro: human DSA{sub 05} correlation is better than in vitro: LLNA correlation.

  4. SNL-NUMO collaborative : development of a deterministic site characterization tool using multi-model ranking and inference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Matthew; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Gray, Genetha Anne; Ahlmann, Michael

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty in site characterization arises from a lack of data and knowledge about a site and includes uncertainty in the boundary conditions, uncertainty in the characteristics, location, and behavior of major features within an investigation area (e.g., major faults as barriers or conduits), uncertainty in the geologic structure, as well as differences in numerical implementation (e.g., 2-D versus 3-D, finite difference versus finite element, grid resolution, deterministic versus stochastic, etc.). Since the true condition at a site can never be known, selection of the best conceptual model is very difficult. In addition, limiting the understanding to a single conceptualization too early in the process, or before data can support that conceptualization, may lead to confidence in a characterization that is unwarranted as well as to data collection efforts and field investigations that are misdirected and/or redundant. Using a series of numerical modeling experiments, this project examined the application and use of information criteria within the site characterization process. The numerical experiments are based on models of varying complexity that were developed to represent one of two synthetically developed groundwater sites; (1) a fully hypothetical site that represented a complex, multi-layer, multi-faulted site, and (2) a site that was based on the Horonobe site in northern Japan. Each of the synthetic sites were modeled in detail to provide increasingly informative 'field' data over successive iterations to the representing numerical models. The representing numerical models were calibrated to the synthetic site data and then ranked and compared using several different information criteria approaches. Results show, that for the early phases of site characterization, low-parameterized models ranked highest while more complex models generally ranked lowest. In addition, predictive capabilities were also better with the low-parameterized models. For the latter iterations, when more data were available, the information criteria rankings tended to converge on the higher parameterized models. Analysis of the numerical experiments suggest that information criteria rankings can be extremely useful for site characterization, but only when the rankings are placed in context and when the contribution of each bias term is understood.

  5. Final report, BWR drywell debris transport Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leonard, M.T.; Williams, K.A.; Wolf, L.T.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a Regulatory Bulletin and accompanying Regulatory Guide (1.82, Rev. 2) which requires licensees of boiling water reactors to develop a specific plan of action (including hardware backfits, if necessary) to preclude the possibility of early emergency core cooling system strainer blockage following a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident. The postulated mechanism for strainer blockage is destruction of piping insulation in the vicinity of the break and subsequent transport of fragmented insulation to the wetwell. In the absence of more definitive information, the Regulatory Guide recommends that licensees assume a drywell debris transport fraction of 1.0. Accordingly, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research focused toward developing a technical basis to provide insights useful to regulatory oversight of licensee submittals associated with resolution of the postulated strainer blockage issue. Part of this program was directed towards experimental and analytical research leading to a more realistic specification of the debris transport through the drywell to the wetwell. To help focus this development into a cost effective effort, a panel, with broad based knowledge and experience, was formed to address the relative importance of the various phenomena that can be expected in plant response to postulated accidents that may produce strainer blockage. The resulting phenomena identification and ranking tables reported herein were used to help guide research. The phenomena occurring in boiling water reactors drywells was the specific focus of the panel, although supporting experimental data and calculations of debris transport fractions were considered.

  6. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  7. Study of the combustion of low rank coal in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, R.; Grimes, R.W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of preliminary combustion tests performed with Eagle Butte Coal in a bubbling, fluidized-bed combustion system. The system was designed for the combustion of low-rank coals and industrial wastes. The work, as proposed, was aimed at not only the evaluation of co-firing of waste material with coal, but also at developing modifications to first generation bubbling bed designs to improve the combustion performance during co-firing. However, the funding for the work was redirected and the combustion tests were suspended soon after the shakedown testing was completed. Consequently, this report describes the results of the tests completed prior to the redirection of the effort and funding. A total of 33 combustion tests were performed in a 6-inch diameter fluidized-bed combustor. Oxygen concentrations were measured at two points in the system; the vent line and at the interface between the fluid bed and the freeboard. These measurements provided a measure of the amount of conversion of coal within the fluidized bed compared to the conversion in the freeboard region. Typically, 75 to 80% of the conversion occurred within the bed. Several experiments were performed in which special bed internals were placed in the bed. The internals were designed to reduce bubble size in the bed thus increasing the surface area of the bubbles and hence promoting oxygen diffusion into the emulsion phase.

  8. Low-rank separated representation surrogates of high-dimensional stochastic functions: Application in Bayesian inference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Validi, AbdoulAhad, E-mail: validiab@msu.edu

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a non-intrusive approach in the context of low-rank separated representation to construct a surrogate of high-dimensional stochastic functions, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, in order to decrease the computational cost of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations in Bayesian inference. The surrogate model is constructed via a regularized alternative least-square regression with Tikhonov regularization using a roughening matrix computing the gradient of the solution, in conjunction with a perturbation-based error indicator to detect optimal model complexities. The model approximates a vector of a continuous solution at discrete values of a physical variable. The required number of random realizations to achieve a successful approximation linearly depends on the function dimensionality. The computational cost of the model construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs, which potentially tackles the curse of dimensionality in high-dimensional stochastic functions. Furthermore, this vector-valued separated representation-based model, in comparison to the available scalar-valued case, leads to a significant reduction in the cost of approximation by an order of magnitude equal to the vector size. The performance of the method is studied through its application to three numerical examples including a 41-dimensional elliptic PDE and a 21-dimensional cavity flow.

  9. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  10. Ranking of four potential nuclear power plant sites in Iraq according to the collective dose criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marouf, B.A.; Al-Kateeb, G.H.; Al-Ani, D.S. [and others

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose criterion was used to rank four potential nuclear power-plant sites. Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. Atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides into the environment from the VVER 440 nuclear power plant during normal operation were used to estimate the collective dose equivalents. The results indicated that the collective doses at Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf were 3.6 x 10{sup -2}, 4.7 x 10{sup -2}, 1.1 x 10{sup -1}, and 1.2 x 10{sup -1} man-Sv, respectively. Thus the order of preference is Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. The effective dose equivalents to the highest exposed individual resulting from atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides from the reactor at any one of the four potential nuclear power-plant sites would not exceed 2 x 10{sup -5} Sv/yr. Thus any one of the four sites is suitable for the operation of the 440 nuclear power plants. 27 refs., 1 tab.

  11. A sharp upper bound for the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian of compact hypersurfaces in rank-1 symmetric spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santhanam, G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $M$ be a closed hypersurface in a simply connected rank-1 symmetric space $\\olm$. In this paper, we give an upper bound for the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian of $M$ in terms of the Ricci curvature of $\\olm$ and the square of the length of the second fundamental form of the geodesic spheres with center at the center-of-mass of $M$.

  12. Finales Ranking Club Apollo 13 (2008/2009) Bei Rckfragen bitte Mail an: leydecker@unikik.uni-hannover.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Finales Ranking Club Apollo 13 (2008/2009) Bei Rückfragen bitte Mail an: leydecker Helmstedt 17 10 18 22 3 57 12 69 #12;Apollo-Crew 5 12, 13 Leibnizschule Hannover Käthe-Einstein-Gymnasium Hameln 18 7 17 21,5 4 56,5 9 65,5 Apollo911 3 11 Gymnasium "In Der Wüste" 21 10 22 53 9 62 Die heimlichen

  13. Advanced CO{sub 2} Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal IGCC System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in bituminous coal the net plant efficiency is about 2.4 percentage points higher than an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant equipped with SelexolTM to capture CO{sub 2}. We also previously completed two successful field demonstrations: one at the National Carbon Capture Center (Southern- Wilsonville, AL) in 2011, and a second demonstration in fall of 2012 at the Wabash River IGCC plant (Terra Haute, IN). In this project, we first optimized the sorbent to catalyst ratio used in the combined WGS and CO{sub 2} capture process and confirmed the technical feasibility in bench-scale experiments. In these tests, we did not observe any CO breakthrough both during adsorption and desorption steps indicating that there is complete conversion of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The overall CO conversions above 90 percent were observed. The sorbent achieved a total CO{sub 2} loading of 7.82 percent wt. of which 5.68 percent is from conversion of CO into CO{sub 2}. The results of the system analysis suggest that the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based Warm Gas Clean-up technology can make a substantial improvement in the IGCC plant thermal performance for a plant designed to achieve near zero emissions (including greater than 90 percent carbon capture). The capital expenses are also expected to be lower than those of Selexol. The higher net plant efficiency and lower capital and operating costs result in substantial reduction in the COE for the IGCC plant equipped with the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based carbon capture system.

  14. MATH 240; EXAM # 2, 100 points, November 8, 2002 (R.A.Brualdi) TOTAL SCORE (10 problems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brualdi, Richard A.

    MATH 240; EXAM # 2, 100 points, November 8, 2002 (R.A.Brualdi) TOTAL SCORE (10 problems): Name, then s1 := 1. Else sn := sn-1 + n5 . (ii) Iterative Algorithm: s1 := 1 For i = 2, 3, . . . , n, si := si

  15. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constance Senior

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

  16. A Study of the Relationship Between Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) and Student Performance on Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Scores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkeley-Jones, Catherine Spotswood

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine teacher Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) self-ratings and student Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores. The study assessed the relationship between LoTi ratings and TAKS scores...

  17. To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement Classification Algorithms presents a set of qualitative and quantitative scores designed to assess performance of any eye movement

  18. Schonlau M., Van Soest A, Kapteyn A, Are `Webographic' or attitudinal questions useful for adjusting estimates from Web surveys using propensity scoring? Survey Research Methods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schonlau, Matt

    for adjusting estimates from Web surveys using propensity scoring? Survey Research Methods, 2007, 1 (3), 155-163. Are `Webographic' or attitudinal questions useful for adjusting estimates from Web surveys using propensity scoring? Abstract Inference from Web surveys may be affected by non-random selection of Web survey participants. One

  19. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) for large break loss of coolant accidents (LBLOCA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggles, A.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, L.Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dimenna, R.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Griffith, P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wilson, G.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of experts in reactor analysis conducted a phenomena identification and ranking (PIR) exercise for a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) in the Advanced Neutron source Reactor (ANSR). The LBLOCA transient is broken into two separate parts for the PIR exercise. The first part considers the initial depressurization of the system that follows the opening of the break. The second part of the transient includes long-term decay heat removal after the reactor is shut down and the system is depressurized. A PIR is developed for each part of the LBLOCA. The ranking results are reviewed to establish if models in the RELAP5-MOD3 thermalhydraulic code are adequate for use in ANSR LBLOCA simulations. Deficiencies in the RELAP5-MOD3 code are identified and existing data or models are recommended to improve the code for this application. Experiments were also suggested to establish models for situations judged to be beyond current knowledge. The applicability of the ANSR PIR results is reviewed for the entire set of transients important to the ANSR safety analysis.

  20. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals: relationship between sporinite spectral fluorescence and coal rank of selected western Kentucky coals. Final report, Part I. [Vitrinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poe, S.H.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 43 coal samples were analyzed - the majority from western Kentucky, with a few from Pennsylvania for comparative purposes - using quantitative fluorescence microscopy of sporinite to determine if coal rank as determined by vitrinite maximum reflectance could be predicted by data gathered from selected fluorescence parameters. All eight parameters (wavelength of highest intensity, area under curve to the left of the peak, area in the blue wavelengths (400 to 500 nm), green (500 to 570 nm), yellow (570 to 630 nm), blue-red ratio, and red-green ratio were found to statistically predict coal rank. The general research hypothesis, which included all the variables, had a R/sup 2/ = 0.354. The results of the step-wise regression yielded red and yellow (collective R/sup 2/ = 0.341) as the best predictor variables of coal rank. The individual parameters of area of red wavelength and blue-red ratio accounted for the greatest variance in predicting coal rank, while the parameter yellow area was the least predictive of coal rank. 31 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group, Energy Technology Research Institute

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  3. EMPIRE ULTIMATE EXPANSION: RESONANCES AND COVARIANCES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERMAN,M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; PIGNI, M.T.; KAWANO, T.; CAPOTE, R.; ZERKIN, V.; TRKOV, A.; SIN, M.; CARSON, B.V.; WIENKE, H. CHO, Y.-S.

    2007-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMPIRE code system is being extended to cover the resolved and unresolved resonance region employing proven methodology used for the production of new evaluations in the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Another directions of Empire expansion are uncertainties and correlations among them. These include covariances for cross sections as well as for model parameters. In this presentation we concentrate on the KALMAN method that has been applied in EMPIRE to the fast neutron range as well as to the resonance region. We also summarize role of the EMPIRE code in the ENDF/B-VII.0 development. Finally, large scale calculations and their impact on nuclear model parameters are discussed along with the exciting perspectives offered by the parallel supercomputing.

  4. An Ultimate Target for Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Yanou Cui; Marc Kamionkowski

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of S-matrix unitarity and the dynamics of thermal freeze-out for massive relic particles (denoted here simply by WIMPs) implies a lower limit on the density of such particles, that provide a (potentially sub-dominant) contribution to dark matter. This then translates to lower limits to the signal rates for a variety of techniques for direct and indirect detection of dark matter. For illustration, we focus on models where annihilation is s-wave dominated. We derive lower limits to the flux of gamma-rays from WIMP annihilation at the Galactic center; direct detection of WIMPs; energetic neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun; and the effects of WIMPs on the angular power spectrum and frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The results suggest that a variety of dark-matter-search techniques may provide interesting avenues to seek new physics, even if WIMPs do not constitute all the dark matter. While the limits are quantitatively some distance from the reach of current measurements, they may be interesting for long-range planning exercises.

  5. The Ultimate Law of Social Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overlander, Jacob Alphaeus

    1901-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 THE ULTIf'ATE LAW OF SOCIAL E7GLUTI0?-T. I n de termin ing the u n d e r l y i n g force? o f the s o c i a l organism, t h e o r i s t s and s c i e n t i... in the KU Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Submitted to the Department of Sociology of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts P o c i t H g y • O v e r l...

  6. The ultimate downscaling limit of FETs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamaluy, Denis; Gao, Xujiao; Tierney, Brian David

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We created a highly efficient, universal 3D quant um transport simulator. We demonstrated that the simulator scales linearly - both with the problem size (N) and number of CPUs, which presents an important break-through in the field of computational nanoelectronics. It allowed us, for the first time, to accurately simulate and optim ize a large number of realistic nanodevices in a much shorter time, when compared to other methods/codes such as RGF[~N 2.333 ]/KNIT, KWANT, and QTBM[~N 3 ]/NEMO5. In order to determine the best-in-class for different beyond-CMOS paradigms, we performed rigorous device optimization for high-performance logic devices at 6-, 5- and 4-nm gate lengths. We have discovered that there exists a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs). We have found that, at room temperatures, all FETs, irre spective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths.

  7. Ultimate Best Buy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSOdatabase[1]

  8. Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO{sub 2} has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO{sub 2} is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO{sub 2} through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO{sub 2} has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO{sub 2} over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry properties. This low-rank coal study extends the existing knowledge base to evaluate the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry concept on an E-Gas™-based IGCC plant with full 90% CO{sub 2} capture. The overall objective is to determine if this technology could be used to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of IGCC plants. The study goes beyond the systems-level analyses and initial lab work that formed the bases of previous studies and includes the following tasks: performing laboratory tests to quantify slurry properties; developing an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry preparation and feed system; conducting a full IGCC plant techno-economic analysis for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and North Dakota lignite in both water and liquid CO{sub 2} slurries; and identifying a technology development plan to continue the due diligence to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this technology. The initial task included rheology tests and slurry data analyses that would increase the knowledge and understanding of maximum solids loading capability for both PRB and lignite. Higher coal concentrations have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} over water slurries, and a coal concentration of 75% by weight in liquid CO{sub 2} has been estimated to be achievable in a commercial application. In addition, lower slurry viscosities have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} at the same solids loading, where the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry viscosity has been measured to be about a factor of 10 lower than the comparable water slurry and estimated to be less than 100 centipoise in a commercial application. In the following task, an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and mixing system has been developed for both a batch and continuous system. The capital cost of the design has also been estimated so that it could be used in the economic analysis. An industry search and survey has been conducted to determine if essential components required to construct the feed system are available from commercial sources or if targeted R&D efforts are required. The search and survey concluded that commercial sources are available for selected components that comprise both the batch and continuous type systems. During normal operation, the fuel exits the bottom of the coal silo and is fed to a rod mill fo

  9. Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

  10. Prognostic Significance of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Patients With Gleason Score 8-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hayek, Sylvia; Amin, Mitual [Department of Pathology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ye Hong; Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Zadora, Steven [Department of Pathology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Cotant, Matthew [Department of Medical Oncology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Brabbins, Donald S.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic significance of neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) in Gleason score 8-10 prostate cancer treated with primary radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Chromogranin A (CgA) staining was performed and overseen by a single pathologist on core biopsies from 176 patients from the William Beaumont prostate cancer database. A total of 143 had evaluable biopsy material. Staining was quantified as 0%, <1%, 1-10%, or >10% of tumor cells. Patients received external beam RT alone or together with high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier estimates determined if the presence/frequency of neuroendocrine cells correlated with clinical endpoints. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Forty patients (28%) had at least focal positive CgA staining (<1% n = 21, 1-10% n = 11, >10% n = 8). No significant differences existed between patients with or without staining in terms of age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, tumor stage, hormone therapy administration, % biopsy core involvement, mean Gleason score, or RT dose/modality. CgA staining concentration independently predicted for biochemical and clinical failure, distant metastases (DM), and cause-specific survival (CSS). For patients with <1% vs. >1% staining, 10-year DM rates were 13.4% vs. 55.3%, respectively (p = 0.001), and CSS was 91.7% vs. 58.9% (p < 0.001). As a continuous variable, increasing CgA staining concentration predicted for inferior rates of DM, CSS, biochemical control, and any clinical failure. No differences in outcomes were appreciated for patients with 0% vs. <1% NED. Conclusions: For Gleason score 8-10 prostate cancer, >1% NED is associated with inferior clinical outcomes for patients treated with radiotherapy. This relates most directly to an increase in distant disease failure.

  11. Validation of a Score Predicting Post-Treatment Ambulatory Status After Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.ne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Douglas, Sarah; Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood (United Kingdom); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A score predicting post-radiotherapy (RT) ambulatory status was developed based on 2,096 retrospectively evaluated metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. This study aimed to validate the score in a prospective series. Methods and Materials: The score included five factors associated with post-RT ambulatory status: tumor type, interval tumor diagnosis to MSCC, visceral metastases, pre-RT motor function, time developing motor deficits. Patients were divided into five groups: 21-28, 29-31, 32-34, 35-37, 38-44 points. In this study, 653 prospectively followed patients were divided into the same groups. Furthermore, the number of prognostic groups was reduced from five to three (21-28, 29-37, 38-44 points). Post-RT ambulatory rates from this series were compared with the retrospective series. Additionally, this series was compared with 104 patients receiving decompressive surgery plus RT (41 laminectomy, 63 laminectomy plus stabilization of vertebrae). Results: In this study, post-RT ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 43.5% (29-31 points), 71.0% (32-34 points), 89.5% (35-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points). Ambulatory rates from the retrospective study were 6.2%, 43.5%, 70.0%, 86.1%, and 98.7%. After regrouping, ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 70.9% (29-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points) in this series, and 6.2%, 68.4%, and 98.7% in the retrospective series. Ambulatory rates were 0%, 62.5%, and 90.9% in the laminectomy plus RT group, and 14.3%, 83.9%, and 100% in the laminectomy + stabilization plus RT group. Conclusions: Ambulatory rates in the different groups in this study were similar to those in the retrospective study demonstrating the validity of the score. Using only three groups is simplier for clinical routine.

  12. Screening and ranking framework (SRF) for geologic CO2 storagesite selection on the basis of HSE risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening and ranking framework (SRF) has been developedto evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on thebasis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from CO2leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that CO2 leakage risk isdependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site:(1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2)the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks;and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 ifthe primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. Theframework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numericalscores representing expert opinions or published information along withestimates of uncertainty. Applications to three sites in Californiademonstrate the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible throughthe use of more detailed data or model results in place of propertyproxies.

  13. Scoring and mapping bovine anchor loci and screening polymorphic markers for horns and coat color in a Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenneman, Rick Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chromosomes or syntenic groups, 12 markers are assigned to linkage groups, and 19 are unassigned and unlinked markers. In order to more efficiently assign the markers under development to chromosomes, additional anchor loci were scored and tested...

  14. An Analysis of Relationships between the Green Building Certification System for Multi-family Housing (GBCS-MF) Scores and Resident Perception Ratings in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joo Hyun

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the relationships between the scores of the Green Building Certification System for Multifamily Housing (GBCS-MF) and resident perception ratings in South Korea. Sustainability has become important in architecture...

  15. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  16. Rank in materials science Rank in chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    ,503 60.12 31 Paul W.M. Blom University of Groningen 37 2,176 58.81 32 Jenny Nelson Imperial College London 31 1,821 58.74 33 David J. Mooney Harvard University 43 2,512 58.42 34 Tsu-Wei Chou University

  17. Compact complex manifolds as models Main theorem Strongly minimal groups Higher rank groups Questions Groups in the theory of compact complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Thomas

    = {z U | f (z) = 0}. Definition The structure CCM is the multisorted structure having a sort M Questions Basic model theory of CCM · CCM eliminates quantifiers. Thomas Scanlon University of California theorem Strongly minimal groups Higher rank groups Questions Basic model theory of CCM · CCM eliminates

  18. Ranked in the top 50 MFA programs in the nation by Poets & Writers, the nation's largest nonprofit organization for creative writers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    · Ranked in the top 50 MFA programs in the nation by Poets & Writers, the nation's largest, starred reviews in Publishers Weekly and been named Notable Books by the Academy of American Poets's leading poets, with chapbooks that are available free of charge and without copyright #12;

  19. Expanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue is preparing for the 21st century global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges ­ global health, global competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, global and visibility that Purdue enjoys at all levels globally. · Provide global experience for Purdue facultyExpanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue

  20. Documents Required by the Office of Academic Affairs for Clinician Educator Actions, October 2014 Rank Action Duration Required documents (Number of letters shown are minimums)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Documents Required by the Office of Academic Affairs for Clinician Educator Actions, October 2014 Rank Action Duration Required documents (Number of letters shown are minimums) Clinical Instructor% FTE or greater and who have outside clinical activity, http://med.stanford.edu/academicaffairs/documents

  1. Annotating animal mitochondrial tRNAs: A new scoring scheme and an empirical evaluation of four methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, Stacia K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of transfer RNAs in animal mitochondrial genomes is important for many areas of genome analysis including phylogenetic reconstruction, understanding inheritance of disease, and identifying forensic materials. Animal mitochondrial tRNAs differ from the canonical tRNAs in both their secondary structure and level of conservation of nucleotide sequence and therefore, conventional tRNA or general RNA searching software cannot be used for identification and custom methods are required. Here we present the results of an experimental analysis of four different methods tested on a large dataset consisting of 5,720 tRNAs extracted from the entire set of complete animal mitochondrial genomes in GenBank. Methods were evaluated based on number of false negatives and false positives. Additionally, we present a new scoring scheme customized for animal mitochondrial tRNAs.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

  3. Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

  4. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period I.

  5. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the third quarter of Budget Period II.

  6. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re- injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fourth quarter of Budget Period II.

  7. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  8. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the second quarter of Budget Period II.

  9. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the twelfth quarter of Budget Period I.

  10. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

  11. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the final quarter of Budget Period I.

  12. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the tenth quarter of Budget Period I.

  13. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

  14. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the eleventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  15. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

  16. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

  17. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  18. Mathematics Achievement Scale Score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Croatia 490 New Zealand 486 Spain 482 Romania 482 Poland 481 Turkey 469 Azerbaijan 463 Chile 462 Thailand Romania 505 Spain 505 Poland 505 TIMSS Scale Centerpoint 500 New Zealand 497 Kazakhstan 495 Norway 494 Kazakhstan 487 Sweden 484 Ukraine 479 Norway 475 Armenia 467 Romania 458 United Arab Emirates 456 Turkey 452

  19. Initial Score: # of workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    My lab has replaced incandescent lamps with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) or Light Emitting Diodes

  20. OMB Guidance and Scoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the improvements; * (2) measurement and verification (M& V) of savings through commissioning and retrocommissioning; and * (3) competition or an alternatives analysis as part...

  1. Energy Performance Score Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energy Incentive Programs,EnergyAugust 10,Installof

  2. General User Proposal Scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coherent Imaging) 72 2.30 9.3.2 (APSDAMC, High-Pressure XPS) 38 1.90 10.0.1. (HERSAMO) 34 2.05 10.3.2 (Micro XAFS) 45 1.90 11.0.1 (Magnetic Microscopy,...

  3. Home Energy Score graphic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,theA12345 Honeysuckle Lane 1,800

  4. Home Energy Score Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment ofEnergy

  5. Technical report TR2011-11-23, 2011, HCI Lab, Texas State University Automated Classification and Scoring of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    and Scoring of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in Presence of Fixations and Saccades Alex Karpov Department Science Texas State University-San Marcos ok11@txstate.edu Abstract Ternary eye movement classification, which separates fixations, saccades, and smooth pursuit from the raw eye positional data, is extremely

  6. Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

  7. The effect of individualized self-paced single-gender classrooms on reading and math scores at the mclennan county challenge academy in Waco, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Marilyn Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to determine the effects on the reading and math scores of females segregated into single-gender alternative classrooms that had the benefit of an individualized, self-paced curriculum. The Challenge Academy testing clerk...

  8. Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R. & Buja, A. (1994b), `Flexible discriminant analysis by optimal scoring', Journal of the American Statistical Association 89, 1255--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    ', Journal of the American Statistical Association 89, 1255-- 1270. Hertz, J., Krogh, A. & Palmer, R. (1991. 1994a). References Becker, R., Chambers, J. & Wilks, A. (1988), The New S Language, WadsworthHastie, T., Tibshirani, R. & Buja, A. (1994b), `Flexible discriminant analysis by optimal scoring

  9. RANK Cultivar Compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 6 5 5.5 S1S3 (II) 48 Glacier 6 6 6 6 5 6 5.8 Self Fruitful 49 Sylvia 6 6 - 6.0 S1S4 (IX) 50 Viva 6

  10. Reordering MPI Ranks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contain 24 cores) are located across different positions on the 3D torus network, communication time between tasks will vary depending not only on node placement, but also the...

  11. Feature ranking - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Poland electricity load, diabetes, and Santa Fe laser. References ... ing CCA and kohonen maps - application to electricity consumption. ESANN'2000.

  12. GLOSSARY: ARMY RANK, ACRONYMS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    by a relentless insurgency and by a horrific expansion of sectarian violence between Sunni and Shia factions

  13. Reordering MPI Ranks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewal Individual Permit

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

  15. Synthesis gas production with an adjustable H{sub 2}/CO ratio through the coal gasification process: effects of coal ranks and methane addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct production of synthesis gas using coal as a cheap feedstock is attractive but challenging due to its low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas. Three typical U.S. coals of different ranks were tested in a 2.5 in. coal gasifier to investigate their gasification reactivity and adjustability on H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas with or without the addition of methane. Tests indicated that lower-rank coals (lignite and sub-bituminous) have higher gasification reactivity than bituminous coals. The coal gasification reactivity is correlated to its synthesis-gas yield and the total percentage of H{sub 2} and CO in the synthesis gas, but not to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio of coal gasification was found to be correlated to the rank of coals, especially the H/C ratio of coals. Methane addition into the dense phase of the pyrolysis and gasification zone of the cogasification reactor could make the best use of methane in adjusting the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the generated synthesis gas. The maximum methane conversion efficiency, which was likely correlated to its gasification reactivity, could be achieved by 70% on average for all tested coals. The actual catalytic effect of generated coal chars on methane conversion seemed coal-dependent. The coal-gasification process benefits from methane addition and subsequent conversion on the adjustment of the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of synthesis gas. The methane conversion process benefits from the use of coal chars due to their catalytic effects. This implies that there were likely synergistic effects on both. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3

  16. Low-rank approximations for large stationary covariance matrices, as used in the Bayesian and generalized-least-squares analysis of pulsar-timing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutger van Haasteren; Michele Vallisneri

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Many data-analysis problems involve large dense matrices that describe the covariance of stationary noise processes; the computational cost of inverting these matrices, or equivalently of solving linear systems that contain them, is often a practical limit for the analysis. We describe two general, practical, and accurate methods to approximate stationary covariance matrices as low-rank matrix products featuring carefully chosen spectral components. These methods can be used to greatly accelerate data-analysis methods in many contexts, such as the Bayesian and generalized-least-squares analysis of pulsar-timing residuals.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 3: Fission-Product Transport and Dose PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Fission Product Transport (FPT) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) report briefly reviews the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) FPT mechanisms and then documents the step-by-step PIRT process for FPT. The panel examined three FPT modes of operation: (1) Normal operation which, for the purposes of the FPT PIRT, established the fission product circuit loading and distribution for the accident phase. (2) Anticipated transients which were of less importance to the panel because a break in the pressure circuit boundary is generally necessary for the release of fission products. The transients can change the fission product distribution within the circuit, however, because temperature changes, flow perturbations, and mechanical vibrations or shocks can result in fission product movement. (3) Postulated accidents drew the majority of the panel's time because a breach in the pressure boundary is necessary to release fission products to the confinement. The accidents of interest involved a vessel or pipe break, a safety valve opening with or without sticking, or leak of some kind. Two generic scenarios were selected as postulated accidents: (1) the pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC) accident, and (2) the depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC) accidents. FPT is not an accident driver; it is the result of an accident, and the PIRT was broken down into a two-part task. First, normal operation was seen as the initial starting point for the analysis. Fission products will be released by the fuel and distributed throughout the reactor circuit in some fashion. Second, a primary circuit breach can then lead to their release. It is the magnitude of the release into and out of the confinement that is of interest. Depending on the design of a confinement or containment, the impact of a pressure boundary breach can be minimized if a modest, but not excessively large, fission product attenuation factor can be introduced into the release path. This exercise has identified a host of material properties, thermofluid states, and physics models that must be collected, defined, and understood to evaluate this attenuation factor. The assembled PIRT table underwent two iterations with extensive reorganization between meetings. Generally, convergence was obtained on most issues, but different approaches to the specific physics and transport paths shade the answers accordingly. The reader should be cautioned that merely selecting phenomena based on high importance and low knowledge may not capture the true uncertainty of the situation. This is because a transport path is composed of several serial linkages, each with its own uncertainty. The propagation of a chain of modest uncertainties can lead to a very large uncertainty at the end of a long path, resulting in a situation that is of little regulatory guidance.

  18. GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botte, Gerardine G.

    -point average; graduate or professional examination scores be eligible for consideration. and percentile ranking the application as the college or university A copy of the score report and percentile ranking on official

  19. Development of a phenomena identification and ranking table for thermal-hydraulic phenomena during a double-ended guillotine break LOCA in an SRS production reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.G.; Ortiz, M.G.; Bolander, M.A.; Wilson, G.E.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rising level of scrutiny is being directed toward the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors. Improved calculational capabilities are being developed to provide a best estimate analytical process to determine the safe operating margins of the reactors. The Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology, developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support best estimate simulations, is being applied to the best estimate limits analysis for the SRS production reactors. One of the foundational parts of the method is the identification and ranking of all the processes that occur during the specific limiting scenario. The phenomena ranking is done according to their importance to safety criteria during the transient and is used to focus the uncertainty analysis on a sufficient, yet cost effective scope of work. This report documents the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur during a limiting break in an SRS production reactor and their importance to the uncertainty in simulations of the reactor behavior. 9 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. On the controllers of prime ideals of group algebras of Abelian torsion-free groups of finite rank over a field of positive characteristic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tushev, A V [Department of Chemistry, Dnepropetrovsk National University, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine)

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper certain methods are developed that enable one to study the properties of the controller of a prime faithful ideal I of the group algebra kA of an Abelian torsion-free group A of finite rank over a field k. The main idea is that the quotient ring kA/I by the given ideal I can be embedded as an integral domain k[A] into some field F and the group A becomes a subgroup of the multiplicative group of the field F. This allows one to apply certain results of field theory, such as Kummer's theory and the properties of the multiplicative groups of fields, to the study of the integral domain k[A]. In turn, the properties of the integral domain k[A]{approx_equal}kA/I depend essentially on the properties of the ideal I. In particular, by using these methods, an independent proof of the new version of Brookes's theorem on the controllers of prime ideals of the group algebra kA of an Abelian torsion-free group A of finite rank is obtained in the case where the field k has positive characteristic.

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eligible Cost Share1 Proposed Award Per Station Score Rank Proposed Awards 5 Linde, LLC Linde Cupertino

  2. The Relationship of Principal Leadership to Organizational Learning and Sustained Academic Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardoin, Leonard J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared to Norms Established by Kouzes and Posner Ranked From Most to Least Observed?....................?. 115 7. Leadership Practices Inventory Percentile Rankings??????..??.?.? 116 8. LPI Self /Observer Scores and Mean... Percentile Rankings for Model the Way? 118 9. LPI Self /Observer Scores and Mean Percentile Rankings for Inspire a Shared Vision...

  3. The Effects of Anchor Length, Test Difficulty, Population Ability Differences, Mixture of Populations and Sample Size on the Psychometric Properties of Levine Observed Score Linear Equating Method for Different Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvajal, Jorge E.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    group Q gets form Y and the same group of items A. In other words, A is a test of common items. The group of 2 common items measures differences in group ability (Kolen and Brennan, 2004). Anchor test is another name for this group of common items... or vertical scaling, which involves a comparison of scores from tests for different grade levels; however, because the content from these tests is different, these scores cannot be used interchangeably as in the case of equated scores (Kolen and Brennan...

  4. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  5. Separability of the massive Dirac's equation in 5-dimensional Myers-Perry black hole geometry and its relation to a rank-three Killing-Yano tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang-Qing Wu

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dirac equation for the electron around a five-dimensional rotating black hole with two different angular momenta is separated into purely radial and purely angular equations. The general solution is expressed as a superposition of solutions derived from these two decoupled ordinary differential equations. By separating variables for the massive Klein-Gordon equation in the same space-time background, I derive a simple and elegant form for the Stackel-Killing tensor, which can be easily written as the square of a rank-three Killing-Yano tensor. I have also explicitly constructed a symmetry operator that commutes with the scalar Laplacian by using the Stackel-Killing tensor, and the one with the Dirac operator by the Killing-Yano tensor admitted by the five-dimensional Myers-Perry metric, respectively.

  6. The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is accepting applications for open rank non-tenure track faculty positions for academic year 2014-2015. All positions require teaching undergraduate and/or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is accepting applications for open rank non/or graduate courses related to Industrial and Systems Engineering, and service to the department. A successful of Industrial and Systems Engineering provides competitive compensation packages and benefits. To apply, please

  7. How Can Journal Impact Factors be Normalized across Fields of Science? An Assessment in terms of Percentile Ranks and Fractional Counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CD-ROM version of the Science Citation Index 2010 (N = 3,705 journals), we study the (combined) effects of (i) fractional counting on the impact factor (IF) and (ii) transformation of the skewed citation distributions into a distribution of 100 percentiles and six percentile rank classes (top-1%, top-5%, etc.). Do these approaches lead to field-normalized impact measures for journals? In addition to the two-year IF (IF2), we consider the five-year IF (IF5), the respective numerators of these IFs, and the number of Total Cites, counted both as integers and fractionally. These various indicators are tested against the hypothesis that the classification of journals into 11 broad fields by PatentBoard/National Science Foundation provides (statistically) significant between-field effects. Using fractional counting the between-field variance is reduced by 91.7% in the case of IF5, and by 79.2% in the case of IF2. However, the differences in citation counts are not significantly affected by fractional coun...

  8. Hazard Ranking System evaluation of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 1, Evaluation methods and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.; Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to formally document the individual site Hazard Ranking System (HRS) evaluations conducted as part of the preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI) activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that describe the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program addressing the cleanup of inactive waste sites. These orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The methodology includes six parts: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the HRS methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 34 refs., 43 figs., 47 tabs.

  9. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  10. Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

  11. EURISOL Design Study : Towards an Ultimate ISOL Facility for Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenfeld, Y; Butler, P; Cornell, J; Fortuna, G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract of invited talk at Franco-Japanese Symposium: New Paradigms in Nuclear Physics.Paris, France, Sept.29 - Oct.2, 2008

  12. ccsd00000974, Evaluation of the ultimate performances of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (for a recent review see [1]). The present work is motivated by strong progress in storing, cooling. If using the odd isotope 43 Ca + and a vessel cooled to 77 K, the expected relative shift is 2 #2; 10 16 ion. PACS: 32.60.+i, 32.70.Jz, 32.80.Pj, 32.80.Qk 1 Introduction Thanks to the recent progress made

  13. The Legacy of Rolf Hagedorn: Statistical Bootstrap and Ultimate Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the latter half of the last century, it became evident that there exists an ever increasing number of different states of the so-called elementary particles. The usual reductionist approach to this problem was to search for a simpler infrastructure, culminating in the formulation of the quark model and quantum chromodynamics. In a complementary, completely novel approach, Hagedorn suggested that the mass distribution of the produced particles follows a self-similar composition pattern, predicting an unbounded number of states of increasing mass. He then concluded that such a growth would lead to a limiting temperature for strongly interacting matter. We discuss the conceptual basis for this approach, its relation to critical behavior, and its subsequent applications in different areas of high energy physics.

  14. The Legacy of Rolf Hagedorn: Statistical Bootstrap and Ultimate Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Redlich; Helmut Satz

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the latter half of the last century, it became evident that there exists an ever increasing number of different states of the so-called elementary particles. The usual reductionist approach to this problem was to search for a simpler infrastructure, culminating in the formulation of the quark model and quantum chromodynamics. In a complementary, completely novel approach, Hagedorn suggested that the mass distribution of the produced particles follows a self-similar composition pattern, predicting an unbounded number of states of increasing mass. He then concluded that such a growth would lead to a limiting temperature for strongly interacting matter. We discuss the conceptual basis for this approach, its relation to critical behavior, and its subsequent applications in different areas of high energy physics.

  15. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  16. Last Updated: 8/3/2010 ULTIMATE FRISBEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    , or synthetic) which covers the foot attached to a composition bottom. iii. Shoes with rubber cleats

  17. A Test Stand for Ion Sources of Ultimate Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enparantza, R.; Uriarte, L.; Romano, P.; Alonso, J.; Ariz, I.; Egiraun, M. [Fundacion Tekniker-IK4, Eibar (Spain); Bermejo, F. J.; Etxebarria, V. [University of the Basque Country, Dpt. Electricity and Electronics, Leioa, Spain, and Consejo Superior de Investgaciones Cientificas, Inst. Estructura de la Materia (Spain); Lucas, J. [Elytt Energy, Portugalete (Spain); Del Rio, J. M. [Jema Group, Lasarte (Spain); Letchford, A.; Faircloth, D. [ISIS Accelerator Division, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Stockli, M. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge (United States)

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rationale behind the ITUR project is to perform a comparison between different kinds of H{sup -} ion sources using the same beam diagnostics setup. In particular, a direct comparison will be made in terms of the emittance characteristics of Penning Type sources such as those currently in use in the injector for the ISIS (UK) Pulsed Neutron Source and those of volumetric type such as that driving the injector for the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (TN, U.S.A.). The endeavour here pursued is thus to build an Ion Source Test Stand where virtually any type of source can be tested and its features measured and, thus compared to the results of other sources under the same gauge. It would be possible then to establish a common ground for effectively comparing different ion sources. The long term objectives are thus to contribute towards building compact sources of minimum emittance, maximum performance, high reliability-availability, high percentage of desired particle production, stability and high brightness. The project consortium is lead by Tekniker-IK4 research centre and partners are companies Elytt Energy and Jema Group. The technical viability is guaranteed by the collaboration between the project consortium and several scientific institutions, such the CSIC (Spain), the University of the Basque Country (Spain), ISIS (STFC-UK), SNS (ORNL-USA) and CEA in Saclay (France)

  18. Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the limits of current conventional computers and develop multiple functions for a single device, possibly allowing everyday electronics to become smaller and faster than they are...

  19. achieve ultimate properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plates CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. A new regime of convection, with a unprecedented heat transfer efficiency (Nu ? Ra 0.38) has been observed in Grenoble in 1996 and named...

  20. Ultimate disposal of low and medium radioactive waste in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringeard, C. [National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Environmental, Safety, Quality Dept.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) has been entrusted with the long-term management of radioactive waste. This paper presents the methodology of safety assessment used by ANDRA for a land disposal facility of radioactive waste with short or medium half-life and with low or medium specific activity. This methodology was used in the design of ``the Centre de stockage de l`Aube``.

  1. On the ultimate fate of AM Her stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Meyer; E. Meyer-Hofmeister

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest, that the magnetic field of the white dwarf in AM Her systems loses coupling to the secondary star when the latter becomes non-magnetic at the transition from a late main sequence star to a cool degenerate brown dwarf. This leads to spin-up of the primary white dwarf. After synchronous rotation is lost the systems do not appear as AM Her stars anymore. We discuss the further evolution of such systems.

  2. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big* - ' E 1PERFORMANCE

  3. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTimeof

  4. Science Bowl Scoring Sheet Team Team Final Team Score Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 3 6 10 14 18 22 24 2 5 9 13 17 21 4 8 12 16 20 7 11 15 19 23 25 Toss-up Toss-up Bonus Bonus Penalty Penalty Cumulative Total Cumulative Total B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R...

  5. Commercial Building Energy Assest Score Overall Building Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational Broadbandof theCommercial Building

  6. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational Broadbandof theCommercial

  7. Science Bowl Scoring Sheet Team Team Final Team Score Final Team Score

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney, Office of ScienceActivities in

  8. Key Blog Distillation: Ranking Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, C.; Ounis, I.

    Macdonald,C. Ounis,I. In Proceedings of the 17th ACM Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM 2008), Napa Valley, California, USA, October 26-30, 2008 ACM Press

  9. Table Search (or Ranking Tables)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halevy, Alon

    ;Table Search #3 #12;Outline · Goals of table search · Table search #1: Deep Web · Table search #3 search Table search #1: Deep Web · Table search #3: (setup): Fusion Tables · Table search #2: WebTables ­Version 1: modify document search ­Version 2: recover table semantics #12;Searching the Deep Web store

  10. Rank Equilibration and Political Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Bo; Zelditch, Morris Jr

    2015-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    little mobility occurs»" Lipset and Bendix point to several factors which in their view contribute to the maintenance of widespread mobility expectations among Americans; The absence of a Feudal past, educational opportunities, the presence...

  11. Sensitivityindex Rank of Sensitivity index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villa-vialaneix, Nathalie

    , Marco1 ; Tarantola, Stefano2 ; Busto, Mirko1 ; Villa-Vialaneix Nathalie3.4 Abstract Process-based model, Institute for Environment and Sustainability; 2 Stefano Tarantola: European Commission, Joint Research the marginal pdfs of the k input parameters using a quasi-Monte Carlo generator (Sobol', 1967) is generated. 2

  12. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  13. Multicenter Analysis of Effect of High Biologic Effective Dose on Biochemical Failure and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Gleason Score 7-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rates and survival for Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologic effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 5,889 permanent prostate brachytherapy patients, of whom 1,078 had Gleason score 7 (n = 845) or Gleason score 8-10 (n = 233) prostate cancer and postimplant dosimetry results available. The median prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/mL (range, 0.4-300). The median follow-up for censored patients was 46 months (range, 5-130). Short-term hormonal therapy (median duration, 3.9 months) was used in 666 patients (61.8%) and supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 620 (57.5%). The patients were stratified into three BED groups: <200 Gy (n = 645), 200-220 Gy (n = 199), and >220 Gy (n = 234). Biochemical freedom from failure (bFFF) was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: The 5-year bFFF rate was 80%. The bFFF rate stratified by the three BED groups was 76.4%, 83.5%, and 88.3% (p < 0.001), respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, use of hormonal therapy, EBRT, and BED were associated with bFFF (p < 0.001). Freedom from metastasis improved from 92% to 99% with the greatest doses. The overall survival rate at 5 years for the three BED groups for Gleason score 8-10 cancer was 86.6%, 89.4%, and 94.6%, respectively (p = 0.048). Conclusion: These data suggest that permanent prostate brachytherapy combined with EBRT and hormonal therapy yields excellent bFFF and survival results in Gleason score 7-10 patients when the delivered BEDs are >220 Gy. These doses can be achieved by a combination of 45-Gy EBRT with a minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume of 120 Gy of {sup 103}Pd or 130 Gy of {sup 125}I.

  14. Uncertainties and Ambiguities in Percentiles and how to Avoid Them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently proposed fractional scoring scheme is used to attribute publications to percentile rank classes. It is shown that in this way uncertainties and ambiguities in the evaluation of percentile ranks do not occur. Using the fractional scoring the total score of all papers exactly reproduces the theoretical value.

  15. Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS AUDI TT ROADSTER QUATTRO 2.0L 4, auto Awd [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 22 31 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (CONVERTIBLE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (COUPE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES

  16. Essays on the Economics of Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Hosung

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improved significantly (7 to 10 percentile points) after theschools scored 2 to 3 percentile points higher in reading,of the distribution of percentile ranks. The estimated

  17. SaltRx HT -Scoring Sheet A1. 0.1 M Bis-Tris Propane pH 7.0, 1.8 M Sodium Acetate pH 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    SaltRx HT - Scoring Sheet A1. 0.1 M Bis-Tris Propane pH 7.0, 1.8 M Sodium Acetate pH 7.0 A2. 0.1 M Bis-Tris Propane pH 7.0, 2.8 M Sodium Acetate pH 7.0 A3. 0.1 M Sodium Acetate pH 4.6, 1.5 M Ammonium Chloride A4. 0.1 M Bis-Tris Propane pH 7.0, 1.5 M Ammonium Chloride A5. 0.1 M Tris pH 8.5, 1.5 M Ammonium

  18. Tenneco scores a first with artificial reef

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1982-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes the launching of a retired production platform in Florida waters where the 500-ton structure will become the world's first artificial fishing reef. Recent studies show how abandoned platforms can contribute to marine life propagation. Reef marker buoys were added to the jacket before launching to conform to U.S. Coast Guard specifications. Dives made at the site established a fish population base on which to evaluate the jacket's success. Periodic dives will be made to update the census and determine the reef's performance.

  19. Tenneco scores a first with artificial reef

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1982-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes the launching of a retired production platform in Florida waters where it will become the world's first artificial fishing reef. Tenneco's decision to use a 500-ton structure for a reef was made after recent studies showed how abandoned platforms can contribute to marine life propagation. The accommodations unit and other structures on the deck section were perforated with holes of varying sizes to permit light penetration and provide additional protection for young fish. Photo sequence shows the jacket launch. A number of dives made at the site before the jacket was launched established a fish population base on which to evaluate the jacket's success. Periodic dives will be made to update the census and determine the reef's performance.

  20. El Paso Electric- SCORE and Commercial Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    El Paso Electric offers a targeted incentive program for public institutions, local governments and higher education.

  1. Prostate Cancer Postoperative Nomogram Scores and Obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Postoperative Nomogram and Obesity Table 1. Characteristicscharacteristics according to obesity. Race/ethnicity, n (%)Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999-2000.

  2. Generalized score tests for missing covariate data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Lei

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.2 The Case of the Selection Probability pi Being Known and ? Being Given . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.3 Parametric Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.4 Semiparametric Setting... in Scharfstein, Rotnitzky, and Robins, 1999; Van der Laan and Robins, 2003, Ibrahim, Chen, Lipsitz, and Herring, 2005). Considering n independent observations, Robins et al. (1994) proposed the gen- eral weighted estimating equations (WEEs) U(?,pi...

  3. Energy Performance Score Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen| DepartmentTrackingSeptember 18, 2014Energy

  4. Home Energy Score | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,GlenLearningDepartment of Energy Blower door

  5. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Features | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Specification for Parking Lots Lighten Energy Load The GE GeoSpring(tm) Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the...

  6. Making sense of divergent career test scores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Steven

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ?) (Myers, McCaulley, Quenk & Hammer, 1998) was originally the brainchild of Katharine Myers (Saunders, 1991). Myers based the test on the theory of the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung. Jung posited that based on similarities of personality preferences... century as strictly an assessment of career-related interests. The test is based on the theory of six, career-related personality types of John Holland (1997). The six personality types of his theory include Realistic (R), which indicates an interest...

  7. Scoring "The Electric Leg" 100 Years Later

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Sally

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Sally Chou is approved. Frank Heuser Ian Krouse Paul S.Chou Master of Arts in Music University of California, Los Angeles, 2013 Professor Paul

  8. Home Energy Score Launch | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,theA Qualified AssessorEnergyThis

  9. Home Energy Score Webinar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,theA

  10. LDRD Scoring Sheet | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 104

  11. Appendix I Cultural Resource Sensitivity Scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 TableimpurityAppeals8I Cultural Resources

  12. Home Energy Score Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial ColdEnergySavvy HomeLaunch Home Energy

  13. Home Energy Score Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial ColdEnergySavvy HomeLaunchof(TextProgram

  14. Home Energy Score Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial ColdEnergySavvy

  15. Boosting Native American students' math scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticle IdentificationBoosting Native

  16. Asset Score Overviews | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems |AsApril

  17. Home Energy Score Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,AssessmentInteractive Graphic Home Energy

  18. Home Energy Score Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,AssessmentInteractive Graphic Home

  19. Home Energy Score FAQs for Homeowners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment of EnergyDataWhy

  20. Home Energy Score FAQs for Partners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment of

  1. Home Energy Score Launch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment ofEnergy HomeHome

  2. Home Energy Score Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment ofEnergyHome Energy

  3. Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p aDepartment

  4. ActiveGreenScore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki HomeASN PowerApplications |

  5. Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromising Magnesium

  6. Versant tests are automated spoken language tests that are taken on the telephone or computer. If you would like to listen to a sample test, purchase a practice test, or view the test score after taking the test (if applicable), please visit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blei, Ron

    Versant tests are automated spoken language tests that are taken on the telephone or computer. If you would like to listen to a sample test, purchase a practice test, or view the test score after taking the test (if applicable), please visit www.VersantTest.com PART INSTRUCTIONS · Carefully read

  7. COMPARISON OF IDENTIFICATION AND RANKING METHODOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    refinement of the rate quality control (RQC) method, using climate data that helps identify road segments screening, speed countermeasure, GIS crash analysis, rate quality control, crash data. 18. Distribution causal factor in 27% of total crashes and 36% of all fatal crashes. Excessive speed is a driver behavior

  8. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  9. Deep-web search engine ranking algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Brian Wai Fung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep web refers to content that is hidden behind HTML forms. The deep web contains a large collection of data that are unreachable by link-based search engines. A study conducted at University of California, Berkeley ...

  10. A New Ranking Method for Multimedia Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounis, I.

    Ounis,I. Proceedings of Asia Pacific Web Conference, APWEB'99, World Wide Web -- Technologies and Applications for the New Millennium, Sept. 27-29 (Hong Kong)

  11. Ranking Related News Predictions Nattiya Kanhabua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    world. These include the energy crisis, the global financial crisis, politics, health care, science, requires prior specif c permission and/or a fee. SIGIR'11, July 24­28, 2011, Beijing, China. Copyright 2011

  12. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /A N/A 200 pounds of alkaline batteries 4 Solar Flood Lighting* Life Sciences, BO (Robert Colichio) $5 are based on installation charges for a typical street light (trenching and pulling wire). ** This project

  13. RABBITSFOOT (T) ctRanking(Econ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) (0008040) IL, IN X Tulsa SWD MCCLELLAN-KERR ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION SYSTEM (TULSA DISTRICT) OK X139 Tulsa SWD MCCLELLAN KERR ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION SYSTEM (TULSA DISTRICT) (0000510) OK X #12;Economic

  14. Hierarchical Ranking of Facial Attributes Ankur Datta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    to queries containing facial attributes, such as baldness, presence of beard, sunglasses, eyeglasses, hat

  15. ON THE IRREDUCIBILITY, LYAPUNOV RANK, AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 28, 2013 ... ?(K) > n, one gets an overdetermined system of bilinear relations. In many of these ...... International Journal of Optimization: Theory,. Methods ...

  16. Ranking of Information in Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    and prices, ­ What taxi cabs are there around me? ­ Does the next Route 7 bus have a bike rack? · Multimodal(vi, sj) is distance between vehicle vi and slot sj. 12 Identical speeds of vehicles #12;Parking Problem

  17. Personalized PageRank Solution Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    recent survey [10].) Among all .... We plan to make our experimental codes available in the ...... Knowledge Management, CIKM '08, pages 609–618, New York,.

  18. CANCELLATION DOES NOT IMPLY STABLE RANK ONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toms AS

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    K0-groups. These algebras constitute the first simple, nuclear and stably finite counterexamples to Elliott's classification conjecture for nuclear C*-algebras [2, 6

  19. Optimization Online - Hankel Matrix Rank Minimization with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryam Fazel

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 29, 2012 ... Abstract: We introduce a flexible optimization framework for nuclear norm minimization of matrices with linear structure, including Hankel, ...

  20. Rank-Sparsity Incoherence for Matrix Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkat Chandrasekaran

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2009 ... Keywords: matrix decomposition, convex relaxation, L1 norm minimization, nuclear norm minimization, uncertainty principle, semidefinite ...