National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ultimate ranking score

  1. General User Proposal Scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Scores Print Scoring Proposals are scored on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the best score and 5 the worst. Reviewers are requested to use the following ranking schema: Must do High Priority Medium Priority Low priority Don't do Beam time is assigned based on each proposal's score in relation to all other proposals for a given beamline. For beamlines where beam time requests exceed available beam time, a cutoff score is assigned after which no beam time is allocated. Individual Beam

  2. UltimateAdvisor offers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UltimateAdvisor offers you comprehensive legal insurance at an affordable cost. Protect your family, finances and future from everyday legal issues without the high cost of attorney fees. ∙ Employee: $5.55 semi-monthly ∙ Employee plus child(ren): $7.62 semi-monthly Questions about your insurance? Call us toll-free at 800-247-4184 or visit ARAGLegalCenter.com, Access Code 14822lal. Your Opportunity to Enroll is Limited - Take Control Today! Legal Insurance from ARAG ® Affordable Legal

  3. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  4. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  5. Ultimate Best Buy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ultimate Best Buy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ultimate Best Buy LLC Place: Lebanon, Ohio Country: United States Zip: 45036 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services,...

  6. Reordering MPI Ranks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reordering MPI Ranks Reordering MPI Ranks Introduction When a parallel program runs, MPI tasks are assigned to compute cores. Since compute nodes (which each contain 24 cores) are located across different positions on the 3D torus network, communication time between tasks will vary depending not only on node placement, but also the placement of each task within the allocated nodes. This study explores the performance of applications when the placement of MPI tasks is changed across nodes

  7. Ultimate Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ultimate Biofuels LLC Place: Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip: 48108 Product: Plans to develop sweet sorghum based ethanol plants. References:...

  8. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  9. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  10. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ultimate storage ring lattice...

  11. The Phenix ultimate natural convection test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauthe, P.; Pialla, D.; Tenchine, D.; Vasile, A.; Rochwerger, D.

    2012-07-01

    The French sodium cooled fast reactor Phenix was shut down in 2009 after 35 years of operation. Before decommissioning, a final set of tests were performed by the CEA during 9 months. Several topics were involved such as thermal hydraulics, core physics and fuel behaviour. Among these ultimate experiments, two thermal hydraulic tests were performed: an asymmetrical test consisting in a trip of one secondary pump and a natural convection test in the primary circuit. Recognizing the unique opportunity offered by these Phenix ultimate tests, IAEA decided in 2007 to launch a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to benchmarking analyses with system codes on the Phenix natural convection test. One objective of the natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the assessment of the CATHARE system code for safety studies on future and advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The aim of this paper is to describe this test, which was performed on June 22-23, 2009, and the associated benchmark specifications for the CRP work. The paper reminds briefly the Phenix reactor with the main physical parameters and the instrumentation used during the natural convection test. After that, the test scenario is described: - initial state at a power of 120 MWth, - test beginning resulting from a manual dry out of the two steam generators, - manual scram, - manual trip on the three primary pumps without back-up by pony motors, - setting and development of natural convection in the primary circuit, in a first phase without significant heat sink in the secondary circuits and in a second phase with significant heat sink in the secondary circuits, by opening the casing of steam generators to create an efficient heat sink, by air natural circulation in the steam generators casing. The benchmark case ends after this second phase, which corresponds to the experimental test duration of nearly 7 hours. The paper presents also the benchmark specifications data supplied by the CEA to all participants of this CRP in order to perform calculations (core, primary circuit, primary pumps, IHX, shutdown system, operating parameters, test scenario and real test conditions). Finally, main test results and analyses are presented including the evolution of the core and of the heat exchangers inlet and outlet temperatures, and some local temperature measurements. The natural convection has been easily set up in the pool type reactor Phenix with different boundary conditions at the secondary side, with or without heat sink. The data obtained during this unique test represent some very useful and precious results for the development of SFR in a wide range of thematic such as numerical methods dedicated to thermal-hydraulics safety analyses (system codes, CFD codes and coupling system and CFD codes) and instrumentation. (authors)

  12. Home Energy Score graphic

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    12345 Honeysuckle Lane 1,800 square feet Smithville, AR 72466 1970 Yes Home Energy Score Recommendations Home Facts Score Address: Home size: Year built: Air conditioned: Your home's current score 3 Score with improvements 7 Estimated annual savings $411 Uses Uses more 10 less 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 energy energy homeenergyscore.gov The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's

  13. Energy Performance Score Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PERFORMANCE SCORE $787 10.7 tons/yr 43,000 kWhe/yr Reference Number: Electric: Natural Gas: Electric: Natural Gas: Carbon Carbon Score Energy Score *See Recommended Upgrades *See Recommended Upgrades †With energy from renewable sources This score measures the estimated total energy use (electricity, natural gas, propane, heating oil) of this home for one year. The lower the score, the less energy required for normal use. Actual consumption and costs may vary. Measured in kilowatt hours per

  14. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website. PDF icon Spotlight on Michigan More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives BetterBuildings for Michigan:

  15. Revenue from Sales to Ultimate Customers (Thousand Dollars) by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Revenue from Sales to Ultimate Customers (Thousand Dollars) by State by Provider, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Tran...

  16. Home Energy Score

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-16

    The Home Energy Score allows a homeowner to compare her or his home's energy consumption to that of other homes, similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. A home energy assessor will collect energy information during a brief home walk-through and then score that home on a scale of 1 to 10.

  17. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage

  18. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring ...

  19. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size nm having Boolean rank n contains acolumn with at least ?n/2?1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As acorollary, it is established that the size of afull-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by afunction of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  20. Presidential Rank Awards Announced | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presidential Rank Awards Announced Presidential Rank Awards Announced November 4, 2011 - 10:45am Addthis Senior level executives and the 2010 Presidential Rank Award winners. First Row: Melvin Williams; Neile Miller for James B. Lambert and Theodore D. Sherry; Daniel Poneman, Patricia R. Worthington, Sandra Waisley for David A. Brockman, Secretary Chu, Frank B. Russo, and Steven Aoki. Second Row: William Barker for Andrew Lawrence, Raymond V. Furstenau, Charles McConnell for Victor A. Der,

  1. Home Energy Score Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency of homes at

  2. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor

  3. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 2011 Version 2 betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Service Delivery The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is part of the national Better Buildings Initiative led by the U.S. Department of Energy. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is making homes more comfortable and businesses more lucrative and to read more from this Spotlight series, visit betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods. 1 A Sweeping

  4. Asset Score Overviews | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Analysis Tools Energy Asset Score Asset Score Overviews Asset Score Overviews The following Building Energy Asset Score overviews are available for...

  5. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  6. Commercial Building Energy Assest Score Overall Building Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings & Program Update April 16, 2014 Joan Glickman, DOE Nora Wang, PNNL 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov 1) Asset Score Overview 2) Asset Score 2013 Pilot Summary 3) Pilot Participant Feedback 4) Next Steps Today's Agenda 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov 1) Asset Score Overview 4 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose * Develop national energy asset ratings to: - Encourage investment in energy

  7. Exclusive Demo: Asset Score Preview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office invites you to join us for a presentation on Asset Score Preview, a new, simplified version of DOE's Building Energy Asset Scoring tool...

  8. Using Home Energy Scoring Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Using Home Energy Scoring Systems, call slides and discussion summary, March 28, 2013.

  9. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  10. Home Energy Score Webinar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar Home Energy Score Webinar File webinar_homeenergyscore_20101117.wmv More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Launch Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides

  11. LDRD Scoring Sheet | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scoring Sheet Document Number: NA Effective Date: 10/2014 File (public): PDF icon ldrd_scoring_sheet

  12. Asset Score National Leadership Network

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Asset Score National Leadership Network is a landmark partnership between DOE and leading companies, federal agencies, and state and local governments to expand usage and knowledge of the Asset...

  13. Home Energy Score Calculation Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Qualified Assessor calculates the Home Energy Score by first conducting a brief walk-through of the home and collecting approximately 40 data points. Next, the Qualified Assessor uses the Home...

  14. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Nora Wang, nora.wang@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Key Partners: Start date: 04/01/2011 Planned end date: Major tool development to be completed by 2016; ongoing maintenance Key Milestones: 1) Completed Pilot #2: 03/01/2014 2) Public launch of Asset Scoring Tool, 2014 version : 09/30/2014 State Energy Program (DOE Grantees) Minnesota Center for Energy and Environment

  15. Home Energy Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Score Home Energy Score DOE announces new training and testing tool DOE announces new training and testing tool A broader pool of individuals are qualified to provide the Home Energy Score. Read more Home Energy Score Home Energy Score How does your home's energy performance compare? Read more Home Energy Score: Coming to a neighborhood near you Home Energy Score: Coming to a neighborhood near you Find out if the Home Energy Score is available in your area. Read more What's in a Score?

  16. Building Energy Asset Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » Analysis Tools » Building Energy Asset Score Building Energy Asset Score Building Energy Asset Score The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) is a national standardized tool for assessing the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities to invest in energy

  17. Energy Performance Score Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program. PDF icon Energy Performance Score Report example More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Sample Report Be a Smart and Engaged Homeowner Building America Best...

  18. Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE and Utility Partners (Presentation Slides) Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE and Utility ...

  19. Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. The High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] is the most widely recognized and discussed metric for ranking high performance computing systems. However, HPL is increasingly unreliable as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important

  20. United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production

  1. Home Energy Score Launch | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Launch Home Energy Score Launch This webinar provides an overview of the initial program and answers stakeholder questions posed during the session. File webinar_homeenergyscore_20101117.wmv More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Webinar Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot

  2. NNSA's Cielo, Roadrunner Supercomputers Ranked as World's Most...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of the world's most powerful supercomputers. The list was released today. Both NNSA computers are located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL): Cielo is ranked number six on...

  3. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

  4. EM’s Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently received the nation’s highest civil service recognition, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award.

  5. NREL Ranks Leading Utility Green Power Programs - News Releases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Ranks Leading Utility Green Power Programs Pricing programs give consumers clean power choices April 3, 2007 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy ...

  6. Energy Performance Score Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance Score Report Energy Performance Score Report Energy Performance Score Report, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. PDF icon Energy Performance Score Report example More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Sample Report Be a Smart and Engaged Homeowner Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners

  7. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  8. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quigley, David R.

    1992-12-01

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  9. Home Energy Score FAQs for Partners

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    What types of homes can get a Home Energy Score? Where is the Home Energy Score offered? Who can become a Home Energy Score Partner? Why should I become a Home Energy Score Partner? What is required of Partners? Partners have to score 500 homes in the frst year. When does that start/end? How do I apply to become a Partner? Can the Home Energy Scoring Tool be integrated with other software tools we already use? What are the criteria for Assessors? What does the Assessor look for during a Home

  10. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE conducted its first pilot test of the Asset Score in 2012. Findings from that pilot led to improvements in the overall program and the Asset Scoring Tool. The tool was updated to include the...

  11. Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document contains the presentation slides from the Home Energy ScoreWebinar on November 17, 2010.

  12. Home Energy Score Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partners Home Energy Score Partners Home Energy Score Partners include various types of organizations (e.g., utilities, state agencies, local governments, non-profits, contractor associations) that administer the delivery of the Score on a local, state, or national basis. Partners must be able to score at least 500 homes a year and fulfill quality assurance requirements in order to participate in the program. Current Partners can be found by clicking on this interactive map. The Department of

  13. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. We have designed an 'ultimate' storage ring for...

  14. Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score Webinar-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE, presented in January 2016. Watch the presentation.

  15. Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system | Department of Energy Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat

  16. Los Alamos scientists join prestigious ranks of APS fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists join prestigious ranks of APS fellows Los Alamos scientists join prestigious ranks of APS fellows Cristian Batista, Malcolm Boshier, Dana Dattelbaum, Stephen Doorn, Michelle Espy, George Rodriguez, Avadh Saxena, Sergei Tretiak and Lin Yin are the new honorees. February 23, 2015 Nine Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists were selected as fellows of the American Physical Society. Nine Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists were selected as fellows of the American Physical

  17. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  18. Home Energy Score Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Home Energy Score Publications The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a variety of research and analyses to guide development of the Home Energy Score. DOE also considered research on homeowner motivation, labeling programs, and other related topics. Below are links to some of these documents as well as other useful information. See also: Research and Background Calculation Methodology Development of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score Assessor Candidates

  19. TVA Partner Utilities- eScore Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in partnership with local electric utilities offers eScore program, which provides homeowners financial incentives to increase the energy efficiency of existing...

  20. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool This Asset Scoring Tool will guide your data collection, store your building information, and generate Asset Scores and system ...

  1. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  2. Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release Webinar (Text

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Version) | Department of Energy and New Scoring Tool Release Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text-alternative version of the Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release webinar held on January 14, 2014. You can also watch the recording or download a copy of the presentation. Joan Glickman: So again, thank you for calling in. I look forward to hearing your questions and comments. So

  3. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    2000-01-01

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  4. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

    1999-01-01

    A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

  5. NNSA Leaders Receive 2015 Presidential Rank Awards | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Leaders Receive 2015 Presidential Rank Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  6. NNSA's Cielo, Roadrunner Supercomputers Ranked as World's Most Powerful

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration Cielo, Roadrunner Supercomputers Ranked as World's Most Powerful Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios

  7. Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

    1999-01-26

    A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

  8. Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales to Ultimate Customers (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2014" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Industry",2043614,2761518,1359680,0,"NA",6164812 2014,"AL","Total Electric

  9. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted a series of webinars for interested Pilot Participants to review requirements for participating in the 2013 Pilot and on how to use the Asset Scoring Tool. 

  10. Boosting Native American students' math scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boosting Native American students' math scores Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Boosting Native American students' math scores Professional development opportunities for teachers provide essential foundation May 5, 2014 Mara Herrera teaches a young student at San Felipe Pueblo Elementary School. Mara Herrera teaches a young student at San Felipe Pueblo Elementary School. Contact

  11. Smokes and obscurants: A health and environmental effects data base assessment: A first-order, environmental screening and ranking of Army smokes and obscurants: Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Martins, S.A.; Cederwall, P.L.; Gratt, L.B.

    1985-03-01

    An initial environmental screening and ranking is provided for each Army smoke and obscurant (S and O) depending on smoke type and smoke-generating device. This was done according to the magnitude of the impact area, the characteristic environmental concentration, the relative inhalation toxicity, the relative toxicity when ingested by animals, the aquatic toxicity, the environmental mobility when freshly deposited, and the ultimate mobility and fate in the environment. The major smoke types considered were various forms of white phosphorus (WP), red phosphorus (RP), hexachloroethane-derived smokes (HC), fog oil (SGF-2), diesel fuel smokes (DF), and some infrared obscuring agents (IR).

  12. Quality Scores for 32,000 Genomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Land, Miriam L; Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Jun, Se Ran; Kora, Guruprasad H; Hauser, Loren John; Ussery, David W

    2014-01-01

    More than 80% of the microbial genomes in GenBank are of draft quality (12,553 draft vs. 2,679 finished, as of October, 2013). We examined the microbial DNA sequences available for complete, draft, and Sequence Read Archive genomes in GenBank as well as three other major public databases and assigned quality scores for more than 30,000 prokaryotic genome sequences. Scores were assigned using four categories: the completeness of the assembly, the presence of full-length rRNA genes, tRNA composition and the presence of a set of 120 conserved genes in prokaryotes. Most (~87.6%) of the genomes had quality scores of 0.8 ormore » better and can be safely used for standard comparative genomics analysis, although only 6.1% of the genomes had a perfect quality score. We find that about 2.9% of the genomes had a score below 0.6 and probably have too low a quality to yield reliable analysis. This score corresponds to more than 1000 contigs. Comparison of the codon usage across 15,000 quality genomes found that anti-codons beginning with an A (codons ending with a U ) are almost non-existent, with the exception of one arginine codon (CGU).« less

  13. Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Provides an overview of DOE's objectives for the Home Energy Score program including an overview of Home Energy Score pilots. PDF icon Home Energy Score program update More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Know the

  14. Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Homeowners | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Homeowners Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Homeowners Below you will find answers to frequently asked questions for homeowners about the Home Energy Score, from basics such as what a Home Energy Score is, to how the Score is calculated and what you can expect from your Score. What is a Home Energy Score? Why should I get a Home Energy Score? What types of homes can get a Home Energy Score? How do I get a Home Energy Score? What does the Assessor look for during a

  15. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, J.P.; Ochoa, E.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-10-09

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  16. Optical ranked-order filtering using threshold decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allebach, Jan P. (West Lafayette, IN); Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A hybrid optical/electronic system performs median filtering and related ranked-order operations using threshold decomposition to encode the image. Threshold decomposition transforms the nonlinear neighborhood ranking operation into a linear space-invariant filtering step followed by a point-to-point threshold comparison step. Spatial multiplexing allows parallel processing of all the threshold components as well as recombination by a second linear, space-invariant filtering step. An incoherent optical correlation system performs the linear filtering, using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator as the input device and a computer-generated hologram in the filter plane. Thresholding is done electronically. By adjusting the value of the threshold, the same architecture is used to perform median, minimum, and maximum filtering of images. A totally optical system is also disclosed.

  17. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  18. I T E L I N E S S Carlos Saenz Makes the Ultimate Sacrifice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlos Saenz Makes the Ultimate Sacrifice 1 Agencies Collaborate to Tackle Fire Season 2 NTS Groups Garner P2 Best-in-Class Awards 3 NTS Security Contract Awarded to WSI 4 Offsites .... "Go Long-Term!" 5 E-mentors Meet and Greet E-Mentees 5 Occupational Medicine Focuses on Heat Stroke 6 Milestones 7 Calendar 8 In This Issue A publication for all members of the NNSA/NSO family Issue 117 June 2006 S adly, on May 5, 2006, Wackenhut Services, Inc. - Nevada (WSI-NV) was informed that Carlos

  19. SunShot Prize Score Sheet Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score Sheet Template SunShot Prize Score Sheet Template This is the scoring template for the SunShot Prize: Race to 7-Day Solar. File SunShot Prize scoring template. More Documents & Publications Race to 7-Day Solar: Scoring Sheet Template 2014 SunShot Initiative Soft Costs Subprogram Overview SunShot Prize Frequently Asked Questions

  20. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score 2013 Pilot Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot This webinar covers the overall objectives of the 2013 Pilot and the process for pilot participation. File asset_score_pilot_overview_webinar_061713.wmv More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Asset Score API Webinar June 14, 2013

  1. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score Program Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Fact sheet summarizing the Building Technologies Program's commercial building energy asset score program PDF icon Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) Commercial Building Asset Rating Program

  2. Presidential Rank Award Winners | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Presidential Rank Award Winners | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs

  3. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

    1992-11-10

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  4. Gas turbine fuel from low-rank coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maas, D.J.; Smith, F.J.

    1986-06-01

    Five low-rank coals from the western United States were cleaned in a bench-scale heavy media separation procedures followed by acid leaching and hydrothermal processing. The objective of these cleaning steps was to determine the amenability of preparing gas turbine quality fuel from low-rank coal. The best candidate for scale-up was determined to be a Wyoming subbituminous coal from the eagle Butte mine. Two hundred thirty kilograms of cleaned and micronized coal/water fuel were prepared in pilot-scale equipment to determine process parameters and fuel characteristics. After establishing operating conditions, two thousand kilograms of cleaned and micronized coal/water and powdered coal fuel were produced for testing in a pilot-scale gas turbine combustor. An economic analysis was completed for a commercial-scale plant designed to produce clean gas turbine fuel from low-rank coal using the most promising process steps identified form the bench- and pilot-scale studies. 21 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Potas, Todd A.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Musich, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

  6. HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release, a presentation from the U.S....

  7. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders, a presentation by the U.S. Department of Energy, Home Energy Score program, from Joan Glickman, Senior Advisor/Program Manager, July 23, 2012. PDF icon program_update_webinar7-23-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score Program:

  8. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders PDF icon program_update_webinar7-23-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE and Utility Partners (Presentation Slides)

  9. Home Energy Score Frequently Asked Questions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score Frequently Asked Questions Home Energy Score Frequently Asked Questions Below you will find answers to frequently asked questions for homeowners and Partners about the Home Energy Score, from basics such as what a Home Energy Score is and how to become a Partner, to how the Score is calculated and what you can expect from your Score. Frequently Asked Questions for Homeowners (download a printable PDF) Frequently Asked Questions for Partners (download a printable PDF)

  10. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Session More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview...

  11. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy ...

  12. Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Partners | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Partners Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Partners Below you will find answers to frequently asked questions for homeowners and Partners about the Home Energy Score, from basics such as what a Home Energy Score is and how to become a Partner, to how the Score is calculated. What is a Home Energy Score? What types of homes can get a Home Energy Score? Where is the Home Energy Score offered? Who can become a Home Energy Score Partner? Why should I become a Home Energy

  13. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Asset Scoring Tool uses the "block" concept to simplify your building geometry. Most buildings can be scored as one block PDF icon Commercial Building Energy Asset...

  14. Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar Slides Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides PDF icon webinarhomeenergyscore20101117.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides Home...

  15. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders PDF icon programupdatewebinar7-23-12.pdf More Documents &...

  16. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    upgrade opportunities (best practice, general implementation guide, etc.) Updated scoring method (to be finalized) June 20, 2013 4 5 Asset Scoring Tool June 20, 2013 Apply...

  17. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Energy Efficiency Services Companies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Services Companies Asset Score Webinar Slides: Energy Efficiency Services Companies The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the ...

  18. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  19. Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria Print Principal Investigator The proposal form asks for the names and contact information of the experiment leader completing the form and the Principal Investigator (PI). The PI is the leader and the individual responsible for the group, and the experiment leader is often the person completing the proposal form. In this way the ALS would like to encourage postdocs and students to gain experience in submitting proposals as the experiment leader,

  20. Overview of Energy Performance Score (EPS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance Score (EPS) Sean Penrith, Executive Director Earth Advantage Institute Portland, Oregon | DoubleTree Berkeley Marina 200 Marina Blvd. | Berkeley, CA 94710 | February23 st , 2011 | Topics covered "MPG" label for label for new & existing homes * Should homes be labeled? * What should a label display? * How to inform stakeholders to easily understand the impact of green building and home improvements on energy consumption * Can home labeling progress influence

  1. Geothermal Heat Pumps are Scoring High Marks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-08-01

    Geothermal Energy Program Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies Geothermal Heat Pumps are Scoring High Marks Geothermal heat pumps, one of the clean energy technology stars Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) are one of the most cost-effective heating, cooling, and water heating systems available for both residential and commercial buildings. GHPs extract heat from the ground during the heating season and discharge waste heat to the ground during the cooling season. The U.S. Environmental Protecti

  2. Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    eere.energy.gov Home Energy Score Webinar Joan Glickman November 17, 2010 $ SAVINGS JOBS JOBS 2 eere.energy.gov Recovery thru Retrofit: Identified 3 Major Market Barriers Consumer Information Consumers do not have access to straightforward and reliable information. Financing Homeowners need access to financing to pursue investments in energy efficiency. Worker Certification & Training Consumers and industry want access to consistent workforce standards and a national certification. 3

  3. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Web Service (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Geoffrey; Wang, Na

    2013-09-30

    Documentation of the DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score application programming interface (API).

  4. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

    2006-08-31

    Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

  5. Lattice Design for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    SLAC expertise in designing and operating high current storage rings and the availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel present an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the SPEAR3 storage ring in the future. The PEP-X 'baseline' design, with 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. As a next step, a so-called 'ultimate' PEP-X lattice, reducing the emittance to 11 pm-rad at zero current, has been designed. This emittance approaches the diffraction limited photon emittance for multi-keV photons, providing near maximum photon brightness and high coherence. It is achieved by using 7-bend achromat cells in the ring arcs and a 90-m damping wiggler in one of the 6 long straight sections. Details of the lattice design, dynamic aperture, and calculations of the intra-beam scattering effect and Touschek lifetime at a nominal 0.2 A current are presented. Accelerator-based light sources are in high demand for many experimental applications. The availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel at SLAC presents an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the existing SPEAR3 light source in the future. The PEP-X study started in 2008, and the 'baseline' design, yielding 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. This relatively conservative design can be built using existing technology. However, for a long term future, it is natural to investigate a more aggressive, so-called 'ultimate' ring design. The goal is to reduce the electron emittance in both x and y planes to near the diffraction limited photon emittance of 8 pm-rad at hard X-ray photon wavelength of 0.1 nm. This would provide a near maximum photon brightness and significant increase in photon coherence. This study was motivated by the advances in low emittance design at MAX-IV. The latter was used as a starting point for the PEP-X arc lattice, however new features were included into the design for better tuning capabilities and compensation of non-linear optics effects. Further emittance reduction is achieved with a 90-m damping wiggler. Finally, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and Touschek lifetime effects were estimated and cross-checked using various codes.

  6. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Buildings » Analysis Tools » Energy Asset Score » Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development To develop the Asset Score, DOE issued public Requests for Information (RFIs) and completed pilot testing with users. DOE also commissioned analyses from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to inform the technical design, scoring methodology, and other features of

  7. Vice President Biden Launches Home Energy Scoring Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Launches Home Energy Scoring Program Vice President Biden Launches Home Energy Scoring Program November 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Biden joined U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today to announce the launch of the Home Energy Score pilot program. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows

  8. Home Energy Score API User: Spirit Foundation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spirit Foundation Home Energy Score API User: Spirit Foundation The Spirit Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization and Home Energy Score Partner, assists veterans and wounded heroes in sustainable careers. The Spirit Foundation offers Assessor training, sustainable energy evaluations, products, and services for both residential and commercial industries. The API team has released the SCORE! App for the Home Energy Score and is working on the release SCORE! V2.0, a multiplatform, multidevice

  9. Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries Home Energy Score Pilot Summaries The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partnered with counties, utilities, and non-profit organizations ("Pilots") across the country to test and evaluate the Home Energy Score from November 2010 through July 2011. Through these Pilots, DOE tested a wide range of issues associated with the program and the associated software, the Home Energy Scoring Tool, including: How

  10. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection Form |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pilot Data Collection Form Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection Form This form is intended to facilitate your data collection. The Energy Asset Scoring Tool uses the "block" concept to simplify your building geometry. Most buildings can be scored as one block PDF icon Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection Form More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report Chapter

  11. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2013 Pilot Overview Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview provides an overview of the 2013 pilot for the commercial building energy asset score PDF icon Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update Microsoft PowerPoint - AGA webinar July 2013 Final .pptx Commercial Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information: February 2013

  12. Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score Program Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score Program May 19, 2015 - 5:21pm Addthis Connecticut launches nation’s first statewide Home Energy Score Program Joan Glickman Senior Advisor & Program Manager, Home Energy Score Program, Building Technologies Office What are the key facts? Home Energy Score is a free tool from the Department of Energy that provides an energy

  13. U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Quick Start Guide To create a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) for your building you need to complete the following six (6) steps using the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool). Although you are not required to carry out these steps in a specific order, the following sequence will most likely save you time. Input Basic Building Information * Click the New Building button to begin. * Enter building name,

  14. Home Energy Score Sample Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Home Energy Score Sample Report Home Energy Score Sample Report The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems. Recommendations show how to improve the energy efficiency of the home to achieve a higher score and save money. PDF icon

  15. Get Involved with Home Energy Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Energy Score » Get Involved with Home Energy Score Get Involved with Home Energy Score The Department of Energy's (DOE) Home Energy Score helps homeowners understand the energy performance of their homes and how they compare to other homes nationwide. Energy professionals and organizations can use the Score to promote energy efficiency to homeowners and encourage investments in energy improvements. Information for Homeowners Information for Interested Organizations Information for

  16. Home Energy Score Interactive Graphic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interactive Graphic Home Energy Score Interactive Graphic The Home Energy Score is similar to a vehicle's miles-per-gallon rating. The Home Energy Score allows homeowners to compare the energy performance of their homes to other homes nationwide. It also provides homeowners with suggestions for improving their homes' efficiency. The process starts with a Home Energy Score Assessor collecting energy information during a brief home walk-through. Using the Home Energy Scoring Tool, developed by the

  17. Ranking of sabotage/tampering avoidance technology alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Tabatabai, A.S.; Powers, T.B.; Daling, P.M.; Fecht, B.A.; Gore, B.F.; Overcast, T.D.; Rankin, W.R.; Schreiber, R.E.; Tawil, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study to evaluate alternatives to the design and operation of nuclear power plants, emphasizing a reduction of their vulnerability to sabotage. Estimates of core melt accident frequency during normal operations and from sabotage/tampering events were used to rank the alternatives. Core melt frequency for normal operations was estimated using sensitivity analysis of results of probabilistic risk assessments. Core melt frequency for sabotage/tampering was estimated by developing a model based on probabilistic risk analyses, historic data, engineering judgment, and safeguards analyses of plant locations where core melt events could be initiated. Results indicate the most effective alternatives focus on large areas of the plant, increase safety system redundancy, and reduce reliance on single locations for mitigation of transients. Less effective options focus on specific areas of the plant, reduce reliance on some plant areas for safe shutdown, and focus on less vulnerable targets.

  18. Home Energy Score Program Update, February 2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technologies Office eere.energy.gov 2 | Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score homeenergyscore@ee.doe.gov Joan Glickman Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov An "MPG" for Homes What's the Value?  For Program Providers  Reliable, consistent modeling tool  Customizable report; available at no-cost  Homeowners  For Homeowners  Easy to understand homes' energy

  19. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  20. U.S. States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production

  1. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy February 6, 2015 - 4:18pm Addthis Biofuels Digest recently released its "Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy," ranking Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Dr. Jonathan Male, Deputy Director Dr. Valerie Reed, Technology Manager Dr. Joyce Yang, and Lead Analyst Zia Haq at number 20. Other Energy Department leaders

  2. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task ...

  3. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Polyakov, Oleg 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from...

  4. Proximate and Ultimate Compositional Changes in Corn Stover during Torrefaction using Thermogravimetric Analyzer and Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2012-07-01

    Abstract The world is currently aiming to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is considered carbon neutral because the carbon dioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle. Increasing the use of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol. Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes, including thermochemical (direct combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation), or chemical (esterification) technologies. There are lot challenges in using biomass for energy applications. To name few low bulk density, high moisture content, irregular size and shape, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value. In commercial scale operation large quantities of biomass are needed and this will create problems associated with storage and transportation. Furthermore, grinding raw biomass with high moisture content is very challenging as there are no specific equipments and can increase the costs and in some cases it becomes highly impossible. All of these drawbacks led to development of some pretreatment techniques to make biomass more suitable for fuel applications. One of the promising techniques is torrefaction. Torrefaction is heating the biomass in an inert environment or reduced environment. During torrefaction biomass losses moisture, becomes more brittle and with increased energy density values. There are different techniques used for torrefaction of biomass. Fixed bed, bubbling sand bed and moving bed are the most common ones used. The use of microwaves for torrefaction purposes has not been explored. In the present study we looked into the torrefaction of biomass using the regular and microwaves and their effect on proximate and ultimate composition. Studies indicated that microwave torrefaction is a good way to torrefy the biomass in short periods of time. A maximum calorific value of 21 MJ/kg is achievable at 6 min residence time compared to 15 min using the dry torrefaction technique. Increasing the residence time increased the carbon content where a maximum carbon content of 52.20 % was achievable at lower residence time. The loss of volatiles is comparatively lower compared to dry torrefaction technique. Moisture content of microwave torrefied samples was in between 2-2.5 % (w.b).

  5. CenterPoint Energy- SCORE and CitySmart Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers the SCORE and CitySmart Programs to help customers address energy costs through energy efficiency. The SCORE and CitySmart Programs provide complimentary tools, services...

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on Updates to the Home Energy Scoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Standard Time. The Home Energy Score program is set to release its first major update to the Home Energy Scoring Tool in January 2014. After more than a year of ...

  7. Energy Department Announces New Asset Score Partnership Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced partnerships with 21 companies, federal agencies, and state and local governments to promote the use of DOE's Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (the Asset Score).

  8. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The new Home Energy Score pilot program provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The program also offers...

  9. Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    What are the key facts? Home Energy Score is a free tool from the Department of Energy that provides an energy efficiency score for a home and recommendations for energy efficiency ...

  10. Home Energy Score Frequently Asked Questions for Homeowners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frequently asked questions for homeowners in the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score Program.

  11. Home Energy Score Frequently Asked Questions for Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frequently asked questions for Partners of the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score Program.

  12. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Requirements for Assessors | Department of Energy Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors, a presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score program, March 4, 2015, with Joan Glickman and Glenn Dickey. PDF icon Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides More

  13. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool 2013 Pilot Training Session

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    overview of the June 18, 2013 pilot training session for the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool

  14. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    slides from June 14, 2013 webinar on the commercial building energy asset scoring tool application programming interface

  15. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pilot Findings and Program Update Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update The webinar was held on April 16, 2014, to share the findings from the 2013 Pilot and provide a program update on the Commercial Building Energy Asset Score. PDF icon Presentation More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview

  16. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II Building Types | Department of Energy Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types PDF icon asset_score_assumptions_july_2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology Tankless Gas Water

  17. Home Energy Score: Information for Interested Organizations | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Organizations Home Energy Score: Information for Interested Organizations Home Energy Score Partners include various types of organizations (e.g., utilities, state agencies, local governments, non-profits, contractor associations) that administer the delivery of the Score on a local, state, or national basis. Partners must be able to score at least 500 homes a year and fulfill quality assurance requirements in order to participate in the program. If your organization is interested in

  18. Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE and Utility Partners (Presentation Slides)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of efforts to recruit new Partners, Home Energy Score hosted a webinar for utilities in February 2016. Joan Glickman, Home Energy Score program manager, outlined the basics of the program...

  19. Low-rank coal research: Volume 1, Control technology, liquefaction, and gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G.F.; Collings, M.E.; Schelkoph, G.L.; Steadman, E.N.; Moretti, C.J.; Henke, K.R.; Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.; Knudson, C.L.; Willson, W.G.

    1987-04-01

    Volume I contains articles on SO/sub x//NO/sub x/ control, waste management, low-rank direct liquefaction, hydrogen production from low-rank coals, and advanced wastewater treatment. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  20. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to perform pressure transient testing to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. To perform permeability testing of the Wilcox coal, we worked with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in selecting the well and intervals to test and in designing the pressure transient test. Anadarko agreed to allow us to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well (Well APCT2). This well is located in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that we earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2} emissions. A service company, Pinnacle Technologies Inc. (Pinnacle) was contracted to conduct the tests in the field. Intervals tested were 2 coal beds with thicknesses of 3 and 7 feet, respectively, at approximately 4,100 ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. Analyses of pressure transient test data indicate that average values for coalbed methane reservoir permeability in the tested coals are between 1.9 and 4.2 mD. These values are in the lower end of the range of permeability used in the preliminary simulation modeling. These new coal fracture permeability data from the APCT2 well, along with the acquired gas compositional analyses and sorption capacities of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}, complete the reservoir description phase of the project. During this quarter we also continued work on reservoir and economic modeling to evaluate performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery.

  1. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on limited data suggest that sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed gas recovery should be located basinward of the Wilcox freshwater contour, where methane content is high and the freshwater aquifer can be avoided.

  2. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview June 17, 2013 Joan Glickman, DOE Patty Kappaz, SRA 1 eere.energy.gov Agenda � Team Introduction � Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Update * Program overview * Progress to date * Objectives of the 2013 Pilot * Future plans � Process for Pilot Participation 2 I Energy Asset Score eere.energy.gov � � � � � � � Meet the Team U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project oversight Strategic direction Policy perspective

  3. Commercial Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 2013 webinar | Department of Energy Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information: February 2013 webinar Commercial Buildings: Asset Scoring Efforts and Request for Information: February 2013 webinar webinar providing an overview of the commercial building energy asset program, the energy asset scoring tool, and a recently issued RFI PDF icon cbeas_overview_webinar_022013.pdf More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Asset Rating Program Commercial

  4. Building Energy Asset Score: Architects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Architects Building Energy Asset Score: Architects The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifices opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use. View additional information

  5. Building Energy Asset Score: Building Owners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Owners Building Energy Asset Score: Building Owners The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use. View information

  6. Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Services Companies, Engineers and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consultants | Department of Energy Energy Services Companies, Engineers and Consultants Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Services Companies, Engineers and Consultants The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies

  7. Building Energy Asset Score: Real Estate Managers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Estate Managers Building Energy Asset Score: Real Estate Managers The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use. View

  8. Building Energy Asset Score: State and Local Governments | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy State and Local Governments Building Energy Asset Score: State and Local Governments The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based

  9. Building Energy Asset Score: Utilities and Energy Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administrators | Department of Energy Utilities and Energy Efficiency Program Administrators Building Energy Asset Score: Utilities and Energy Efficiency Program Administrators The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and

  10. Home Energy Score Data Collection Form | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Collection Form Home Energy Score Data Collection Form Input sheet for qualified assessors to collect data for input into the Home Energy Scoring Tool for evaluation. PDF icon Data Collection Sheet More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Sample Report Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: New Traditions, Vancouver, Washington

  11. Energy Department Updates Home Energy Scoring Tool for Advancing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Energy Performance | Department of Energy Updates Home Energy Scoring Tool for Advancing Residential Energy Performance Energy Department Updates Home Energy Scoring Tool for Advancing Residential Energy Performance January 9, 2014 - 3:19pm Addthis As part of the Energy Department's commitment to helping families across the United States save money by saving energy, the Department announced today its first major software update to the Home Energy Scoring Tool, developed by the

  12. Home Energy Score Research and Background | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Background Home Energy Score Research and Background With the goal of addressing the significant, and yet untapped, potential for saving energy in existing homes, the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, developed the Home Energy Score as a low cost and reliable method for estimating the energy use of a home and motivating investment in efficiency improvements. The Home Energy Score

  13. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    14, 2013 webinar on the commercial building energy asset scoring tool application programming interface Application Programming Interface Webinar More Documents & Publications...

  14. El Paso Electric Company- SCORE Plus Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The El Paso Electric (EPE) SCORE Plus Program is designed to help participants identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and to provide monetary incentives...

  15. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Application Programming Interface NORA WANG GEOFF ELLIOTT JUSTIN ALMQUIST EDWARD ELLIS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory JUNE 14, 2013 Commercial Building Energy Asset Score...

  16. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory One of the primary market barriers to enhancing energy efficiency ...

  17. Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Services Companies, Engineers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Services Companies, Engineers and Consultants Building Energy Asset Score: Energy ... and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. ...

  18. Building Energy Asset Score: Utilities and Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilities and Energy Efficiency Program Administrators Building Energy Asset Score: Utilities and Energy Efficiency Program Administrators The U.S. Department of Energy's Building ...

  19. Home Energy Score API User: United Illuminating Company and Eversource...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Eversource, administering conservation, and load management programs funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, are Home Energy Score Partners. Home Energy Solutions...

  20. Home Energy Scoring Systems, Call Slides and Discussion Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    components: 1. Audit 2. Scorecard 3. Recommendation report to guide cost-effective ... 10 Energy Performance Score (EPS) Recommendation Report * Guides improvements in a ...

  1. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors Home Energy...

  2. Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Home Energy Score Program: Update and Overview for Potential Partners Provides an overview of DOE's objectives for the Home...

  3. EECBG Success Story: North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights EECBG Success Story: North Carolina ... EECBG Success Story: Brighter Lights, Safer Streets Fort Fairfield's new energy efficient ...

  4. Home Energy Score API User: United Illuminating Company and Eversource

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Illuminating Company and Eversource, administering conservation, and load management programs funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, are Home Energy Score Partners. Home...

  5. Home Energy Score: Information for Homeowners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homeowners Home Energy Score: Information for Homeowners The Home Energy Score is a quick, low-cost way for you to learn about your home's energy performance and see how it compares to others in the area or nationwide. It also provides homeowners with recommendations for energy upgrades as well as an estimate of how these improvements can reduce utility bills and improve the Score. How does the Home Energy Score compare to other types of home energy assessments and audits? To produce a Home

  6. Home Energy Score: Information for Interested Assessors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Assessors Home Energy Score: Information for Interested Assessors <a target="_self" href="/node/1014056">Read DOE's announcement about the new training and tool that broadens the pool of individuals qualified to provide the Home Energy Score.</a> Read DOE's announcement about the new training and tool that broadens the pool of individuals qualified to provide the Home Energy Score. Interested in Becoming a Home Energy Score Assessor? Follow these steps

  7. Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 12 eere.energy.gov Marketing Materials for Partners & ... Having DOE seal lends credibility to the Home Energy Score ...Recognition Strategies - How and to what extent ...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWDRegional 5-Yr MIL and Ranking Process_20150616_revised.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-year Plan and MIL The Risk Factors Miles P. Waldron, P.E. Senior Hydropower Program Manager CESWD-PDO 15 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ® Ranking Criteria for Capitalized Work in Plants (Ranking Worksheet) Hydropower Relative Risk Index (1-5)- Primary Ranking *Condition Index *Consequence Rating Criteria *Hydropower Relative Risk Values Availability Risk Public Safety and Health Environmental Concerns Legal Concerns Impact to Other Business Lines Formulate a Condition Index Rank- 1=High Risk; 5=

  9. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    Papers in the quarterly technical progress report for the period April-June, 1984, of the Low-Rank Coal Research project have been entered individually into EDB and ERA (17 items). (LTN)

  10. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of December. A preliminary report shows methane content values for the desorbed coal samples ranged between 330 and 388 scf/t., on ''as received'' basis. Residual gas content of the coals was not included in the analyses, which results in an approximate 5-10% underestimation of in-situ gas content. Coal maps indicate that total coal thickness is 40-70 ft in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of the Sam K. Seymour power plant. A conservative estimate indicates that methane in place for a well on 160-acre spacing is approximately 3.5 Bcf in Lower Calvert Bluff coal beds. When they receive sorption isotherm data from the laboratory, they will determine the amount of CO{sub 2} that it may be possible to sequester in Wilcox coals. In December, when the final laboratory and field test data are available, they will complete the reservoir model and begin to simulate CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CH{sub 4} production.

  11. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in

  12. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  13. BETO Director Ranks #6 in Biofuels Digest’s Top 100 People in the Advanced Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biofuels Digest has released its 2016 ranking of the “Top 100 People in the Advanced Bioeconomy,” and Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Dr. Jonathan Male is ranked high in the list at number six. Sharing this prestigious spot with Dr. Male are other top players from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)— Assistant Secretary for EERE, David Danielson and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation, Reuben Sarkar.

  14. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly

  15. NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 January 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - One of the world's fastest, most energy-efficient supercomputers - expected to help energy researchers discover new materials, optimize designs and better predict operational characteristics - is up and running at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, W.Va. NETL's new

  16. Home Energy Score Assessor Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessor Training Materials Home Energy Score Assessor Training Materials Download detailed instructions for logging onto the training portal and accessing the training modules. PDF icon accessing_nter_training_portalv2015.pdf More Documents & Publications NTER Authoring Training Participant_Guide_2012 Development of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score Assessor Candidates NTERTraining Guides

  17. Low-rank coal research, Task 5.1. Topical report, April 1986--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This document is a topical progress report for Low-Rank Coal Research performed April 1986 - December 1992. Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research is described for Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains, and Hot-Gas Cleanup. Advanced Research and Technology Development was conducted on Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Combustion Research is described for Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Fuels (completed 10/31/90), Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals (completed 12/31/90), Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications (completed 10/31/90), Nitrous Oxide Emission, and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion. Liquefaction Research in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction is discussed. Gasification Research was conducted in Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coals and in Sulfur Forms in Coal.

  18. Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

  19. Low-rank coal study : national needs for resource development. Volume 2. Resource characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Comprehensive data are presented on the quantity, quality, and distribution of low-rank coal (subbituminous and lignite) deposits in the United States. The major lignite-bearing areas are the Fort Union Region and the Gulf Lignite Region, with the predominant strippable reserves being in the states of North Dakota, Montana, and Texas. The largest subbituminous coal deposits are in the Powder River Region of Montana and Wyoming, The San Juan Basin of New Mexico, and in Northern Alaska. For each of the low-rank coal-bearing regions, descriptions are provided of the geology; strippable reserves; active and planned mines; classification of identified resources by depth, seam thickness, sulfur content, and ash content; overburden characteristics; aquifers; and coal properties and characteristics. Low-rank coals are distinguished from bituminous coals by unique chemical and physical properties that affect their behavior in extraction, utilization, or conversion processes. The most characteristic properties of the organic fraction of low-rank coals are the high inherent moisture and oxygen contents, and the correspondingly low heating value. Mineral matter (ash) contents and compositions of all coals are highly variable; however, low-rank coals tend to have a higher proportion of the alkali components CaO, MgO, and Na/sub 2/O. About 90% of the reserve base of US low-rank coal has less than one percent sulfur. Water resources in the major low-rank coal-bearing regions tend to have highly seasonal availabilities. Some areas appear to have ample water resources to support major new coal projects; in other areas such as Texas, water supplies may be constraining factor on development.

  20. The ultimate biomass refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bungay, H.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Bits and pieces of refining schemes and both old and new technology have been integrated into a complete biomass harvesting, processing, waste recycle, and marketing complex. These choices are justified with economic estimates and technology assessments.

  1. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zoi, Cathy

    2013-05-29

    Acting Under Secretary Cathy Zoi talks about the new Home Energy Score pilot program that was announced today by Vice President Biden and U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The report also includes customized, cost-effective recommendations that will help to reduce their energy costs and improve the comfort of their homes.

  2. Home Energy Score Pilot Analysis Webinar (Text Version) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Home Energy Score Pilot Analysis Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Pilot Analysis Webinar (Text Version) Below is a text version of the webinar titled "Home Energy Score: Analysis and Improvements to Date," originally presented on July 24, 2012. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access the presentation slides and a recording of the webinar. Slide 2: To date based on the pilot findings, tell you a little bit about the analysis that we did over the

  3. Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score March 9, 2016 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Wouldn't your customers like to know how their homes stack up in terms of energy efficiency? Now, using the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) free Home Energy Score, you can provide a miles-per-gallon type rating along with your home inspections. Better yet, by offering the rating and accompanying

  4. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Energy Efficiency Services Companies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that assesses the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. It generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies custom opportunities to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. The Asset Score has already been used, or is in the process of being used, on more than 600 buildings nationwide. This Asset Score webinar is aimed at an audience of energy efficiency services companies.

  5. Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score Enhance Your Home Inspection Business with the Home Energy Score March 17, 2016 8:00PM to 9:00PM EDT Wouldn't your customers like to know how their homes stack up in terms of energy efficiency? Now, using the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) free Home Energy Score, you can provide a miles-per-gallon type rating along with your home inspections. Better yet, by offering the rating and accompanying

  6. Retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment scoring interaction report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raivo, B.D.; Richardson, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    A retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment technology process for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory transuranic waste pits and trenches is present. A system performance score is calculated, and assumptions, requirements, and reference baseline technologies for all subelements are included.

  7. Home Energy Score Update (text version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Below is a text version of the webinar titled "Home Energy Score Update," originally presented on November 17, 2010. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access ...

  8. AEP (Central, SWEPCO and North)- SCORE Program for Schools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SCORE Program is designed to help K-12 public schools identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and to provide monetary incentives to help implement the...

  9. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Real Estate and Design Professionals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that assesses the physical and structural energy efficiency ...

  10. The Home Energy Score: Measuring 'MPG' For Your Home | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biden and Secretary Chu recently launched the Home Energy Score program to help consumers save money by saving energy. The program is kicking off in ten pilot locations across the...

  11. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory One of the primary market barriers to enhancing energy efficiency in the commercial building sector is that building owners and investors lack a reliable and low cost source to understand a building's as-built efficiency and identify opportunities for cost-effective improvements. While the ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager

  12. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessors Webinar -- Text Version | Department of Energy Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements for Assessors Webinar -- Text Version Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements for Assessors Webinar -- Text Version Below is the text version of the Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Requirements for Assessors webinar, presented in March 2015. Patty Kappaz: Cover slide of presentation: ... taking your questions. So our team is very

  13. Asset Score Webinar Slides: Real Estate and Design Professionals |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Real Estate and Design Professionals Asset Score Webinar Slides: Real Estate and Design Professionals The Asset Score is a free, web-based software tool developed by DOE and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that assesses the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. It generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies custom opportunities to invest in

  14. EECBG Success Story: North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights EECBG Success Story: North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights July 19, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis Energy efficient metal halide lighting is replacing the outdated lighting system at Mecklenburg Park. | Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks Energy efficient metal halide lighting is replacing the outdated lighting system at Mecklenburg Park. | Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks Huntersville, North Carolina received a

  15. What's Your PEV Readiness Score? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What's Your PEV Readiness Score? What's Your PEV Readiness Score? February 14, 2013 - 10:30am Addthis PEV readiness is a community-wide effort that requires charging infrastructure, planning, regulations and support services. The new PEV Scorecard helps communities determine their PEV friendliness. | Photo courtesy of IKEA Orlando. PEV readiness is a community-wide effort that requires charging infrastructure, planning, regulations and support services. The new PEV Scorecard helps communities

  16. Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score: � Analysis & Improvements to Date � Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy July 24, 2012 1 eere.energy.gov Presentation Overview 1) Background 2) Program Improvements 3) Analysis: Efficacy of Tool & Program - Asset Perturbations - Behavior Perturbations - Estimated Energy Use vs. Actual Energy Use (from utility bills) - Time Required for Assessment and Scoring - Blower Door Test Analysis 4) Next Steps & Ongoing Analysis 2

  17. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy July 23, 2012 1 eere.energy.gov DOE's objectives for the Home Energy Score Program * Strengthen the home energy improvement market * Provide an affordable and credible means for homeowners to understand - their home's energy performance, - how their home compares to others in their area, and - how to improve its efficiency. * Build on and complement existing home

  18. MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rines, Kenneth; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2013-04-10

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  19. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

  20. Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date, a presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy, by Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager, Home Energy Score, July 24, 2012. PDF icon pilot_analysis_webinar7-24-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date Home Energy Score Program HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release

  1. U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score provides quick start intstructions for creating a commercial building energy asset score PDF icon Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Quick Start Guide More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Pilot Findings and Program Update Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: 2013 Pilot Overview

  2. Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

    2001-01-01

    The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

  3. Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World June 25, 2012 - 2:19pm Addthis A view of one of the aisles of racks that hold Sequoia’s 1.6 million cores. Its 16.32 sustained petaflops and 1.6 petabytes of memory make it the world's fastest supercomputer. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A view of one of the aisles of racks that hold Sequoia's 1.6 million cores. Its 16.32 sustained petaflops and 1.6

  4. Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. ); Ruether, J.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

  5. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmorethat MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.less

  6. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Qiang [Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ. Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Wu, Si [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Xiaowen [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  7. Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date PDF icon pilot_analysis_webinar7-24-12.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date Home Energy Score Program HES Program Update and Scoring Tool v2014 Release

  8. Race to 7-Day Solar: Scoring Sheet Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Race to 7-Day Solar: Scoring Sheet Template Race to 7-Day Solar: Scoring Sheet Template Race to 7-Day Solar: Grand Prize Scoring Sheet Template File Grand Prize Scoring Sheet Template.xlsx More Documents & Publications SunShot Prize Score Sheet Template

  9. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  10. Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

  11. Home Energy Score Program Update Webinar (Text Version) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Program Update Webinar (Text Version) Below is a text version of the webinar titled "Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders," originally presented on July 23, 2012. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access the presentation slides and a recording of the webinar. Joan Glickman: Slide 1: Thank you very much and good afternoon, or good morning to those of you on the west coast. Thanks for

  12. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positive semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.

  13. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positivemore » semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.« less

  14. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

  15. On the third cohomology of algebraic groups of rank two in positive characteristic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhumadil'daev, A S; Ibraev, Sh Sh

    2014-03-31

    We evaluate the third cohomology of simple simply connected algebraic groups of rank 2 over an algebraically closed field of positive characteristic with coefficients in simple modules. It is assumed that the characteristic p of the field is greater than3 for SL{sub 3}, greater than5 for Sp{sub 4}, and greater than11 forG{sub 2}. It follows from the main result that the dimensions of the cohomology spaces do not exceed the rank of the algebraic group in question. To prove the main results we study the properties of the first-quadrant Lyndon-Hochschild-Serre spectral sequence with respect to an infinitesimal subgroup, namely, the Frobenius kernel of the given algebraic group. Bibliography: 49 titles.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J

    2008-03-01

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  17. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

    1994-01-01

    A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

  18. Jefferson Lab research into the pentaquark is ranked among the top science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stories of 2003 | Jefferson Lab research into the pentaquark is ranked among the top science stories of 2003 December 24, 2003 Twice during the last month the discovery of the pentaquark has been named among the top science stories for 2003. Researchers working at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab, located in Newport News, Va., are among those to identify some of the most convincing evidence yet of the subatomic particle's existence. Discover Magazine's January 2004 issue listed the

  19. New Training Tool Broadens Pool of Home Energy Score Assessors | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Training Tool Broadens Pool of Home Energy Score Assessors New Training Tool Broadens Pool of Home Energy Score Assessors February 5, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis Today, DOE announced the release of the Home Energy Score Simulation Training, a new online simulation tool that provides free, targeted training and testing to individuals interested in providing the Home Energy Score - a standard energy efficiency assessment and score generated only by qualifying professionals. The Home Energy

  20. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  1. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  2. Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

    1994-06-21

    A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

  3. Weekly Preliminary Crude Imports by Top 10 Countries of Origin (ranking

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    based on 2013 Petroleum Supply Monthly data) Preliminary Crude Imports by Top 10 Countries of Origin (ranking based on 2013 Petroleum Supply Monthly data) (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Country 02/05/16 02/12/16 02/19/16 02/26/16 03/04/16 03/11/16 View History 1- Canada 3,446 3,247 3,006 3,140 3,314 3,151 2010-2016 2- Saudi Arabia 696 774 1,209 1,190

  4. HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Mark; Brown, Jed; Shalf, John; Straalen, Brian Van; Strohmaier, Erich; Williams, Sam

    2014-05-05

    This document provides an overview of the benchmark ? HPGMG ? for ranking large scale general purpose computers for use on the Top500 list [8]. We provide a rationale for the need for a replacement for the current metric HPL, some background of the Top500 list and the challenges of developing such a metric; we discuss our design philosophy and methodology, and an overview of the specification of the benchmark. The primary documentation with maintained details on the specification can be found at hpgmg.org and the Wiki and benchmark code itself can be found in the repository https://bitbucket.org/hpgmg/hpgmg.

  5. Relationship between Particle Size Distribution of Low-Rank Pulverized Coal and Power Plant Performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ganguli, Rajive; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » he impact of particle size distribution (PSD) of pulverized, low rank high volatile content Alaska coal on combustion related power plant performance was studied in a series of field scale tests. Performance was gauged through efficiency (ratio of megawatt generated to energy consumed as coal), emissions (SO 2 , NO x , CO), and carbon content of ash (fly ash and bottom ash). The study revealed that the tested coal could be burned at a grind as coarse as 50% passing 76 microns, with no deleterious impact on power generation and emissions. The PSD’s tested in this study were in the range of 41 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. There was negligible correlation between PSD and the followings factors: efficiency, SO 2 , NO x , and CO. Additionally, two tests where stack mercury (Hg) data was collected, did not demonstrate any real difference in Hg emissions with PSD. The results from the field tests positively impacts pulverized coal power plants that burn low rank high volatile content coals (such as Powder River Basin coal). These plants can potentially reduce in-plant load by grinding the coal less (without impacting plant performance on emissions and efficiency) and thereby, increasing their marketability.« less

  6. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  7. DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment Webinar-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment, presented in March 2015.

  8. Colorado Kicks Off Home Energy Score Program to Benefit Home Buyers,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sellers | Department of Energy Colorado Kicks Off Home Energy Score Program to Benefit Home Buyers, Sellers Colorado Kicks Off Home Energy Score Program to Benefit Home Buyers, Sellers September 22, 2015 - 1:50pm Addthis Colorado Kicks Off Home Energy Score Program to Benefit Home Buyers, Sellers Joan Glickman Senior Advisor & Program Manager, Home Energy Score Program, Building Technologies Office What are the key facts? This month, through its Better Buildings Colorado program,

  9. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Here are past webinars and materials from Home Energy Score. March 4, 2015: Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements for Assessors In an effort to improve Assessor training and broaden the pool of candidates eligible to score homes, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed a 3D Simulation training and testing tool to train building professionals on using the Home Energy

  10. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks search a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  11. Waste oils utilized as coal liquefaction solvents on differing ranks of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, E.C.; Shi, Y.; Liang, J.

    1995-12-31

    To determine the feasibility of using different waste oils as solvent media for coals of differing rank, oil from automobile crankcases, oil derived from the vacuum pyrolysis of waste rubber tires, and oil derived from the vacuum pyrolysis of waste plastics, have been heated to 430{degrees}C with coal in tubing reactors a hydrotreated for 1 hour. Analysis of the solvents indicates the presence of heavy metals in the waste automobile oil. Analysis of the plastic oil shows the presence of iron and calcium. The analysis of the tire oil shows the presence of zinc. Conversion yields are compared and results of analysis for the presence of metals in the liquid products are reported.

  12. Liquefaction/solubilization of low-rank Turkish coals by white-rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbeyli, I.Y.; Palantoken, A.; Piskin, S.; Kuzu, H.; Peksel, A.

    2006-08-15

    Microbial coal liquefaction/solubilization of three low-rank Turkish coals (Bursa-Kestelek, Kutahya-Seyitomer and Mugla-Yatagan lignite) was attempted by using a white-rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium DSM No. 6909); chemical compositions of the products were investigated. The lignite samples were oxidized by nitric acid under moderate conditions and then oxidized samples were placed on the agar medium of Phanerochaete chrysosporium. FTIR spectra of raw lignites, oxidized lignites and liquid products were recorded, and the acetone-soluble fractions of these samples were identified by GC-MS technique. Results show that the fungus affects the nitro and carboxyl/carbonyl groups in oxidized lignite sample, the liquid products obtained by microbial effects are the mixture of water-soluble compounds, and show limited organic solubility.

  13. Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  14. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  15. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

  16. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  17. Home Energy Score API User: CakeSystems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CakeSystems Home Energy Score API User: CakeSystems CakeSystems is a platform that helps efficiency programs, professionals, and homeowners implement scoring tools to help move the market forward. CakeSystems uses a flexible data collection platform to gather the data necessary for a Home Energy Score and incorporates that into other workflows for creating proposals, program tracking, and homeowner engagement. The information also populates in an offline mobile app, available for Android and iOS

  18. Chemical and physical characterization of western low-rank-coal waste materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Carol May

    1981-03-01

    Evaluations of disposal requirements for solid wastes from power stations burning low-rank western coals is the primary objective of this program. Solid wastes to be characterized include: fly ashes, sludges from wet scrubbers, solids from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) processes and solids from dry scrubbing systems. Fly ashes and sludges to be studied will be obtained primarily from systems using alkaline fly ashes as significant sources of alkalinity for sulfur dioxide removal. Fluidized bed combustion wastes will include those produced by burning North Dakota lignite and Texas lignite. Dry scrubbing wastes will include those from spray drying systems and dry injection systems. Spray dryer wastes will be from a system using sodium carbonate as the scrubbing reagent. Dry injection wastes will come from systems using nahcolite and trona as sorbents. Spray dryer wastes, dry injection wastes, and FBC wastes will be supplied by the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. Sludges and other samples will be collected at power stations using fly ash to supply alkalinity to wet scrubbers for sulfur dioxide removal. Sludges will be subjected to commercial fixation processes. Coal, fly ashes, treated and untreated sludges, scrubber liquor, FBC wastes, and dry scrubbing wastes will be subjected to a variety of chemical and physical tests. Results of these tests will be used to evaluate disposal requirements for wastes frm the systems studied.

  19. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  20. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  1. DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Efficiency Services Companies Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Energy Efficiency Services Companies, presented in March 2015.

  2. Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update Webinar (Text Version) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar, Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update, presented in September 2011. Joan Glickman: ... today's webinar, I'm going to go through our progress to date in implementing the Home Energy Score across the country in a pilot program and also provide some background information for those of you who are not yet familiar with the Home Energy Score project. First slide: We

  3. Texas-New Mexico Power Company- SCORE/CitySmart, Commercial Solutions, and Small Business Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The TNMP SCORE/CitySmart program helps school facilities and local governments identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and provides financial incentives ...

  4. Advanced CO{sub 2} Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal IGCC System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-09-30

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in bituminous coal the net plant efficiency is about 2.4 percentage points higher than an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant equipped with SelexolTM to capture CO{sub 2}. We also previously completed two successful field demonstrations: one at the National Carbon Capture Center (Southern- Wilsonville, AL) in 2011, and a second demonstration in fall of 2012 at the Wabash River IGCC plant (Terra Haute, IN). In this project, we first optimized the sorbent to catalyst ratio used in the combined WGS and CO{sub 2} capture process and confirmed the technical feasibility in bench-scale experiments. In these tests, we did not observe any CO breakthrough both during adsorption and desorption steps indicating that there is complete conversion of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The overall CO conversions above 90 percent were observed. The sorbent achieved a total CO{sub 2} loading of 7.82 percent wt. of which 5.68 percent is from conversion of CO into CO{sub 2}. The results of the system analysis suggest that the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based Warm Gas Clean-up technology can make a substantial improvement in the IGCC plant thermal performance for a plant designed to achieve near zero emissions (including greater than 90 percent carbon capture). The capital expenses are also expected to be lower than those of Selexol. The higher net plant efficiency and lower capital and operating costs result in substantial reduction in the COE for the IGCC plant equipped with the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based carbon capture system.

  5. STUDIES OF THE SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION OF LOW RANK COALS AND LIGNITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph M. Okoh; Joseph N.D. Dodoo

    2005-07-26

    Spontaneous combustion has always been a problem in coal utilization especially in the storage and transportation of coal. In the United States, approximately 11% of underground coal mine fires are attributed to spontaneous coal combustion. The incidence of such fires is expected to increase with increased consumption of lower rank coals. The cause is usually suspected to be the reabsorption of moisture and oxidation. To understand the mechanisms of spontaneous combustion this study was conducted to (1) define the initial and final products during the low temperature (10 to 60 C) oxidation of coal at different partial pressures of O{sub 2}, (2) determine the rate of oxidation, and (3) measure the reaction enthalpy. The reaction rate (R) and propensity towards spontaneous combustion were evaluated in terms of the initial rate method for the mass gained due to adsorbed O{sub 2}. Equipment that was used consisted of a FT-IR (Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectrometer, Perkin Elmer), an accelerated surface area porosimeter (ASAP, Micromeritics model 2010), thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, Cahn Microbalance TG 121) and a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, Q1000, thermal analysis instruments). Their combination yielded data that established a relation between adsorption of oxygen and reaction enthalpy. The head space/ gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer system (HS/GC/MS) was used to identify volatiles evolved during oxidation. The coal samples used were Beulah lignite and Wyodak (sub-bituminous). Oxygen (O{sub 2}) absorption rates ranged from 0.202 mg O{sub 2}/mg coal hr for coal sample No.20 (Beulah pyrolyzed at 300 C) to 6.05 mg O{sub 2}/mg coal hr for coal sample No.8 (wyodak aged and pyrolyzed at 300 C). Aging of coal followed by pyrolysis was observed to contribute to higher reaction rates. Reaction enthalpies ranged from 0.42 to 1580 kcal/gm/mol O{sub 2}.

  6. Ranking low cost sorbents for mercury capture from simulated flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Revata Seneviratne; Cedric Charpenteau; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti

    2007-12-15

    Coal fired utility boilers are the largest anthropogenic source of mercury release to the atmosphere, and mercury abatement legislation is already in place in the USA. The present study aimed to rank low cost mercury sorbents (char and activated carbon from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber and two coal fly ashes from UK power plants) against Norit Darco HgTM for mercury retention by using a novel bench-scale reactor. In this scheme, a fixed sorbent bed was tested for mercury capture efficiency from a simulated flue gas stream. Experiments with a gas stream of only mercury and nitrogen showed that while the coal ashes were the most effective in mercury capture, char from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber was as effective as the commercial sorbent Norit Darco HgTM. Tests conducted at 150{sup o}C, with a simulated flue gas mix that included N{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and HCl, showed that all the sorbents captured approximately 100% of the mercury in the gas stream. The introduction of NO and NO{sub 2} was found to significantly improve the mercury capture, possibly by reactions between NOx and the mercury. Since the sorbents' efficiency decreased with increasing test temperature, physical sorption could be the initial step in the mercury capture process. As the sorbents were only exposed to 64 ng of mercury in the gas stream, the mercury loadings on the samples were significantly less than their equilibrium capacities. The larger capacities of the activated carbons due to their more microporous structure were therefore not utilized. Although the sorbents have been characterized by BET surface area analysis and XRD analysis, further analysis is needed in order to obtain a more conclusive correlation of how the characteristics of the different sorbents correlate with the observed variations in mercury capture ability. 34 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constance Senior

    2004-12-31

    The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

  8. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score System: Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2013-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system that includes an energy asset score tool to help building owners evaluate their buildings with respect to the score system. The goal of the energy asset score system is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrade progress over time. The system can also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building operators, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from their operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset score tool. This report also describes alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach. Finally, this report describes a few features of the program where alternative approaches are still under evaluation.

  9. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  10. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dos Santos, R.

    2012-07-01

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  11. The Home Energy Score: Measuring "MPG" For Your Home | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Home Energy Score: Measuring "MPG" For Your Home The Home Energy Score: Measuring "MPG" For Your Home November 9, 2010 - 2:27pm Addthis Acting Under Secretary Cathy Zoi talks about the new Home Energy Score pilot program. Dr. Kathleen Hogan Dr. Kathleen Hogan Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency You may know the miles per gallon your car gets, but have you ever wanted to know the miles per gallon your home gets? Today, Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu

  12. The Home Energy Score: Measuring 'MPG' For Your Home | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Home Energy Score: Measuring 'MPG' For Your Home The Home Energy Score: Measuring 'MPG' For Your Home November 16, 2010 - 8:52am Addthis Dr. Kathleen Hogan Dr. Kathleen Hogan Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Editor's Note: Cross-posted from the Energy Blog. You may know the miles per gallon your car gets, but have you ever wanted to know the miles per gallon your home gets? Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu recently launched the Home Energy Score program to help

  13. Cathy Zoi on the New Home Energy Score Pilot Program (Text Version) |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Cathy Zoi on the New Home Energy Score Pilot Program (Text Version) Cathy Zoi on the New Home Energy Score Pilot Program (Text Version) Below is the text version of the video, Cathy Zoi on the New Home Energy Score Pilot Program, presented on November 19, 2010. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can view the video. Cathy Zoi: Hi. I'm Cathy Zoi, acting undersecretary of Energy. I'm excited to expand upon an announcement Vice President Biden just made to

  14. CESP Tool 6.1: Sample Scoring Form for Prioritizing Actions ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CESP Tool 6.1: Sample Scoring Form for Prioritizing Actions from Step 6: Identify and Prioritize Actions, Guide to the Community Energy Strategic Planning. File CESP Tool 6.1: ...

  15. Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association Webinar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Text Version) | Department of Energy Overview for the American Gas Association Webinar (Text Version) Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar, Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association, presented on July 30, 2013. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access the presentation slides and a recording of the webinar. Elizabeth Noll: Good afternoon. This is

  16. Moab Project Contractor Scores 'Very Good' on Fiscal Year 2015 Performance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Contractor Scores 'Very Good' on Fiscal Year 2015 Performance Moab Project Contractor Scores 'Very Good' on Fiscal Year 2015 Performance February 25, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis A view of the uranium mill tailings pile at EM's Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah. A view of the uranium mill tailings pile at EM's Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah. MOAB, Utah - Portage, Inc., the remedial action contractor for EM's Moab Uranium

  17. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training and Credential Requirements for Assessors

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Credential Requirements for Assessors March 4, 2015 Joan Glickman, U.S. Dept. of Energy Glenn Dickey, SRA 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Welcome * Program Overview and Update * New Assessor Requirements * Training Platform Demo * Home Energy Scoring Tool v. 2015 * In the Works * How to Participate * Questions/Comments Today's Webinar 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov An "MPG" for Homes Home

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Updates to the Home Energy Scoring Tool, a

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Student Design Contest for Hydrogen Infrastructure, and More | Department of Energy Updates to the Home Energy Scoring Tool, a Student Design Contest for Hydrogen Infrastructure, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Updates to the Home Energy Scoring Tool, a Student Design Contest for Hydrogen Infrastructure, and More January 10, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to

  19. Development of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessor Candidates | Department of Energy of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score Assessor Candidates Development of 3D Simulation Training and Testing for Home Energy Score Assessor Candidates This report summarizes findings from research, analysis, and pilot testing conducted with Assessor candidates across the nation and supports DOE's new qualification requirements for Assessors. PDF icon HES Assessor Requirements Summary Report 02-2015.pdf More Documents &

  20. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a voluntary national scoring system for commercial buildings to help building owners and managers assess a buildings energy-related systems independent of operations. The goal of the score is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system, known as the Commercial Building Energy Asset Score, will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrades over time. The system will also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building investors, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset scoring tool. The alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach are described in the Program Overview and Technical Protocol Version 1.0.

  1. International Energy Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rankings

  2. Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

    2013-09-30

    This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO{sub 2} has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO{sub 2} is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO{sub 2} through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO{sub 2} has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO{sub 2} over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry properties. This low-rank coal study extends the existing knowledge base to evaluate the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry concept on an E-Gas™-based IGCC plant with full 90% CO{sub 2} capture. The overall objective is to determine if this technology could be used to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of IGCC plants. The study goes beyond the systems-level analyses and initial lab work that formed the bases of previous studies and includes the following tasks: performing laboratory tests to quantify slurry properties; developing an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry preparation and feed system; conducting a full IGCC plant techno-economic analysis for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and North Dakota lignite in both water and liquid CO{sub 2} slurries; and identifying a technology development plan to continue the due diligence to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this technology. The initial task included rheology tests and slurry data analyses that would increase the knowledge and understanding of maximum solids loading capability for both PRB and lignite. Higher coal concentrations have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} over water slurries, and a coal concentration of 75% by weight in liquid CO{sub 2} has been estimated to be achievable in a commercial application. In addition, lower slurry viscosities have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} at the same solids loading, where the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry viscosity has been measured to be about a factor of 10 lower than the comparable water slurry and estimated to be less than 100 centipoise in a commercial application. In the following task, an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and mixing system has been developed for both a batch and continuous system. The capital cost of the design has also been estimated so that it could be used in the economic analysis. An industry search and survey has been conducted to determine if essential components required to construct the feed system are available from commercial sources or if targeted R&D efforts are required. The search and survey concluded that commercial sources are available for selected components that comprise both the batch and continuous type systems. During normal operation, the fuel exits the bottom of the coal silo and is fed to a rod mill for grinding to the desired particle size. From the rod mill, the coal is transported in a dense phase pneumatic transport system to the top of a solids heat exchanger, wherein the ground coal is chilled to a low temperature (in the range of -23.3°C (-10°F)) prior to mixing with liquid CO{sub 2}. This temperature was selected based on evaluating trade-offs between refrigeration work and the cost of the system pressure boundary at various combinations of pressure and temperature that correspond to the gas/liquid phase boundary for CO{sub 2}. Electrical loads to drive the equipment comprising the liquid CO{sub 2} feed system are significantly greater than those for a water slurry system, and this effect has been captured in the technical performance analysis. In the next task, a plant-wide techno-economic analysis has been conducted for PRB coal and lignite in both liquid CO{sub 2} and water slurry feed. The IGCC cases using a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry system show reduced plant output and higher heat rate for PRB coal and for ND lignite at 90% CO{sub 2} capture. Some of these performance differences can be attributed to the higher requirement for steam for the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry cases to drive the water-gas shift reaction, thereby reducing steam turbine power generation. Other factors contributing to the calculated performance differences are the increase in parasitic loads attributable to refrigeration to produce liquid CO{sub 2} and chilled coal and the reduction in enthalpy of the inlet streams to the gasifier associated with the low temperature liquid CO{sub 2} slurry feed. The capital costs for the complete plant are slightly higher for the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry cases for PRB coal but somewhat reduced for ND lignite relative to the corresponding water slurry cases. Differences in dollar/kWe costs are higher for both coals due to the reduction in net output. The cost of electricity computed for the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry cases is greater for both PRB and ND Lignite coals. It does not appear that there is any benefit to using liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries for feeding low rank coals to the E-Gas™ gasifier. Any incidental benefits in improved cold gas efficiency are more than compensated for in higher overall plant costs, increased complexity, and reduced power output and efficiency. The results of the study are compared with previous published analyses, and the differences in model assumptions, approach and basis are summarized. It has been concluded that the use of liquid CO{sub 2} may still prove to have a significant advantage in a different type of gasifier, i.e., single-stage entrained flow with radiant quench section, but some key questions remain unanswered that can validate the potential improvement of gasifier performance using liquid CO{sub 2} slurries. In order to provide a path to answering these questions, a technology development roadmap has been developed to resolve fundamental issues and to better define the operation aspects of using liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries. The fundamental issues could be resolved by conducting additional laboratory analyses consisting of: • A rheological test program to quantitatively evaluate slurry preparation and handling for liquid CO{sub 2} including experiments to evaluate preparation systems. • An experimental program on CO{sub 2}-assisted gasification in order to obtain the most relevant experimental data from drop tube furnace studies to aid in verifying the potential advantages of direct feed of liquid CO{sub 2}/coal as gasifier feedstocks. Quantifying the operational aspects of liquid CO{sub 2} slurries can best be achieved with: • An experimental program using a flow test loop to evaluate equipment performance and handling properties of liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries for gasifier feedstocks on a scale sufficient to predict full scale operating parameters. • Spray atomization studies necessary to evaluate the effect of atomization properties of liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurries that could be significantly different than those of water/coal slurries.

  3. Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update Q&A Session (Text Version) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Q&A Session (Text Version) Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update Q&A Session (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar, Home Energy Score Post-Pilot Update Q&A Session, presented in September 2011. Joan Glickman: The first question I have here is, how do you choose and recruit partner organizations? Well, we're in the process of doing that right now. For instance, we talked to the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (I'm hoping I'm getting that name right), a

  4. Fact #856 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Owner Satisfaction | Department of Energy 6 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for Owner Satisfaction Fact #856 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for Owner Satisfaction The annual owner-satisfaction survey from Consumer Reports in 2014 covered 350,000 vehicles from one to three years old. They asked subscribers if they would purchase the same vehicle again knowing what they know now. The respondents were asked to consider styling, comfort,

  5. Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2008-11-15

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 2: Accident and Thermal Fluids Analysis PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J; Corradini, M.; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Gauntt, R.; Geffraye, G.; Gehin, Jess C; Hassan, Y.; Moses, David Lewis; Renier, John-Paul; Schultz, R.; Wei, T.

    2008-03-01

    An accident, thermal fluids, and reactor physics phenomena identification and ranking process was conducted by a panel of experts on the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design (consideration given to both pebble-bed and prismatic gas-cooled reactor configurations). Safety-relevant phenomena, importance, and knowledge base were assessed for the following event classes: (1) normal operation (including some reactor physics aspects), (2) general loss of forced circulation (G-LOFC), (3) pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC), (4) depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC), (5) air ingress (following D-LOFC), (6) reactivity transients - including anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), (7) processes coupled via intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) (IHX failure with molten salt), and (8) steam/water ingress. The panel's judgment of the importance ranking of a given phenomenon (or process) was based on the effect it had on one or more figures of merit or evaluation criteria. These included public and worker dose, fuel failure, and primary (and other safety) system integrity. The major phenomena of concern that were identified and categorized as high importance combined with medium to low knowledge follow: (1) core coolant bypass flows (normal operation), (2) power/flux profiles (normal operation), (3) outlet plenum flows (normal operation), (4) reactivity-temperature feedback coefficients for high-plutonium-content cores (normal operation and accidents), (5) fission product release related to the transport of silver (normal operation), (6)emissivity aspects for the vessel and reactor cavity cooling system (G-LOFC), (7) reactor vessel cavity air circulation and heat transfer (G-LOFC), and (8)convection/radiation heating of upper vessel area (P-LOFC).

  7. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Lu [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thall, Peter F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need confirmation, IMRT should be considered for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  8. Fact #856 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Owner Satisfaction - Dataset | Department of Energy Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for Owner Satisfaction File fotw#856_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #881: July 13, 2015 Powertrain Efficiency Improvements, 2005 to 2013 - Dataset Fact #892: September 28, 2015 Over One-Million in Plug-in Vehicle Sales Worldwide - Dataset Quarterly Analysis Review February 2015

  9. Computing quality scores and uncertainty for approximate pattern matching in geospatial semantic graphs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stracuzzi, David John; Brost, Randolph C.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Robinson, David G.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Woodbridge, Diane M. -K.

    2015-09-26

    Geospatial semantic graphs provide a robust foundation for representing and analyzing remote sensor data. In particular, they support a variety of pattern search operations that capture the spatial and temporal relationships among the objects and events in the data. However, in the presence of large data corpora, even a carefully constructed search query may return a large number of unintended matches. This work considers the problem of calculating a quality score for each match to the query, given that the underlying data are uncertain. As a result, we present a preliminary evaluation of three methods for determining both match qualitymore » scores and associated uncertainty bounds, illustrated in the context of an example based on overhead imagery data.« less

  10. Computing quality scores and uncertainty for approximate pattern matching in geospatial semantic graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracuzzi, David John; Brost, Randolph C.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Robinson, David G.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Woodbridge, Diane M. -K.

    2015-09-26

    Geospatial semantic graphs provide a robust foundation for representing and analyzing remote sensor data. In particular, they support a variety of pattern search operations that capture the spatial and temporal relationships among the objects and events in the data. However, in the presence of large data corpora, even a carefully constructed search query may return a large number of unintended matches. This work considers the problem of calculating a quality score for each match to the query, given that the underlying data are uncertain. As a result, we present a preliminary evaluation of three methods for determining both match quality scores and associated uncertainty bounds, illustrated in the context of an example based on overhead imagery data.

  11. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Update on CREBs DATA and ENERGY STAR Score Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process | Department of Energy 4, 2015 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Hosted by the EPA's ENERGY STAR, this webinar will outline the schedule for ENERGY STAR 1-100 score development based on the 2012 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey data, provide a review of the types of properties covered, and a summary of new variables collected. This webinar runs from

  12. Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Scoring Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Scoring Tool David Roberts, Noel Merket, Ben Polly, Mike Heaney, Sean Casey, and Joseph Robertson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54074 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401

  13. Home Energy Score API User: EnergySavvy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EnergySavvy Home Energy Score API User: EnergySavvy EnergySavvy provides cloud-based software for the utility industry. Dedicated to making energy efficiency more controllable and transparent, EnergySavvy's Optix platform provides a modern user experience that delivers predictability to the industry. The Optix platform transforms the way utilities engage customers, automates demand-side management programs, and quantifies results. At New Jersey Natural Gas, EnergySavvy's customized API interface

  14. Home Energy Score API User: OptiMiser | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OptiMiser Home Energy Score API User: OptiMiser OptiMiser software and data management tools are used by utilities, implementers, programs, and contractors across the country. Features include: Streamlined interface that provides continuous savings estimation Advanced utility bill analysis for accuracy and reduced data entry An array of reports and a built-in report editor A modifiable measures library, simple proposals, and detailed estimations ePortal to remotely pre-load, queue, retrieve, and

  15. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Velarde students Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and Savannah Martinez from Velarde Elementary School (left to right). Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and Savannah Martinez from Velarde

  16. Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energys Home Energy Scoring Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, David; Merket, Noel; Polly, Ben; Heaney, Mike; Casey, Sean; Robertson, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a series of assessments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed Home Energy Scoring Tool (HEST). This report is an assessment of the 4/27/2012 release of HEST. Predictions of electric and natural gas consumption were compared with weather-normalized utility billing data for a mixture of newer and older homes located in Oregon, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Carolina and Texas.

  17. Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Scoring Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, David; Merket, Noel; Polly, Ben; Heaney, Mike; Casey, Sean; Robertson, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a series of assessments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed Home Energy Scoring Tool (HEST). This report is an assessment of the 4/27/2012 release of HEST. Predictions of electric and natural gas consumption were compared with weather-normalized utility billing data for a mixture of newer and older homes located in Oregon, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Carolina and Texas.

  18. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-11-30

    This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

  19. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  20. Presidential Rank Award Winners

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a Senior Executive Service leader in Naval Reactors since 2008 and holds a Master's of Science in Computer and Information Systems from George Mason University. Vavoso began his...

  1. Reordering MPI Ranks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contain 24 cores) are located across different positions on the 3D torus network, communication time between tasks will vary depending not only on node placement, but also the...

  2. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CNS has purview of over ninety EM nuclear facilities across the DOE complex. To ensure that limited resources are applied in a risk-informed and balanced approach, the CNS performed a methodical assessment of the EM nuclear facilities. This risk-informed approach provides a data-driven foundation on which to construct a balanced set of operating plans and staff assignments.

  3. Understanding Building Infrastructure and Building Operation through DOE Asset Score Model: Lessons Learned from a Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-06-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system to help building owners to evaluate the as-built physical characteristics (including building envelope, the mechanical and electrical systems) and overall building energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The energy asset score breaks down building energy use information by simulating building performance under typical operating and occupancy conditions for a given use type. A web-based modeling tool, the energy asset score tool facilitates the implementation of the asset score system. The tool consists of a simplified user interface built on a centralized simulation engine (EnergyPlus). It is intended to reduce both the implementation cost for the users and increase modeling standardization compared with an approach that requires users to build their own energy models. A pilot project with forty-two buildings (consisting mostly offices and schools) was conducted in 2012. This paper reports the findings. Participants were asked to collect a minimum set of building data and enter it into the asset score tool. Participants also provided their utility bills, existing ENERGY STAR scores, and previous energy audit/modeling results if available. The results from the asset score tool were compared with the building energy use data provided by the pilot participants. Three comparisons were performed. First, the actual building energy use, either from the utility bills or via ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, was compared with the modeled energy use. It was intended to examine how well the energy asset score represents a buildings system efficiencies, and how well it is correlated to a buildings actual energy consumption. Second, calibrated building energy models (where they exist) were used to examine any discrepancies between the asset score model and the pilot participant buildings [known] energy use pattern. This comparison examined the end use breakdowns and more detailed time series data. Third, ASHRAE 90.1 prototype buildings were also used as an industry standard modeling approach to test the accuracy level of the asset score tool. Our analysis showed that the asset score tool, which uses simplified building simulation, could provide results comparable to a more detailed energy model. The buildings as-built efficiency can be reflected in the energy asset score. An analysis between the modeled energy use through the asset score tool and the actual energy use from the utility bills can further inform building owners about the effectiveness of their buildings operation and maintenance.

  4. EM's Oak Ridge Office Contractor Scores High in Latest Award Fee Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – EM gave URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) a score of nearly 96 percent, allowing the contractor to earn over $4.4 million of the available fee of more than $4.6 million for the period from April to September 2015. UCOR is responsible for cleaning up the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, as well as other select sites on DOE’s Oak Ridge Reservation under a contract valued at $2.4 billion.

  5. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  6. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zain, Zakiyah Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Azwan, Zairul E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com Raduan, Farhana E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com Sagap, Ismail E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com; Aziz, Nazrina

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  7. The ultimate downscaling limit of FETs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamaluy, Denis; Gao, Xujiao; Tierney, Brian David

    2014-10-01

    We created a highly efficient, universal 3D quant um transport simulator. We demonstrated that the simulator scales linearly - both with the problem size (N) and number of CPUs, which presents an important break-through in the field of computational nanoelectronics. It allowed us, for the first time, to accurately simulate and optim ize a large number of realistic nanodevices in a much shorter time, when compared to other methods/codes such as RGF[~N 2.333 ]/KNIT, KWANT, and QTBM[~N 3 ]/NEMO5. In order to determine the best-in-class for different beyond-CMOS paradigms, we performed rigorous device optimization for high-performance logic devices at 6-, 5- and 4-nm gate lengths. We have discovered that there exists a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs). We have found that, at room temperatures, all FETs, irre spective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths.

  8. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, J.D.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Gorensek, M. B.; Herring, S.; Pickard, P.

    2008-03-01

    A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

  10. Impact of Primary Gleason Grade on Risk Stratification for Gleason Score 7 Prostate Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Sun, Leon; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Moul, Judd; Lee, W. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary Gleason grade (GG) in Gleason score (GS) 7 prostate cancers for risk of non-organ-confined disease with the goal of optimizing radiotherapy treatment option counseling. Methods: One thousand three hundred thirty-three patients with pathologic GS7 were identified in the Duke Prostate Center research database. Clinical factors including age, race, clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen at diagnosis, and pathologic stage were obtained. Data were stratified by prostate-specific antigen and clinical stage at diagnosis into adapted D'Amico risk groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed evaluating for association of primary GG with pathologic outcome. Results: Nine hundred seventy-nine patients had primary GG3 and 354 had GG4. On univariate analyses, GG4 was associated with an increased risk of non-organ-confined disease. On multivariate analysis, GG4 was independently associated with seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) but not extracapsular extension. Patients with otherwise low-risk disease and primary GG3 had a very low risk of SVI (4%). Conclusions: Primary GG4 in GS7 cancers is associated with increased risk of SVI compared with primary GG3. Otherwise low-risk patients with GS 3+4 have a very low risk of SVI and may be candidates for prostate-only radiotherapy modalities.

  11. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

  12. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

  13. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  14. Preradiotherapy Calcium Scores of the Coronary Arteries in a Cohort of Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Comparison With a Cohort of Healthy Women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, Mirjam E.; Heijenbrok, Mark W.; Petoukhova, Anna L.; Scholten, Astrid N.; Schreur, Joop H.M.; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer radiotherapy has been associated with an increased risk of cardiac toxicity. However, no data are available on the probability of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) in breast cancer patients when compared with healthy women. Therefore, baseline coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores, as an accepted tool to predict CAD, were determined and compared with the CAC scores of a healthy, asymptomatic cohort, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or infiltrative breast cancer referred for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery were included in our study. Their cardiovascular risk profile was registered, and a 64 multislice CT scan was performed. The CAC scores of an unselected (Caucasian only) Radiotherapy Centre West (RCWEST) cohort, as well as of those of a selected (comorbidity and race adjusted) RCWEST cohort, were determined. The scores of both cohorts were compared with those of the female (Caucasian only) MESA cohort. Results: For the unselected RCWEST cohort (n = 62) we found significant (p < .01) higher scores for women in the 55-64 age category compared with those of the MESA cohort. In the selected cohort (n = 55) the CAC scores of the women in the age category 55-64 were significantly (p = .02) higher compared with the MESA cohort. No significant differences were noted in the other age categories. Conclusion: Both cohorts revealed that CAC scores in the 55-64 age category were significantly higher than the CAC scores in the asymptomatic (female) MESA population. These data suggest that breast cancer patients bear a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease before the start of radiotherapy. Therefore, measures to decrease cardiac dose further in breast cancer radiotherapy are even more important.

  15. Home Energy Score Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  16. A Test Stand for Ion Sources of Ultimate Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enparantza, R.; Uriarte, L.; Romano, P.; Alonso, J.; Ariz, I.; Egiraun, M.; Bermejo, F. J.; Etxebarria, V.; Lucas, J.; Del Rio, J. M.; Letchford, A.; Faircloth, D.; Stockli, M.

    2009-03-12

    The rationale behind the ITUR project is to perform a comparison between different kinds of H{sup -} ion sources using the same beam diagnostics setup. In particular, a direct comparison will be made in terms of the emittance characteristics of Penning Type sources such as those currently in use in the injector for the ISIS (UK) Pulsed Neutron Source and those of volumetric type such as that driving the injector for the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (TN, U.S.A.). The endeavour here pursued is thus to build an Ion Source Test Stand where virtually any type of source can be tested and its features measured and, thus compared to the results of other sources under the same gauge. It would be possible then to establish a common ground for effectively comparing different ion sources. The long term objectives are thus to contribute towards building compact sources of minimum emittance, maximum performance, high reliability-availability, high percentage of desired particle production, stability and high brightness. The project consortium is lead by Tekniker-IK4 research centre and partners are companies Elytt Energy and Jema Group. The technical viability is guaranteed by the collaboration between the project consortium and several scientific institutions, such the CSIC (Spain), the University of the Basque Country (Spain), ISIS (STFC-UK), SNS (ORNL-USA) and CEA in Saclay (France)

  17. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  18. Ultimate collapse of offshore structures exposed to fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amdahl, J.; Eberg, E.; Holmaas, T.; Landroe, H.; Ulfsnes, M.

    1995-12-31

    A systematic validation of the computer program for analysis of mechanical response USFOS is presented. It is based upon a nonlinear finite element formulation and is capable of predicting total collapse, taking systems effects including force redistribution caused by failing members into account. For acceptance of the method it is vital that component behavior is predicted reliably. For this purpose the element formulation used is calibrated such that buckling curves for fire exposed columns and beam-column behavior are reproduced accurately. As a part of the verification of the program a laboratory test with a three dimensional frame representative of the upper part of a four-legged jacket is carried out. The structure is exposed to a gas pool fire at sea level close to one leg until total collapse takes place. A description of the test is given along with numerically predicted structural response. Some preliminary results from the experiment are also presented. Finally, the use of the integrated fire analysis system is illustrated by application to an actual offshore structure.

  19. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    total down and net radiation are sub- stantially affected by the state of the sky in terms of cloudi- ness. The data volume contains both sets of data and also, in this Chapter,...

  20. Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties that make it useful for products ranging from computer displays and flat panel TVs to ATM touch screens and solar cells. But now electronic structure computations...

  1. Solution behavior of PEO : the ultimate biocompatible polymer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curro, John G.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile

    2004-11-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is the quintessential biocompatible polymer. Due to its ability to form hydrogen bonds, it is soluble in water, and yet is uncharged and relatively inert. It is being investigated for use in a wide range of biomedical and biotechnical applications, including the prevention of protein adhesion (biofouling), controlled drug delivery, and tissue scaffolds. PEO has also been proposed for use in novel polymer hydrogel nanocomposites with superior mechanical properties. However, the phase behavior of PEO in water is highly anomalous and is not addressed by current theories of polymer solutions. The effective interactions between PEO and water are very concentration dependent, unlike other polymer/solvent systems, due to water-water and water-PEO hydrogen bonds. An understanding of this anomalous behavior requires a careful examination of PEO liquids and solutions on the molecular level. We performed massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations and self-consistent Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) calculations on PEO liquids. We also initiated MD studies on PEO/water solutions with and without an applied electric field. This work is summarized in three parts devoted to: (1) A comparison of MD simulations, theory and experiment on PEO liquids; (2) The implementation of water potentials into the LAMMPS MD code; and (3) A theoretical analysis of the effect of an applied electric field on the phase diagram of polymer solutions.

  2. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The...

  3. Ultimate storage ring based on fourth-order geometric achromats...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-4402 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of...

  4. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Schreiber, Jane E.; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm{sup 2}). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate the value of newer methods of irradiation.

  5. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 19, No. 1, Summer 2015: Biodiesel Scores Big with Fleets Nationwide (Newsletter), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vol. 19, No. 1 Summer 2015 Clean Cities Now Inside: Bakery Turns to Propane for Sustainable Transportation Solution California Coordinator Educates Dealers about Plugging in to PEVs Coalitions Step Up to Manage Air Quality Funds for Fleets Maintaining Focus on Niche Market Fleets Biodiesel Scores Big with Fleets Nationwide Dennis A. Smith National Clean Cities Director Linda Bluestein National Clean Cities Co-Director Welcome We hope you enjoy this latest edition of Clean Cities Now, the

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    then evaluated and ranked according to their Equitable Threat Score (ETS), a statistical method often used in the evaluation of weather forecasting. A skill score close to 1...

  7. Home Energy Score Program Update and New Scoring Tool Release...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 14, 2014. You can also watch the recording or download a copy of the presentation. ... but you are also required to pass a two-part exam that we offer online for free. ...

  8. Deputy Administrator Greg Delwiche receives Presidential Rank...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the natural environment within which the power system exists." His approachability, honesty and transparency in decision-making have contributed to positive and productive...

  9. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  10. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    risk-informed and balanced approach, the CNS performed a methodical assessment of the EM nuclear facilities. This risk-informed approach provides a data-driven foundation on which...

  11. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Oikawa, Hirobumi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kanesaka, Naoto; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Kosugi, Takashi; Hatano, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masao; Ito, Yoshinori; Takayama, Makoto; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Imai, Michiko; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+group and 40% for theILBTgroup(P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+group and 41% for the ILBT group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for theILBT+group and 35% for the ILBT group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the needfor further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life.

  12. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III NonSmall-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score MatchedAnalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, George; Oberije, Cary; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Wiersma, Terry; Moreno-Jimenez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Marks, Lawrence B.; Rengan, Ramesh; De Petris, Luigi; Ramella, Sara; DeRuyck, Kim; De Dios, Nria Rodriguez; Warner, Andrew; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy?BED 10?76.8Gy (eg 60-64Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy64Gy/32 fr and <74Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89months; ID were 40months). Median dose fractionation was 60Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5Gy) and 66Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15months (median survival SD: 19.3months; ID: 21.0months). There was an increase in grades III to V lung toxicity associated with ID (13.0% vs 4.9%, respectively). Conclusions: No significant overall survival benefits were found with intermediate DE; however, more grade III or greater lung toxicity was observed. The separation of survival curves after 15months of follow-up suggests that a small overall survival improvement associated with intermediate DE cannot be excluded.

  13. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BW at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In...

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Pursuit of the Ultimate Conductivity in ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Look, David C

    2014-12-22

    In this program, we and our colleagues at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) had proposed nine areas of research. In most of these we made significant progress, as outlined below. Many of the results were published as listed at the end of the report. 1. Optimized growth of GZO in H2 2. Optimized growth of GZO in forming gas 3. Optimized growth of GZO in Ar with a subsequent anneal in H2 or forming gas 4. Optimized growth of GZO in Ar with a subsequent anneal in Zn vapor 5. Modeling of thickness effects and experimental verification 6. Measurements of thickness and optical mobility by ellipsometry 7. Low-temperature photoluminescence measurements and analysis 8. Transmission and reflectance measurements 9. Measurements of stability 10. Discussion: electrical characterization

  15. Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when the reasons for choosing a specific beamline are clearly stated, e.g., unique features, required resolution, higher flux, etc. Criteria for Evaluating the Scientific...

  16. Home Energy Score FAQs for Homeowners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    you feel in your home and may improve the air quality in your home. ... information about a home's characteristics into an energy model- ing software developed by DOE and Lawrence ...

  17. Home Energy Scoring Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings - Residential Phase: Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed...

  18. ActiveGreenScore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: hackerleague.orghackathonsboston-cleanweb-hackathonhacksactivegree Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated Coordinates:...

  19. Low rank coal upgrading in a flow of hot water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masato Morimoto; Hiroyuki Nakagawa; Kouichi Miura

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous hydrothermal degradation and extraction at around 350{sup o}C using flowing solvent as a reaction/extraction medium were proposed for upgrading brown coal, more specifically, for converting brown coal into several fractions having different molecular weight and chemical structure under mild conditions. When an Australian brown coal, Loy Yang coal, was treated by water at 350{sup o}C under 18 MPa, the coal was separated into four fractions: gaseous product by 8% yield, water-soluble extract at room temperature (soluble) by 23% yield, extract precipitates as solid at room temperature (deposit) by 23% yield, and residual coal (upgraded coal) by 46% yield on daf basis. The separation was found to be realized by in situ extraction of low-molecular-weight substances released from coal macromolecular structure and/or those generated by hydrothermal decomposition reactions at 350{sup o}C. The solid products obtained, deposit and upgraded coal, were characterized in detail to examine the possibility of their effective utilization as solid fuel and chemical feed stock. The upgraded coal showed higher heating value and higher gasification reactivity than the parent coal, indicating that the upgraded coal can be a better solid fuel than the parent coal. The solid extract, deposit, was found to show thermoplasticity at less than 200{sup o}C, suggesting the possibility of utilizing the deposit as a raw material of high performance carbon materials. Several variables affecting the performance of the proposed method are also examined in detail in this paper. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Wu, Kuang Tsai

    2004-03-02

    A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum amount of energy per unit of time is enabled to combust fuel having a lower energy content, while still obtaining at least the stated minimum energy generation rate, by replacing a small amount of the combustion air fed to the furnace by oxygen. The replacement of oxygen for combustion air also provides reduction in the generation of NOx.

  1. Wyoming - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Wyoming

  2. Arizona - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Arizona

  3. Arkansas - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Arkansas

  4. California - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California California

  5. Colorado - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Colorado

  6. Connecticut - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Connecticut

  7. Delaware - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Delaware

  8. District of Columbia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EIA) District of Columbia District of Columbia

  9. Florida - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Florida

  10. Georgia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Georgia

  11. Hawaii - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Hawaii

  12. Idaho - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Idaho

  13. Illinois - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Illinois

  14. Indiana - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Indiana

  15. Kansas - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Kansas

  16. Kentucky - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Kentucky

  17. Louisiana - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Louisiana

  18. Maine - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Maine

  19. Maryland - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Maryland

  20. Massachusetts - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Massachusetts

  1. Michigan - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Michigan

  2. Minnesota - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Minnesota

  3. Mississippi - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Mississippi

  4. Missouri - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Missouri

  5. Montana - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Montana

  6. Tennessee - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Tennessee

  7. Texas - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Texas

  8. Vermont - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Vermont

  9. Virginia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Virginia

  10. Washington - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Washington

  11. West Virginia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia West Virginia

  12. Wisconsin - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Wisconsin

  13. Alabama - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Alabama

  14. Alaska - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Alaska

  15. ranking of utilities by demand charge? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the API? New to this API stuff. Many thanks Submitted by Apin101 on 26 November, 2013 - 07:12 1 answer Points: 0 There is currently no way to sort the responses, but since...

  16. Drying low rank coal and retarding spontaneous ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixel, J.C.; Bellow, E.J.; Heaney, W.F.; Facinelli, S.H.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described of producing a dried particulate coal fuel having a reduced tendency to ignite spontaneously comprising spraying and intimately mixing the dried coal with an aqueous emulsion of a material selected from the group consisting of foots oils, petrolatum filtrate, and hydrocracker recycle oil.

  17. State Clean Energy Scorecard: Renewable Energy Performance and Policy Rankings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the State Clean Energy Scorecard Project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program.

  18. Nebraska - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Nebraska

  19. Nevada - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Nevada

  20. New Hampshire - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire New Hampshire

  1. New Jersey - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey New Jersey

  2. New Mexico - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico New Mexico

  3. New York - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New York New York

  4. North Carolina - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina North Carolina

  5. Oklahoma - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Oklahoma

  6. Oregon - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Oregon

  7. South Carolina - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina South Carolina

  8. Sequoia ranked third in TOP500 list | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    according to the industry-standard Top500 list. Sequoia, which recently completed its transition to classified computing in support of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program,...

  9. Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate...

  10. Three dimensional imaging and analysis of a single nano-device at the ultimate scale using correlative microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenier, A.; Barnes, J. P.; Serra, R.; Audoit, G.; Cooper, D.; Duguay, S.; Rolland, N.; Blavette, D.; Vurpillot, F.; Morin, P.; Gouraud, P.

    2015-05-25

    The analysis of a same sample using nanometre or atomic-scale techniques is fundamental to fully understand device properties. This is especially true for the dopant distribution within last generation nano-transistors such as MOSFET or FINFETs. In this work, the spatial distribution of boron in a nano-transistor at the atomic scale has been investigated using a correlative approach combining electron and atom probe tomography. The distortions present in the reconstructed volume using atom probe tomography have been discussed by simulations of surface atoms using a cylindrical symmetry taking into account the evaporation fields. Electron tomography combined with correction of atomic density was used so that to correct image distortions observed in atom probe tomography reconstructions. These corrected atom probe tomography reconstructions then enable a detailed boron doping analysis of the device.

  11. Zirconia Inert Matrix Fuel for Plutonium and Minor Actinides Management in Reactors and as an Ultimate Waste Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degueldre, Claude; Wiesenack, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    An yttria stabilised zirconia doped with plutonia and erbia has been selected as inert matrix fuel (IMF) at PSI. The results of experimental irradiation tests on yttria-stabilised zirconia doped with plutonia and erbia pellets in the Halden research reactor as well as a study of zirconia solubility are presented. Zirconia must be stabilised by yttria to form a solid solution such as MAz(Y,Er){sub y}Pu{sub x}Zr{sub 1-y}O{sub 2-{xi}} where minor actinides (MA) oxides are also soluble. (Er,Y,Pu,Zr)O{sub 2-{xi}} (with Pu containing 5% Am) was successfully prepared at PSI and irradiated in the Halden reactor. Emphasis is given on the zirconia- IMF properties under in-pile irradiation, on the fuel material centre temperatures and on the fission gas release. The retention of fission products in zirconia may be stronger at similar temperature, compared to UO{sub 2}. The outstanding behaviour of plutonia-zirconia inert matrix fuel is compared to the classical (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels. The properties of the spent fuel pellets are presented focusing on the once-through strategy. For this strategy, low solubility of the inert matrix is required for geological disposal. This parameter was studied in detail for a range of solutions corresponding to groundwater under near field conditions. Under these conditions the IMF solubility is about 109 times smaller than glass, several orders of magnitude lower than UO{sub 2} in oxidising conditions (Yucca Mountain) and comparable in reducing conditions, which makes the zirconia material very attractive for deep geological disposal. The behaviour of plutonia-zirconia inert matrix fuel is discussed within a 'burn and bury' strategy. (authors)

  12. The Ultimate Structure of Matter: The High Energy Physics Program from the 1950s through the 1980s

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1990-02-01

    This discusses the following topics in High Energy Physics: The Particle Zoo; The Strong and the Weak; The Particle Explosion; Deep Inside the Nucleon; The Search for Unity; Physics in Collision; The Standard Model; Particles and the Cosmos; and Practical Benefits.

  13. NREL Develops Method to Evaluate Accuracy of Home Energy Scoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    based test methods based on large samples of homes. Potential Impact A standardized, empirical method of test based on a large sample of homes will improve the accuracy of...

  14. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:energyright.comresidentialescore.html State Mississippi Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation - 250...

  15. El Paso Electric- SCORE Program for Counties, Municipalities, and Schools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    El Paso Electric offers a targeted incentive program for public institutions, local governments and higher education.

  16. Entergy Texas- SCORE, CitySmart, and Commercial Solutions Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial Solutions Program is designed to help participants identify energy efficiency opportunities in existing and newly planned facilities and to provide monetary incentives to implement...

  17. Using Home Energy Scoring Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Trends in Real Estate and Energy Efficiency -- Update on Program Experience Trends in Real Estate and Energy Efficiency Working with Real Estate Home ...

  18. Sandia Energy - Sandia Researchers Score MRS "Outstanding" Rating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the best-to represent the MRS in Cancun, Mexico, from August 11-15 at the 22nd annual International Materials Research Congress. The other two winning posters were from...

  19. Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... your Web or to provide to homeowners or to provide to your assessors for their cards to make it easy and something uniform that they can provide to give you (inaudible) branding. ...

  20. Building Energy Asset Score Frequently Asked Questions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    major energy-related systems (such as lighting, hot water, and HVAC systems). These physical and structural elements have a significant impact on how efficiently energy is used ...

  1. Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... So we would go choose our unconditioned attic, and enter our ... But in terms of, I think they were asking how do we evaluate ... But we are in a continuous search in identifying new ...

  2. The Combined Federal Campaign: Scoring a Touchdown in Giving

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It has been said that Federal employees are big-hearted people. We could not agree more, and nothing demonstrates that caring spirit year after year better than the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), the Federal government’s annual giving drive.

  3. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 150Unit (No Limit) Geothermal Heat Pump Replacement - 500Unit (No Limit) Dual Fuel Heat Pump Replacement - 250Unit (No Limit) Subsidized Energy Audit Price- 75...

  4. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 150Unit (No Limit) Geothermal Heat Pump Replacement - 500Unit (No Limit) Dual Fuel Heat Pump Replacement - 250Unit (No Limit) Energy Audit- 75 Summary The...

  5. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy efficiency of existing homes. This program replaces the previous In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot program offered by TVA. To participate in the program, homeowner must...

  6. New Training Tool Broadens Pool of Home Energy Score Assessors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Self-evaluation features in the Sim help candidates identify areas where they need to focus more attention. Once confident that they know how to collect required information ...

  7. North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lighting system at Mecklenburg Park. | Photo courtesy of Michael Jaycocks Nearly 600 games are played on four athletic fields as North Mecklenburg Park, one of the largest parks...

  8. Energy Department Updates Home Energy Scoring Tool for Advancing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As part of the Energy Department's commitment to helping families across the United States save money by saving energy, the Department announced today its first major software ...

  9. Low-rank coal research semiannual report, January 1992--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This semiannual report is a compilation of seventeen reports on ongoing coal research at the University of North Dakota. The following research areas are covered: control technology and coal preparation; advanced research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction and gasification. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO partners with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Biomass Research and Development. Each year, Biofuels Digest, a widely read online biofuels trade publication, and its ...

  11. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  12. Questions For Identification, Evaluation, and Ranking of Proposed Infrastructure Protection Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAND2002-0877 Unlimited Release Printed April 2002 A Scalable Systems Approach for Critical Infrastructure Security Arnold B. Baker, Robert J. Eagan, Patricia K. Falcone, Joe M. Harris, Gilbert V. Herrera,W. Curtis Hines, Robert L. Hutchinson, Ajoy K. Moonka, Mark L. Swinson, Erik K. Webb, Tommy D. Woodall, and Gregory D. Wyss Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation,

  13. Effect of coal rank and process conditions on temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.; Moniz, M.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor in the integrated TSL process is studied. The effects of gas and slurry superficial velocities, process solvent characteristics, reactor length, and catalyst sulfiding agent on the exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are studied. A substantial temperature difference is observed with subbituminous coal as compared with bituminous coal, at comparable reactor conditions. Some of the factors that are believed to have contributed to the large exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are slow kinetics and high reaction heat for subbituminous coal conversion and pyrrhotite catalysis.

  14. Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fleet; commander NATO Allied Joint Command, Lisbon; and, commander, Striking and Support Forces NATO. He also served as the commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command...

  15. Prioritization of VHTR system modeling needs based on phenomena identification, ranking and sensitivity studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilim, R. B.; Pointer, W. D.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-04-30

    Quantification of uncertainty is a key requirement for the design of a nuclear power plant and the assurance of its safety. Historically the procedure has been to perform the required uncertainty assessment through comparison of the analytical predictions with experimental simulations. The issue with this historical approach has always been that the simulations through experiments could not be at full scale for the practical reasons of cost and scheduling. Invariably, only parts of the system were tested separately or if integral testing was performed for the complete system, the size or scale of the experimental apparatus was significantly smaller than the actual plant configuration.

  16. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Proposal-Review-Flow-Chart_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staff Proposal submitted Feasible? User Office communicates to PI envelope Within ES&H envelope Assign to PRC (3 reviews) Safety safeguards Safety review Recommend safeguards g Proposal Review Committee for scoring Ranking in set CNMS Management team Complete? PI Resubmit? Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Approval? 2 1/2 weeks 4 weeks 1 week No

  18. An oxy-hydrocarbon model of fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Lang; Tom Canning

    2007-09-15

    This paper asserts a new method of analyzing fossil fuels, useful for sorting coals into well-defined categories and for the identification of outlying ultimate analysis data. It describes a series of techniques starting with a new multivariant approach for describing the lower ranks of coal, progressing to a classical, but modified, single-variant approach for the volatile and high-energy ranks. In addition, for a few special cases, multiple low and high ranks are also well described by the multivariant approach. As useful as these techniques are for analyzing fuel chemistry in the laboratory arena, this work was initiated in support of Exergetic Systems' Input/Loss Method. At commercial coal-fired power plants, Input/Loss allows the determination of fuel chemistry based on combustion effluents. The methods presented allow equations to be developed independent of combustion stoichiometrics, which improve Input/Loss accuracy in determining fuel chemistry on-line and in real time.

  19. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal -- Task 3.8, Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

    1995-03-01

    The goal of the PFBC activity is to generate fundamental process information that will further the development of an economical and environmentally acceptable second-generation PFBC. The immediate objectives focus on generic issues, including the performance of sulfur sorbents, fate of alkali, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals in PFBC. A great deal of PFBC performance relates to the chemistry of the bed and the contact between gas and solids that occurs during combustion. These factors can be studied in a suitably designed bench-scale reactor. The present studies are focusing on the emission control strategies applied in the bed, rather than in hot-gas cleaning. Emission components include alkali and heavy metals in addition to SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O, and CO. The report presents: a description of the pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR); a description of the alkali sampling probe; shakedown testing of the bench-scale PFBR; results from alkali sampling; results from sulfur sorbent performance tests; and results from refuse-derived fuel and lignite combustion tests.

  20. Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. AO13. High energy, low methane syngas from low-rank coals for coal-to-liquids production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucero, Andrew; Goyal, Amit; McCabe, Kevin; Gangwal, Santosh

    2015-06-30

    An experimental program was undertaken to develop and demonstrate novel steam reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, and methane under high temperature and sulfur environments at lab scale. Several catalysts were developed and synthesized along with some catalysts based on recipes found in the literature. Of these, two had good resistance at 90 ppm H2S with one almost not affected at all. Higher concentrations of H2S did affect methane conversion across the catalyst, but performance was fairly stable for up to 200 hours. Based on the results of the experimental program, a techno-economic analysis was developed for IGCC and CTL applications and compared to DOE reference cases to examine the effects of the new technology. In the IGCC cases, the reformer/POX system produces nearly the same amount of electricity for nearly the same cost, however, the reformers/POX case sequesters a higher percentage of the carbon when compared to IGCC alone. For the CTL case the economics of the new process were nearly identical to the CTL case, but due to improved yields, the greenhouse gas emissions for a given production of fuels was approximately 50% less than the baseline case.

  2. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal. Semi-annual report, January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    Summaries of progress on the following tasks are presented: Mixed waste treatment; Hot water extraction of nonpolar organic pollutant from soils; Aqueous phase thermal oxidation wastewater treatment; Review of results from comprehensive characterization of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants; Air toxic fine particulate control; Effectiveness of sorbents for trace elements; Catalyst for utilization of methane in selective catalytic reduction of NOx; Fuel utilization properties; Hot gas cleaning; PFBC; catalytic tar cracking; sulfur forms in coal; resid and bitumen desulfurization; biodesulfurization; diesel fuel desulfurization; stability issues; Sorbent carbon development; Evaluation of carbon products; Stable and supercritical chars; Briquette binders; Carbon molecular sieves; Coal char fuel evaporation canister sorbent; Development of a coal by-product classification protocol for utilization; Use of coal ash in recycled plastics and composite materials; Corrosion of advanced structural materials; Joining of advanced structural materials; Resource data evaluation; and the Usti and Labem (Czech Republic) coal-upgrading program.

  3. Environmental Risk Evaluation System An Approach to Ranking Risk of Ocean Energy Development on Coastal and Estuarine Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Deployment and operation of ocean energy devices does not represent the first foray into industrialization of the oceans; shipping, nearshore development, waste disposal, subsea mining, oil and gas extraction, and large-scale commercial fishing all coexist in various states of equilibrium with the marine environment. In most cases these industries were developed without a clear understanding of the likely outcomes of large-scale development. In virtually every country where the harvest of ocean energy is emerging, regulators and stakeholders require that the industry examine potential effects of devices, minimize the footprint of effects, and provide management measures that either avoid the impacts or mitigate to further reduce the residual impacts. The ERES analysis is based on scenarios that are consistent with sequences of events that lead to adverse impacts, distinguishing between episodic, intermittent, and chronic risks. In the context of ocean energy development, an episodic scenario might involve the exceedingly rare but potentially devastating event of an oil spill from vessels caused by the presence of the device, while vulnerable receptors are present; understanding the risk of such a scenario involves determining the probability of the occurrence by examining factors such as the petroleum content of ocean energy devices, the vessel traffic volume and the proximity of shipping lanes to the ocean energy devices, the reliability of the control measures to avoid an episodic event, and the likely presence of seabirds, marine mammals, or fish that may be affected by oil. In contrast, chronic risk scenarios involve events or circumstances that are continuous, so that risk characterization involves assessing only the severity of the consequences. An example of a chronic risk scenario might be the toxicity to marine organisms due to low-level chemical releases from anti-biofouling paints and coatings that may be used on devices, and the effect that the level of toxicity may have on marine flora and fauna. Between these two extremes are intermittent events, such as encounters between fish and rotating tidal turbine blades that will occur only when fish are present and the tidal device is turning. A key feature of understanding risk is describing the uncertainty associated with the occurrence of an episodic, intermittent, or chronic event, as well as the uncertainty of the resulting consequences.

  4. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Two long gasification tests were accomplished (66 and 72 hours of slagging operation) this quarter, and the balance of the wastewater needed for the second cooling tower (CT) test (approx. 11,000 gallons) was generated. Eleven thousand gallons of slagging fixed-bed gasifier (SFBG) wastewater were solvent extracted and ammonia stripped (AS) to nominal levels of 160 mg/1 phenol and 600 mg/1 NH/sub 3/. This wastewater is being further treated by activated sludge (AS) and granular activated carbon (GAC) processing to prepare a high quality makeup for the second CT test. Phenol mass balances indicated that > 90 pct of the phenol was stripped from the tower, indicating that previous assumptions of high levels of biodegradation were erroneous. Over 80 pct of the ammonia and about 25 pct of the methanol were also stripped. Data collected during steady state operation of the bench-scale rotating biological contractor indicate complete removal of phenolics and alcohols, and 94 pct removal of BOD. Nitrification also occurred in this unit, with over 30 pct removal of ammonia. Problems due to individual bacteria, present in the biotreated wastewater, passing through the multi-media filter and thus decreasing the carbon adsorption efficiency of the GAC system, have resulted in lower treatment rates than originally anticipated. As a result, to achieve the desired treatment, the contact time of the wastewater with the carbon in the granular activated carbon system has been increased. Since this has decreased the treatment rate, a larger carbon adsorption system has been designed and is presently being constructed.

  5. Integrating flotation to improve the performance of an HMC circuit treating a low-rank fine coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, H.; Polat, M.

    2005-11-01

    One reason that heavy media cyclone (HMC) circuits suffer from the inadvertent loss of magnetite and fine coal is the presence of nonmagnetic material in the magnetic separator feed. In this study, flotation was applied to the undersize fractions of the HMC drain-and-rinse screens to minimize these problems. These fractions, which contain 17.9% nonmagnetic material, are currently sent to magnetic separators and the nonmagnetic portion from the separators contains 39.1% ash. Applying flotation resulted in a clean coal product with an ash content of 8.7% and a calorific value of 6,300 kcal/kg. The refuse from flotation, which will be sent to the magnetic separators, contains 7.7% nonmagnetics.

  6. Award-Winning DOE Technology Scores Success in Carbon Storage Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ability to detect and track the movement of carbon dioxide in underground geologic storage reservoirs -- an important component of carbon capture and storage technology -- has been successfully demonstrated at a U.S. Department of Energy New Mexico test site.

  7. A taxonomy of bacterial microcompartment loci constructed by a novel scoring method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Axen, Seth D.; Erbilgin, Onur; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Tanaka, Mark M.

    2014-10-23

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles involved in both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism. All BMCs share homologous shell proteins but differ in their complement of enzymes; these are typically encoded adjacent to shell protein genes in genetic loci, or operons. To enable the identification and prediction of functional (sub)types of BMCs, we developed LoClass, an algorithm that finds putative BMC loci and inventories, weights, and compares their constituent pfam domains to construct a locus similarity network and predict locus (sub)types. In addition to using LoClass to analyze sequences in the Non-redundant Protein Database, we compared predicted BMC loci found inmore » seven candidate bacterial phyla (six from single-cell genomic studies) to the LoClass taxonomy. Together, these analyses resulted in the identification of 23 different types of BMCs encoded in 30 distinct locus (sub)types found in 23 bacterial phyla. These include the two carboxysome types and a divergent set of metabolosomes, BMCs that share a common catalytic core and process distinct substrates via specific signature enzymes. Furthermore, many Candidate BMCs were found that lack one or more core metabolosome components, including one that is predicted to represent an entirely new paradigm for BMC-associated metabolism, joining the carboxysome and metabolosome. By placing these results in a phylogenetic context, we provide a framework for understanding the horizontal transfer of these loci, a starting point for studies aimed at understanding the evolution of BMCs. This comprehensive taxonomy of BMC loci, based on their constituent protein domains, foregrounds the functional diversity of BMCs and provides a reference for interpreting the role of BMC gene clusters encoded in isolate, single cell, and metagenomic data. Many loci encode ancillary functions such as transporters or genes for cofactor assembly; this expanded vocabulary of BMC-related functions should be useful for design of genetic modules for introducing BMCs in bioengineering applications.« less

  8. Home Energy Scoring Tools (website) and Application Programming Interfaces, APIs (aka HEScore)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    A web-based residential energy rating tool with APIs that runs the LBNL website: Provides customized estimates of residential energy use and energy bills based on building description information provided by the user. Energy use is estimated using engineering models developed at LBNL. Space heating and cooling use is based on the DOE-2. 1E building simulation model. Other end-users (water heating, appliances, lighting, and misc. equipment) are based on engineering models developed by LBNL.

  9. A taxonomy of bacterial microcompartment loci constructed by a novel scoring method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axen, Seth D.; Erbilgin, Onur; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Tanaka, Mark M.

    2014-10-23

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are proteinaceous organelles involved in both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism. All BMCs share homologous shell proteins but differ in their complement of enzymes; these are typically encoded adjacent to shell protein genes in genetic loci, or operons. To enable the identification and prediction of functional (sub)types of BMCs, we developed LoClass, an algorithm that finds putative BMC loci and inventories, weights, and compares their constituent pfam domains to construct a locus similarity network and predict locus (sub)types. In addition to using LoClass to analyze sequences in the Non-redundant Protein Database, we compared predicted BMC loci found in seven candidate bacterial phyla (six from single-cell genomic studies) to the LoClass taxonomy. Together, these analyses resulted in the identification of 23 different types of BMCs encoded in 30 distinct locus (sub)types found in 23 bacterial phyla. These include the two carboxysome types and a divergent set of metabolosomes, BMCs that share a common catalytic core and process distinct substrates via specific signature enzymes. Furthermore, many Candidate BMCs were found that lack one or more core metabolosome components, including one that is predicted to represent an entirely new paradigm for BMC-associated metabolism, joining the carboxysome and metabolosome. By placing these results in a phylogenetic context, we provide a framework for understanding the horizontal transfer of these loci, a starting point for studies aimed at understanding the evolution of BMCs. This comprehensive taxonomy of BMC loci, based on their constituent protein domains, foregrounds the functional diversity of BMCs and provides a reference for interpreting the role of BMC gene clusters encoded in isolate, single cell, and metagenomic data. Many loci encode ancillary functions such as transporters or genes for cofactor assembly; this expanded vocabulary of BMC-related functions should be useful for design of genetic modules for introducing BMCs in bioengineering applications.

  10. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the international competition in May. Velarde Elementary School parent volunteer Marie Martinez prepared two sixth-grade teams for both events: An all-girls team called...

  11. Texas-New Mexico Power Company - SCORE/CitySmart, Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    20% of program budget Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Texas-New Mexico Power Company Website http:www.tnmpefficiency.com Expiration Date 12312015 State...

  12. Microsoft Word - FY14 AF One-Page Score Card through Mod 133...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    System, the system was verified by DOE. Delivered a Life Cycle Performance Measurement Baseline for the entire Portsmouth D&D scope. Supported DOE in issuing CERCLA...

  13. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Update on CREBs DATA and ENERGY STAR Score...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the 2012 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey data, provide a review of the types of properties covered, and a summary of new variables collected. This webinar runs from...

  14. An informal expert judgment assessment of subsidence mitigation options for low-level radioactive waste management sites on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M. |; Leary, K.; Jacobson, R.; Bensinger, H.; Dolenc, M.

    1999-03-01

    An assessment of options to mitigate the effects of subsidence at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites on the Nevada Test Site was conducted using an informal method of expert judgment. Mitigation options for existing waste cells and future waste cells were identified by a committee composed of knowledgeable personnel from the DOE and DOE-contractors. Eight ranking factors were developed to assess the mitigation options and these factors were scored through elicitation of consensus views from the committee. Different subsets of the factors were applied respectively, to existing waste cells and future waste cells, and the resulting scores were ranked using weighted and unweighted scores. These scores show that there is a large number of viable mitigation options and considerable flexibility in assessing the subsidence issue with a greater range of options for future waste cells compared to existing waste cells. A highly ranked option for both existing and future waste cells is covering the waste cells with a thick closure cap of native alluvium.

  15. Ultra-High-Efficiency Multijunction Cell and Receiver Module, Phase 1B: High Performance PV Exploring and Accelerating Ultimate Pathways; Final Subcontract Report, 13 May 2005 - 10 December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R. R.

    2010-03-01

    Spectrolab's two High Performance Photovoltaics primary objectives: (1) develop ultra-high-efficiency concentrator multijunction cells and (2) develop a robust concentrator cell receiver package.

  16. [Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal]: Task 7.1, Strategic planning. Topical report, February 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table (Table 1) and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and I), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

  17. Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Micahel J

    2009-11-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are relatively large in size with mature or old-growth community composition; lack current disturbance factors or potential threats and disturbances; are in excellent condition with good buffers; are places where ecological and evolutionary processes can occur relatively unaffected by humans; and can be reasonably defended and maintained as natural areas in an undeveloped condition. Highly ranked sites are the most significant and should receive the greatest protections. Composite scores of the ranked areas ranged from 1-25.5, with a mean score of 12. The ranked areas were divided into three Priority Groups. Group I, the most highly ranked group, included 20 sites and covered 5189 acres or 15.4% of Reservation lands; Group II included 31 sites and covered 4108 acres; Group III included 19 sites covering 400 acres of Reservation lands. All sites together comprise 9697 acres or 28.8% of Reservation lands. Six sites emerged as clearly the most significant natural areas on the Reservation. The study developed a number of recommendations that should be implemented in order to enhance and refine the natural areas data for the Reservation. There is a clear need for better and standardized ecological community classification and identification. Several areas are proposed for merger into larger units, and some new areas are proposed for inclusion and recognition in a natural areas system. Various gaps and discrepancies in the existing data are described and should be corrected. Other recommendations are made, including the development of a corollary system that can accommodate aquatic natural areas. The study relied primarily on the synthesis of information from many sources and from limited reconnaissance and direct observation during field work to produce a methodology for assessing natural area importance and assigning priorities for protection. Many instances of incomplete, missing or conflicting information made it difficult to complete thorough analysis. Further review and discussion among natural resources personnel will likely reveal possibilities for refinement and

  18. CCSM RMSE:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rank: 14 CCSM RMSE: 26.50 Rank: 1 HADCM3 RMSE: 7.93 Rank: 2 ERA40 RMSE: 8.02 Rank: 3 GISS RMSE: 10.70 Rank: 10 MRI RMSE: 20.80 Rank: 4 GFDL2.0 RMSE: 13.32 Rank: 16 INMCM3 RMSE: 36.27 Rank: 6 MIROC RMSE: 15.92 Rank: 7 CNRM RMSE: 18.49 Rank: 8 CCCMA RMSE: 19.46 Rank: 9 HADGEM RMSE: 20.07 Rank: 18 NCEP RMSE: 51.11 Rank: 17 PCM RMSE: 39.31 Rank: 15 NARR RMSE: 29.28 Rank: 5 GFDL2.1 RMSE: 14.41 Rank: 13 CSIRO RMSE: 23.08 Rank: 12 ECHAM5 RMSE: 22.96 Rank: 11 JRA25 RMSE: 21.24 ARM vs. GCM downwelling

  19. A macro environmental risk assessment methodology for establishing priorities among risks to human health and the environment in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernhofer, S.; Oliver, T.J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-12-31

    A macro environmental risk assessment (ERA) methodology was developed for the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) as part of the US Agency for International Development Industrial Environmental Management Project. The DENR allocates its limited resources to mitigate those environmental problems that pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. The National Regional Industry Prioritization Strategy (NRIPS) methodology was developed as a risk assessment tool to establish a national ranking of industrial facilities. The ranking establishes regional and national priorities, based on risk factors, that DENR can use to determine the most effective allocation of its limited resources. NRIPS is a systematic framework that examines the potential risk to human health and the environment from hazardous substances released from a facility, and, in doing so, generates a relative numerical score that represents that risk. More than 3,300 facilities throughout the Philippines were evaluated successfully with the NRIPS.

  20. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-04-01

    This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

  1. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, December 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-04-01

    This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

  2. Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C.; Langle, N.; Bedilion, R.; Libby, C.

    2011-02-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems utilize solar thermal energy for the generation of electric power. This attribute makes it relatively easy to integrate CSP systems with fossil-fired power plants. The 'solar-augment' of fossil power plants offers a lower cost and lower risk alternative to stand-alone solar plant construction. This study ranked the potential to add solar thermal energy to coal-fired and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants found throughout 16 states in the southeast and southwest United States. Each generating unit was ranked in six categories to create an overall score ranging from Excellent to Not Considered. Separate analysis was performed for parabolic trough and power tower technologies due to the difference in the steam temperatures that each can generate. The study found a potential for over 11 GWe of parabolic trough and over 21 GWe of power tower capacity. Power towers offer more capacity and higher quality integration due to the greater steam temperatures that can be achieved. The best sites were in the sunny southwest, but all states had at least one site that ranked Good for augmentation.

  3. Analysis of the Quality of Information Obtained About Uterine Artery Embolization From the Internet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavare, Aniket N.; Alsafi, Ali Hamady, Mohamad S.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The Internet is widely used by patients to source health care-related information. We sought to analyse the quality of information available on the Internet about uterine artery embolization (UAE). Materials and Methods: We searched three major search engines for the phrase 'uterine artery embolization' and compiled the top 50 results from each engine. After excluding repeated sites, scientific articles, and links to documents, the remaining 50 sites were assessed using the LIDA instrument, which scores sites across the domains of accessibility, usability, and reliability. The Fleisch reading ease score (FRES) was calculated for each of the sites. Finally, we checked the country of origin and the presence of certification by the Health On the Net Foundation (HONcode) as well as their effect on LIDA and FRES scores.ResultsThe following mean scores were obtained: accessibility 48/60 (80%), usability 42/54 (77%), reliability 20/51 (39%), total LIDA 110/165 (67%), and FRES 42/100 (42%). Nine sites had HONcode certification, and this was associated with significantly greater (p < 0.05) reliability and total LIDA and FRES scores. When comparing sites between United Kingdom and United States, there was marked variation in the quality of results obtained when searching for information on UAE (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In general, sites were well designed and easy to use. However, many scored poorly on the reliability of their information either because they were produced in a non-evidence-based way or because they lacking currency. It is important that patients are guided to reputable, location-specific sources of information online, especially because prominent search engine rank does not guarantee reliability of information.

  4. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ``ideal system,`` could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  5. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ideal system,'' could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  6. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 9: Oak Ridge site site team report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This report provides the input to and results of the Department of Energy (DOE) - Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) DOE Plutonium Environment, Safety and Health (ES & H) Vulnerability Assessment (VA) self-assessment performed by the Site Assessment Team (SAT) for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL or X-10) and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12) sites that are managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES). As initiated (March 15, 1994) by the Secretary of Energy, the objective of the VA is to identify and rank-order DOE-ES&H vulnerabilities associated for the purpose of decision making on the interim safe management and ultimate disposition of fissile materials. This assessment is directed at plutonium and other co-located transuranics in various forms.

  7. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  8. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2012-06-27

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  10. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

  12. Method and system for detecting polygon boundaries of structures in images as particle tracks through fields of corners and pixel gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W. (Pleasanton, CA); Manay, Siddharth (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-20

    A stochastic method and system for detecting polygon structures in images, by detecting a set of best matching corners of predetermined acuteness .alpha. of a polygon model from a set of similarity scores based on GDM features of corners, and tracking polygon boundaries as particle tracks using a sequential Monte Carlo approach. The tracking involves initializing polygon boundary tracking by selecting pairs of corners from the set of best matching corners to define a first side of a corresponding polygon boundary; tracking all intermediate sides of the polygon boundaries using a particle filter, and terminating polygon boundary tracking by determining the last side of the tracked polygon boundaries to close the polygon boundaries. The particle tracks are then blended to determine polygon matches, which may be made available, such as to a user, for ranking and inspection.

  13. Primary Uranium Supply: Past, Present, and Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... updated July 21, 2014 29 Adamas Intelligence Evaluation & ranking of REE projects Exploration-stage rankings (27 projects) Tonnes TREO (40%) Tonnes CREO & relative ...

  14. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source:...

  15. ALSNews Vol. 318

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Papers Published Nature recently released its 2010 Global Top 50 publishing index, which ranks the institutions with the most papers published. Harvard ranks first,...

  16. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore » of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  17. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  18. Siting Study for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Joan Connolly; Lance Peterson; Brennon Orr; Bob Starr

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has identified a mission need for continued disposal capacity for remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An alternatives analysis that was conducted to evaluate strategies to achieve this mission need identified two broad options for disposal of INL generated remote-handled LLW: (1) offsite disposal and (2) onsite disposal. The purpose of this study is to identify candidate sites or locations within INL boundaries for the alternative of an onsite remote handled LLW disposal facility and recommend the highest-ranked locations for consideration in the National Environmental Policy Act process. The study implements an evaluation based on consideration of five key elements: (1) regulations, (2) key assumptions, (3) conceptual design, (4) facility performance, and (5) previous INL siting study criteria, and uses a five-step process to identify, screen, evaluate, score, and rank 34 separate sites located across INL. The result of the evaluation is identification of two recommended alternative locations for siting an onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility. The two alternative locations that best meet the evaluation criteria are (1) near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and (2) west of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility.

  19. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state's investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy's Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC's solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC's scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).

  20. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state`s investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC`s solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC`s scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).

  1. Combustion characteristics of refuse derived fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, W.; Macek, A.; Domalski, E.; Walker, J.A.; Charagundla, S.R.; Colbert, J.C.; Kirklin, D.R.; Ledford, A.E. Jr.; Decker, P.H.; Ryan, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the laboratory studies presented here is to furnish preliminary input to the technologists in the sense of providing relative rankings through comparisons of appropriate coal and MSW combustion related properties. Support for a future program of sub-scale (demonstration or pilot) experiments to expand on the concepts and quantify them for scale-up to industrial sizes should be provided. A complete plan for this second phase study is included as an appendix to this report. With respect to the actual experimental investigations; these consist of three main tasks. Specifically: (a) static measurements (calorimetry, proximates and ultimate analysis; (b) dynamic measurements using the full range of modern thermoanalytical instrumentation; and (c) combustion of particulates in a specially constructed laboratory furnace as well as studies on the entrainment properties of MSW. The first two tasks deal mainly with the chemical properties of municipal solid waste and is of general utility. The latter is more specifically orientated. The scale of laboratory instrumentation set definite to the limits particle size with respect to the intrainment and combustion studies. Thus the most straightforward application is to combustion in stokers, including semi-suspension units.

  2. Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R.; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

  3. Fusion Materials Science and Technology Research Needs: Now and During the ITER era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.

    2013-09-30

    The plasma facing components, first wall and blanket systems of future tokamak-based fusion power plants arguably represent the single greatest materials engineering challenge of all time. Indeed, the United States National Academy of Engineering has recently ranked the quest for fusion as one of the top grand challenges for engineering in the 21st Century. These challenges are even more pronounced by the lack of experimental testing facilities that replicate the extreme operating environment involving simultaneous high heat and particle fluxes, large time varying stresses, corrosive chemical environments, and large fluxes of 14-MeV peaked fusion neutrons. This paper will review, and attempt to prioritize, the materials research and development challenges facing fusion nuclear science and technology into the ITER era and beyond to DEMO. In particular, the presentation will highlight the materials degradation mechanisms we anticipate to occur in the fusion environment, the temperature- displacement goals for fusion materials and plasma facing components and the near and long-term materials challenges required for both ITER, a fusion nuclear science facility and longer term ultimately DEMO.

  4. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01

    Planning and decision making amidst programmatic and technological risks represent significant challenges for projects. This presentation addresses the four step risk-assessment process needed to determine clear path forward to mature needed technology and design, license, and construct advanced nuclear power plants, which have never been built before, including Small Modular Reactors. This four step process has been carefully applied to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. STEP 1 - Risk Identification Risks are identified, collected, and categorized as technical risks, programmatic risks, and project risks, each of which result in cost and schedule impacts if realized. These include risks arising from the use of technologies not previously demonstrated in a relevant application. These risks include normal and accident scenarios which the SMR could experience including events that cause the disablement of engineered safety features (typically documented in Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) as produced with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and design needs which must be addressed to further detail the design. Product - Project Risk Register contained in a database with sorting, presentation, rollup, risk work off functionality similar to the NGNP Risk Management System . STEP 2 - Risk Quantification The risks contained in the risk register are then scored for probability of occurrence and severity of consequence, if realized. Here the scoring methodology is established and the basis for the scoring is well documented. Product - Quantified project risk register with documented basis for scoring. STEP 3 - Risk Handling Strategy Risks are mitigated by applying a systematic approach to maturing the technology through Research and Development, modeling, test, and design. A Technology Readiness Assessment is performed to determine baseline Technology Readiness Levels (TRL). Tasks needed to mature the technology are developed and documented in a roadmap. Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  5. UMT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Hopper platform using 96 MPI ranks. To recast the problem to use 32 MPI ranks, the following modifications can be made. The dimentionality of the problem is reduced by 13...

  6. OpenEI:Projects/Geographic Pages/California: Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Governor Jerry Brown Population (rank: 1) Household Income 61,021 (rank: 9) Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5332921 Coordinates 36.778261, -119.4179324 Loading map......

  7. City of Dallas- Green Energy Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Furthermore, the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is the highest-ranked airport for renewable energy use, separately ranking 7th on the Green Power Partner listing of local government gree...

  8. ALSNews Vol. 318

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top 50 publishing index, which ranks the institutions with the most papers published. Harvard ranks first, with Stanford at four and MIT at five. Berkeley Lab is the only...

  9. Using Cray MPI:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OpenMP aprun depth (cont.) % setenv OMPNUMTHREADS 4 % aprun -n 4 -q .omp1 | sort Hello from rank 0, thread 0, on nid00291. (core affinity 0) Hello from rank 0, thread 1,...

  10. Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bash-4.1 srun mpirun.mic -n 2 -hostfile micfile.SLURMJOBID -ppn 1 .xthi.mic Hello from rank 0, thread 0, on bc0908-mic0. (core affinity 1) Hello from rank 0, thread...

  11. Aprun MAN Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    % aprun -n 4 -N 2 .xthi | sort Application 225100 resources: utime 0s, stime 0s Hello from rank 0, thread 0, on nid00290. (core affinity 0) Hello from rank 1, thread 0,...

  12. R. Glenn Brook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OpenMP aprun depth (cont.) % setenv OMPNUMTHREADS 4 % aprun -n 4 -q .omp1 | sort Hello from rank 0, thread 0, on nid00291. (core affinity 0) Hello from rank 0, thread 1,...

  13. Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Barrels of 42 U.S. Gallons) 200 9 2009 Est. Non 2009 Proved Production Producing Discov er 2008 Rank Field Name Location Reserves Volume Reserves Y ear Rank 1 PRUDHOE BAY AK 95.9 ...

  14. Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...162 Figure 73: Ranking of Electricity Requirements for Our Process Design Model and for Current Comparable Technology...

  15. Nanotechnology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Engineering. A Advanced Functional Materials Nanotechnology Nature Nanotechnology Biosensors & Bioelectronics Small 2013 JCR Science Edition, ranked by total citations,...

  16. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... on Appropriations The Honorable Richard C. Shelby Ranking Member, Senate ... Resources The Honorable Harold Rogers Chairman, House Committee on ...

  17. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Appropriations 2 The Honorable Richard C. Shelby Ranking Member, Senate ... Resources The Honorable Harold Rogers Chairman, House Committee on ...

  18. Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

  19. SES Awards and Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The three SES award programs are:• Performance Awards;• Presidential Rank Awards; and• Other Awards 

  20. SU-E-J-107: Supervised Learning Model of Aligned Collagen for Human Breast Carcinoma Prognosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bredfeldt, J; Liu, Y; Conklin, M; Keely, P; Eliceiri, K; Mackie, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our goal is to develop and apply a set of optical and computational tools to enable large-scale investigations of the interaction between collagen and tumor cells. Methods: We have built a novel imaging system for automating the capture of whole-slide second harmonic generation (SHG) images of collagen in registry with bright field (BF) images of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue. To analyze our images, we have integrated a suite of supervised learning tools that semi-automatically model and score collagen interactions with tumor cells via a variety of metrics, a method we call Electronic Tumor Associated Collagen Signatures (eTACS). This group of tools first segments regions of epithelial cells and collagen fibers from BF and SHG images respectively. We then associate fibers with groups of epithelial cells and finally compute features based on the angle of interaction and density of the collagen surrounding the epithelial cell clusters. These features are then processed with a support vector machine to separate cancer patients into high and low risk groups. Results: We validated our model by showing that eTACS produces classifications that have statistically significant correlation with manual classifications. In addition, our system generated classification scores that accurately predicted breast cancer patient survival in a cohort of 196 patients. Feature rank analysis revealed that TACS positive fibers are more well aligned with each other, generally lower density, and terminate within or near groups of epithelial cells. Conclusion: We are working to apply our model to predict survival in larger cohorts of breast cancer patients with a diversity of breast cancer types, predict response to treatments such as COX2 inhibitors, and to study collagen architecture changes in other cancer types. In the future, our system may be used to provide metastatic potential information to cancer patients to augment existing clinical assays.

  1. Potential enhancements to addressing programmatic risk in the tank waste remediation system (TWRS) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brothers, A.; Fassbender, L.; Bilyard, G.; Levine, L.

    1996-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Risk Management methodology development task. The objective of this task was to develop risk management methodology focused on (1) the use of programmatic risk information in making TWRS architecture selection decisions and (2) the identification/evaluation/selection of TWRS risk-handling actions. Methods for incorporating programmatic risk/uncertainty estimates into trade studies are provided for engineers/analysts. Methods for identifying, evaluating, and selecting risk-handling actions are provided for managers. The guidance provided in this report is designed to help decision-makers make difficult judgments. Current approaches to architecture selection decisions and identification/evaluation/selection of risk-handling actions are summarized. Three categories of sources of programmatic risk (parametric, external, and organizational) are examined. Multiple analytical approaches are presented to enhance the current alternative generation and analysis (AGA) and risk-handling procedures. Appendix A describes some commercially available risk management software tools and Appendix B provides a brief introduction to quantification of risk attitudes. The report provides three levels of analysis for enhancing the AGA Procedure: (1) qualitative discussion coupled with estimated uncertainty ranges for scores in the alternatives-by-criteria matrix; (2) formal elicitation of probability distributions for the alternative scores; and (3) a formal, more structured, comprehensive risk analysis. A framework is also presented for using the AGA programmatic risk analysis results in making better decisions. The report also presents two levels of analysis for evaluation and selection of risk-handling actions: (1) qualitative analysis and judgmental rankings of alternative actions, and (2) Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART).

  2. A 2-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Departments of Pathology and Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York ; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson; Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York ; Buckstein, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Campbell, Christopher; Rath, Lynda; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Hixson, Rosetta; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) among prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A 2-stage genome-wide association study was performed. Patients were split randomly into a stage I discovery cohort (132 cases, 103 controls) and a stage II replication cohort (128 cases, 102 controls). The discovery cohort was genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 genome-wide arrays. The 940 top ranking SNPs selected from the discovery cohort were genotyped in the replication cohort using Illumina iSelect custom SNP arrays. Results: Twelve SNPs identified in the discovery cohort and validated in the replication cohort were associated with development of ED following radiation therapy (Fisher combined P values 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} to 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}). Notably, these 12 SNPs lie in or near genes involved in erectile function or other normal cellular functions (adhesion and signaling) rather than DNA damage repair. In a multivariable model including nongenetic risk factors, the odds ratios for these SNPs ranged from 1.6 to 5.6 in the pooled cohort. There was a striking relationship between the cumulative number of SNP risk alleles an individual possessed and ED status (Sommers' D P value = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}). A 1-allele increase in cumulative SNP score increased the odds for developing ED by a factor of 2.2 (P value = 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19}). The cumulative SNP score model had a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 75% for prediction of developing ED at the radiation therapy planning stage. Conclusions: This genome-wide association study identified a set of SNPs that are associated with development of ED following radiation therapy. These candidate genetic predictors warrant more definitive validation in an independent cohort.

  3. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used to measure the inferential variables, which can then be applied (through the data correlations) to convert existing flow meters (ultrasonic, orifice, turbine, rotary, Coriolis, diaphragm, etc.) for on-line energy measurement. The practical issues for field development were evaluated using two transducers extracted from a $100 ultrasonic domestic gas meter, and a $400 infrared sensor.

  4. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael; Castillo, Carlos; Pavey, Todd; Alexan, Tamer; Bainbridge, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  5. Review of consolidated Edison`s integrated resource bidding program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Baldick, R.; Milne, A.

    1993-07-01

    Competitive bidding has emerged as the dominant method for procuring new resources by US utilities. In New York, the Public Service Commission (NYPSC) ordered the state`s seven investor-owned utilities to develop bidding programs to acquire supply and DSM resource options. Utilities were allowed significant discretion in program design in order to encourage experimentation. Competitive bidding programs pose formidable policy, design, and management challenges for utilities and their regulators. Yet, there have been few detailed case studies of bidding programs, particularly of those utilities that take on the additional challenge of having supply and DSM resources compete head-to-head for a designated block of capacity. To address that need, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the bidding programs of two utilities that tested the integrated ``all-sources`` approach. This study focuses primarily on Consolidated Edison Company of New York`s (Con Edison) bidding program; an earlier report discusses our review of Niagara Mohawk`s program (Goldman et al 1992). We reviewed relevant Commission decisions, utility filings and signed contracts, interviewed utility and regulatory staff, surveyed DSM bidders and a selected sample of DSM non-bidders, and analyzed the bid evaluation system used in ranking bids based on detailed scoring information on individual bids provided by Con Edison.

  6. Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core File Settings About Core Files By default, a rank that aborts will dump core, and the control system will signal the other ranks to quit (without dumping core). Multiple core files will be generated only when several ranks abort almost simultaneously. The ranks that do not dump core are those that received the system signal to quit before anything bad happened on that rank. The settings listed below can modify this behaviour in various ways. The core files generated will be in a lightweight

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2008-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2007-01-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  11. [Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research]. Technical Quarterly Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-30

    Major Accomplishments by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during this reporting period are highlighted below and amplified in later sections of this report: AGTSR distributed 50 proposals from the 98RFP to the IRB for review, evaluation and rank-ordering during the summer; AGTSR conducted a detailed program review at DOE-FETC on July 24; AGTSR organized the 1998 IRB proposal review meeting at SCIES on September 15-16; AGTSR consolidated all the IRB proposal scores and rank-orderings to facilitate the 98RFP proposal deliberations; AGTSR submitted meeting minutes and proposal short-list recommendation to the IRB and DOE for the 98RFP solicitation; AGTSR reviewed two gas turbine related proposals as part of the CU RFP State Project for renovating the central energy facility; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from the University of Pittsburgh, Wisconsin, and Minnesota; AGTSR assisted GTA in obtaining university stakeholder support of the ATS program from California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado; AGTSR assisted GTA in distributing alert notices on potential ATS budget cuts to over 150 AGTSR performing university members; AGTSR submitted proceedings booklet and organizational information pertaining to the OAI hybrid gas turbine workshop to DOE-FETC; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR updated the university consortium poster to include new members and research highlights; For DOE-FETC, the general AGTSR Fact Sheet was updated to include new awards, workshops, educational activity and select accomplishments from the research projects; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR prepared three fact sheets highlighting university research supported in combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted pictures on materials research for inclusion in the ATS technology brochure; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted a post-2000 roadmap showing potential technology paths AGTSR could pursue in the next decade; AGTSR distributed the ninth newsletter UPDATE to DOE, the IRB: and two interested partners involved in ATS; AGTSR submitted information on its RFP's, workshops, and educational activities for the 1999 ASMWIGTI technology report for worldwide distribution; AGTSR coordinated university poster session titles and format with Conference Management Associates (CMA) for the 98 ATS Annual; and AGTSR submitted 2-page abstract to CMA for the 98 ATS Review titled: ''AGTSR: A Virtual National Lab''.

  12. distance_webinar_2013_03_05.wmv | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    distance_webinar_2013_03_05.wmv File distance_webinar_2013_03_05.wmv More Documents & Publications Asset Score API Webinar June 14, 2013 Home Energy Score Webinar Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot

  13. Methodology to identify risk-significant components for inservice inspection and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Jones, J.L. Jr.; Kido, C.; Phillips, J.H.

    1992-08-01

    Periodic inspection and testing of vital system components should be performed to ensure the safe and reliable operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear processing facilities. Probabilistic techniques may be used to help identify and rank components by their relative risk. A risk-based ranking would allow varied DOE sites to implement inspection and testing programs in an effective and cost-efficient manner. This report describes a methodology that can be used to rank components, while addressing multiple risk issues.

  14. FE's Corbin Among DOE Leaders Selected to Receive Prestigious Award |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy FE's Corbin Among DOE Leaders Selected to Receive Prestigious Award FE's Corbin Among DOE Leaders Selected to Receive Prestigious Award January 6, 2016 - 3:38pm Addthis 2015 Presidential Rank Awards 2015 Presidential Rank Awards Secretary Ernest Moniz has announced that Fossil Energy's (FE) Bob Corbin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Petroleum Reserves, is one of 11 leaders from the Department of Energy (DOE) selected to receive a 2015 Presidential Rank

  15. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cascades and Aleutians - Ranking PI: Lisa Shevenell Presenter: Mark Coolbaugh ATLAS Geosciences Inc Track Name: HRC Project Officer: Eric Hass Total Project Funding: 343,262 May...

  16. CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Marketing and Outreach: N2N used a multifaceted, community-based social marketing ... N2N employed an online "leaderboard," a scorecard that ranked the towns' performances. ...

  17. Extension of latin hypercube samples with correlated variables.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hora, Stephen Curtis; Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD.

    2006-11-01

    A procedure for extending the size of a Latin hypercube sample (LHS) with rank correlated variables is described and illustrated. The extension procedure starts with an LHS of size m and associated rank correlation matrix C and constructs a new LHS of size 2m that contains the elements of the original LHS and has a rank correlation matrix that is close to the original rank correlation matrix C. The procedure is intended for use in conjunction with uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of computationally demanding models in which it is important to make efficient use of a necessarily limited number of model evaluations.

  18. Dr Tanja Pietrass | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    where she rose through the ranks to Full Professor. Her research interests centered on solid-state nuclear magnetic (NMR) resonance spectroscopy and optical techniques to enhance...

  19. baseline-studies | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthetic natural gas and fuels, all with and without carbon dioxide capture and storage. Several ranks of coal are assessed in process configurations that are intended to...

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    state-level energy data and infrastructure. The new web portal, which includes a profile analysis for each state, allows users to compare state rankings of energy consumption,...

  1. 2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top Green Power Providers See All Leaders x Renewable Energy Sales Total Customer Participants Customer Participation...

  2. Testimony of Secretary Ernest Moniz U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee on Science, Space, and Technology U.S. House of Representatives March 22, 2016 Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Johnson, and Members of the Committee

  3. Testimony of Mark A. McCall Executive Director, Loan Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space, & Technology U.S. House of Representatives March 3, 2016 Introduction Chairman Smith, Subcommittee Chairmen Weber and Loudermilk, Ranking Members Johnson, Grayson, and ...

  4. Jonathan Elkind Acting Assistant Secretary Office of International...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Africa November 14, 2014 Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Bass, and members of the ... Energy Acting Assistant Secretary Chris Smith will travel to emerging oil and gas ...

  5. Microsoft Word - new_york.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Profiles 2010 1 Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics Item Value U.S. Rank New York NERC Region(s) ......

  6. Christopher Smith

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House of Representatives The Department of Energy's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications March 19, 2013 Thank you Chairman Lankford, Ranking Member Speier,...

  7. Christopher Smith

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House of Representatives The Department of Energy's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications June 18, 2013 Thank you Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush,...

  8. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    In 2014, California ranked fourth in the nation in conventional hydroelectric generation, second in net electricity generation from other renewable energy resources, and first as a ...

  9. FMI NewCoal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    developer focused on upgrading low rank coals to improve combustion efficiency and reduce production of greenhouse emissions for coal fired utility and industrial power generation...

  10. Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. Heroux, Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN The High Performance Linpack...

  11. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems Heroux Michael Allen Dongarra Jack University of Tennessee Knoxville TN The High Performance Linpack HPL or Top...

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Related Topics: federated search, multilingual, r&d, relevance ranking, SBIR, sttr, translations Read more... DOE Data: Would We, Could We...? by Jannean Elliott 01 Feb, 2010 in ...

  13. 02-10-05.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    joined the ranks of Highway Watch. "The training was very informative," said Gaylon Fuller, Cast Operations manager. "For example, we learned that there is a pattern to...

  14. Annual Performance Report FY 2004 Annual Performance Plan FY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Year 2004 Annual Performance Report and Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Performance Plan. In Fiscal Year 2004, the Department was ranked first among all cabinet agencies in...

  15. Becoming a User | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Becoming a User LCLS beam lines are open to academic and industrial users for scientific research. All research proposals are subjected to peer review and ranked against competing...

  16. Murdoch University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    offers a university education of the highest quality and has been ranked the best teaching campus of all Australia's public universities in an independent national survey of...

  17. Energy Department Announces Winner of the 2013 Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ranking in the Environmental Protection Agency's National Building Competition, Battle of the Buildings, which challenges federal, commercial, and industrial buildings to...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    page 5 Lujan . . . Langmuir, an interdisciplinary journal published by the American Chemical Society, ranks No. 2 in citations out of 121 journals in the physical chemistry. The...

  19. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 26, 2013) The Honorable Harold Rogers The Honorable Barbara A. Mikulski ... House of Representatives The Honorable Richard C. Shelby Ranking Member Committee on ...

  20. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conversion of Low Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Polyakov Oleg COAL LIGNITE AND PEAT Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from...