Sample records for ultimate quantum limit

  1. Ultimate limit in low threshold quantum well GaAlAs semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Derry, P.L.; Yariv, A.

    1988-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gain measurements were performed on buried heterostructure single quantum well lasers to ascertain the transparency current density, which represents a basic limit in the threshold current. By using the optimal design approach, a lowest threshold of 0.55 mA in a 120-..mu..m-long device was achieved. Modulation of the low threshold laser by a pseudorandom digital stream at 1.3 Gbit/s without current bias is demonstrated.

  2. The ultimate downscaling limit of FETs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamaluy, Denis; Gao, Xujiao; Tierney, Brian David

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We created a highly efficient, universal 3D quant um transport simulator. We demonstrated that the simulator scales linearly - both with the problem size (N) and number of CPUs, which presents an important break-through in the field of computational nanoelectronics. It allowed us, for the first time, to accurately simulate and optim ize a large number of realistic nanodevices in a much shorter time, when compared to other methods/codes such as RGF[~N 2.333 ]/KNIT, KWANT, and QTBM[~N 3 ]/NEMO5. In order to determine the best-in-class for different beyond-CMOS paradigms, we performed rigorous device optimization for high-performance logic devices at 6-, 5- and 4-nm gate lengths. We have discovered that there exists a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs). We have found that, at room temperatures, all FETs, irre spective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths.

  3. Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the limits of current conventional computers and develop multiple functions for a single device, possibly allowing everyday electronics to become smaller and faster than they are...

  4. Quantum limits to estimation of photon deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni De Cillis; Matteo G. A. Paris

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We address potential deviations of radiation field from the bosonic behaviour and employ local quantum estimation theory to evaluate the ultimate bounds to precision in the estimation of these deviations using quantum-limited measurements on optical signals. We consider different classes of boson deformation and found that intensity measurement on coherent or thermal states would be suitable for their detection making, at least in principle, tests of boson deformation feasible with current quantum optical technology. On the other hand, we found that the quantum signal-to-noise ratio (QSNR) is vanishing with the deformation itself for all the considered classes of deformations and probe signals, thus making any estimation procedure of photon deformation inherently inefficient. A partial way out is provided by the polynomial dependence of the QSNR on the average number of photon, which suggests that, in principle, it would be possible to detect deformation by intensity measurements on high-energy thermal states.

  5. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  6. Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Bing Wu; Constantin Brif; Matthew R. James; Herschel Rabitz

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum optimal control theory, kinematic bounds are the minimum and maximum values of the control objective achievable for any physically realizable system dynamics. For a given initial state of the system, these bounds depend on the nature and state of the controller. We consider a general situation where the controlled quantum system is coupled to both an external classical field (referred to as a classical controller) and an auxiliary quantum system (referred to as a quantum controller). In this general situation, the kinematic bound is between the classical kinematic bound (CKB), corresponding to the case when only the classical controller is available, and the quantum kinematic bound (QKB), corresponding to the ultimate physical limit of the objective's value. Specifically, when the control objective is the expectation value of a quantum observable (a Hermitian operator on the system's Hilbert space), the QKBs are the minimum and maximum eigenvalues of this operator. We present, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the necessary and sufficient conditions for surpassing the CKB and reaching the QKB, through the use of a quantum controller. The general conditions are illustrated by examples in which the system and controller are initially in thermal states. The obtained results provide a basis for the design of quantum controllers capable of maximizing the control yield and reaching the ultimate physical limit.

  7. Polymer Quantum Mechanics and its Continuum Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi; Tatjana Vukasinac; Jose A. Zapata

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A rather non-standard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle and a simple cosmological model.

  8. Quantum Cryptography Approaching the Classical Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weedbrook, Christian

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender’s station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as ...

  9. Ideal Quantum Gases with Planck Scale Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Collier

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermodynamic system of non-interacting quantum particles changes its statistical distribution formulas if there is a universal limitation for the size of energetic quantum leaps (magnitude of quantum leaps smaller than Planck energy). By means of a restriction of the a priori equiprobability postulate one can reach a thermodynamic foundation of these corrected distribution formulas. The number of microstates is determined by means of a suitable counting method and combined with thermodynamics via the Boltzmann principle. The result is that, for particle energies that come close to the Planck energy, the thermodynamic difference between fermion and boson distribution vanishes. Both distributions then approximate a Boltzmann distribution. The wave and particle character of the quantum particles, too, can be influenced by choosing the size of the temperature and particle energy parameters relative to the Planck energy, as you can see from the associated fluctuation formulas. In the case of non-relativistic degeneration, the critical parameters Fermi momentum (fermions) and Einstein temperature (bosons) vanish as soon as the rest energy of the quantum particles reaches the Planck energy. For the Bose-Einstein condensation there exists, in the condensation range, a finite upper limit for the number of particles in the ground state, which is determined by the ratio of Planck mass to the rest mass of the quantum particles. In the relativistic high-temperature range, the energy densities of photon and neutrino radiation have finite limit values, which is of interest with regard to the start of cosmic expansion.

  10. Ideal Quantum Gases with Planck Scale Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Rainer

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermodynamic system of non-interacting quantum particles changes its statistical distribution formulas if there is a universal limitation for the size of energetic quantum leaps (magnitude of quantum leaps smaller than Planck energy). By means of a restriction of the a priori equiprobability postulate one can reach a thermodynamic foundation of these corrected distribution formulas. The number of microstates is determined by means of a suitable counting method and combined with thermodynamics via the Boltzmann principle. The result is that, for particle energies that come close to the Planck energy, the thermodynamic difference between fermion and boson distribution vanishes. Both distributions then approximate a Boltzmann distribution. The wave and particle character of the quantum particles, too, can be influenced by choosing the size of the temperature and particle energy parameters relative to the Planck energy, as you can see from the associated fluctuation formulas. In the case of non-relativistic de...

  11. Efficiency limits of quantum well solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, J P; Barnham, K W J; Bushnell, D B; Tibbits, T N D; Roberts, J S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum well solar cell (QWSC) has been proposed as a flexible means to ensuring current matching for tandem cells. This paper explores the further advantage afforded by the indication that QWSCs operate in the radiative limit because radiative contribution to the dark current is seen to dominate in experimental data at biases corresponding to operation under concentration. The dark currents of QWSCs are analysed in terms of a light and dark current model. The model calculates the spectral response (QE) from field bearing regions and charge neutral layers and from the quantum wells by calculating the confined densities of states and absorption coefficient, and solving transport equations analytically. The total dark current is expressed as the sum of depletion layer and charge neutral radiative and non radiative currents consistent with parameter values extracted from QE fits to data. The depletion layer dark current is a sum of Shockley-Read-Hall non radiative, and radiative contributions. The charge neu...

  12. Cooling at the quantum limit and RF refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Cooling at the quantum limit and RF refrigeration Jukka Pekola Low Temperature Laboratory, Helsinki) Francesco Giazotto (SNS Pisa) Yuri Pashkin (NEC) #12;Outline Electronic refrigeration Classical vs quantum (electromagnetic) heat transport Cooling at the quantum limit: experiments RF refrigeration in a single

  13. Standard Quantum Limit for Probing Mechanical Energy Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbitt, Thomas R.

    We derive a standard quantum limit for probing mechanical energy quantization in a class of systems with mechanical modes parametrically coupled to external degrees of freedom. To resolve a single mechanical quantum, it ...

  14. Ultimate Energy Densities for Electromagnetic Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate electric and magnetic energy densities that can be attained by bandlimited electromagnetic pulses in free space are calculated using an ab initio quantized treatment, and the quantum states of electromagnetic fields that achieve the ultimate energy densities are derived. The ultimate energy densities also provide an experimentally accessible metric for the degree of localization of polychromatic photons.

  15. A Trotter-Kato Theorem for Quantum Markov Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Bouten; Rolf Gohm; John Gough; Hendra Nurdin

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Trotter-Kato theorem we prove the convergence of the unitary dynamics generated by an increasingly singular Hamiltonian in the case of a single field coupling. The limit dynamics is a quantum stochastic evolution of Hudson-Parthasarathy type, and we establish in the process a graph limit convergence of the pre-limit Hamiltonian operators to the Chebotarev-Gregoratti-von Waldenfels Hamiltonian generating the quantum Ito evolution.

  16. On the limiting absorption principle and spectra of quantum graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beng-Seong Ong

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The main result of the article is validity of the limiting absorption principle and thus absence of the singular continuous spectrum for compact quantum graphs with several infinite leads attached. The technique used involves Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators.

  17. Superconducting quantum interference device as a near-quantum-limited amplifier at 0.5 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Superconducting quantum interference device as a near-quantum-limited amplifier at 0.5 GHz Michael 94720 Received 10 October 2000; accepted for publication 14 December 2000 A dc superconducting quantum, for example, superconducting transition-edge sensors for infrared, optical, and ultraviolet wavelengths,2

  18. Doppler cooling to the Quantum limit M. Chalony,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Doppler cooling to the Quantum limit M. Chalony,1 A. Kastberg,2 B. Klappauf,3 and D. Wilkowski1, 4 637371, Singapore (Dated: December 16, 2011) Doppler cooling on a narrow transition is limited by the noise of single scattering events. It shows novel features, which are in sharp contrast with cooling

  19. Effects of Quantum Confinement on the Doping Limit of Semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Effects of Quantum Confinement on the Doping Limit of Semiconductor Nanowires D. R. Khanal,, Joanne concentrations in semiconductor nanowires. Our calculations are based on the amphoteric defect model, which describes the thermodynamic doping limit in semiconductors in terms of the compensation of external dopants

  20. Quantum Apices: Identifying Limits of Entanglement, Nonlocality, & Contextuality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elie Wolfe

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This work develops analytic methods to quantitatively demarcate quantum reality from its subset of classical phenomenon, as well as from the superset of general probabilistic theories. Regarding quantum nonlocality, we discuss how to determine the quantum limit of Bell-type linear inequalities. In contrast to semidefinite programming approaches, our method allows for the consideration of inequalities with abstract weights, by means of leveraging the Hermiticity of quantum states. Recognizing that classical correlations correspond to measurements made on separable states, we also introduce a practical method for obtaining sufficient separability criteria. We specifically vet the candidacy of driven and undriven superradiance as schema for entanglement generation. We conclude by reviewing current approaches to quantum contextuality, emphasizing the operational distinction between nonlocal and contextual quantum statistics. We utilize our abstractly-weighted linear quantum bounds to explicitly demonstrate a set of conditional probability distributions which are simultaneously compatible with quantum contextuality while being incompatible with quantum nonlocality. It is noted that this novel statistical regime implies an experimentally-testable target for the Consistent Histories theory of quantum gravity.

  1. Limiting the complexity of quantum states: a toy theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Scarani

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a restriction of quantum theory, in which very complex states would be excluded. The toy theory is phrased in the language of the circuit model for quantum computing, its key ingredient being a limitation on the number of interactions that \\textit{each} qubit may undergo. As long as one stays in the circuit model, the toy theory is consistent and may even match what we shall be ever able to do in a controlled laboratory experiment. The direct extension of the restriction beyond the circuit model conflicts with observed facts: the possibility of restricting the complexity of quantum state, while saving phenomena, remains an open question.

  2. Limited Holism and Real-Vector-Space Quantum Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucien Hardy; William K. Wootters

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum theory has the property of "local tomography": the state of any composite system can be reconstructed from the statistics of measurements on the individual components. In this respect the holism of quantum theory is limited. We consider in this paper a class of theories more holistic than quantum theory in that they are constrained only by "bilocal tomography": the state of any composite system is determined by the statistics of measurements on pairs of components. Under a few auxiliary assumptions, we derive certain general features of such theories. In particular, we show how the number of state parameters can depend on the number of perfectly distinguishable states. We also show that real-vector-space quantum theory, while not locally tomographic, is bilocally tomographic.

  3. Doppler cooling to the Quantum limit M. Chalony,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is canceled. PACS numbers: 37.10.De, 37.10.Gh Laser cooling of atoms is a technique widely used, mainly of laser cooling and trapping techniques, in parallel with precise measure- ments of the momentumDoppler cooling to the Quantum limit M. Chalony,1 A. Kastberg,2 B. Klappauf,3 and D. Wilkowski1, 4

  4. Quantum Limit on Stability of Clocks in a Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha; Joseph Samuel

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Good clocks are of importance both to fundamental physics and for applications in astronomy, metrology and global positioning systems. In a recent technological breakthrough, researchers at NIST have been able to achieve a stability of 1 part in $10^{18}$ using an Ytterbium clock. This naturally raises the question of whether there are fundamental limits to the stability of clocks. In this paper we point out that gravity and quantum mechanics set a fundamental limit on the stability of clocks. This limit comes from a combination of the uncertainty relation, the gravitational redshift and the relativistic time dilation effect. For example, a single ion hydrogen maser clock in a terrestrial gravitational field cannot achieve a stability better than one part in $10^{22}$. This observation has implications for laboratory experiments involving both gravity and quantum theory.

  5. Quantum entropy dynamics for chaotic systems beyond the classical limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaldo Gammal; Arjendu K. Pattanayak

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy production rate for an open quantum system with a classically chaotic limit has been previously argued to be independent of $\\hbar$ and $D$, the parameter denoting coupling to the environment, and to be equal to the sum of generalized Lyapunov exponents, with these results applying in the near-classical regime. We present results for a specific system going well beyond earlier work, considering how these dynamics are altered for the Duffing problem by changing $\\hbar,D$ and show that the entropy dynamics have a transition from classical to quantum behavior that scales, at least for a finite time, as a function of $\\hbar^2/D$.

  6. Quantum Limits and Robustness of Nonlinear Intracavity Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John K. Stockton; Ari K. Tuchman

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the limits of intracavity absorption spectroscopy with nonlinear media. Using a common theoretical framework, we compare the detection of a trace gas within an undriven cavity with gain near and above threshold, a driven cavity with gain kept just below threshold, and a cavity driven close to the saturation point of a saturable absorber. These phase-transition-based metrology methods are typically quantum-limited by spontaneous emission, and we compare them to the empty cavity shotnoise-limited case. Although the fundamental limits achievable with nonlinear media do not surpass the empty cavity limits, we show that nonlinear methods are more robust against certain technical noise models. This recognition may have applications in spectrometer design for devices operating in non-ideal field environments.

  7. The Weak-Coupling Limit of Simplicial Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Thorleifsson; P. Bialas; B. Petersson

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the weak-coupling limit, kappa_0 going to infinity, the partition function of simplicial quantum gravity is dominated by an ensemble of triangulations with the ratio N_0/N_D close to the upper kinematic limit. For a combinatorial triangulation of the D--sphere this limit is 1/D. Defining an ensemble of maximal triangulations, i.e. triangulations that have the maximal possible number of vertices for a given volume, we investigate the properties of this ensemble in three dimensions using both Monte Carlo simulations and a strong-coupling expansion of the partition function, both for pure simplicial gravity and a with a suitable modified measure. For the latter we observe a continuous phase transition to a crinkled phase and we investigate the fractal properties of this phase.

  8. Private Database Queries Using Quantum States with Limited Coherence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tad Hogg; Li Zhang

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method for private database queries using exchange of quantum states with bits encoded in mutually incompatible bases. For technology with limited coherence time, the database vendor can announce the encoding after a suitable delay to allow the user to privately learn one of two items in the database without the ability to also definitely infer the second item. This quantum approach also allows the user to choose to learn other functions of the items, such as the exclusive-or of their bits, but not to gain more information than equivalent to learning one item, on average. This method is especially useful for items consisting of a few bits by avoiding the substantial overhead of conventional cryptographic approaches.

  9. Absolute Dynamical Limit to Cooling Weakly-Coupled Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Wang; Sai Vinjanampathy; Frederick W. Strauch; Kurt Jacobs

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling of a quantum system is limited by the size of the control forces that are available (the "speed" of control). We consider the most general cooling process, albeit restricted to the regime in which the thermodynamics of the system is preserved (weak coupling). Within this regime, we further focus on the most useful control regime, in which a large cooling factor, and good ground-state cooling can be achieved. We present a control protocol for cooling, and give clear structural arguments, as well as strong numerical evidence, that this protocol is globally optimal. From this we obtain simple expressions for the limit to cooling that is imposed by the speed of control.

  10. Quantum Limits of Interferometer Topologies for Gravitational Radiation Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haixing Miao; Huan Yang; Rana X Adhikari; Yanbei Chen

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to expand the astrophysical reach of gravitational wave detectors, several interferometer topologies have been proposed to evade the thermodynamic and quantum mechanical limits in future detectors. In this work, we make a systematic comparison among them by considering their sensitivities and complexities. We numerically optimize their sensitivities by introducing a cost function that tries to maximize the broadband improvement over the sensitivity of current detectors. We find that frequency-dependent squeezed-light injection with a hundred-meter scale filter cavity yields a good broadband sensitivity, with low complexity, and good robustness against optical loss. This study gives us a guideline for the near-term experimental research programs in enhancing the performance of future gravitational-wave detectors.

  11. Quantum Limits of Interferometer Topologies for Gravitational Radiation Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Haixing; Adhikari, Rana X; Chen, Yanbei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to expand the astrophysical reach of gravitational wave detectors, several interferometer topologies have been proposed to evade the thermodynamic and quantum mechanical limits in future detectors. In this work, we make a systematic comparison among them by considering their sensitivities and complexities. We numerically optimize their sensitivities by introducing a cost function that tries to maximize the broadband improvement over the sensitivity of current detectors. We find that frequency-dependent squeezed-light injection with a hundred-meter scale filter cavity yields a good broadband sensitivity, with low complexity, and good robustness against optical loss. This study gives us a guideline for the near-term experimental research programs in enhancing the performance of future gravitational-wave detectors.

  12. Nearly quantum-noise-limited timing jitter from miniature Er:Yb:glass lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    Nearly quantum-noise-limited timing jitter from miniature Er:Yb:glass lasers A. Schlatter, B. Rudin Received January 4, 2005 We report on nearly quantum-limited timing-jitter performance of two passively mode-locked Er:Yb:glass lasers with a repetition rate of 10 GHz. The relative timing jitter of both

  13. New Limits on FaultTolerant Quantum Computation Harry Buhrman #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    @cwi.nl Richard Cleve + U of Waterloo and Perimeter Institute cleve@cs.uwaterloo.ca Monique Laurent # CWI. A fundamental problem is to cope with noise, which creates major di#culties in storing and operating on quantum

  14. New Limits on Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation Harry Buhrman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleve, Richard

    @cwi.nl Richard Cleve U of Waterloo and Perimeter Institute cleve@cs.uwaterloo.ca Monique Laurent CWI, Amsterdam- ically realizing quantum computers. A fundamental prob- lem is to cope with noise, which creates major

  15. Inequalities for quantum channels assisted by limited resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittorio Giovannetti

    2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The information capacities and ``distillability'' of a quantum channel are studied in the presence of auxiliary resources. These include prior entanglement shared between the sender and receiver and free classical bits of forward and backward communication. Inequalities and trade-off curves are derived. In particular an alternative proof is given that in the absence of feedback and shared entanglement, forward classical communication does not increase the quantum capacity of a channel.

  16. Quantum Criticality at the Large-Dimensional Limit: Three-Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    -electron atoms, a second-order phase transition [5] occurs at Zc 2.0. The estima- tion of critical nuclear chargeQuantum Criticality at the Large-Dimensional Limit: Three-Body Coulomb Systems QICUN SHI, SABRE; revised 3 May 2001; accepted 14 May 2001 ABSTRACT: We present quantum phase transitions and critical

  17. Quantum-projection-noise-limited interferometry with coherent atoms in a Ramsey-type setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doering, D.; McDonald, G.; Debs, J. E.; Figl, C.; Altin, P. A.; Bachor, H.-A.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Department of Quantum Science, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Every measurement of the population in an uncorrelated ensemble of two-level systems is limited by what is known as the quantum projection noise limit. Here, we present quantum-projection-noise-limited performance of a Ramsey-type interferometer using freely propagating coherent atoms. The experimental setup is based on an electro-optic modulator in an inherently stable Sagnac interferometer, optically coupling the two interfering atomic states via a two-photon Raman transition. Going beyond the quantum projection noise limit requires the use of reduced quantum uncertainty (squeezed) states. The experiment described demonstrates atom interferometry at the fundamental noise level and allows the observation of possible squeezing effects in an atom laser, potentially leading to improved sensitivity in atom interferometers.

  18. Towards fully quantum second laws of thermodynamics: limitations on the evolution of quantum coherences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr ?wikli?ski; Micha? Studzi?ski; Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The second law of thermodynamics places a limitation on what states a system can evolve into. For closed systems, it says that a state can be transformed into another state, only if the course grained entropy increases. For systems in contact with a heat bath, it can be combined with the law of energy conservation, and it says that a system can only evolve into another if the free energy goes down. Here, the free energy is written in terms of the fine-grained entropy. Recently, it's been shown that there are actually many second laws, and that it is only for large macroscopic systems that they all become equivalent to the ordinary one. These additional second laws also hold for quantum systems, and are in fact, often more relevant in this regime. They place a restriction on how the probabilities of energy levels can evolve. Here, we consider additional restrictions on how the coherences between energy levels can evolve. Coherences can only go down, and we provide a set of restrictions which limit the extent to which they can be maintained. We find that coherences over energy levels must decay at rates that are suitably adapted to the transition rates between energy levels. We show that the limitations are matched in the case of single qubit, in which case we obtain the full characterization of state-to-state transformations. For higher dimensions, we conjecture more severe constraints exist. The results are obtained in the paradigm of Thermal Operations, and we introduce a new class of thermodynamical operations which allow for greater manipulation of coherences and study its power with respect to Thermal Operations.

  19. Wavelength limits for InGaN quantum wells on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pristovsek, Markus, E-mail: markus@pristovsek.de [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission wavelength of coherently strained InGaN quantum wells (QW) is limited by the maximum thickness before relaxation starts. For high indium contents x>40% the resulting wavelength decreases because quantum confinement dominates. For low indium content x<40% the electron hole wave function overlap (and hence radiative emission) is strongly reduced with increasing QW thickness due to the quantum confined Stark effect and imposes another limit. This results in a maximum usable emission wavelength at around 600?nm for QWs with 40%-50% indium content. Relaxed InGaN buffer layers could help to push this further, especially on non- and semi-polar orientations.

  20. From quantum metrological precision bounds to quantum computation speed-up limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafal Demkowicz-Dobrzanski; Marcin Markiewicz

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme for translating metrological precision bounds into lower bounds on query complexity of quantum search algorithms. Within the scheme the link between quadratic performance enhancement in idealized quantum metrological and quantum computing schemes becomes clear. More importantly, we utilize results from the field of quantum metrology on a generic loss of quadratic quantum precision enhancement in presence of decoherence to infer an analogous generic loss of quadratic speed-up in oracle based quantum computing. While most of our reasoning is rigorous, at one of the final steps, we need to make use of an unproven technical conjecture. We hope that we will be able to amend this deficiency in the near future, but we are convinced that even without the conjecture proven our results provide a novel and deep insight into relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum metrology protocols.

  1. Quantum-limited metrology and Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Boixo; Animesh Datta; Matthew J. Davis; Anil Shaji; Alexandre B. Tacla; Carlton M. Caves

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a quantum-metrology protocol designed to estimate a physical parameter in a Bose-Einstein condensate of N atoms, and we show that the measurement uncertainty can decrease faster than 1/N. The 1/N scaling is usually thought to be the best possible in any measurement scheme. From the perspective of quantum information theory, we outline the main idea that leads to a measurement uncertainty that scales better than 1/N. We examine in detail some potential problems and challenges that arise in implementing such a measurement protocol using a Bose-Einstein condensate. We discuss how some of these issues can be dealt with by using lower-dimensional condensates trapped in nonharmonic potentials.

  2. Trajectories without quantum uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene S. Polzik; Klemens Hammerer

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A common knowledge suggests that trajectories of particles in quantum mechanics always have quantum uncertainties. These quantum uncertainties set by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle limit precision of measurements of fields and forces, and ultimately give rise to the standard quantum limit in metrology. With the rapid developments of sensitivity of measurements these limits have been approached in various types of measurements including measurements of fields and acceleration. Here we show that a quantum trajectory of one system measured relatively to the other "reference system" with an effective negative mass can be quantum uncertainty--free. The method crucially relies on the generation of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled state of two objects, one of which has an effective negative mass. From a practical perspective these ideas open the way towards force and acceleration measurements at new levels of sensitivity far below the standard quantum limit.

  3. The classical limit of quantum optics: not what it seems at first sight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir Aharonov; Alonso Botero; Shmuel Nussinov; Sandu Popescu; Jeff Tollaksen; Lev Vaidman

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is light and how to describe it has always been a central subject in physics. As our understanding has increased, so have our theories changed: Geometrical optics, wave optics and quantum optics are increasingly sophisticated descriptions, each referring to a larger class of phenomena than its predecessor. But how exactly are these theories related? How and when wave optics reduces to geometric optics is a rather simple problem. Similarly, how quantum optics reduces to wave optics has been considered to be a very simple business as well. It's not so. As we show here the classical limit of quantum optics is a far more complicated issue; it is in fact dramatically more involved and it requires a complete revision of all our intuitions. The revised intuitions can then serve as a guide to finding novel quantum effects.

  4. Einstein gravity as the thermodynamic limit of an underlying quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Singh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole area theorem suggests that classical general relativity is the thermodynamic limit of a quantum statistics. The degrees of freedom of the statistical theory cannot be the spacetime metric. We argue that the statistical theory should be constructed from a noncommutative gravity, whose classical, and thermodynamic, approximation is Einstein gravity. The noncommutative gravity theory exhibits a duality between quantum fields and macroscopic black holes, which is used to show that the black hole possesses an entropy of the order of its area. The principle on which this work is based also provides a possible explanation for the smallness of the cosmological constant, and for the quantum measurement problem, indicating that this is a promising avenue towards the merger of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  5. A phase-space study of the quantum Loschmidt in the semiclassical limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A phase-space study of the quantum Loschmidt Echo in the semiclassical limit Monique Combescure email : monique.combescure@ipnl.in2p3.fr Didier Robert D´epartement de Math´ematiques Laboratoire Jean the evolutions governed by the perturbed and unperturbed Hamiltonians play a major role in this estimate. We also

  6. Morphological evolution of seeded self-limiting quantum dots on patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Pelucchi, Emanuele [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Vvedensky, Dimitri D. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental data and a comprehensive theoretical model for the self-limiting growth during metalorganic vaporphase epitaxy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As within tetrahedral recesses etched in GaAs(111)B substrates. A self-limiting profile develops during growth, accompanied by Ga segregation, and leads to the formation of quantum dots and vertical quantum wires along the base and central axis of the recesses, respectively. A theoretical model based on reaction-diffusion equations for the precursor kinetics, adatom diffusion and incorporation, on each crystallographic facet composing the template, is formulated: our theory explains, and reproduces with good agreement, all the experimental trends of the self-limiting profile and alloy segregation dependence on material composition and growth temperature. These results represent a promising route toward a reproducible on-demand design of seeded lowdimensional nanostructures grown on any patterned surface.

  7. Quantum limit for avian magnetoreception: How sensitive can a chemical compass be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianming Cai; Filippo Caruso; Martin B. Plenio

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical compass model, based on radical pair reactions, is a fascinating idea to explain avian magnetoreception. At present, questions concerning the key ingredients responsible for the high sensitivity of a chemical compass and the possible role of quantum coherence and decoherence remain unsolved. Here, we investigate the optimized hyperfine coupling for a chemical compass in order to achieve the best magnetic field sensitivity. We show that its magnetic sensitivity limit can be further extended by simple quantum control and may benefit from additional decoherence. With this, we clearly demonstrate how quantum coherence can be exploited in the functioning of a chemical compass. The present results also provide new routes towards the design of a biomimetic weak magnetic field sensor.

  8. Quantum Dynamical Model for Wave Function Reduction in Classical and Macroscopic Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Pu Sun

    1993-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this papper, a quantum dynamical model describing the quantum measurement process is presented as an extensive generalization of the Coleman-Hepp model. In both the classical limit with very large quantum number and macroscopic limit with very large particle number in measuring instrument, this model generally realizes the wave packet collapse in quantum measurement as a consequence of the Schrodinger time evolution in either the exactly-solvable case or the non-(exactly-)solvable case. For the latter, its quasi-adiabatic case is explicitly analysed by making use of the high-order adiabatic approximation method and then manifests the wave packet collapse as well as the exactly-solvable case. By highlighting these analysis, it is finally found that an essence of the dynamical model of wave packet collapse is the factorization of the Schrodinger evolution other than the exact solvability. So many dynamical models including the well-known ones before, which are exactly-solvable or not, can be shown only to be the concrete realizations of this factorizability

  9. Classical limits of quantum mechanics on a non-commutative configuration space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benatti, Fabio [Department of Physics, University of Trieste and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, I-34051 Trieste (Italy)] [Department of Physics, University of Trieste and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, I-34051 Trieste (Italy); Gouba, Laure [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy)] [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of non-commutative quantum mechanics given by two harmonic oscillators over a non-commutative two dimensional configuration space. We study possible ways of removing the non-commutativity based on the classical limit context known as anti-Wick quantization. We show that removal of non-commutativity from the configuration space and from the canonical operators is not commuting operation.

  10. Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo integration cycle Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates The Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate DeviceV Thermo Scientific MAT 253 or the 3-kV DELTA V isotope ratio mass spectrometer meets the requirements

  11. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate...

  12. Quantum dynamics in light-harvesting complexes: Beyond the single-exciton limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Cui; X. Y. Zhang; X. X. Yi

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Primitive photosynthetic cells appear over three billion years prior to any other more complex life-forms, thus it is reasonable to assume that Nature has designed a photosynthetic mechanism using minimal resources but honed to perfection under the action of evolution. A number of different quantum models have been proposed to understand the high degree of efficient energy transport, most of them are limited to the scenario of single-exciton. Here we present a study on the dynamics in light-harvesting complexes beyond the single exciton limit, and show how this model describes the energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex. We find that the energy transfer efficiency above 90% under realistic conditions is achievable.

  13. Generalized Uncertainty Relations and Long Time Limits for Quantum Brownian Motion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Anastopoulos; J. J. Halliwell

    1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the time evolution of the reduced Wigner function for a class of quantum Brownian motion models. We derive two generalized uncertainty relations. The first consists of a sharp lower bound on the uncertainty function, $U = (\\Delta p)^2 (\\Delta q)^2 $, after evolution for time $t$ in the presence of an environment. The second, a stronger and simpler result, consists of a lower bound at time $t$ on a modified uncertainty function, essentially the area enclosed by the $1-\\sigma$ contour of the Wigner function. In both cases the minimizing initial state is a non-minimal Gaussian pure state. These generalized uncertainty relations supply a measure of the comparative size of quantum and thermal fluctuations. We prove two simple inequalites, relating uncertainty to von Neumann entropy, and the von Neumann entropy to linear entropy. We also prove some results on the long-time limit of the Wigner function for arbitrary initial states. For the harmonic oscillator the Wigner function for all initial states becomes a Gaussian at large times (often, but not always, a thermal state). We derive the explicit forms of the long-time limit for the free particle (which does not in general go to a Gaussian), and also for more general potentials in the approximation of high temperature.

  14. Limitations on the quantum non-Gaussian characteristic of Schrödinger kitten state generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongbin Song; Katanya B. Kuntz; Elanor H. Huntington

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative analysis is conducted on the impacts of experimental imperfections in the input state, the detector properties, and their interactions on photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum states in terms of a quantum non-Gaussian character witness and Wigner function. Limitations of the non-classicality and quantum non-Gaussian characteristic of Schr\\"{o}dinger kitten states are identified and addressed. The detrimental effects of a photon-number detector on the generation of odd Schr\\"{o}dinger kitten state at near-infrared wavelengths ($\\sim$ 860 nm) and telecommunication wavelengths ($\\sim$ 1550 nm) are presented and analysed. This analysis demonstrates that the high dark count probability of telecommunication-wavelength photon-number detectors significantly undermines the negativity of the Wigner function in Schr\\"{o}dinger kitten state generation experiments. For a one-photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum state at $\\sim$ 1550 nm, an APD-based photon-number-resolving detector provides no significant advantage over a non-photon-number-resolving detector when imperfections, such as dark count probability and inefficiency, are taken into account.

  15. Large gain quantum-limited qubit measurement using a two-mode nonlinear cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeed Khan; R. Vijay; I. Siddiqi; Aashish A. Clerk

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a thorough theoretical analysis of qubit state measurement in a setup where a driven, parametrically-coupled cavity system is directly coupled to the qubit, with one of the cavities having a weak Kerr nonlinearity. Such a system could be readily realized using circuit QED architectures. We demonstrate that this setup is capable in the standard linear-response regime of both producing a highly amplified output signal while at the same time achieving near quantum-limited performance: the measurement backaction on the qubit is near the minimal amount required by the uncertainty principle. This setup thus represents a promising route for performing efficient large-gain qubit measurement that is completely on-chip, and that does not rely on the use of circulators or complex non-reciprocal amplifiers.

  16. High-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator with a quantum-limited optomechanical sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Arcizet; P. -F. Cohadon; T. Briant; M. Pinard; A. Heidmann; J. -M. Mackowski; C. Michel; L. Pinard; O. Francais; L. Rousseau

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate the high-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator and its cooling by active control. Coating a low-loss mirror upon the resonator, we have built an optomechanical sensor based on a very high-finesse cavity (30000). We have measured the thermal noise of the resonator with a quantum-limited sensitivity at the 10^-19 m/rootHz level, and cooled the resonator down to 5K by a cold-damping technique. Applications of our setup range from quantum optics experiments to the experimental demonstration of the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical resonator.

  17. Quantum criticality at the infinite complete basis set limit: A thermodynamic analog of the Yang and Lee theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    length for one- electron screened Coulomb potentials, the critical nuclear charges for twoQuantum criticality at the infinite complete basis set limit: A thermodynamic analog of the Yang Abstract Finite size scaling for calculations of the critical parameters of the few-body Schro

  18. Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

  19. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  20. The Computational Limit to Quantum Determinism and the Black Hole Information Loss Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkady Bolotin

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper scrutinizes the principle of quantum determinism, which maintains that the complete information about the initial quantum state of a physical system should determine the system's quantum state at any other time. As it shown in the paper, assuming the strong exponential time hypothesis, SETH, which conjectures that known algorithms for solving computational NP-complete problems (often brute-force algorithms) are optimal, the quantum deterministic principle cannot be used generally, i.e., for randomly selected physical systems, particularly macroscopic systems. In other words, even if the initial quantum state of an arbitrary system were precisely known, as long as SETH is true it might be impossible in the real world to predict the system's exact final quantum state. The paper suggests that the breakdown of quantum determinism in a process, in which a black hole forms and then completely evaporates, might actually be physical evidence supporting SETH.

  1. Maximal boost and energy of elementary particles as a manifestation of the limit of localizability of elementary quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japaridze, George

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss an upper bound on the boost and the energy of elementary particles. The limit is derived utilizing the core principle of relativistic quantum mechanics stating that there is a lower limit for localization of an elementary quantum system and the suggestion that when the localization scale reaches the Planck length, elementary particles are removed from observables. The limit for the boost and energy, $M_{Planck}/m$ and $M_{Planck}c^{2}\\approx\\,8.6* 10^{27}$ eV, is defined in terms of fundamental constants and the mass of elementary particle and does not involve any dynamic scale. These bounds imply that the cosmic ray flux of any flavor may stretch up to energies of order $10^{18}$ GeV and will cut off at this value.

  2. Nonlinear Michelson interferometer for improved quantum metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Luis; Ángel Rivas

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine nonlinear quantum detection via a Michelson interferometer embedded in a gas with Kerr nonlinearity. The interferometer is illuminated by pulses of classical light. This strategy combines the robustness against practical imperfections of classical light with the improvement provided by nonlinear detection. Regarding ultimate quantum limits, we stress that, as a difference with linear schemes, the nonlinearity introduces pulse duration as a new variable into play along with the energy resources.

  3. Theoretical Limit to the Laser Threshold Current Density in an InGaN Quantume Well Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amano, H; Chow, W W; Han, J

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an investigation of the spontaneous emission limit to the laser threshold current density in an InGaN quantum well laser. The peak gain and spontaneous emission rate as functions of carrier density are com- puted using a microscopic laser theory. From these quantities, the minimum achievable threshold current density is determined for a given threshold gain. The dependence on quantum well width, and the effects of inhomogeneous broadening due to spatial alloy variations are discussed. Also, comparison with experiments is made.

  4. Limits of control for quantum systems: kinematical bounds on the optimization of observables and the question of dynamical realizability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; J. V. Leahy

    2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the limits of control for mixed-state quantum systems. The constraint of unitary evolution for non-dissipative quantum systems imposes kinematical bounds on the optimization of arbitrary observables. We summarize our previous results on kinematical bounds and show that these bounds are dynamically realizable for completely controllable systems. Moreover, we establish improved bounds for certain partially controllable systems. Finally, the question of dynamical realizability of the bounds for arbitary partially controllable systems is shown to depend on the accessible sets of the associated control system on the unitary group U(N) and the results of a few control computations are discussed briefly.

  5. Control-free control: manipulating a quantum system using only a limited set of measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ashhab; Franco Nori

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and discuss different protocols for preparing an arbitrary quantum state of a qubit using only a restricted set of measurements, with no unitary operations at all. We show that an arbitrary state can indeed be prepared, provided that the available measurements satisfy certain requirements. Our results shed light on the role that measurement-induced back-action plays in quantum feedback control and the extent to which this back-action can be exploited in quantum-control protocols.

  6. Optimization of superconducting flux qubit readout using near-quantum-limited amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jedediah Edward Jensen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    junctions . . . . . . . 1.4 Superconducting QuantumInterference 1.5 Superconducting qubits . . . . . . . . .2 Superconducting flux qubits 2.1 The one-junction flux

  7. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  8. Ultimate Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSOdatabase[1]Ultimate Biofuels

  9. Theoretical Limits of Photovoltaics Efficiency and Possible Improvements by Intuitive Approaches Learned from Photosynthesis and Quantum Coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahhad H Alharbi; Sabre Kais

    2014-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review, we present and discussed the main trends in photovoltaics with emphasize on the conversion efficiency limits. The theoretical limits of various photovoltaics device concepts are presented and analyzed using a flexible detailed balance model where more discussion emphasize is toward the losses. Also, few lessons from nature and other fields to improve the conversion efficiency in photovoltaics are presented and discussed as well. From photosynthesis, the perfect exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes can be utilized for PVs. Also, we present some lessons learned from other fields like recombination suppression by quantum coherence. For example, the coupling in photosynthetic reaction centers is used to suppress recombination in photocells.

  10. Analytically derived limits on short-range fifth forces from quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Westphal; Hartmut Abele; Stefan Baessler

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field have been observed for the first time. From the fact that they are consistent with Newtonian gravity on the 10 %-level, analytical limits on alpha and lambda of short-range Yukawa-like additional interactions are derived between lambda = 1 micrometer and 1 mm. We arrive for lambda > 10 micrometer at alpha < 2 \\cdot 10^11 at 90 % confidence level. This translates into a limit g_s g_p / (\\hbar c) < 2 \\cdot 10^{-15} on the pseudo-scalar coupling of axions in the previously experimentally unaccessible astrophysical axion window.

  11. arXiv:quantph/0604141 New Limits on Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleve, Richard

    cleve@cs.uwaterloo.ca Monique Laurent z CWI, Amsterdam M.Laurent@cwi.nl Noah Linden x U of Bristol n creates major diÆculties in storing and operating on quantum states reliably. A key advance

  12. Global existence and semiclassical limit for quantum hydrodynamic equations with viscosity and heat conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xueke Pu; Boling Guo

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic equations with quantum effects are studied in this paper. First we establish the global existence of smooth solutions with small initial data and then in the second part, we establish the convergence of the solutions of the quantum hydrodynamic equations to those of the classical hydrodynamic equations. The energy equation is considered in this paper, which added new difficulties to the energy estimates, especially to the selection of the appropriate Sobolev spaces.

  13. Dynamics of geometric phase in the adiabatic limit of quantum phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Basu

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric phase associated with a many body ground state exhibits a signature of quantum phase transition. In this context, we have studied the behaviour of the geometric phase during a linear quench caused by a gradual turning off of the magnetic field interacting with a spin chain.

  14. An Ultimate Target for Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Yanou Cui; Marc Kamionkowski

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of S-matrix unitarity and the dynamics of thermal freeze-out for massive relic particles (denoted here simply by WIMPs) implies a lower limit on the density of such particles, that provide a (potentially sub-dominant) contribution to dark matter. This then translates to lower limits to the signal rates for a variety of techniques for direct and indirect detection of dark matter. For illustration, we focus on models where annihilation is s-wave dominated. We derive lower limits to the flux of gamma-rays from WIMP annihilation at the Galactic center; direct detection of WIMPs; energetic neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun; and the effects of WIMPs on the angular power spectrum and frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The results suggest that a variety of dark-matter-search techniques may provide interesting avenues to seek new physics, even if WIMPs do not constitute all the dark matter. While the limits are quantitatively some distance from the reach of current measurements, they may be interesting for long-range planning exercises.

  15. Quantum Mechanical Resolution Limits to Imaging and Spectroscopy in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , advances in CCD detectors and increased computer power have allowed efficient diagnosis of aberrations completely different contrast, resolution limits, and sensitivity to individual atoms. This is true even measurement system, and that the view of the specimen does depend on how you look at it (Pennycook, 2002). #12

  16. Decoherence and the quantum-classical limit in the presence of chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toscano, F.; Matos Filho, R.L. de; Davidovich, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68.528, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how decoherence affects the short-time separation between quantum and classical dynamics for classically chaotic systems, within the framework of a specific model. For a wide range of parameters, the distance between the corresponding phase-space distributions depends on a single parameter {chi} that relates an effective Planck constant ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff}, the Lyapunov coefficient, and the diffusion constant. This distance peaks at a time that depends logarithmically on ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff}, in agreement with previous estimations of the separation time for Hamiltonian systems. However, for {chi} < or approx. 1, the separation remains small, going down with ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sub eff}{sup 2}, so the concept of separation time loses its meaning.

  17. Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade Find Mølholt Jensen Risø-PhD-34(EN) ISBN 978 2008 #12;#12;Author: Find Mølholt Jensen Title: Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction

  18. Ris-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines Gunner Chr. Larsen, Knut Ronold, Hans E analysis as well as a wind turbine reliability study. In the wind climate analysis, the distribution to analyse wind turbine components with respect to failure in ultimate loading, and in addition to establish

  19. Performance Limits for Cherenkov Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hofmann

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Cherenkov instruments for the detection of very high energy gamma rays is ultimately limited by the fluctuations in the development of air showers. With particular emphasis on the angular resolution, the ultimate performance limits are investigated on the basis of simulations.

  20. Macroscopic quantum resonators (MAQRO): 2015 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Kaltenbaek; Markus Arndt; Markus Aspelmeyer; Peter F. Barker; Angelo Bassi; James Bateman; Kai Bongs; Sougato Bose; Claus Braxmaier; ?aslav Brukner; Bruno Christophe; Michael Chwalla; Pierre-François Cohadon; Adrian M. Cruise; Catalina Curceanu; Kishan Dholakia; Klaus Döringshoff; Wolfgang Ertmer; Jan Gieseler; Norman Gürlebeck; Gerald Hechenblaikner; Antoine Heidmann; Sven Herrmann; Sabine Hossenfelder; Ulrich Johann; Nikolai Kiesel; Myungshik Kim; Claus Lämmerzahl; Astrid Lambrecht; Michael Mazilu; Gerard J. Milburn; Holger Müller; Lukas Novotny; Mauro Paternostro; Achim Peters; Igor Pikovski; André Pilan-Zanoni; Ernst M. Rasel; Serge Reynaud; C. Jess Riedel; Manuel Rodrigues; Loïc Rondin; Albert Roura; Wolfgang P. Schleich; Jörg Schmiedmayer; Thilo Schuldt; Keith C. Schwab; Martin Tajmar; Guglielmo M. Tino; Hendrik Ulbricht; Rupert Ursin; Vlatko Vedral

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Do the laws of quantum physics still hold for macroscopic objects - this is at the heart of Schr\\"odinger's cat paradox - or do gravitation or yet unknown effects set a limit for massive particles? What is the fundamental relation between quantum physics and gravity? Ground-based experiments addressing these questions may soon face limitations due to limited free-fall times and the quality of vacuum and microgravity. The proposed mission MAQRO may overcome these limitations and allow addressing those fundamental questions. MAQRO harnesses recent developments in quantum optomechanics, high-mass matter-wave interferometry as well as state-of-the-art space technology to push macroscopic quantum experiments towards their ultimate performance limits and to open new horizons for applying quantum technology in space. The main scientific goal of MAQRO is to probe the vastly unexplored "quantum-classical" transition for increasingly massive objects, testing the predictions of quantum theory for truly macroscopic objects in a size and mass regime unachievable in ground-based experiments. The hardware for the mission will largely be based on available space technology. Here, we present the MAQRO proposal submitted in response to the (M4) Cosmic Vision call of the European Space Agency for a medium-size mission opportunity with a possible launch in 2025.

  1. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (and-eventually, spray ponds) that are proposed to be used as ultimate heat sinks in nuclear power plant emergency core cooling systems. The need is derived from the concern...

  2. The Legacy of Rolf Hagedorn: Statistical Bootstrap and Ultimate Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the latter half of the last century, it became evident that there exists an ever increasing number of different states of the so-called elementary particles. The usual reductionist approach to this problem was to search for a simpler infrastructure, culminating in the formulation of the quark model and quantum chromodynamics. In a complementary, completely novel approach, Hagedorn suggested that the mass distribution of the produced particles follows a self-similar composition pattern, predicting an unbounded number of states of increasing mass. He then concluded that such a growth would lead to a limiting temperature for strongly interacting matter. We discuss the conceptual basis for this approach, its relation to critical behavior, and its subsequent applications in different areas of high energy physics.

  3. The Legacy of Rolf Hagedorn: Statistical Bootstrap and Ultimate Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Redlich; Helmut Satz

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the latter half of the last century, it became evident that there exists an ever increasing number of different states of the so-called elementary particles. The usual reductionist approach to this problem was to search for a simpler infrastructure, culminating in the formulation of the quark model and quantum chromodynamics. In a complementary, completely novel approach, Hagedorn suggested that the mass distribution of the produced particles follows a self-similar composition pattern, predicting an unbounded number of states of increasing mass. He then concluded that such a growth would lead to a limiting temperature for strongly interacting matter. We discuss the conceptual basis for this approach, its relation to critical behavior, and its subsequent applications in different areas of high energy physics.

  4. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danel, J.-F.; Blottiau, P.; Kazandjian, L.; Piron, R.; Torrent, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures.

  5. Relativistic Quantum Metrology in Open System Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zehua Tian; Jieci Wang; Heng Fan; Jiliang Jing

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum metrology studies the ultimate limit of precision in estimating a physical quantity if quantum strategies are exploited. Here we investigate the evolution of a two-level atom as a detector which interacts with a massless scalar field using the master equation approach for open quantum system. We employ local quantum estimation theory to estimate the Unruh temperature when probed by a uniformly accelerated detector in the Minkowski vacuum. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over all possible detector preparations and evolution times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We find that the optimal precision of estimation is achieved when the detector evolves for a long enough time. Furthermore, we find that in this case the FI for population measurement is independent of initial preparations of the detector and is exactly equal to the QFI, which means that population measurement is optimal. This result demonstrates that the achievement of the ultimate bound of precision imposed by quantum mechanics is possible. Finally, we note that the same configuration is also available to the maximum of the QFI itself.

  6. Search for quantum transducers between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation: A measurement of an upper limit on the transducer conversion efficiency of yttrium barium copper oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao; W. J. Fitelson; A. D. Speliotopoulos

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimal coupling rule for the coupling of the electron spin to curved spacetime in general relativity suggests the possibility of a coupling between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation mediated by means of a quantum fluid. Thus quantum transducers between these two kinds of radiation fields might exist. We report here on the first attempt at a Hertz-type experiment, in which a high-$\\rm{T_c}$ superconductor (YBCO) was the sample material used as a possible quantum transducer to convert EM into GR microwaves, and a second piece of YBCO in a separate apparatus was used to back-convert GR into EM microwaves. An upper limit on the conversion efficiency of YBCO was measured to be $1.6\\times10^{-5}$ at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  7. The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology Editorial overview to provide a landscape of current research at the interface between outstanding ecological questions to the biotechnologist for mining enzymatic activities from unusual environments. It is a fact that, despite many

  8. arXiv:quant-ph/0604141v220Apr2006 New Limits on Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleve, Richard

    @cs.uwaterloo.ca Monique Laurent CWI, Amsterdam M.Laurent@cwi.nl Noah Linden§ U of Bristol n to physically realizing quantum computers. A fundamental prob- lem is to cope with noise, which creates major

  9. the rate-limiting step of mevalonate and ultimately, cholesterol biosynthesis, accounting for Cu's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    's effect on cholesterol levels in the rat [Valsala and Krump (1987) J Biosci 12, 137-142]. In a recent

  10. Finding Ultimate Limits of Performance for Hybrid Electric Edward D. Tate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    automobiles. By recovering kinetic energy during braking and optimizing the engine operation to reduce fuel to achieving maximum fuel economy. In this paper we introduce the application of convex optimization to hybrid, optimization of emissions and extensions to other hybrid vehicle architectures. INTRODUCTION Two areas

  11. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  12. Photonic architecture for scalable quantum information processing in NV-diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kae Nemoto; Michael Trupke; Simon J. Devitt; Ashley M. Stephens; Kathrin Buczak; Tobias Nobauer; Mark S. Everitt; Jorg Schmiedmayer; William J. Munro

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics and information are intimately connected, and the ultimate information processing devices will be those that harness the principles of quantum mechanics. Many physical systems have been identified as candidates for quantum information processing, but none of them are immune from errors. The challenge remains to find a path from the experiments of today to a reliable and scalable quantum computer. Here, we develop an architecture based on a simple module comprising an optical cavity containing a single negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Modules are connected by photons propagating in a fiber-optical network and collectively used to generate a topological cluster state, a robust substrate for quantum information processing. In principle, all processes in the architecture can be deterministic, but current limitations lead to processes that are probabilistic but heralded. We find that the architecture enables large-scale quantum information processing with existing technology.

  13. A semiclassical theory of quantum noise in open chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Bag; S. Chaudhuri; J. Ray Chaudhuri; D. S. Ray

    1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the quantum evolution of classically chaotic systems in contact with surroundings. Based on $\\hbar$-scaling of an equation for time evolution of the Wigner's quasi-probability distribution function in presence of dissipation and thermal diffusion we derive a semiclassical equation for quantum fluctuations. This identifies an early regime of evolution dominated by fluctuations in the curvature of the potential due to classical chaos and dissipation. A stochastic treatment of this classical fluctuations leads us to a Fokker-Planck equation which is reminiscent of Kramers' equation for thermally activated processes. This reveals an interplay of three aspects of evolution of quantum noise in weakly dissipative open systems; the reversible Liouville flow, the irreversible chaotic diffusion which is characteristic of the system itself, and irreversible dissipation induced by the external reservoir. It has been demonstrated that in the dissipation-free case a competition between Liouville flow in the contracting direction of phase space and chaotic diffusion sets a critical width in the Wigner function for quantum fluctuations. We also show how the initial quantum noise gets amplified by classical chaos and ultimately equilibrated under the influence of dissipation. We establish that there exists a critical limit to the expansion of phase space. The limit is determined by chaotic diffusion and dissipation. Making use of appropriate quantum-classical correspondence we verify the semiclassical analysis by the fully quantum simulation in a chaotic quartic oscillator.

  14. Static and high-frequency hole transport in p-Si/SiGe heterostructures in the ultra-quantum limit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drichko, I. L.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Suslov, A. V.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V.; Myronov, M.; Mironov, O. A.; Materials Science Division; A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst. of Russian Academy of Sciences; National High Magnetic Field Lab.; Univ. Oslo; Musashi Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Warwick; International Lab. of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperature

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex high-frequency (HF), {sigma}{sup AC} = {sigma}{sub 1} - i{sigma}{sub 2}, and static, {sigma}{sup DC}, conductivities, as well as current-voltage characteristics, have been measured in p-Si/SiGe heterostructures with a low hole density (p = 8.2 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}) at temperatures T = 0.3-4.2 K in the ultraquantum limit, when the filling factor is v < 1. In order to determine the components of the HF conductivity, the acoustic contactless method in the 'hybrid configuration' is used, when the surface acoustic wave propagates on the surface of the LiNbO{sub 3} piezoelectric and the heterostructure is pressed to the surface by a spring. The conductivities {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 2} are determined from the damping and velocity of the surface acoustic waves that are measured simultaneously with varying the magnetic field. The revealed HF conductivity features - {sigma}{sub 1} >> |{sigma}{sub 2}|, the negative sign of {sigma}{sub 2}, the threshold behavior of the current-voltage characteristic, and the dependence I {proportional_to} exp(-A/V{sup 0.3}) in the subthreshold region - indicate the formation of a pinned Wigner crystal (glass) in the ultraquantum limit (T = 0.3-0.8 K, B > 14 T).

  15. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Pooser; B. J. Lawrie

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) cantilevers is used to measure a broad variety of phenomena in devices ranging from force microscopes to biochemical sensors to thermal imaging systems. We demonstrate the first direct measurement of a MEMS cantilever displacement with a noise floor at 40% of the shot noise limit (SNL). By combining multi-spatial-mode quantum light sources with a simple ?differential measurement, we show that sub-SNL MEMS displacement sensitivity is highly accessible compared to previous efforts that measured the displacement of macroscopic mirrors with very distinct spatial structures crafted with multiple optical parametric amplifiers and locking loops. These results support a new class of quantum MEMS sensor with an ultimate signal to noise ratio determined by quantum correlations, enabling ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and microscopy applications in which signals were previously obscured by shot noise.

  16. ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2 Audigane, P.1 , Brown, S.2 , Dimier A.3 , Frykman P.4 , Gherardi F.5 , Le Gallo Y.6 Recherches Géologiques et minières - France 2 CO2SENSE limited, United Kingdom 3 EIFER, EIFER europaisches

  17. Quantum limit of photothermal cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone De Liberato; Neill Lambert; Franco Nori

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

  18. Age effects in L2 acquisition: ultimate attainment at the syntax-morphology interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Paulina

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a selective overview of studies that have examined age effects in second language (L2) acquisition. The focus was on adult second language learners and the L2 ultimate attainment at syntax-interface morphology, with particular...

  19. Ultimate Limit State Response of Reinforced Concrete Columns for Use in Performance-Based Analysis and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urmson, Christopher R.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in Gaussian quadrature formulation b exponent in axial-lateral strain relationship bi width of ith fiber in Gaussian quadrature formulation Ch nodal concrete force c depth of neutral axis D? diameter of core concrete d diameter db diameter...

  20. Bounds on Information and the Security of Quantum Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Biahm; T. Mor

    1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong attacks against quantum key distribution use quantum memories and quantum gates to attack directly the final key. In this paper we extend a novel security result recently obtained, to demonstrate proofs of security against a wide class of such attacks. To reach this goal we calculate information-dependent reduced density matrices, we study the geometry of quantum mixed states, and we find bounds on the information leaked to an eavesdropper. Our result suggests that quantum cryptography is ultimately secure.

  1. Models of quantum computation and quantum programming languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Miszczak

    2011-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the presented paper is to provide an introduction to the basic computational models used in quantum information theory. We review various models of quantum Turing machine, quantum circuits and quantum random access machine (QRAM) along with their classical counterparts. We also provide an introduction to quantum programming languages, which are developed using the QRAM model. We review the syntax of several existing quantum programming languages and discuss their features and limitations.

  2. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abalin, S. S.; Alekseev, P. N.; Ignat'ev, V. V.; Kolyaskin, O. E.; Men'shikov, L. I.; Mostovoi, V. I.; Prusakov, V. N.; Subbotin, S. A.; Krasnykh, A. K.; Popov, Yu. P.; Rudenko, V. T.; Somov, L. N.; Dikansky, N. S.; Novokhatsky, A. V.; Dovbnia, A. N. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kharkov Physical Technical Institute, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the ''ultimate safety reactor'' using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R and D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  3. Quantum-Space Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Gelles; Tal Mor

    2007-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols commonly rely on the use of qubits (quantum bits). In reality, however, due to practical limitations, the legitimate users are forced to employ a larger quantum (Hilbert) space, say a quhexit (quantum six-dimensional) space, or even a much larger quantum Hilbert space. Various specific attacks exploit of these limitations. Although security can still be proved in some very special cases, a general framework that considers such realistic QKD protocols, as well as} attacks on such protocols, is still missing. We describe a general method of attacking realistic QKD protocols, which we call the `quantum-space attack'. The description is based on assessing the enlarged quantum space actually used by a protocol, the `quantum space of the protocol'. We demonstrate these new methods by classifying various (known) recent attacks against several QKD schemes, and by analyzing a novel attack on interferometry-based QKD.

  4. Predicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis of AE signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on ``testing'' the real structure rather than trying to model it. Experiments on reinforced concrete (RC) beamsPredicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis the unloading and loading phases of a cycle test and it showed a clear correlation with the bending failure load

  5. he mobile world depends on lithium-ion batteries --today's ultimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    T he mobile world depends on lithium- ion batteries -- today's ultimate rechargeable energy store -- a performance roughly on a par with the best Li-ion batteries. His batteries are based on lithium­sulphur (Li is applied to reverse the electron flow, which also drives the lithium ions back. In a Li­S battery

  6. Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible Energy Source" John D. Moody, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" " Presented to: MIT ­ PSFC IAP 2014" " January 15, 2014" This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

  7. The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*. Tools difficult macromolecule to analyse. Now it is possible to determine the nucleotide sequence at a rate of several hundred nucleotide a day. (August 2005: 1011 bases) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; = 0.283 #12

  8. Limitation of decoy-state Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin quantum-key-distribution protocols with a heralded single-photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Shengli [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China); Electronic Technology Institute, Information Engineering University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450004 (China); Zou Xubo; Li Ke; Guo Guangcan [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China); Jin Chenhui [Electronic Technology Institute, Information Engineering University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450004 (China)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution, longer distance and higher key generating rate is shown with a heralded single-photon source (HSPS) [Phys. Rev. A. 73, 032331 (2006)]. In this paper, the performance of the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisim (SARG) protocol utilizing the HSPS sources is considered and the numerical simulation turns out that still a significant improvement in secret key generating rate can also be observed. It is shown that the security distance for HSPS+SARG is 120 km. However, compared with the HSPS+BB84 protocols, the HSPS+SARG protocol has a lower secret key rate and a shorter distance. Thus we show the HSPS+BB84 implementation is a preferable protocol for long distance transmittance.

  9. Analysis of Various Pumping Methods With Respect to the Lowest Achievable Ultimate Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Ganapati; Rao Myneni, Ganapati; Favale, Anthony; Poelker, Benard; Stutzman, Marcy

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Labzs CEBAF Accelerator Facility uses most of the currently available vacuum pumping systems for its successful operations.These vacuum systems include turbo, ion, NEG and cryo pumps.The theoretical lowest pressure obtainable with these pumps is different and also the effective pumping speeds of all these pumps at lowest pressures are likely to vary depending on the prevailing conditions. Consequently, the ultimate pressure of a given vacuum system pumped by each of the above mentioned pumps could be expected to vary under the same operating conditions. In this paper the results of the analysis of above pumps with respect to their lowest achievable ultimate pressures are presented.z This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

  10. Results from large scale ultimate strength tests of K-braced jacket frame structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolt, H.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 2 of the JIP Frames Project included four large scale collapse tests of K-braced frames in which both gap and overlap K joints were the critical components. The results are presented in this paper. The local failure modes differed from typical isolated component tests, yet were representative of structural damage observed following Hurricane Andrew. The frame test results therefore provide important insight to the ultimate response of offshore jacket structures.

  11. Quantum Bootstrapping via Compressed Quantum Hamiltonian Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Wiebe; Christopher Granade; David G. Cory

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work has shown that quantum simulation is a valuable tool for learning empirical models for quantum systems. We build upon these results by showing that a small quantum simulators can be used to characterize and learn control models for larger devices for wide classes of physically realistic Hamiltonians. This leads to a new application for small quantum computers: characterizing and controlling larger quantum computers. Our protocol achieves this by using Bayesian inference in concert with Lieb-Robinson bounds and interactive quantum learning methods to achieve compressed simulations for characterization. Whereas Fisher information analysis shows that current methods which employ short-time evolution are suboptimal, interactive quantum learning allows us to overcome this limitation. We illustrate the efficiency of our bootstrapping protocol by showing numerically that an 8-qubit Ising model simulator can be used to calibrate and control a 50 qubit Ising simulator while using only about 750 kilobits of experimental data.

  12. Polymer crystals in Rydberg quantum gases with competing attractive and repulsive interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Zhihao; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a quantum spin chain with density-density interactions, whose nearest-neighbor strength can be tuned freely while the long-range tail follows a repulsive (van-der-Waals) power-law. The classical limit of this many-body system with generally non-convex interactions possesses an exact solution. In the case of attractive nearest-neighbor interaction the ground state features two complete devil's staircases of crystals that --- depending on the filling fraction --- are either composed of dimer particles or dimer holes. The staircase structure is controlled by the values of the nearest-neighbor interaction rather than a chemical potential which would be typically the case for convex interactions. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the dimer crystalline structures and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region, where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi l...

  13. Heisenberg-limited metrology with information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti; Matthias D. Lang; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of atom interferometers by exploiting atom-light entanglement. In this paper, we apply information recycling to an interferometer where the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. We demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of number-correlated Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  14. Extended quantum color coding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Horibe, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Fukui University, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum color coding scheme proposed by Korff and Kempe [e-print quant-ph/0405086] is easily extended so that the color coding quantum system is allowed to be entangled with an extra auxiliary quantum system. It is shown that in the extended scheme we need only {approx}2{radical}(N) quantum colors to order N objects in large N limit, whereas {approx}N/e quantum colors are required in the original nonextended version. The maximum success probability has asymptotics expressed by the Tracy-Widom distribution of the largest eigenvalue of a random Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) matrix.

  15. Optical Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single photon sources, linear optical elements, and single photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high efficiency single photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  16. The Static Quantum Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasunori Nomura

    2012-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the multiverse in the intrinsically quantum mechanical framework recently proposed in Refs. [1,2]. By requiring that the principles of quantum mechanics are universally valid and that physical predictions do not depend on the reference frame one chooses to describe the multiverse, we find that the multiverse state must be static---in particular, the multiverse does not have a beginning or end. We argue that, despite its naive appearance, this does not contradict observation, including the fact that we observe that time flows in a definite direction. Selecting the multiverse state is ultimately boiled down to finding normalizable solutions to certain zero-eigenvalue equations, analogous to the case of the hydrogen atom. Unambiguous physical predictions would then follow, according to the rules of quantum mechanics.

  17. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  18. The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

  19. Quantum metrology in Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick critical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Salvatori; Antonio Mandarino; Matteo G. A. Paris

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model describes critical systems with interaction beyond the first-neighbor approximation. Here we address the characterization of LMG systems, i.e. the estimation of anisotropy, and show how criticality may be exploited to improve precision. In particular, we provide exact results for the Quantum Fisher Information of small-size LMG chains made of $N=2, 3$ and $4$ lattice sites and analyze the same quantity in the thermodynamical limit by means of a zero-th order approximation of the system Hamiltonian. We then show that the ultimate bounds to precision may be achieved by tuning the external field and by measuring the total magnetization of the system. We also address the use of LMG systems as quantum thermometers and show that: i) precision is governed by the gap between the lowest energy levels of the systems, ii) field-dependent level crossing provides a resource to extend the operating range of the quantum thermometer.

  20. Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com SECRET PLANS -Eagles of Death Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SECRET PLANS - Eagles of Death Metal It Secret Plans Midnight missions Wheels in motion Hoo Hoo Secret Plans Midnight mission With emotion Hou

  1. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  2. On description of quantum plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Vladimirov; Yu. O. Tyshetskiy

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma becomes quantum when the quantum nature of its particles significantly affects its macroscopic properties. To answer the question of when the collective quantum plasma effects are important, a proper description of such effects is necessary. We consider here the most common methods of description of quantum plasma, along with the related assumptions and applicability limits. In particular, we analyze in detail the hydrodynamic description of quantum plasma, as well as discuss some kinetic features of analytic properties of linear dielectric response function in quantum plasma. We point out the most important, in our view, fundamental problems occurring already in the linear approximation and requiring further investigation. (submitted to Physics-Uspekhi)

  3. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  4. Short seed extractors against quantum storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amnon Ta-Shma

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Some, but not all, extractors resist adversaries with limited quantum storage. In this paper we show that Trevisan's extractor has this property, thereby showing an extractor against quantum storage with logarithmic seed length.

  5. Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    -generation solar cells. The ultimate success of photovoltaic (PV) cell technology requires great advancementsFundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells Zongfu Yu1 , Aaswath Raman and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping

  6. Exploring the limit of metazoan thermal tolerance via comparative proteomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    around hydrothermal vents are highly variable, ranging from near freezing up to 3008C. Never- theless transport chain enable pronounced thermotolerance. Ultimately, oxidative stress may be the key factor instability [2], and limitations in gas transport have all been implicated as possible modes of physiological

  7. What are the Hidden Quantum Processes Behind Newton's Laws?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the hidden quantum processes that are responsible for Newton's laws of motion and Newton's universal law of gravity. We apply Electro-Magnetic Quantum Gravity or EMQG to investigate Newtonian classical physics. EQMG is a quantum gravity theory that is manifestly compatible with Cellular Automata (CA) theory, a new paradigm for physical reality. EMQG is also based on a theory of inertia proposed by R. Haisch, A. Rueda, and H. Puthoff, which we modified and called Quantum Inertia (QI). Quantum Inertia theory states that in Newton's 2nd law of motion (F=MA), inertia is caused by the strictly local electrical force interactions bewteen matter (ultimately composed of electrically charged quantum particles) and the surrounding electrically charged virtual particles of the quantum vacuum. When an electrically charged particle is accelerated, an electrical force results between the particle and the surrounding electrically charged virtual particles of the quantum vacuum appears in a direction to oppose...

  8. Proximate and Ultimate Compositional Changes in Corn Stover during Torrefaction using Thermogravimetric Analyzer and Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The world is currently aiming to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is considered carbon neutral because the carbon dioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle. Increasing the use of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol. Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes, including thermochemical (direct combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation), or chemical (esterification) technologies. There are lot challenges in using biomass for energy applications. To name few low bulk density, high moisture content, irregular size and shape, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value. In commercial scale operation large quantities of biomass are needed and this will create problems associated with storage and transportation. Furthermore, grinding raw biomass with high moisture content is very challenging as there are no specific equipments and can increase the costs and in some cases it becomes highly impossible. All of these drawbacks led to development of some pretreatment techniques to make biomass more suitable for fuel applications. One of the promising techniques is torrefaction. Torrefaction is heating the biomass in an inert environment or reduced environment. During torrefaction biomass losses moisture, becomes more brittle and with increased energy density values. There are different techniques used for torrefaction of biomass. Fixed bed, bubbling sand bed and moving bed are the most common ones used. The use of microwaves for torrefaction purposes has not been explored. In the present study we looked into the torrefaction of biomass using the regular and microwaves and their effect on proximate and ultimate composition. Studies indicated that microwave torrefaction is a good way to torrefy the biomass in short periods of time. A maximum calorific value of 21 MJ/kg is achievable at 6 min residence time compared to 15 min using the dry torrefaction technique. Increasing the residence time increased the carbon content where a maximum carbon content of 52.20 % was achievable at lower residence time. The loss of volatiles is comparatively lower compared to dry torrefaction technique. Moisture content of microwave torrefied samples was in between 2-2.5 % (w.b).

  9. Comment on "A limit on the variation of the speed of light arising from quantum gravity effects" aka "Testing Einstein's special relativity with Fermi's short hard gamma-ray burst GRB090510"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin G. Zloshchastiev

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the Fermi GBM and LAT Collaborations reported their new observational data disfavoring quite a number of the quantum gravity theories, including the one suggesting the nonlinear (logarithmic) modification of a quantum wave equation. We show that the latter is still far from being ruled out: it is not only able to explain the new data but also its phenomenological implications turn out to be more vast (and more interesting) than one expected before.

  10. Limit theorems and absorption problems for one-dimensional correlated random walks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norio Konno

    2010-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There has recently been considerable interest in quantum walks in connection with quantum computing. The walk can be considered as a quantum version of the so-called correlated random walk. We clarify a strong structural similarity between both walks and study limit theorems and absorption problems for correlated random walks by our PQRS method, which was used in our analysis of quantum walks.

  11. Quantum ballistic evolution in quantum mechanics: Application to quantum computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computers are important examples of processes whose evolution can be described in terms of iterations of single-step operators or their adjoints. Based on this, Hamiltonian evolution of processes with associated step operators {ital T} is investigated here. The main limitation of this paper is to processes which evolve quantum ballistically, i.e., motion restricted to a collection of nonintersecting or distinct paths on an arbitrary basis. The main goal of this paper is proof of a theorem which gives necessary and sufficient conditions that {ital T} must satisfy so that there exists a Hamiltonian description of quantum ballistic evolution for the process, namely, that {ital T} is a partial isometry and is orthogonality preserving and stable on some basis. Simple examples of quantum ballistic evolution for quantum Turing machines with one and with more than one type of elementary step are discussed. It is seen that for nondeterministic machines the basis set can be quite complex with much entanglement present. It is also proven that, given a step operator {ital T} for an arbitrary {ital deterministic} quantum Turing machine, it is decidable if {ital T} is stable and orthogonality preserving, and if quantum ballistic evolution is possible. The proof fails if {ital T} is a step operator for a {ital nondeterministic} machine. It is an open question if such a decision procedure exists for nondeterministic machines. This problem does not occur in classical mechanics. Also the definition of quantum Turing machines used here is compared with that used by other authors. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Cover image in semiconductor quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    nuclear spins limits the attainable electron-spin-coherence time. But the nuclear-spin reservoir can take Amselem and Mohamed Bourennane N&V p711 753 antiferromagnetic criticality at a heavy-fermion quantum excitation and bidirectional quantum-dot nuclear-spin polarization C. Latta, A. Högele, Y. Zhao, A. N

  13. ight-derived energy enters the biosphere through photosyn-thesis, and ultimately sustains virtually all living organisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarhan, Fathey

    supplied through photochemistry and the energy consumed through photosynthetic CO2 assimilation under con- ditions of either high light or cold temperatures, which lead to increased PSII excitation measured as either the quantum yield of CO2 assimilation ( CO2) or the quantum yield of O2 evo- lution ( O2

  14. A quantum dot implementation of the quantum NAND algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Taylor

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a physical implementation of the quantum NAND tree evaluation algorithm. Our approach, based on continuous time quantum walks, uses the wave interference of a single electron in a heirarchical set of tunnel coupled quantum dots. We find that the query complexity of the NAND tree evaluation does not suffer strongly from disorder and dephasing, nor is it directly limited by temperature or restricted dimensionality for 2-d structures. Finally, we suggest a potential application of this algorithm to the efficient determination of high-order correlation functions of complex quantum systems.

  15. Metal Nanowires: Quantum Transport, Cohesion, and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stafford, Charles

    nature's ultimate limit of conductors down to a single atom in thickness. In the past eight years. In this article, we discuss our generalization of the free-electron model to describe nanoscale conductors [15 to surface tension [23], but we find that electron-shell effects can stabilize arbitrarily long nanowires [22

  16. Process Limits on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

  17. Dynamical Casimir Effect in Quantum Information Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuliano Benenti; Antonio D'Arrigo; Stefano Siccardi; Giuliano Strini

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate, in the regime of ultrastrong matter-field coupling, the strong connection between the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) and the performance of quantum information protocols. Our results are illustrated by means of a realistic quantum communication channel and show that the DCE is a fundamental limit for quantum computation and communication and that novel schemes are required to implement ultrafast and reliable quantum gates. Strategies to partially counteract the DCE are also discussed.

  18. Reality without Realism: On the Ontological and Epistemological Architecture of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First, the article considers the nature of quantum reality (the reality responsible for quantum phenomena) and the concept of realism (our ability to represent this reality) in quantum theory, in conjunction with the roles of locality, causality, and probability and statistics there. Second, it offers two interpretations of quantum mechanics, developed by the authors of this article, the second of which is also a different (from quantum mechanics) theory of quantum phenomena. Both of these interpretations are statistical. The first interpretation, by A. Plotnitsky, "the statistical Copenhagen interpretation," is non-realist, insofar as the description or even conception of the nature of quantum objects and processes is precluded. The second, by A. Khrennikov, is ultimately realist, because it assumes that the quantum-mechanical level of reality is underlain by a deeper level of reality, described, in a realist fashion, by a model based on the pre-quantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), the predict...

  19. Quantum Data Compression of a Qubit Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee A. Rozema; Dylan H. Mahler; Alex Hayat; Peter S. Turner; Aephraim M. Steinberg

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data compression is a ubiquitous aspect of modern information technology, and the advent of quantum information raises the question of what types of compression are feasible for quantum data, where it is especially relevant given the extreme difficulty involved in creating reliable quantum memories. We present a protocol in which an ensemble of quantum bits (qubits) can in principle be perfectly compressed into exponentially fewer qubits. We then experimentally implement our algorithm, compressing three photonic qubits into two. This protocol sheds light on the subtle differences between quantum and classical information. Furthermore, since data compression stores all of the available information about the quantum state in fewer physical qubits, it could provide a vast reduction in the amount of quantum memory required to store a quantum ensemble, making even today's limited quantum memories far more powerful than previously recognized.

  20. Quantum metrology and its application in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Taylor; Warwick P. Bowen

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum metrology provides a route to overcome practical limits in sensing devices. It holds particular relevance in biology, where sensitivity and resolution constraints restrict applications both in fundamental biophysics and in medicine. Here, we review quantum metrology from this biological context. The understanding of quantum mechanics developed over the past century has already enabled important applications in biology, including positron emission tomography (PET) with entangled photons, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using nuclear magnetic resonance, and bio-magnetic imaging with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). With the birth of quantum information science came the realization that an even greater range of applications arise from the ability to not just understand, but to engineer coherence and correlations in systems at the quantum level. In quantum metrology, quantum coherence and quantum correlations are engineered to enable new approaches to sensing. This review focusses specifically on optical quantum metrology, where states of light that exhibit non-classical photon correlations are used to overcome practical and fundamental constraints, such as the shot-noise and diffraction limits. Recent experiments have demonstrated quantum enhanced sensing of biological systems, and established the potential for quantum metrology in biophysical research. These experiments have achieved capabilities that may be of significant practical benefit, including enhanced sensitivity and resolution, immunity to imaging artifacts, and characterisation of the biological response to light at the single-photon level. New quantum measurement techniques offer even greater promise, raising the prospect for improved multi-photon microscopy and magnetic imaging, among many other possible applications.

  1. Effective equations for quantum dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Schlein

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent results concerning the derivation of effective evolution equations starting from many body quantum dynamics. In particular, we obtain rigorous derivations of nonlinear Hartree equations in the bosonic mean field limit, with precise bounds on the rate of convergence. Moreover, we present a central limit theorem for the fluctuations around the Hartree dynamics.

  2. Quantum Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Kosloff

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum thermodynamics addresses the emergence of thermodynamical laws from quantum mechanics. The link is based on the intimate connection of quantum thermodynamics with the theory of open quantum systems. Quantum mechanics inserts dynamics into thermodynamics giving a sound foundation to finite-time-thermodynamics. The emergence of the 0-law I-law II-law and III-law of thermodynamics from quantum considerations is presented. The emphasis is on consistence between the two theories which address the same subject from different foundations. We claim that inconsistency is the result of faulty analysis pointing to flaws in approximations.

  3. Photon and graviton mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

  4. Quantum optical technologies for metrology, sensing and imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan P. Dowling; Kaushik P. Seshadreesan

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 20 years, bright sources of entangled photons have led to a renaissance in quantum optical interferometry. Optical interferometry has been used to test the foundations of quantum mechanics and implement some of the novel ideas associated with quantum entanglement such as quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography, quantum lithography, quantum computing logic gates, and quantum metrology. In this paper, we focus on the new ways that have been developed to exploit quantum optical entanglement in quantum metrology to beat the shot-noise limit, which can be used, e.g., in fiber optical gyroscopes and in sensors for biological or chemical targets. We also discuss how this entanglement can be used to beat the Rayleigh diffraction limit in imaging systems such as in LIDAR and optical lithography.

  5. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  6. Quantum correlations; quantum probability approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Majewski

    2015-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This survey gives a comprehensive account of quantum correlations understood as a phenomenon stemming from the rules of quantization. Centered on quantum probability it describes the physical concepts related to correlations (both classical and quantum), mathematical structures, and their consequences. These include the canonical form of classical correlation functionals, general definitions of separable (entangled) states, definition and analysis of quantumness of correlations, description of entanglement of formation, and PPT states. This work is intended both for physicists interested not only in collection of results but also in the mathematical methods justifying them, and mathematicians looking for an application of quantum probability to concrete new problems of quantum theory.

  7. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  8. Continuous-time quantum walks on star graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salimi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 66177-15175, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shsalimi@uok.ac.ir

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs. It is shown that quantum central limit theorem for a continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs for N-fold star power graph, which are invariant under the quantum component of adjacency matrix, converges to continuous-time quantum walk on K{sub 2} graphs (complete graph with two vertices) and the probability of observing walk tends to the uniform distribution.

  9. Zeno Dynamics for Open Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Gough

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we formulate limit Zeno dynamics of general open systems as the adiabatic elimination of fast components. We are able to exploit previous work on adiabatic elimination of quantum stochastic models to give explicitly the conditions under which open Zeno dynamics will exist. The open systems formulation is further developed as a framework for Zeno master equations, and Zeno filtering (that is, quantum trajectories based on a limit Zeno dynamical model). We discuss several models from the point of view of quantum control. For the case of linear quantum stochastic systems we present a condition for stability of the asymptotic Zeno dynamics.

  10. Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics from Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei-Ming Ho; Hsien-Chung Kao

    2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive noncommutative multi-particle quantum mechanics from noncommutative quantum field theory in the nonrelativistic limit. Paricles of opposite charges are found to have opposite noncommutativity. As a result, there is no noncommutative correction to the hydrogen atom spectrum at the tree level. We also comment on the obstacles to take noncommutative phenomenology seriously, and propose a way to construct noncommutative SU(5) grand unified theory.

  11. Weak Measurement and Feedback in Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. W. Murch; R. Vijay; I. Siddiqi

    2015-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of weak quantum measurements in superconducting qubits, focusing specifically on transmon type devices in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. To access this regime, the readout cavity is probed with on average a single microwave photon. Such low-level signals are detected using near quantum-noise-limited superconducting parametric amplifiers. Weak measurements yield partial information about the quantum state, and correspondingly do not completely project the qubit into an eigenstate. As such, we use the measurement record to either sequentially reconstruct the quantum state at a given time, yielding a quantum trajectory, or to close a direct quantum feedback loop, stabilizing Rabi oscillations indefinitely.

  12. Joint system quantum descriptions arising from local quantumness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Cooney; Marius Junge; Miguel Navascues; David Perez-Garcia; Ignacio Villanueva

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipartite correlations generated by non-signalling physical systems that admit a finite-dimensional local quantum description cannot exceed the quantum limits, i.e., they can always be interpreted as distant measurements of a bipartite quantum state. Here we consider the effect of dropping the assumption of finite dimensionality. Remarkably, we find that the same result holds provided that we relax the tensor structure of space-like separated measurements to mere commutativity. We argue why an extension of this result to tensor representations seems unlikely.

  13. Quantum information science and complex quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Nielsen

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What makes quantum information science a science? This paper explores the idea that quantum information science may offer a powerful approach to the study of complex quantum systems.

  14. Natural Inflation and Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton de la Fuente; Prashant Saraswat; Raman Sundrum

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic Inflation provides an attractive framework for understanding the early universe and the cosmic microwave background. It can readily involve energies close to the scale at which Quantum Gravity effects become important. General considerations of black hole quantum mechanics suggest nontrivial constraints on any effective field theory model of inflation that emerges as a low-energy limit of quantum gravity, in particular the constraint of the Weak Gravity Conjecture. We show that higher-dimensional gauge and gravitational dynamics can elegantly satisfy these constraints and lead to a viable, theoretically-controlled and predictive class of Natural Inflation models.

  15. Quantum random walks without walking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manouchehri, K.; Wang, J. B. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum random walks have received much interest due to their nonintuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to a new generation of quantum algorithms. What remains a major challenge is a physical realization that is experimentally viable and not limited to special connectivity criteria. We present a scheme for walking on arbitrarily complex graphs, which can be realized using a variety of quantum systems such as a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside an optical lattice. This scheme is particularly elegant since the walker is not required to physically step between the nodes; only flipping coins is sufficient.

  16. How energy conservation limits our measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Navascues; Sandu Popescu

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in Quantum Mechanics are subject to complex restrictions arising from the principle of energy conservation. Determining such restrictions, however, has been so far an elusive task, and only partial results are known. In this paper we discuss how constraints on the energy spectrum of a measurement device translate into limitations on the measurements which we can effect on a target system with non-trivial energy operator. We provide efficient algorithms to characterize such limitations and we quantify them exactly when the target is a two-level quantum system. Our work thus identifies the boundaries between what is possible or impossible to measure, i.e., between what we can see or not, when energy conservation is at stake.

  17. Quantum Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shabbir A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum plasma physics is a rapidly evolving research field with a very inter-disciplinary scope of potential applications, ranging from nano-scale science in condensed matter to the vast scales of astrophysical objects. The theoretical description of quantum plasmas relies on various approaches, microscopic or macroscopic, some of which have obvious relation to classical plasma models. The appropriate model should, in principle, incorporate the quantum mechanical effects such as diffraction, spin statistics and correlations, operative on the relevant scales. However, first-principle approaches such as quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory or quantum-statistical methods such as quantum kinetic theory or non-equilibrium Green's functions require substantial theoretical and computational efforts. Therefore, for selected problems, alternative simpler methods have been put forward. In particular, the collective behavior of many-body systems is usually described within a self-consistent scheme of parti...

  18. Quantum friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tsekov

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brownian motion of a light quantum particle in a heavy classical gas is theoretically described and a new expression for the friction coefficient is obtained for arbitrary temperature. At zero temperature it equals to the de Broglie momentum of the mean free path divided by the mean free path. Alternatively, the corresponding mobility of the quantum particle in the classical gas is equal to the square of the mean free path divided by the Planck constant. The Brownian motion of a quantum particle in a quantum environment is also discussed.

  19. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adami; G. Ver Steeg

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole's absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal "quantum cloning machines" and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as $\\omega/T\\geq10$, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  20. Gaussian quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weedbrook, Christian

    The science of quantum information has arisen over the last two decades centered on the manipulation of individual quanta of information, known as quantum bits or qubits. Quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum ...

  1. Quantum Gravity and Precision Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. P. Burgess

    2006-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article provides a cartoon of the quantization of General Relativity using the ideas of effective field theory. These ideas underpin the use of General Relativity as a theory from which precise predictions are possible, since they show why quantum corrections to standard classical calculations are small. Quantum corrections can be computed controllably provided they are made for the weakly-curved geometries associated with precision tests of General Relativity, such as within the solar system or for binary pulsars. They also bring gravity back into the mainstream of physics, by showing that its quantization (at low energies) exactly parallels the quantization of other, better understood, non-renormalizable field theories which arise elsewhere in physics. Of course effective field theory techniques do not solve the fundamental problems of quantum gravity discussed elsewhere in these pages, but they do helpfully show that these problems are specific to applications on very small distance scales. They also show why we may safely reject any proposals to modify gravity at long distances if these involve low-energy problems (like ghosts or instabilities), since such problems are unlikely to be removed by the details of the ultimate understanding of gravity at microscopic scales.

  2. Robustness of topological order and formation of quantum well states in topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Robustness of topological order and formation of quantum well states in topological insulators (like transport measurements) and ultimate application of the topological insulators usually in- volve-resolved photoemission measurements to directly probe the surface state of the prototypical topological insulators, Bi2Se

  3. Fundamental Limits for Light Absorption and Scattering Induced by Cooperative Electromagnetic Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption and scattering of electromagnetic waves by dielectric media are of fundamental importance in many branches of physics. In this Letter we analytically derived the ultimate upper limits for the absorbed and scattered powers by any system of optical resonators in mutual interaction. We show that these bounds depend only on the geometric configuration given an incident field. We give the conditions to fullfill to reach these limits paving so a way for a rational design of optimal metamaterials.

  4. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dahlem Conference on controlling CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere focused on research needs broadly defined. The RD D needs discussed tended to be social-institutional rather than technically oriented perhaps because of the propensity of most attendees, but many important ideas emerged, including those related to questions on technology adoption by both developed, emerging, or transition economics. The European attendees appeared to be strongly devoted to reducing emissions, and doing it soon using efficiency improvement and ultimately renewables. The importance of efficiency improvement was universally accepted, but the extent to which it can be relied upon is a major uncertainty for everyone except the most zealous. There was no detailed discussion of what could be done to encourage the more rapid adoption of renewables. Most attendees seemed to have discounted nuclear, but, at any rate, the problems of reviving nuclear worldwide were not discussed in detail.

  5. Theoretical analysis of perfect quantum state transfer with superconducting qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick W. Strauch; Carl J. Williams

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting quantum circuits, fabricated with multiple layers, are proposed to implement perfect quantum state transfer between nodes of a hypercube network. For tunable devices such as the phase qubit, each node can transmit quantum information to any other node at a constant rate independent of the distance between qubits. The physical limits of quantum state transfer in this network are theoretically analyzed, including the effects of disorder, decoherence, and higher-order couplings.

  6. Quantum Fourier transform and tomographic Renyi entropic inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Man'ko; V. I. Man'ko

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Renyi entropy associated with spin tomograms of quantum states is shown to obey to new inequalities containing the dependence on quantum Fourier transform. The limiting inequality for the von Neumann entropy of spin quantum states and a new kind of entropy associated with quantum Fourier transform are obtained. Possible connections with subadditivity and strong subadditivity conditions for tomographic entropies and von Neumann entropies are discussed.

  7. A Process Model of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Sulis

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model of quantum mechanics utilizes a combinatorial game to generate a discrete and finite causal space upon which can be defined a self-consistent quantum mechanics. An emergent space-time M and continuous wave function arise through a non-uniform interpolation process. Standard non-relativistic quantum mechanics emerges under the limit of infinite information (the causal space grows to infinity) and infinitesimal scale (the separation between points goes to zero). The model has the potential to address several paradoxes in quantum mechanics while remaining computationally powerful.

  8. Engineering the Quantum Foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 Alcubierre, within the General Relativity model for space-time, proposed a scenario for `warp drive' faster than light travel, in which objects would achieve such speeds by actually being stationary within a bubble of space which itself was moving through space, the idea being that the speed of the bubble was not itself limited by the speed of light. However that scenario required exotic matter to stabilise the boundary of the bubble. Here that proposal is re-examined within the context of the new modelling of space in which space is a quantum system, viz a quantum foam, with on-going classicalisation. This model has lead to the resolution of a number of longstanding problems, including a dynamical explanation for the so-called `dark matter' effect. It has also given the first evidence of quantum gravity effects, as experimental data has shown that a new dimensionless constant characterising the self-interaction of space is the fine structure constant. The studies here begin the task of examining to what extent the new spatial self-interaction dynamics can play a role in stabilising the boundary without exotic matter, and whether the boundary stabilisation dynamics can be engineered; this would amount to quantum gravity engineering.

  9. Apply early! Limited enrollment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

  10. Spin networks in quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Lorente

    2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review paper about one of the approaches to unify Quantum Mechanics and the theory of General Relativity. Starting from the pioneer work of Regge and Penrose other scientists have constructed state sum models, as Feymann path integrals, that are topological invariant on the triangulated Riemannian surfaces, and that in the continuous limit become the Hilbert-Einstein action.

  11. Liouville quantum gravity and KPZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duplantier, Bertrand

    Consider a bounded planar domain D, an instance h of the Gaussian free field on D, with Dirichlet energy ... and a constant 0[less than or equal to]?<2. The Liouville quantum gravity measure on D is the weak limit as ...

  12. Waste Not, Want Not: Heisenberg-Limited Metrology With Information Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Simon A; Lang, Matthias D; Caves, Carlton M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of interferometers when the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. In this paper we demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  13. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albash, Tameem

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary canc...

  14. Entropy of quantum channel in the theory of quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Roga

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum channels, also called quantum operations, are linear, trace preserving and completely positive transformations in the space of quantum states. Such operations describe discrete time evolution of an open quantum system interacting with an environment. The thesis contains an analysis of properties of quantum channels and different entropies used to quantify the decoherence introduced into the system by a given operation. Part I of the thesis provides a general introduction to the subject. In Part II, the action of a quantum channel is treated as a process of preparation of a quantum ensemble. The Holevo information associated with this ensemble is shown to be bounded by the entropy exchanged during the preparation process between the initial state and the environment. A relation between the Holevo information and the entropy of an auxiliary matrix consisting of square root fidelities between the elements of the ensemble is proved in some special cases. Weaker bounds on the Holevo information are also established. The entropy of a channel, also called the map entropy, is defined as the entropy of the state corresponding to the channel by the Jamiolkowski isomorphism. In Part III of the thesis, the additivity of the entropy of a channel is proved. The minimal output entropy, which is difficult to compute, is estimated by an entropy of a channel which is much easier to obtain. A class of quantum channels is specified, for which additivity of channel capacity is conjectured. The last part of the thesis contains characterization of Davies channels, which correspond to an interaction of a state with a thermal reservoir in the week coupling limit, under the condition of quantum detailed balance and independence of rotational and dissipative evolutions. The Davies channels are characterized for one-qubit and one-qutrit systems.

  15. The Quantum Absorption Refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amikam Levy; Ronnie Kosloff

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified, the cooling power J_c vanishes as J_c proportional to T_c^{alpha}, when T_c approach 0, where alpha =d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  16. Quantum Non-Demolition Detection of Polar Molecule Complexes: Dimers, Trimers, Tetramers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekhov, Igor B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical nondestructive method for in situ detection of the bound states of ultracold polar molecules is developed. It promises a minimally destructive measurement scheme up to a physically exciting quantum non-demolition (QND) level. The detection of molecular complexes beyond simple pairs of quantum particles (dimers, known, e.g., from the BEC-BCS theory) is suggested, including three-body (trimers) and four-body (tertramers) complexes trapped by one-dimensional tubes. The intensity of scattered light is sensitive to the molecule number fluctuations beyond the mean-density approximation. Such fluctuations are very different for various complexes, which leads to radically different light scattering. This type of research extends "quantum optics of quantum gases" to the field of ultracold molecules. Merging the quantum optical and ultracold gas problems will advance the experimental efforts towards the study of the light-matter interaction at its ultimate quantum level, where the quantizations of both ligh...

  17. Conditional quantum distinguishability and pure quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian-Hai Zeng

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I design a simple way of distinguishing non-orthogonal quantum states with perfect reliability using only quantum control-not gates in one condition. In this way, we can implement pure quantum communication in directly sending classical information, Ekert quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation without the help of classical communications channel.

  18. Computation on Spin Chains with Limited Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Alastair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how to implement quantum computation on a system with an intrinsic Hamiltonian by controlling a limited subset of spins. Our primary result is an efficient control sequence on a chain of hopping, non-interacting, fermions through control of a single site and its interaction with its neighbor. This is applicable to a wide class of spin chains through the Jordan-Wigner transformation. We also discuss how an array of sites can be controlled to give sufficient parallelism for the implementation of fault-tolerant circuits. The framework provides a vehicle to expose the contradictions between the control theoretic concept of controllability with the ability of a system to perform quantum computation.

  19. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  20. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Optics Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Quantum Optics Quantum OpticsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-30T16:37:03+00:00 Quantum Optics with a Single...

  1. Synchronization of Limit Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changpin Li; Weihua Deng

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we derive a sufficient condition of synchronizing limit sets (attractors and repellers) by using the linear feedback control technique proposed here. There examples are included. The numerical simulations and computer graphics show that our method work well.

  2. Towards Quantum Cybernetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Girolami; Rebecca Schmidt; Gerardo Adesso

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical cybernetics is a successful meta-theory to model the regulation of complex systems from an abstract information-theoretic viewpoint, regardless of the properties of the system under scrutiny. Fundamental limits to the controllability of an open system can be formalized in terms of the law of requisite variety, which is derived from the second law of thermodynamics. These concepts are briefly reviewed, and the chances, challenges and potential gains arising from the generalisation of such a framework to the quantum domain are discussed.

  3. Ultimate braid-group generators for coordinate exchanges of Ising anyons from the multi-anyon Pfaffian wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachezar S. Georgiev

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a rigorous and self-consistent derivation of the elementary braid matrices representing the exchanges of adjacent Ising anyons in the two inequivalent representations of the Pfaffian quantum Hall states with even and odd number of Majorana fermions. To this end we use the distinct operator product expansions of the chiral spin fields in the Neveu-Schwarz and Ramond sectors of the two-dimensional Ising conformal field theory. We find recursive relations for the generators of the irreducible representations of the braid group B_{2n+2} in terms of those for B_{2n}, as well as explicit formulas for almost all braid matrices for exchanges of Ising anyons. Finally we prove that the braid-group representations obtained from the multi-anyon Pfaffian wave functions are completely equivalent to the spinor representations of SO(2n+2) and give the equivalence matrices explicitly. This actually proves that the correlation functions of 2n chiral Ising spin fields sigma do indeed realize one of the two inequivalent spinor representations of the rotation group SO(2n) as conjectured by Nayak and Wilczek.

  4. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  5. Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to 'get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall GMTI radar system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the 'seek time'.

  6. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anlage, Steven [University of Maryland

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  7. A Review of Procedure to Evolve Quantum Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Gepp; Phil Stocks

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist quantum algorithms that are more efficient than their classical counterparts; such algorithms were invented by Shor in 1994 and then Grover in 1996. A lack of invention since Grover's algorithm has been commonly attributed to the non-intuitive nature of quantum algorithms to the classically trained person. Thus, the idea of using computers to automatically generate quantum algorithms based on an evolutionary model emerged. A limitation of this approach is that quantum computers do not yet exist and quantum simulation on a classical machine has an exponential order overhead. Nevertheless, early research into evolving quantum algorithms has shown promise. This paper provides an introduction into quantum and evolutionary algorithms for the computer scientist not familiar with these fields. The exciting field of using evolutionary algorithms to evolve quantum algorithms is then reviewed.

  8. Surface code quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin G. Fowler; David S. Wang; Charles D. Hill; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Rodney Van Meter; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum communication typically involves a linear chain of repeater stations, each capable of reliable local quantum computation and connected to their nearest neighbors by unreliable communication links. The communication rate in existing protocols is low as two-way classical communication is used. We show that, if Bell pairs are generated between neighboring stations with a probability of heralded success greater than 0.65 and fidelity greater than 0.96, two-way classical communication can be entirely avoided and quantum information can be sent over arbitrary distances with arbitrarily low error at a rate limited only by the local gate speed. The number of qubits per repeater scales logarithmically with the communication distance. If the probability of heralded success is less than 0.65 and Bell pairs between neighboring stations with fidelity no less than 0.92 are generated only every T_B seconds, the logarithmic resource scaling remains and the communication rate through N links is proportional to 1/(T_B log^2 N).

  9. Quantum Refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ben-Or; Daniel Gottesman; Avinatan Hassidim

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider fault-tolerant quantum computation in the context where there are no fresh ancilla qubits available during the computation, and where the noise is due to a general quantum channel. We show that there are three classes of noisy channels: In the first, typified by the depolarizing channel, computation is only possible for a logarithmic time. In the second class, of which the dephasing channel is an example, computation is possible for polynomial time. The amplitude damping channel is an example of the third class, and for this class of channels, it is possible to compute for an exponential time in the number of qubits available.

  10. Quantum Cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Zizzi; Eliano Pessa; Fabio Cardone

    2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the theoretical setting of a superfluid like 3He in a rotating container, which is set between the two layers of a type-II superconductor. We describe the superfluid vortices as a 2-dimensional Ising-like model on a triangular lattice in presence of local magnetic fields. The interaction term of the superfluid vortices with the Abrikosov vortices of the superconductor appears then as a symmetry breaking term in the free energy. Such a term gives a higher probability of quantum tunnelling across the potential barrier for bubbles nucleation, thus favouring quantum cavitation.

  11. Matrix Models, Large N Limits and Noncommutative Solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Szabo

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of the interrelationships between matrix models and field theories on the noncommutative torus is presented. The discretization of noncommutative gauge theory by twisted reduced models is described along with a rigorous definition of the large N continuum limit. The regularization of arbitrary noncommutative field theories by means of matrix quantum mechanics and its connection to noncommutative solitons is also discussed.

  12. AN EXPERIMENT ON THE LIMITS OF QUANTUM ELECTRODYNAMICS HEPL-170

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral20ALSNewstt^ \ # AN EXPERIMENT ON THE

  13. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateQuantum Optics Quantum Optics videobanner Quantum Optics with a Single Semiconductor Quantum Dot Speaker: Weng Chow, EFRC Scientist Date: September 14, 2011 Event:...

  15. Quantum computing in a piece of glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner A. Miller; Grigoriy Kreymerman; Christopher Tison; Paul M. Alsing; Jonathan R. McDonald

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum gates and simple quantum algorithms can be designed utilizing the diffraction phenomena of a photon within a multiplexed holographic element. The quantum eigenstates we use are the photon's linear momentum (LM) as measured by the number of waves of tilt across the aperture. Two properties of quantum computing within the circuit model make this approach attractive. First, any conditional measurement can be commuted in time with any unitary quantum gate - the timeless nature of quantum computing. Second, photon entanglement can be encoded as a superposition state of a single photon in a higher-dimensional state space afforded by LM. Our theoretical and numerical results indicate that OptiGrate's photo-thermal refractive (PTR) glass is an enabling technology. We will review our previous design of a quantum projection operator and give credence to this approach on a representative quantum gate grounded on coupled-mode theory and numerical simulations, all with parameters consistent with PTR glass. We discuss the strengths (high efficiencies, robustness to environment) and limitations (scalability, crosstalk) of this technology. While not scalable, the utility and robustness of such optical elements for broader quantum information processing applications can be substantial.

  16. Modeling of the quantum dot filling and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameen, Tarek A.; El-Batawy, Yasser M.; Abouelsaood, A. A. [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized drift-diffusion model for the calculation of both the quantum dot filling profile and the dark current of quantum dot infrared photodetectors is proposed. The confined electrons inside the quantum dots produce a space-charge potential barrier between the two contacts, which controls the quantum dot filling and limits the dark current in the device. The results of the model reasonably agree with a published experimental work. It is found that increasing either the doping level or the temperature results in an exponential increase of the dark current. The quantum dot filling turns out to be nonuniform, with a dot near the contacts containing more electrons than one in the middle of the device where the dot occupation approximately equals the number of doping atoms per dot, which means that quantum dots away from contacts will be nearly unoccupied if the active region is undoped.

  17. Quantum Holonomies for Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiannis Pachos; Paolo Zanardi

    2001-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Holonomic Quantum Computation (HQC) is an all-geometrical approach to quantum information processing. In the HQC strategy information is encoded in degenerate eigen-spaces of a parametric family of Hamiltonians. The computational network of unitary quantum gates is realized by driving adiabatically the Hamiltonian parameters along loops in a control manifold. By properly designing such loops the non-trivial curvature of the underlying bundle geometry gives rise to unitary transformations i.e., holonomies that implement the desired unitary transformations. Conditions necessary for universal QC are stated in terms of the curvature associated to the non-abelian gauge potential (connection) over the control manifold. In view of their geometrical nature the holonomic gates are robust against several kind of perturbations and imperfections. This fact along with the adiabatic fashion in which gates are performed makes in principle HQC an appealing way towards universal fault-tolerant QC.

  18. Quantum Holonomies for Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachos, J; Pachos, Jiannis; Zanardi, Paolo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holonomic Quantum Computation (HQC) is an all-geometrical approach to quantum information processing. In the HQC strategy information is encoded in degenerate eigen-spaces of a parametric family of Hamiltonians. The computational network of unitary quantum gates is realized by driving adiabatically the Hamiltonian parameters along loops in a control manifold. By properly designing such loops the non-trivial curvature of the underlying bundle geometry gives rise to unitary transformations i.e., holonomies that implement the desired unitary transformations. Conditions necessary for universal QC are stated in terms of the curvature associated to the non-abelian gauge potential (connection) over the control manifold. In view of their geometrical nature the holonomic gates are robust against several kind of perturbations and imperfections. This fact along with the adiabatic fashion in which gates are performed makes in principle HQC an appealing way towards universal fault-tolerant QC.

  19. The Möbius Symmetry of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon E. Faraggi; Marco Matone

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The equivalence postulate approach to quantum mechanics aims to formulate quantum mechanics from a fundamental geometrical principle. Underlying the formulation there exists a basic cocycle condition which is invariant under $D$--dimensional M\\"obius transformations with respect to the Euclidean or Minkowski metrics. The invariance under global M\\"obius transformations implies that spatial space is compact. Furthermore, it implies energy quantisation and undefinability of quantum trajectories without assuming any prior interpretation of the wave function. The approach may be viewed as conventional quantum mechanics with the caveat that spatial space is compact, as dictated by the M\\"obius symmetry, with the classical limit corresponding to the decompactification limit. Correspondingly, there exists a finite length scale in the formalism and consequently an intrinsic regularisation scheme. Evidence for the compactness of space may exist in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  20. Quantum++ - A C++11 quantum computing library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad Gheorghiu

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum++ is a general-purpose multi-threaded quantum computing library written in C++11 and composed solely of header files. The library is not restricted to qubit systems or specific quantum information processing tasks, being capable of simulating arbitrary quantum processes. The main design factors taken in consideration were ease of use, portability, and performance.

  1. Quantum arithmetic with the Quantum Fourier Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia Ruiz-Perez; Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantum Fourier Transform offers an interesting way to perform arithmetic operations on a quantum computer. We review existing Quantum Fourier Transform adders and multipliers and propose some modifications that extend their capabilities. Among the new circuits, we propose a quantum method to compute the weighted average of a series of inputs in the transform domain.

  2. Quantum superconducting criticality in graphene and topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitan Roy; Vladimir Juricic; Igor F. Herbut

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The field theory of the semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition for graphene and surface states of topological insulators is presented. The Lagrangian possesses the global U(1) symmetry, with the self-interacting complex bosonic order-parameter and the massless Dirac fermions coupled through a Yukawa term. The same theory also governs the quantum critical behavior of graphene near the transition towards the bond-density-wave (Kekule) insulator. The local U(1) gauged version of the theory which describes the quantum semimetal-superconductor transition in the ultimate critical regime is also considered. Due to the Yukawa coupling the transitions are found to be always continuous, both with and without the fluctuating gauge field. The critical behavior is addressed within the dimensional regularization near four space-time dimensions, and the calculation of various universal quantities, including critical exponents and the universal mass-ratio, is reported.

  3. Practical issues in quantum-key-distribution postprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, C.-H. Fred; Chau, H. F. [Department of Physics and Center of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ma Xiongfeng [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a secure key generation method between two distant parties by wisely exploiting properties of quantum mechanics. In QKD, experimental measurement outcomes on quantum states are transformed by the two parties to a secret key. This transformation is composed of many logical steps (as guided by security proofs), which together will ultimately determine the length of the final secret key and its security. We detail the procedure for performing such classical postprocessing taking into account practical concerns (including the finite-size effect and authentication and encryption for classical communications). This procedure is directly applicable to realistic QKD experiments and thus serves as a recipe that specifies what postprocessing operations are needed and what the security level is for certain lengths of the keys. Our result is applicable to the BB84 protocol with a single or entangled photon source.

  4. Quantum dice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano, E-mail: autoricerca@gmail.com

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.

  5. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  6. Decoherence in a dynamical quantum phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah Mostame; Gernot Schaller; Ralf Schützhold

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the similarity between adiabatic quantum algorithms and quantum phase transitions, we study the impact of decoherence on the sweep through a second-order quantum phase transition for the prototypical example of the Ising chain in a transverse field and compare it to the adiabatic version of Grovers search algorithm, which displays a first order quantum phase transition. For site-independent and site-dependent coupling strengths as well as different operator couplings, the results show that (in contrast to first-order transitions) the impact of decoherence caused by a weak coupling to a rather general environment increases with system size (i.e., number of spins/qubits). This might limit the scalability of the corresponding adiabatic quantum algorithm.

  7. Time-optimal navigation through quantum wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorje C. Brody; Gary W. Gibbons; David M. Meier

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum navigation problem of finding the time-optimal control Hamiltonian that transports a given initial state to a target state through quantum wind, that is, under the influence of external fields or potentials, is analysed. By lifting the problem from the state space to the space of unitary gates realising the required task, we are able to deduce the form of the solution to the problem by deriving a universal quantum speed limit. The expression thus obtained indicates that further simplifications of this apparently difficult problem are possible if we switch to the interaction picture of quantum mechanics. A complete solution to the navigation problem for an arbitrary quantum system is then obtained, and the behaviour of the solution is illustrated in the case of a two-level system.

  8. Dynamics of Quantum Dot Photonic Crystal Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Ellis; Ilya Fushman; Dirk Englund; Bingyang Zhang; Yoshihisa Yamamoto; Jelena Vuckovic

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum dot photonic crystal membrane lasers were fabricated and the large signal modulation characteristics were studied. We find that the modulation characteristics of quantum dot lasers can be significantly improved using cavities with large spontaneous emission coupling factor. Our experiments show, and simulations confirm, that the modulation rate is limited by the rate of carrier capture into the dots to around 30GHz in our present system.

  9. 1552 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 9, NO. 6, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2003 Toward a Scalable, Silicon-Based Quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubiatowicz, John D.

    for constructing scalable communication and computation. Finally, we explore an actual layout scheme for recursive error correction, and demonstrate the exponential growth in communication costs with levels of recursion, and that teleportation limits those costs. Index Terms--Quantum architecture, quantum computers, sil- icon-based quantum

  10. How detrimental is decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tameem Albash; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time-scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit $T_2$ time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary cancellation methods, designed to improve the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computing in the closed system setting, remain beneficial in the open system setting. To address the high computational cost of master equation simulations, we also demonstrate that a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that explicitly accounts for a thermal bosonic bath can be used to interpolate between classical and quantum annealing. Our study highlights and clarifies the significantly different role played by decoherence in the adiabatic and circuit models of quantum computing.

  11. Quantum Heat Engines Using Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Quan; Y. D. Wang; Yu-xi Liu; C. P. Sun; Franco Nori

    2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quantum analog of the internal combustion engine used in most cars. Specifically, we study how to implement the Otto-type quantum heat engine (QHE) with the assistance of a Maxwell's demon. Three steps are required: thermalization, quantum measurement, and quantum feedback controlled by the Maxwell demon. We derive the positive-work condition of this composite QHE. Our QHE can be constructed using superconducting quantum circuits. We explicitly demonstrate the essential role of the demon in this macroscopic QHE.

  12. Quantum mechanical approaches to in silico enzyme characterization and drug design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilmeier, J P; Fattebert, J L; Jacobson, M P; Kalyanaraman, C

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The astonishing, exponentially increasing rates of genome sequencing has led to one of the most significant challenges for the biological and computational sciences in the 21st century: assigning the likely functions of the encoded proteins. Enzymes represent a particular challenge, and a critical one, because the universe of enzymes is likely to contain many novel functions that may be useful for synthetic biology, or as drug targets. Current approaches to protein annotation are largely based on bioinformatics. At the simplest level, this annotation involves transferring the annotations of characterized enzymes to related sequences. In practice, however, there is no simple, sequence based criterion for transferring annotations, and bioinformatics alone cannot propose new enzymatic functions. Structure-based computational methods have the potential to address these limitations, by identifying potential substrates of enzymes, as we and others have shown. One successful approach has used in silico 'docking' methods, more commonly applied in structure-based drug design, to identify possible metabolite substrates. A major limitation of this approach is that it only considers substrate binding, and does not directly assess the potential of the enzyme to catalyze a particular reaction using a particular substrate. That is, substrate binding affinity is necessary but not sufficient to assign function. A reaction profile is ultimately what is needed for a more complete quantitative description of function. To address this rather fundamental limitation, they propose to use quantum mechanical methods to explicitly compute transition state barriers that govern the rates of catalysis. Although quantum mechanical, and mixed quantum/classical (QM/MM), methods have been used extensively to investigate enzymatic reactions, the focus has been primarily on elucidating complex reaction mechanisms. Here, the key catalytic steps are known, and they use these methods quantify substrate specificity. That is, we bring the power of quantum mechanics to bear on the problem of annotating enzyme function, which is a novel approach. Although it has been clear to us at the Jacobson group for some time that enzyme specificity may be encoded in transition states, rather than simply substrate recognition, the main limitation has always been computational expense. Using a hierarchy of different methods, they can reduce the list of plausible substrates of an enzyme to a small number in most cases, but even identifying the transition states for a dozen plausible substrates requires significant computational effort, beyond what is practical using standard QM/MM methods. For this project, they have chosen two enzyme superfamilies which they have used as 'model systems' for functional assignment. The enolase superfamily is a large group of {alpha}-{beta} barrel enzymes with highly diverse substrates and chemical transformations. Despite decades of work, over a third of the superfamily remains unassigned, which means that the remaining cases are by definition difficult to assign. They have focused on acid sugar dehydratases, and have considerable expertise on the matter. They are also interested in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily, which is of central interest to the synthetic biology community, because these enzymes are used by nature to create complex rare natural products of medicinal value. the most notable example of this is the artemisinin, an antimalarial compound that is found in trace amounts in the wormwod root. From the standpoint of enzyme function assignment, these enzymes are intriguing because they use a small number of chemically simple substrates to generate, potentially, tens of thousands of different products. Hence, substrate binding specificity is only a small part of the challenge; the key is determining how the enzyme directs the carbocation chemistry to specific products. These more complex modeling approaches clearly require quantum mechanical methods.

  13. Quantum thermal machines with single nonequilibrium environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme for a quantum thermal machine made by atoms interacting with a single non-equilibrium electromagnetic field. The field is produced by a simple configuration of macroscopic objects held at thermal equilibrium at different temperatures. We show that these machines can deliver all thermodynamic tasks (cooling, heating and population inversion), and this by establishing quantum coherence with the body on which they act. Remarkably, this system allows to reach efficiencies at maximum power very close to the Carnot limit, much more than in existing models. Our findings offer a new paradigm for efficient quantum energy flux management, and can be relevant for both experimental and technological purposes.

  14. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng, E-mail: lusongfeng@hotmail.com; Liu, Fang [School of Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  15. Quantum Gravity: Motivations and Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiner Hedrich

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The mutual conceptual incompatibility between GR and QM/QFT is generally seen as the most essential motivation for the development of a theory of Quantum Gravity (QG). It leads to the insight that, if gravity is a fundamental interaction and QM is universally valid, the gravitational field will have to be quantized, not at least because of the inconsistency of semi-classical theories of gravity. If this means to quantize GR, its identification of the gravitational field with the spacetime metric has to be taken into account. And the resulting quantum theory has to be background-independent. This can not be achieved by means of quantum field theoretical procedures. More sophisticated strategies have to be applied. One of the basic requirements for such a quantization strategy is that the resulting quantum theory has GR as a classical limit. - However, should gravity not be a fundamental, but an residual, emergent interaction, it could very well be an intrinsically classical phenomenon. Should QM be nonetheless universally valid, we had to assume a quantum substrate from which gravity would result as an emergent classical phenomenon. And there would be no conflict with the arguments against semi-classical theories, because there would be no gravity at all on the substrate level. The gravitational field would not have any quantum properties, and a quantization of GR would not lead to any fundamental theory. The objective of a theory of 'QG' would instead be the identification of the quantum substrate from which gravity results. - The paper tries to give an overview over the main options for theory construction in the field of QG. Because of the still unclear status of gravity and spacetime, it pleads for the necessity of a plurality of conceptually different approaches to QG.

  16. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janet Anders; Vittorio Giovannetti

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  17. Quantum Information Science | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Quantum Communication and Security Quantum-Enhanced Sensing Quantum...

  18. Quantum nonlocality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that the validity of the predictions of quantum theory in certain spin-correlation experiments entails a violation of Einstein's locality idea that no causal influence can act outside the forward light cone. First, two preliminary arguments suggesting such a violation are reviewed. They both depend, in intermediate stages, on the idea that the results of certain unperformed experiments are physically determinate. The second argument is entangled also with the problem of the meaning of physical reality. A new argument having neither of these characteristics is constructed. It is based strictly on the orthodox ideas of Bohr and Heisenberg, and has no realistic elements, or other ingredients, that are alien to orthodox quantum thinking.

  19. Extractable work from ensembles of quantum batteries. Entanglement helps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Alicki; Mark Fannes

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the recent interest in thermodynamics of micro- and mesoscopic quantum systems we study the maximal amount of work that can be reversibly extracted from a quantum system used to store temporarily energy. Guided by the notion of passivity of a quantum state we show that entangling unitary controls extract in general more work than independent ones. In the limit of large number of copies one can reach the thermodynamical bound given by the variational principle for free energy.

  20. An additive Hamiltonian plus Landauer's Principle yields quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that no-signalling, a quantum of action, unitarity, detailed balance, Bell's theorem, the Hilbert-space representation of physical states and the Born rule all follow from the assumption of an additive Hamiltonian together with Landauer's principle. Common statements of the "classical limit" of quantum theory, as well as common assumptions made by "interpretations" of quantum theory, contradict additivity, Landauer's principle, or both.

  1. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  2. Optimal Performance of a Reciprocating Demagnetization Quantum Refrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosloff, Ronnie

    Optimal Performance of a Reciprocating Demagnetization Quantum Refrigerators Ronnie Kosloff A reciprocating quantum refrigerator is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling. The refrigerator is based on an Otto cycle where the working medium is an interacting spin system with an energy

  3. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  4. Thermo-quantum diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roumen Tsekov

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to thermo-quantum diffusion is proposed and a nonlinear quantum Smoluchowski equation is derived, which describes classical diffusion in the field of the Bohm quantum potential. A nonlinear thermo-quantum expression for the diffusion front is obtained, being a quantum generalization of the classical Einstein law. The quantum diffusion at zero temperature is also described and a new dependence of the position dispersion on time is derived. A stochastic Bohm-Langevin equation is also proposed.

  5. Entropy-energy balance in noisy quantum computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Raginsky

    2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We use entropy-energy arguments to assess the limitations on the running time and on the system size, as measured in qubits, of noisy macroscopic circuit-based quantum computers.

  6. Efficiency of a gravitational detector with interference of quantum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodonov, V.V.; Man'ko, V.I.; Rudenko, V.N.

    1982-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the initial state and of parametric pumping on the sensitivity of a gravitational detector is discussed in the quantum limit. The possibility of a considerable increase in sensitivity in the parametric resonance regime is demonstrated.

  7. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  8. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  9. A Quantum Version of The Spectral Decomposition Theorem of Dynamical Systems, Quantum Chaos Hierarchy: Ergodic, Mixing and Exact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Gomez; Mario Castagnino

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study Spectral Decomposition Theorem [1] and translate it to quantum language by means of the Wigner transform. We obtain a quantum version of Spectral Decomposition Theorem (QSDT) which enables us to achieve three distinct goals: First, to rank Quantum Ergodic Hierarchy levels [2,3]. Second, to analyze the classical limit in quantum ergodic systems and quantum mixing systems. And third, and maybe most important feature, to find a relevant and simple connection between the first three levels of quantum ergodic hierarchy (ergodic, exact and mixing) and quantum spectrum. Finally, we illustrate the physical relevance of QSDT applying it to two examples: Microwave billiards [4,5] and a phenomenological Gamow model type [6,7].

  10. Quantum maximum-entropy principle for closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By introducing a quantum entropy functional of the reduced density matrix, the principle of quantum maximum entropy is asserted as fundamental principle of quantum statistical mechanics. Accordingly, we develop a comprehensive theoretical formalism to construct rigorously a closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function approach. The theoretical formalism is formulated in both thermodynamic equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions, and the quantum contributions are obtained by only assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of ({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}. In particular, by using an arbitrary number of moments, we prove that (1) on a macroscopic scale all nonlocal effects, compatible with the uncertainty principle, are imputable to high-order spatial derivatives, both of the numerical density n and of the effective temperature T; (2) the results available from the literature in the framework of both a quantum Boltzmann gas and a degenerate quantum Fermi gas are recovered as a particular case; (3) the statistics for the quantum Fermi and Bose gases at different levels of degeneracy are explicitly incorporated; (4) a set of relevant applications admitting exact analytical equations are explicitly given and discussed; (5) the quantum maximum entropy principle keeps full validity in the classical limit, when ({h_bar}/2{pi}){yields}0.

  11. Quantum Leap Quantum Mechanics' Killer App

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Quantum Leap Quantum Mechanics' Killer App Q&A with Craig Hawker Director of the Materials Research. Q&A with Craig Hawker LEAP The Materials Research Laboratory is the only Wes

  12. NMR quantum information processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawei Lu; Aharon Brodutch; Jihyun Park; Hemant Katiyar; Tomas Jochym-O'Connor; Raymond Laflamme

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computing exploits fundamentally new models of computation based on quantum mechanical properties instead of classical physics, and it is believed that quantum computers are able to dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been one of the most successful platforms amongst all current implementations. It has demonstrated universal controls on the largest number of qubits, and many advanced techniques developed in NMR have been adopted to other quantum systems successfully. In this review, we show how NMR quantum processors can satisfy the general requirements of a quantum computer, and describe advanced techniques developed towards this target. Additionally, we review some recent NMR quantum processor experiments. These experiments include benchmarking protocols, quantum error correction, demonstrations of algorithms exploiting quantum properties, exploring the foundations of quantum mechanics, and quantum simulations. Finally we summarize the concepts and comment on future prospects.

  13. The Limits of Quintessence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.R.; Linder, Eric V.

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the simplest particle-physics scalar-field models of dynamical dark energy can be separated into distinct behaviors based on the acceleration or deceleration of the field as it evolves down its potential towards a zero minimum. We show that these models occupy narrow regions in the phase-plane of w and w', the dark energy equation-of-state and its time-derivative in units of the Hubble time. Restricting an energy scale of the dark energy microphysics limits how closely a scalar field can resemble a cosmological constant. These results, indicating a desired measurement resolution of order \\sigma(w')\\approx (1+w), define firm targets for observational tests of the physics of dark energy.

  14. Quantum walks and relativistic quantum simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    in a quantum simulation of the Klein para- dox. The position and momentum of a relativistic Dirac particle

  15. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Xi; Yongming Li; Heng Fan

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we firstly give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. Then, we obtain three trade-offs among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system.As a consequence, we obtain that the relative entropy of coherence satisfies the super-additivity. Finally, we discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence.

  16. Low-Energy Effective Theories of Quantum Link and Quantum Spin Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Schlittgen; U. -J. Wiese

    2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum spin and quantum link models provide an unconventional regularization of field theory in which classical fields arise via dimensional reduction of discrete variables. This D-theory regularization leads to the same continuum theories as the conventional approach. We show this by deriving the low-energy effective Lagrangians of D-theory models using coherent state path integral techniques. We illustrate our method for the $(2+1)$-d Heisenberg quantum spin model which is the D-theory regularization of the 2-d O(3) model. Similarly, we prove that in the continuum limit a $(2+1)$-d quantum spin model with $SU(N)_L\\times SU(N)_R\\times U(1)_{L=R}$ symmetry is equivalent to the 2-d principal chiral model. Finally, we show that $(4+1)$-d SU(N) quantum link models reduce to ordinary 4-d Yang-Mills theory.

  17. Coarse Grained Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Agon; Vijay Balasubramanian; Skyler Kasko; Albion Lawrence

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider coarse graining a quantum system divided between short distance and long distance degrees of freedom, which are coupled by the Hamiltonian. Observations using purely long distance observables can be described by the reduced density matrix that arises from tracing out the short-distance observables. The dynamics of this density matrix is that of an open quantum system, and is nonlocal in time, on the order of some short time scale. We describe these dynamics in a model system with a simple hierarchy of energy gaps $\\Delta E_{UV} > \\Delta E_{IR}$, in which the coupling between high-and low-energy degrees of freedom is treated to second order in perturbation theory. We then describe the equations of motion under suitable time averaging, reflecting the limited time resolution of actual experiments, and find an expansion of the master equation in powers of $\\Delta E_{IR}/\\Delta E_{UV}$, in which the failure of the system to be Hamiltonian or even Markovian appears at higher orders in this ratio. We compute the evolution of the density matrix in two specific examples -- coupled spins, and linearly coupled simple harmonic oscillators. Finally, we discuss the evolution of the density matrix using the path integral approach, computing the Feynman-Vernon influence functional for the IR degrees of freedom in perturbation theory, and argue that this influence functional is the correct analog of the Wilsonian effective action for this problem.

  18. The thermodynamics of creating correlations: Limitations and optimal protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Edward Bruschi; Martí Perarnau-Llobet; Nicolai Friis; Karen V. Hovhannisyan; Marcus Huber

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish a rigorous connection between fundamental resource theories at the quantum scale. Correlations and entanglement constitute indispensable resources for numerous quantum information tasks. However, their establishment comes at the cost of energy, the resource of thermodynamics, and is limited by the initial entropy. Here, the optimal conversion of energy into correlations is investigated. Assuming the presence of a thermal bath, we establish general bounds for arbitrary systems and construct a protocol saturating them. The amount of correlations, quantified by the mutual information, can increase at most linearly with the available energy, and we determine where the linear regime breaks down. We further consider the generation of genuine quantum correlations, focusing on the fundamental constituents of our universe: fermions and bosons. For fermionic modes, we find the optimal entangling protocol. For bosonic modes, we show that while Gaussian operations can be outperformed in creating entanglement, their performance is optimal for high energies.

  19. Weyl laws for partially open quantum maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Schenck

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a toy model for "partially open" wave-mechanical system, like for instance a dielectric micro-cavity, in the semiclassical limit where ray dynamics is applicable. Our model is a quantized map on the 2-dimensional torus, with an additional damping at each time step, resulting in a subunitary propagator, or "damped quantum map". We obtain analogues of Weyl's laws for such maps in the semiclassical limit, and draw some more precise estimates when the classical dynamic is chaotic.

  20. Quantum correlations in spin chains at finite temperatures and quantum phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werlang, T; Ribeiro, G A P; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the quantum correlation (quantum discord (QD)) and the entanglement (EoF) between nearest neighbor qubits (spin-1/2) in an infinite chain described by the Heisenberg model (XXZ Hamiltonian) at finite temperatures. The chain is in the thermodynamic limit and thermalized with a reservoir at temperature T (canonical ensemble). We show that QD, in contrast to EoF and other thermodynamic quantities, spotlight the critical points associated to quantum phase transitions (QPT) for this model even at finite T. This remarkable property of QD may have important implications for experimental characterization of QPTs when one is unable to reach temperatures below which a QPT can be seen.

  1. Quantum correlations in spin chains at finite temperatures and quantum phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Werlang; C. Trippe; G. A. P. Ribeiro; Gustavo Rigolin

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the quantum correlation (quantum discord (QD)) and the entanglement (EoF) between nearest neighbor qubits (spin-1/2) in an infinite chain described by the Heisenberg model (XXZ Hamiltonian) at finite temperatures. The chain is in the thermodynamic limit and thermalized with a reservoir at temperature T (canonical ensemble). We show that QD, in contrast to EoF and other thermodynamic quantities, spotlight the critical points associated to quantum phase transitions (QPT) for this model even at finite T. This remarkable property of QD may have important implications for experimental characterization of QPTs when one is unable to reach temperatures below which a QPT can be seen.

  2. Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a novel ground state quantum computation approach that requires no unitary evolution of qubits in time: the qubits are fixed in stationary states of the Hamiltonian. This formulation supplies a completely time-independent approach to realizing quantum computers. We give a concrete suggestion for a ground state quantum computer involving linked quantum dots.

  3. Real-time Information, Uncertainty and Quantum Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Qi; Daoyi Dong; Chunlin Chen; Lijun Liu; Zairong Xi

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback is the core concept in cybernetics and its effective use has made great success in but not limited to the fields of engineering, biology, and computer science. When feedback is used to quantum systems, two major types of feedback control protocols including coherent feedback control (CFC) and measurement-based feedback control (MFC) have been developed. In this paper, we compare the two types of quantum feedback control protocols by focusing on the real-time information used in the feedback loop and the capability in dealing with parameter uncertainty. An equivalent relationship is established between quantum CFC and non-selective quantum MFC in the form of operator-sum representation. Using several examples of quantum feedback control, we show that quantum MFC can theoretically achieve better performance than quantum CFC in stabilizing a quantum state and dealing with Hamiltonian parameter uncertainty. The results enrich understanding of the relative advantages between quantum MFC and quantum CFC, and can provide useful information in choosing suitable feedback protocols for quantum systems.

  4. Localized quantum walks as secured quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Chandrashekar; Th. Busch

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a quantum walk process can be used to construct and secure quantum memory. More precisely, we show that a localized quantum walk with temporal disorder can be engineered to store the information of a single, unknown qubit on a compact position space and faithfully recover it on demand. Since the localization occurss with a finite spread in position space, the stored information of the qubit will be naturally secured from the simple eavesdropper. Our protocol can be adopted to any quantum system for which experimental control over quantum walk dynamics can be achieved.

  5. Impact of nanostructure configuration on the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berbezier, Aude

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, an effective quantum model based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism is used to investigate a selectively contacted high density quantum dot array in an wide band gap host matrix for operation as a quantum dot-enhanced single junction solar cell. By establishing a direct relation between nanostructure configuration and optoelectronic properties, the investigation reveals the influence of inter-dot and dot-contact coupling strength on the radiative rates and consequently on the ultimate performance of photovoltaic devices with finite quantum dot arrays as the active medium. The dominant effects originate in the dependence of the Joint Density of States on the inter-dot coupling in terms of band width and effective band gap.

  6. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  7. Assessing the Montevideo Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Butterfield

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a philosophical assessment of the Montevideo interpretation of quantum theory, advocated by Gambini, Pullin and co-authors. This interpretation has the merit of linking its proposal about how to solve the measurement problem to the search for quantum gravity: namely by suggesting that quantum gravity makes for fundamental limitations on the accuracy of clocks, which imply a type of decoherence that "collapses the wave-packet". I begin (Section 2) by sketching the topics of decoherence, and quantum clocks, on which the interpretation depends. Then I expound the interpretation, from a philosopher's perspective (Sections 3, 4 and 5). Finally, in Section 6, I argue that the interpretation, at least as developed so far, is best seen as a form of the Everett interpretation: namely with an effective or approximate branching, that is induced by environmental decoherence of the familiar kind, and by the Montevideans' "temporal decoherence".

  8. Quantum Phase Transition in a Graphene Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Hands; Costas Strouthos

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the equation of state of a graphene-like model in an effort to understand the properties of its quantum phase transition. The N_f fermion species interact through a three dimensional instantaneous Coulomb potential. Since there are no reliable analytical tools that work for all values of N_f and the coupling constant g, we rely on Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the critical properties of the model near the phase transition. We consider the four-component formulation for the fermion fields, which arises naturally as the continuum limit of the staggered fermion construction in (2+1) dimensions. In the limit of infinitely strong Coulomb interaction, the system undergoes a quantum phase transition at a critical number of fermion species N_fc ~ 4.7. We also calculate the values of the critical exponents at the quantum phase transition.

  9. Quantum search without entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, S

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entanglement of quantum variables is usually thought to be a prerequisite for obtaining quantum speed-ups of information processing tasks such as searching databases. This paper presents methods for quantum search that give a speed-up over classical methods, but that do not require entanglement. These methods rely instead on interference to provide a speed-up. Search without entanglement comes at a cost: although they outperform analogous classical devices, the quantum devices that perform the search are not universal quantum computers and require exponentially greater overhead than a quantum computer that operates using entanglement. Quantum search without entanglement is compared to classical search using waves.

  10. Quantum search without entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Lloyd

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Entanglement of quantum variables is usually thought to be a prerequisite for obtaining quantum speed-ups of information processing tasks such as searching databases. This paper presents methods for quantum search that give a speed-up over classical methods, but that do not require entanglement. These methods rely instead on interference to provide a speed-up. Search without entanglement comes at a cost: although they outperform analogous classical devices, the quantum devices that perform the search are not universal quantum computers and require exponentially greater overhead than a quantum computer that operates using entanglement. Quantum search without entanglement is compared to classical search using waves.

  11. Robust quantum data locking from phase modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmo Lupo; Mark M. Wilde; Seth Lloyd

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum data locking is a unique quantum phenomenon that allows a relatively short key to (un)lock an arbitrarily long message encoded in a quantum state, in such a way that an eavesdropper who measures the state but does not know the key has essentially no information about the encrypted message. The application of quantum data locking in cryptography would allow one to overcome the limitations of the one-time pad encryption, which requires the key to have the same length as the message. However, it is known that the strength of quantum data locking is also its Achilles heel, as the leakage of a few bits of the key or the message may in principle allow the eavesdropper to unlock a disproportionate amount of information. In this paper we show that there exist quantum data locking schemes that can be made robust against information leakage by increasing the length of the shared key by a proportionate amount. This implies that a constant size key can still encrypt an arbitrarily long message as long as a fraction of it remains secret to the eavesdropper. Moreover, we greatly simplify the structure of the protocol by proving that phase modulation suffices to generate strong locking schemes, paving the way to optical experimental realizations. Also, we show that successful data locking protocols can be constructed using random codewords, which very well could be helpful in discovering random codes for data locking over noisy quantum channels.

  12. FREE-SPACE QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY IN DAYLIGHT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T. [and others

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  13. Quantum computer of wire circuit architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Moiseev; F. F. Gubaidullin; S. N. Andrianov

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    First solid state quantum computer was built using transmons (cooper pair boxes). The operation of the computer is limited because of using a number of the rigit cooper boxes working with fixed frequency at temperatures of superconducting material. Here, we propose a novel architecture of quantum computer based on a flexible wire circuit of many coupled quantum nodes containing controlled atomic (molecular) ensembles. We demonstrate wide opportunities of the proposed computer. Firstly, we reveal a perfect storage of external photon qubits to multi-mode quantum memory node and demonstrate a reversible exchange of the qubits between any arbitrary nodes. We found optimal parameters of atoms in the circuit and self quantum modes for quantum processing. The predicted perfect storage has been observed experimentally for microwave radiation on the lithium phthalocyaninate molecule ensemble. Then also, for the first time we show a realization of the efficient basic two-qubit gate with direct coupling of two arbitrary nodes by using appropriate atomic frequency shifts in the circuit nodes. Proposed two-qubit gate runs with a speed drastically accelerated proportionally to the number of atoms in the node. The direct coupling and accelerated two-qubit gate can be realized for large number of the circuit nodes. Finally, we describe two and three-dimensional scalable architectures that pave the road to construction of universal multi-qubit quantum computer operating at room temperatures.

  14. Quantum Thermodynamic Cycles and quantum heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Quan; Yu-xi Liu; C. P. Sun; Franco Nori

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to describe quantum heat engines, here we systematically study isothermal and isochoric processes for quantum thermodynamic cycles. Based on these results the quantum versions of both the Carnot heat engine and the Otto heat engine are defined without ambiguities. We also study the properties of quantum Carnot and Otto heat engines in comparison with their classical counterparts. Relations and mappings between these two quantum heat engines are also investigated by considering their respective quantum thermodynamic processes. In addition, we discuss the role of Maxwell's demon in quantum thermodynamic cycles. We find that there is no violation of the second law, even in the existence of such a demon, when the demon is included correctly as part of the working substance of the heat engine.

  15. Quantum Ice : a quantum Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nic Shannon; Olga Sikora; Frank Pollmann; Karlo Penc; Peter Fulde

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice states, in which frustrated interactions lead to a macroscopic ground-state degeneracy, occur in water ice, in problems of frustrated charge order on the pyrochlore lattice, and in the family of rare-earth magnets collectively known as spin ice. Of particular interest at the moment are "quantum spin ice" materials, where large quantum fluctuations may permit tunnelling between a macroscopic number of different classical ground states. Here we use zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations to show how such tunnelling can lift the degeneracy of a spin or charge ice, stabilising a unique "quantum ice" ground state --- a quantum liquid with excitations described by the Maxwell action of 3+1-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. We further identify a competing ordered "squiggle" state, and show how both squiggle and quantum ice states might be distinguished in neutron scattering experiments on a spin ice material.

  16. Quantum probes for fractional Gaussian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo G. A. Paris

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the characterization of classical fractional random noise via quantum probes. In particular, we focus on estimation and discrimination problems involving the fractal dimension of the trajectories of a system subject to fractional Brownian noise. We assume that the classical degree of freedom exposed to the environmental noise is coupled to a quantum degree of freedom of the same system, e.g. its spin, and exploit quantum limited measurements on the spin part to characterize the classical fractional noise. More generally, our approach may be applied to any two-level system subject to dephasing perturbations described by fractional Brownian noise, in order to assess the precision of quantum limited measurements in the characterization of the external noise. In order to assess the performances of quantum probes we evaluate the Bures metric, as well as the Helstrom and the Chernoff bound, and optimize their values over the interaction time. We find that quantum probes may be successfully employed to obtain a reliable characterization of fractional Gaussian process when the coupling with the environment is weak or strong. In the first case decoherence is not much detrimental and for long interaction times the probe acquires information about the environmental parameters without being too much mixed. Conversely, for strong coupling, information is quickly impinged on the quantum probe and can effectively retrieved by measurements performed in the early stage of the evolution. In the intermediate situation, none of the two above effects take place: information is flowing from the environment to the probe too slowly compared to decoherence, and no measurements can be effectively employed to extract it from the quantum probe. The two regimes of weak- and strong-coupling are defined in terms of a threshold value of the coupling, which itself increases with the fractional dimension.

  17. Quantum realism and quantum surrealism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateus Araújo

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we explore the questions of what should be considered a "classical" theory, and which aspects of quantum theory cannot be captured by any theory that respects our intuition of classicality. This exploration is divided in two parts: in the first we review classical results of the literature, such as the Kochen-Specker theorem, von Neumann's theorem, Gleason's theorem, as well as more recent ideas, such as the distinction between $\\psi$-ontic and $\\psi$-epistemic ontological models, Spekkens' definition of contextuality, Hardy's ontological excess baggage theorem and the PBR theorem. The second part is concerned with pinning down what should be the "correct" definition of contextuality. We settle down on the definition advocated by Abramsky and Branderburger, motivated by the Fine theorem, and show the connection of this definition with the work of George Boole. This definition allows us to unify the notions of locality and noncontextuality, and use largely the same tools to characterize how quantum mechanics violates these notions of classicality. Exploring this formalism, we find a new family of noncontextuality inequalities. We conclude by reviewing the notion of state-independent contextuality.

  18. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  19. Quantum loop programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingsheng Ying; Yuan Feng

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop is a powerful program construct in classical computation, but its power is still not exploited fully in quantum computation. The exploitation of such power definitely requires a deep understanding of the mechanism of quantum loop programs. In this paper, we introduce a general scheme of quantum loops and describe its computational process. The notions of termination and almost termination are proposed for quantum loops, and the function computed by a quantum loop is defined. To show their expressive power, quantum loops are applied in describing quantum walks. Necessary and sufficient conditions for termination and almost termination of a general quantum loop on any mixed input state are presented. A quantum loop is said to be (almost) terminating if it (almost) terminates on any input state. We show that a quantum loop is almost terminating if and only if it is uniformly almost terminating. It is observed that a small disturbance either on the unitary transformation in the loop body or on the measurement in the loop guard can make any quantum loop (almost) terminating. Moreover, a representation of the function computed by a quantum loop is given in terms of finite summations of matrices. To illustrate the notions and results obtained in this paper, two simplest classes of quantum loop programs, one qubit quantum loops, and two qubit quantum loops defined by controlled gates, are carefully examined.

  20. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing Chen; Yong Li; Z. Song; C. -P. Sun

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus. First show that the data bus has an energy gap between the ground and first-excited states in the single-particle case induced by the impurity in the single particle case. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations were performed for a finite system; the results show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  1. Analyzing many-body localization with a quantum computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bela Bauer; Chetan Nayak

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many-body localization, the persistence against electron-electron interactions of the localization of states with non-zero excitation energy density, poses a challenge to current methods of theoretical and numerical analysis. Numerical simulations have so far been limited to a small number of sites, making it difficult to obtain reliable statements about the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, we explore the ways in which a relatively small quantum computer could be leveraged to study many-body localization. We show that, in addition to studying time-evolution, a quantum computer can, in polynomial time, obtain eigenstates at arbitrary energies to sufficient accuracy that localization can be observed. The limitations of quantum measurement, which preclude the possibility of directly obtaining the entanglement entropy, make it difficult to apply some of the definitions of many-body localization used in the recent literature. We discuss alternative tests of localization that can be implemented on a quantum computer.

  2. Unconditional quantum teleportation between distant solid-state qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Pfaff; Bas Hensen; Hannes Bernien; Suzanne B. van Dam; Machiel S. Blok; Tim H. Taminiau; Marijn J. Tiggelman; Raymond N. Schouten; Matthew Markham; Daniel J. Twitchen; Ronald Hanson

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Realizing robust quantum information transfer between long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum information science and technology. Here we demonstrate unconditional teleportation of arbitrary quantum states between diamond spin qubits separated by 3 meters. We prepare the teleporter through photon-mediated heralded entanglement between two distant electron spins and subsequently encode the source qubit in a single nuclear spin. By realizing a fully deterministic Bell-state measurement combined with real-time feed-forward we achieve teleportation in each attempt while obtaining an average state fidelity exceeding the classical limit. These results establish diamond spin qubits as a prime candidate for the realization of quantum networks for quantum communication and network-based quantum computing.

  3. Probability, unitarity, and realism in generally covariant quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jay Olson; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The formalism of covariant quantum theory, introduced by Reisenberger and Rovelli, casts the description of quantum states and evolution into a framework compatable with the principles of general relativity. The leap to this covariant formalism, however, outstripped the standard interpretation used to connect quantum theory to experimental predictions, leaving the predictions of the RR theory ambiguous. Here we discuss in detail some implications of our recently proposed description of covariant quantum information (CQI), which addresses these problems. We show explicit agreement with standard quantum mechanics in the appropriate limit. In addition to compatability with general covariance, we show that our framework has other attractive and satisfying features -- it is fully unitary, realist, and self-contained. The full unitarity of the formalism in the presence of measurements allows us to invoke time-reversal symmetry to obtain new predictions closely related to the quantum Zeno effect.

  4. Probability, unitarity, and realism from generally covariant quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, S Jay

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formalism of covariant quantum theory, introduced by Reisenberger and Rovelli, casts the description of quantum states and evolution into a framework compatable with the principles of general relativity. The leap to this fully covariant formalism, however, outstripped the standard interpretation used to connect quantum theory to experimental predictions, leaving the predictions of the theory ambiguous. Here we discuss in detail some implications of our recently proposed description of covariant quantum information, which addresses these problems. We show explicit agreement with standard quantum mechanics in the appropriate limit. In addition to compatability with general covariance, we show that this framework has other attractive and surprising features -- it is fully unitary, realist, and self-contained. The full unitarity of the formalism in the presence of measurements allows us to invoke time-reversal symmetry to obtain new predictions closely related to the quantum Zeno effect.

  5. A Causal Net Approach to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Bateson

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss a causal network approach to describing relativistic quantum mechanics. Each vertex on the causal net represents a possible point event or particle observation. By constructing the simplest causal net based on Reichenbach-like conjunctive forks in proper time we can exactly derive the 1+1 dimension Dirac equation for a relativistic fermion and correctly model quantum mechanical statistics. Symmetries of the net provide various quantum mechanical effects such as quantum uncertainty and wavefunction, phase, spin, negative energy states and the effect of a potential. The causal net can be embedded in 3+1 dimensions and is consistent with the conventional Dirac equation. In the low velocity limit the causal net approximates to the Schrodinger equation and Pauli equation for an electromagnetic field. Extending to different momentum states the net is compatible with the Feynman path integral approach to quantum mechanics that allows calculation of well known quantum phenomena such as diffraction.

  6. The Forbidden Quantum Adder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Alvarez-Rodriguez; M. Sanz; L. Lamata; E. Solano

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Addition plays a central role in mathematics and physics, while adders are ubiquitous devices in computation and electronics. In this sense, usual sum operations can be realized by classical Turing machines and also, with a suitable algorithm, by quantum Turing machines. Moreover, the sum of state vectors in the same Hilbert space, known as quantum superposition, is at the core of quantum physics. In fact, entanglement and the promised exponential speed-up of quantum computing are based on such superpositions. Here, we consider the existence of a quantum adder, defined as a unitary operation mapping two unknown quantum states encoded in different quantum systems onto their sum codified in a single one. The surprising answer is that this quantum adder is forbidden and it has the quantum cloning machine as a special case. This no-go result is of fundamental nature and its deep implications should be further studied.

  7. Non-representative quantum mechanical weak values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. E. Y. Svensson

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  8. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix C. Binder; Sai Vinjanampathy; Kavan Modi; John Goold

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely-positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorises the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorisation condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  9. Quantum chimera states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Viennot; Lucile Aubourg

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered chaotic dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behavior deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems.

  10. Quantum Evolution and Anticipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Rudolf Thomann

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous paper we have investigated quantum states evolving into mutually orthogonal states at equidistant times, and the quantum anticipation effect exhibited by measurements at one half step. Here we extend our analyzes of quantum anticipation to general type quantum evolutions and spectral measures and prove that quantum evolutions possessing an embedded orthogonal evolution are characterized by positive joint spectral measure. Furthermore, we categorize quantum evolution, assess anticipation strength and provide a framework of analytic tools and results, thus preparing for further investigation and experimental verification of anticipation in concrete physical situations such as the H-atom, which we have found to exhibit anticipation.

  11. Distinctive Signature of Indium Gallium Nitride Quantum Dot Lasing in Microdisks Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolf, Alexander; Aharanovich, Igor; Zhu, Tongtong; Niu, Nan; Wang, Danqing; Oliver, Rachel A; Hu, Evelyn L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low threshold lasers realized within compact, high quality optical cavities enable a variety of nanophotonics applications. Gallium nitride (GaN) materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots and quantum wells offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices such as efficient light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Despite progress in the growth and characterization of InGaN quantum dots, their advantages as the gain medium in low threshold lasers have not been clearly demonstrated. This work seeks to better understand the reasons for these limitations by focusing on the simpler, limited-mode microdisk cavities, and by carrying out comparisons of lasing dynamics in those cavities using varying gain media including InGaN quantum wells, fragmented quantum wells, and a combination of fragmented quantum wells with quantum dots. For each gain medium, we utilize the distinctive, high quality (Q~5500) modes of the cavities, and the change in the highest ...

  12. Ricci flow and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show some relations between Ricci flow and quantum theory via Fisher information and the quantum potential.

  13. Efficient Quantum Filtering for Quantum Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Rouchon; Jason F. Ralph

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an efficient numerical scheme for the recursive filtering of diffusive quantum stochastic master equations. We show that the resultant quantum trajectory is robust and may be used for feedback based on inefficient measurements. The proposed numerical scheme is amenable to approximation, which can be used to further reduce the computational burden associated with calculating quantum trajectories and may allow real-time quantum filtering. We provide a two-qubit example where feedback control of entanglement may be within the scope of current experimental systems.

  14. Quantum weak chaos in a degenerate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Ya. Demikhovskii; D. I. Kamenev; G. A. Luna-Acosta

    1998-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum weak chaos is studied in a perturbed degenerate system --- a charged particle interacting with a monochromatic wave in a transverse magnetic field. The evolution operator for an arbitrary number of periods of the external field is built and its structure is explored in terms of the QE (quasienergy eigenstates) under resonance condition (wave frequency $=$ cyclotron frequency) in the regime of weak classical chaos. The new phenomenon of diffusion via the quantum separatrices and the influence of chaos on diffusion are investigated and, in the quasi classical limit, compared with its classical dynamics. We determine the crossover from purely quantum diffusion to a diffusion which is the quantum manifestation of classical diffusion along the stochastic web. This crossover results from the non-monotonic dependence of the characteristic localization length of the QE states on the wave amplitude. The width of the quantum separatrices was computed and compared with the width of the classical stochastic web. We give the physical parameters which can be realized experimentally to show the manifestation of quantum chaos in nonlinear acoustic resonance.

  15. Quantum model of microcavity intersubband electroluminescent devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone De Liberato; Cristiano Ciuti

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum theoretical analysis of the electroluminescence from an intersubband transition of a quantum well structure embedded in a planar microcavity. By using a cluster factorization method, we have derived a closed set of dynamical equations for the quantum well carrier and cavity photon occupation numbers, the correlation between the cavity field and the intersubband polarization, as well as polarization-polarization contributions. In order to model the electrical excitation, we have considered electron population tunneling from an injector and into an extractor contact. The tunneling rates have been obtained by considering the bare electronic states in the quantum well and the limit of validity of this approximation (broad-band injection) are discussed in detail. We apply the present quantum model to provide a comprehensive description of the electronic transport and optical properties of an intersubband microcavity light emitting diode, accounting for non-radiative carrier relaxation and Pauli blocking. We study the enhancement of the electroluminescence quantum efficiency passing from the weak to the strong polariton coupling regime.

  16. Secure Quantum Communication with Orthogonal States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitra Shukla; Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak; R. Srikanth

    2014-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In majority of protocols of secure quantum communication (such as, BB84, B92, etc.), the unconditional security of the protocols are obtained by using conjugate coding (two or more mutually unbiased bases). Initially all the conjugate-coding-based protocols of secure quantum communication were restricted to quantum key distribution (QKD), but later on they were extended to other cryptographic tasks (such as, secure direct quantum communication and quantum key agreement). In contrast to the conjugate-coding-based protocols, a few completely orthogonal-state-based protocols of unconditionally secure QKD (such as, Goldenberg-Vaidman (GV) and N09) were also proposed. However, till the recent past orthogonal-state-based protocols were only a theoretical concept and were limited to QKD. Only recently, orthogonal-state-based protocols of QKD are experimentally realized and extended to cryptographic tasks beyond QKD. This paper aims to briefly review the orthogonal-state-based protocols of secure quantum communication that are recently introduced by our group and other researchers.

  17. Minisuperspace as a Quantum Open System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu; Juan Pablo Paz; Sukanya Sinha

    1993-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We trace the development of ideas on dissipative processes in chaotic cosmology and on minisuperspace quantum cosmology from the time Misner proposed them to current research. We show 1) how the effect of quantum processes like particle creation in the early universe can address the issues of the isotropy and homogeneity of the observed universe, 2) how viewing minisuperspace as a quantum open system can address the issue of the validity of such approximations customarily adopted in quantum cosmology, and 3) how invoking statistical processes like decoherence and correlation when considered together can help to establish a theory of quantum fields in curved spacetime as the semiclassical limit of quantum gravity. {\\it Dedicated to Professor Misner on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, June 1992.} To appear in the Proceedings of a Symposium on {\\it Directions in General Relativity}, College Park, May 1993, Volume 1, edited by B. L. Hu, M. P. Ryan and C. V. Vishveshwara (Cambridge University Press 1993)~~~~umdpp 93-60

  18. The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing Simona Ginsburg route for the transition from sensory processing to unlimited experiencing, or basic consciousness. We the transition. We believe that the raw mate- rial from which feelings were molded by natural selection

  19. Quantum Stochastic Resonance in Electron Shelving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huelga, S F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic resonance shows that under some circumstances noise can enhance the response of a system to a periodic force. While this effect has been extensively investigated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in classical systems, there is complete lack of experimental evidence within the purely quantum mechanical domain. Here we demonstrate that stochastic resonance can be exhibited in a single ion and would be experimentally observable using well mastered experimental techniques. We discuss the use of this scheme for the detection of the frequency difference of two lasers to demonstrate that stochastic resonance may have applications in precision measurements at the quantum limit.

  20. Quantum Stochastic Resonance in Electron Shelving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Huelga; M. B. Plenio

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic resonance shows that under some circumstances noise can enhance the response of a system to a periodic force. While this effect has been extensively investigated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in classical systems, there is complete lack of experimental evidence within the purely quantum mechanical domain. Here we demonstrate that stochastic resonance can be exhibited in a single ion and would be experimentally observable using well mastered experimental techniques. We discuss the use of this scheme for the detection of the frequency difference of two lasers to demonstrate that stochastic resonance may have applications in precision measurements at the quantum limit.

  1. Limit theory for overfit models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Grayson Ford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Asymptotic Theory and Main Results . . . . . . . . .Chapter 2 Limit theory for comparing over?t models out-of-

  2. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  3. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  4. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  5. Generalized concatenated quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    We discuss the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using ...

  6. Quantum convolutional stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinthamani, Neelima

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum error correction codes were introduced as a means to protect quantum information from decoherance and operational errors. Based on their approach to error control, error correcting codes can be divided into two different classes: block codes...

  7. Simulating the Quantum Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedenauer, Axel; Glückert, Jan Tibor; Porras, Diego; Schätz, Tobias

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain deeper insight into the dynamics of complex quantum systems we need a quantum leap in computer simulations. We can not translate quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement efficiently into the classical language of conventional computers. The final solution to this problem is a universal quantum computer [1], suggested in 1982 and envisioned to become functional within the next decade(s); a shortcut was proposed via simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in a different quantum system, where all parameters and interactions can be controlled and the outcome detected sufficiently well. Here we study the feasibility of a quantum simulator based on trapped ions [2]. We experimentally simulate the adiabatic evolution of the smallest non-trivial spin system from the paramagnetic into the (anti-)ferromagnetic order with a quantum magnetisation for two spins of 98%, controlling and manipulating all relevant parameters of the Hamiltonian independently via electromagnetic fields. W...

  8. Qualia are Quantum Leaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlichny, George

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I contemplate the idea that the subjective world and quantum state reductions are one and the same. If true, this resolves with one stroke both the quantum mechanical measurement problem and the hard problem of consciousness.

  9. Qualia are Quantum Leaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Svetlichny

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I contemplate the idea that the subjective world and quantum state reductions are one and the same. If true, this resolves with one stroke both the quantum mechanical measurement problem and the hard problem of consciousness.

  10. Modes of asymmetry: the application of harmonic analysis to symmetric quantum dynamics and quantum reference frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iman Marvian; Robert W. Spekkens

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding the consequences of symmetry for open system quantum dynamics is a problem with broad applications, including describing thermal relaxation, deriving quantum limits on the performance of amplifiers, and exploring quantum metrology in the presence of noise. The symmetry of the dynamics may reflect a symmetry of the fundamental laws of nature, a symmetry of a low-energy effective theory, or it may describe a practical restriction such as the lack of a reference frame. In this paper, we apply some tools of harmonic analysis together with ideas from quantum information theory to this problem. The central idea is to study the decomposition of quantum operations---in particular, states, measurements and channels---into different modes, which we call modes of asymmetry. Under symmetric processing, a given mode of the input is mapped to the corresponding mode of the output, implying that one can only generate a given output if the input contains all of the necessary modes. By defining monotones that quantify the asymmetry in a particular mode, we also derive quantitative constraints on the resources of asymmetry that are required to simulate a given asymmetric operation. We present applications of our results for deriving bounds on the probability of success in nondeterministic state transitions, such as quantum amplification, and a simplified formalism for studying the degradation of quantum reference frames.

  11. Quantum backgrounds and QFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Suk Park; John Terilla; Thomas Tradler

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of a quantum background and a functor QFT. In the case that the QFT moduli space is smooth formal, we construct a flat quantum superconnection on a bundle over QFT which defines algebraic structures relevant to correlation functions in quantum field theory. We go further and identify chain level generalizations of correlation functions which should be present in all quantum field theories.

  12. Generalized Concatenated Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Graeme Smith; John Smolin; Bei Zeng

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using this method, we construct families of new single-error-correcting nonadditive quantum codes, in both binary and nonbinary cases, which not only outperform any stabilizer codes for finite block length, but also asymptotically achieve the quantum Hamming bound for large block length.

  13. Topological Quantum Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a class of topological quantum codes to perform quantum entanglement distillation. These codes implement the whole Clifford group of unitary operations in a fully topological manner and without selective addressing of qubits. This allows us to extend their application also to quantum teleportation, dense coding and computation with magic states.

  14. Quantum Control Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew James

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explains some fundamental ideas of {\\em feedback} control of quantum systems through the study of a relatively simple two-level system coupled to optical field channels. The model for this system includes both continuous and impulsive dynamics. Topics covered in this paper include open and closed loop control, impulsive control, optimal control, quantum filtering, quantum feedback networks, and coherent feedback control.

  15. Simulating the Quantum Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Friedenauer; Hector Schmitz; Jan Tibor Glückert; Diego Porras; Tobias Schätz

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain deeper insight into the dynamics of complex quantum systems we need a quantum leap in computer simulations. We can not translate quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement efficiently into the classical language of conventional computers. The final solution to this problem is a universal quantum computer [1], suggested in 1982 and envisioned to become functional within the next decade(s); a shortcut was proposed via simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in a different quantum system, where all parameters and interactions can be controlled and the outcome detected sufficiently well. Here we study the feasibility of a quantum simulator based on trapped ions [2]. We experimentally simulate the adiabatic evolution of the smallest non-trivial spin system from the paramagnetic into the (anti-)ferromagnetic order with a quantum magnetisation for two spins of 98%, controlling and manipulating all relevant parameters of the Hamiltonian independently via electromagnetic fields. We prove that the observed transition is not driven by thermal fluctuations, but of quantum mechanical origin, the source of quantum fluctuations in quantum phase transitions [3]. We observe a final superposition state of the two degenerate spin configurations for the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic order, respectively. These correspond to deterministically entangled states achieved with a fidelity up to 88%. Our work demonstrates a building block for simulating quantum spin-Hamiltonians with trapped ions. The method has potential for scaling to a higher number of coupled spins [2].

  16. Quantum Computing Computer Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanofsky, Noson S.

    of Vector Spaces 3 The Leap From Classical to Quantum 3.1 Classical Deterministic Systems 3.2 ClassicalQuantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky and Mirco A. Mannucci #12;© May 2007 Noson S. Yanofsky Mirco A. Mannucci #12;Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky

  17. Enscription of Quantum Texts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall Espinoza; Tom Imbo; Paul Lopata

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate an entangled deformation of the deterministic quantum cloning process, called enscription, that can be applied to (certain) sets of distinct quantum states which are not necessarily orthogonal, called texts. Some basic theorems on enscribable texts are given, and a relationship to probabilistic quantum cloning is demonstrated.

  18. Quantum Circuits Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Chiribella; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

    2007-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for optimizing quantum circuits architecture. The method is based on the notion of "quantum comb", which describes a circuit board in which one can insert variable subcircuits. The method allows one to efficiently address novel kinds of quantum information processing tasks, such as storing-retrieving, and cloning of channels.

  19. Quantum chaos in quantum Turing machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilki Kim; Guenter Mahler

    1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a 2-spin quantum Turing architecture, in which discrete local rotations \\alpha_m of the Turing head spin alternate with quantum controlled NOT-operations. We demonstrate that a single chaotic parameter input \\alpha_m leads to a chaotic dynamics in the entire Hilbert-space.

  20. Vacuum energy: quantum hydrodynamics vs quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare quantum hydrodynamics and quantum gravity. They share many common features. In particular, both have quadratic divergences, and both lead to the problem of the vacuum energy, which in the quantum gravity transforms to the cosmological constant problem. We show that in quantum liquids the vacuum energy density is not determined by the quantum zero-point energy of the phonon modes. The energy density of the vacuum is much smaller and is determined by the classical macroscopic parameters of the liquid including the radius of the liquid droplet. In the same manner the cosmological constant is not determined by the zero-point energy of quantum fields. It is much smaller and is determined by the classical macroscopic parameters of the Universe dynamics: the Hubble radius, the Newton constant and the energy density of matter. The same may hold for the Higgs mass problem: the quadratically divergent quantum correction to the Higgs potential mass term is also cancelled by the microscopic (trans-Planckian) degrees of freedom due to thermodynamic stability of the whole quantum vacuum.

  1. Quantum Physics and Human Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James B. Hartle

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Human languages employ constructions that tacitly assume specific properties of the limited range of phenomena they evolved to describe. These assumed properties are true features of that limited context, but may not be general or precise properties of all the physical situations allowed by fundamental physics. In brief, human languages contain `excess baggage' that must be qualified, discarded, or otherwise reformed to give a clear account in the context of fundamental physics of even the everyday phenomena that the languages evolved to describe. The surest route to clarity is to express the constructions of human languages in the language of fundamental physical theory, not the other way around. These ideas are illustrated by an analysis of the verb `to happen' and the word `reality' in special relativity and the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems.

  2. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  3. Congressional Request Limiting the Magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as goals? Target: limit U.S. GHG emissions (e.g., national emission budget, or percent reduction) What is a reasonable share of U.S. emission reductions relative to the global targets? What is the implied emissions on atmospheric GHG concentrations? Target: limit atmospheric GHG concentrations (e.g., 450, 550 ppm CO2,eq) How

  4. Optical Devices based on Limit Cycles and Amplification in Semiconductor Optical Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamerly, Ryan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At strong pump powers, a semiconductor optical cavity passes through a Hopf bifurcation and undergoes self-oscillation. We simulate this device using semiclassical Langevin equations and assess the effect of quantum fluctuations on the dynamics. Below threshold, the cavity acts as a phase-insensitive linear amplifier, with noise $\\sim 5\\times$ larger than the Caves bound. Above threshold, the limit cycle acts as an analog memory, and the phase diffusion is $\\sim 10\\times$ larger than the bound set by the standard quantum limit. We also simulate entrainment of this oscillator and propose an optical Ising machine and classical CNOT gate based on the effect.

  5. On the hypothesis that quantum mechanism manifests classical mechanics: Numerical approach to the correspondence in search of quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sang-Bong

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum manifestation of classical chaos has been one of the extensively studied subjects for more than a decade. Yet clear understanding of its nature still remains to be an open question partly due to the lack of a canonical definition of quantum chaos. The classical definition seems to be unsuitable in quantum mechanics partly because of the Heisenberg quantum uncertainty. In this regard, quantum chaos is somewhat misleading and needs to be clarified at the very fundamental level of physics. Since it is well known that quantum mechanics is more fundamental than classical mechanics, the quantum description of classically chaotic nature should be attainable in the limit of large quantum numbers. The focus of my research, therefore, lies on the correspondence principle for classically chaotic systems. The chaotic damped driven pendulum is mainly studied numerically using the split operator method that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. For classically dissipative chaotic systems in which (multi)fractal strange attractors often emerge, several quantum dissipative mechanisms are also considered. For instance, Hoover`s and Kubo-Fox-Keizer`s approaches are studied with some computational analyses. But the notion of complex energy with non-Hermiticity is extensively applied. Moreover, the Wigner and Husimi distribution functions are examined with an equivalent classical distribution in phase-space, and dynamical properties of the wave packet in configuration and momentum spaces are also explored. The results indicate that quantum dynamics embraces classical dynamics although the classicalquantum correspondence fails to be observed in the classically chaotic regime. Even in the semi-classical limits, classically chaotic phenomena would eventually be suppressed by the quantum uncertainty.

  6. Getting Humans to do Quantum Optimization - User Acquisition, Engagement and Early Results from the Citizen Cyberscience Game Quantum Moves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Lieberoth; Mads Kock Pedersen; Andreea Catalina Marin; Tilo Planke; Jacob Friis Sherson

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The game Quantum Moves was designed to pit human players against computer algorithms, combining their solutions into hybrid optimization to control a scalable quantum computer. In this midstream report, we open our design process and describe the series of constitutive building stages going into a quantum physics citizen science game. We present our approach from designing a core gameplay around quantum simulations, to putting extra game elements in place in order to frame, structure, and motivate players' difficult path from curious visitors to competent science contributors. The player base is extremely diverse - for instance, two top players are a 40 year old female accountant and a male taxi driver. Among statistical predictors for retention and in-game high scores, the data from our first year suggest that people recruited based on real-world physics interest and via real-world events, but only with an intermediate science education, are more likely to become engaged and skilled contributors. Interestingly, female players tended to perform better than male players, even though men played more games per day. To understand this relationship, we explore the profiles of our top players in more depth. We discuss in-world and in-game performance factors departing in psychological theories of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and the implications for using real live humans to do hybrid optimization via initially simple, but ultimately very cognitively complex games.

  7. Confined quantum Zeno dynamics of a watched atomic arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrien Signoles; Adrien Facon; Dorian Grosso; Igor Dotsenko; Serge Haroche; Jean-Michel Raimond; Michel Brune; Sébastien Gleyzes

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a quantum world, a watched arrow never moves. This is the Quantum Zeno Effect (QZE). Repeatedly asking a quantum system "are you still in your initial state?" blocks its coherent evolution through measurement back-action. Quantum Zeno Dynamics (QZD) leaves more freedom to the system. Instead of pinning it to a single state, it sets a border in its evolution space. Repeatedly asking the system "did you cross the border?" makes it impenetrable. Since the border can be designed at will by choosing the measured observable, QZD allows one to tailor the system's evolution space. Recent proposals, particularly in the Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics (CQED) context, highlight the interest of QZD for quantum state engineering tasks, which are the key to quantumenabled technologies and quantum information processing. We report the observation of QZD in the 51-dimension Hilbert space of a large angular momentum J = 25. Continuous selective interrogation limits the evolution of this angular momentum to an adjustable multi-dimensional subspace. This confined dynamics leads to the production of non-classical "Schr\\"odinger cat" states, quantum superpositions of angular momentums pointing in different directions. These states are promising for sensitive metrology of electric and magnetic fields. This QZD approach could be generalized to other systems, opening novel perspectives for quantum information processing.

  8. Theory of Quantum Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario G. Silveirinha

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we develop a comprehensive quantum theory for the phenomenon of quantum friction. Based on a theory of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics for unstable systems, we calculate the quantum expectation of the friction force, and link the friction effect to the emergence of system instabilities related to the Cherenkov effect. These instabilities may occur due to the hybridization of particular guided modes supported by the individual moving bodies, and selection rules for the interacting modes are derived. It is proven that the quantum friction effect can take place even when the interacting bodies are lossless and made of nondispersive dielectrics.

  9. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  10. Hierarchical quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to study the hierarchical quantum information splitting (HQIS) is proposed and the same is used to systematically investigate the possibility of realizing HQIS using different classes of 4-qubit entangled states that are not connected by SLOCC. Explicit examples of HQIS using 4-qubit cluster state and 4-qubit |\\Omega> state are provided. Further, the proposed HQIS scheme is generalized to introduce two new aspects of hierarchical quantum communication. To be precise, schemes of probabilistic hierarchical quantum information splitting and hierarchical quantum secret sharing are obtained by modifying the proposed HQIS scheme. A number of practical situations where hierarchical quantum communication would be of use are also presented.

  11. Quantum Physics and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir K. Nevolin

    2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of infinite (unrestricted at least in one direction) quantum particle motion using probe nanotechnologies have revealed the necessity of revising previous concepts of their motion. Particularly, quantum particles transfer quantum motion nonlocality energy beside classical kinetic energy, in other words, they are in two different kinds of motion simultaneously. The quantum component of the motion energy may be quite considerable under certain circumstances. Some new effects were predicted and proved experimentally in terms of this phenomenon. A new prototype refrigerating device was tested, its principle of operation being based on the effect of transferring the quantum component of the motion energy.

  12. The M\\"obius Symmetry of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraggi, Alon E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equivalence postulate approach to quantum mechanics aims to formulate quantum mechanics from a fundamental geometrical principle. Underlying the formulation there exists a basic cocycle condition which is invariant under $D$--dimensional M\\"obius transformations with respect to the Euclidean or Minkowski metrics. The invariance under global M\\"obius transformations implies that spatial space is compact. Furthermore, it implies energy quantisation and undefinability of quantum trajectories without assuming any prior interpretation of the wave function. The approach may be viewed as conventional quantum mechanics with the caveat that spatial space is compact, as dictated by the M\\"obius symmetry, with the classical limit corresponding to the decompactification limit. Correspondingly, there exists a finite length scale in the formalism and consequently an intrinsic regularisation scheme. Evidence for the compactness of space may exist in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. N=2 Quantum String Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers; Olaf Lechtenfeld; Bernd Niemeyer

    2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the genus-one three- and four-point amplitudes in the 2+2 dimensional closed N=(2,2) worldsheet supersymmetric string within the RNS formulation. Vertex operators are redefined with the incorporation of spinor helicity techniques, and the quantum scattering is shown to be manifestly gauge and Lorentz invariant after normalizing the string states. The continuous spin structure summation over the monodromies of the worldsheet fermions is carried out explicitly, and the field-theory limit is extracted. The amplitude in this limit is shown to be the maximally helicity violating amplitude in pure gravity evaluated in a two-dimensional setting, which vanishes, unlike the four-dimensional result. The vanishing of the genus-one N=2 closed string amplitude is related to the absence of one-loop divergences in dimensionally regulated IIB supergravity. Comparisons and contrasts between self-dual field theory and the N=2 string theory are made at the quantum level; they have different S-matrices. Finally, we point to further relations with self-dual field theory and two-dimensional models.

  14. Security bound of two-basis quantum-key-distribution protocols using qudits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.; Alber, Gernot [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the security bounds of quantum-cryptographic protocols using d-level systems. In particular, we focus on schemes that use two mutually unbiased bases, thus extending the Bennett-Brassard 1984 quantum-key-distribution scheme to higher dimensions. Under the assumption of general coherent attacks, we derive an analytic expression for the ultimate upper security bound of such quantum-cryptography schemes. This bound is well below the predictions of optimal cloning machines. The possibility of extraction of a secret key beyond entanglement distillation is discussed. In the case of qutrits we argue that any eavesdropping strategy is equivalent to a symmetric one. For higher dimensions such an equivalence is generally no longer valid.

  15. Coherent Quantum Dynamics: What Fluctuations Can Tell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schliemann, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent states provide a natural connection of quantum systems to their classical limit and are employed in various fields of physics. Here we derive general systematic expansions, with respect to quantum parameters, of expectation values of products of arbitrary operators within both oscillator coherent states and SU(2) coherent states. In particular, we generally prove that the energy fluctuations of an arbitrary Hamiltonian are in leading order entirely due to the time dependence of the classical variables. These results add to the list of wellknown properties of coherent states and are applied here to the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, the Dicke model, and to coherent intertwiners in spin networks as considered in Loop Quantum Gravity.

  16. Noncommutative Deformations of Wightman Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Grosse; Gandalf Lechner

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum field theories on noncommutative Minkowski space are studied in a model-independent setting by treating the noncommutativity as a deformation of quantum field theories on commutative space. Starting from an arbitrary Wightman theory, we consider special vacuum representations of its Weyl-Wigner deformed counterpart. In such representations, the effect of the noncommutativity on the basic structures of Wightman theory, in particular the covariance, locality and regularity properties of the fields, the structure of the Wightman functions, and the commutative limit, is analyzed. Despite the nonlocal structure introduced by the noncommutativity, the deformed quantum fields can still be localized in certain wedge-shaped regions, and may therefore be used to compute noncommutative corrections to two-particle S-matrix elements.

  17. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Ü. C. Hardal; Özgür E. Müstecapl?oglu

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  18. Adiabatic Quantum Transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Crosswhite, Gregory M.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a many-body quantum system that can be made to quantum compute by the adiabatic application of a large applied field to the system. Prior to the application of the field, quantum information is localized on one boundary of the device, and after the application of the field, this information propagates to the other side of the device, with a quantum circuit applied to the information. The applied circuit depends on the many-body Hamiltonian of the material, and the computation takes place in a degenerate ground space with symmetry-protected topological order. Such “adiabatic quantum transistors” are universal adiabatic quantum computing devices that have the added benefit of being modular. Here, we describe this model, provide arguments for why it is an efficient model of quantum computing, and examine these many-body systems in the presence of a noisy environment.

  19. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Cesare; Andrew J. Landahl; Dave Bacon; Steven T. Flammia; Alice Neels

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  20. Quantum Thermodynamic Cycles and Quantum Heat Engines (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Quan

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum mechanical generalization of force or pressure, and then we extend the classical thermodynamic isobaric process to quantum mechanical systems. Based on these efforts, we are able to study the quantum version of thermodynamic cycles that consist of quantum isobaric process, such as quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle. We also consider the implementation of quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle with some model systems, such as single particle in 1D box and single-mode radiation field in a cavity. These studies lay the microscopic (quantum mechanical) foundation for Szilard-Zurek single molecule engine.

  1. Blind Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Arrighi; Louis Salvail

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of "having someone carry out the work of executing a function for you, but without letting him learn anything about your input". Say Alice wants Bob to compute some known function f upon her input x, but wants to prevent Bob from learning anything about x. The situation arises for instance if client Alice has limited computational resources in comparison with mistrusted server Bob, or if x is an inherently mobile piece of data. Could there be a protocol whereby Bob is forced to compute f(x) "blindly", i.e. without observing x? We provide such a blind computation protocol for the class of functions which admit an efficient procedure to generate random input-output pairs, e.g. factorization. The cheat-sensitive security achieved relies only upon quantum theory being true. The security analysis carried out assumes the eavesdropper performs individual attacks. Keywords: Secure Circuit Evaluation, Secure Two-party Computation, Information Hiding, Information gain vs disturbance.

  2. Quantum Fisher Information as the Convex Roof of Variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Fisher information places the fundamental limit to the accuracy of estimating an unknown parameter. Here we shall provide the quantum Fisher information an operational meaning: a mixed state can be so prepared that a given observable has the minimal averaged variance, which equals exactly to the quantum Fisher information for estimating an unknown parameter generated by the unitary dynamics with the given observable as Hamiltonian. In particular we shall prove that the quantum Fisher information is the convex roof of the variance, as conjectured by Toth and Petz based on numerical and analytical evidences, by constructing explicitly a pure-state ensemble of the given mixed state in which the averaged variance of a given observable equals to the quantum Fisher information.

  3. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  4. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitanvis, S M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  5. The effective field theory treatment of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donoghue, John F. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a pedagogical introduction to the treatment of quantum general relativity as an effective field theory. It starts with an overview of the methods of effective field theory and includes an explicit example. Quantum general relativity matches this framework and I discuss gravitational examples as well as the limits of the effective field theory. I also discuss the insights from effective field theory on the gravitational effects on running couplings in the perturbative regime.

  6. A necessary and sufficient condition to play games in quantum mechanical settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Junichi Shimamura; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum game theory is a multidisciplinary field which combines quantum mechanics with game theory by introducing non-classical resources such as entanglement, quantum operations and quantum measurement. By transferring two-player-two strategy (2x2) dilemma containing classical games into quantum realm, dilemmas can be resolved in quantum pure strategies if entanglement is distributed between the players who use quantum operations. Moreover, players receive the highest sum of payoffs available in the game, which are otherwise impossible in classical pure strategies. Encouraged by the observation of rich dynamics of physical systems with many interacting parties and the power of entanglement in quantum versions of 2x2 games, it became generally accepted that quantum versions can be easily extended to N-player situations by simply allowing N-partite entangled states. In this article, however, we show that this is not generally true because the reproducibility of classical tasks in quantum domain imposes limitations on the type of entanglement and quantum operators. We propose a benchmark for the evaluation of quantum and classical versions of games, and derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a physical realization. We give examples of entangled states that can and cannot be used, and the characteristics of quantum operators used as strategies.

  7. Observing single quantum trajectories of a superconducting qubit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. W. Murch; S. J. Weber; C. Macklin; I. Siddiqi

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The length of time that a quantum system can exist in a superposition state is determined by how strongly it interacts with its environment. This interaction entangles the quantum state with the inherent fluctuations of the environment. If these fluctuations are not measured, the environment can be viewed as a source of noise, causing random evolution of the quantum system from an initially pure state into a statistical mixture-a process known as decoherence. However, by accurately measuring the environment in real time, the quantum system can be maintained in a pure state and its time evolution described by a quantum trajectory conditioned on the measurement outcome. We employ weak measurements to monitor a microwave cavity embedding a superconducting qubit and track the individual quantum trajectories of the system. In this architecture, the environment is dominated by the fluctuations of a single electromagnetic mode of the cavity. Using a near-quantum-limited parametric amplifier, we selectively measure either the phase or amplitude of the cavity field, and thereby confine trajectories to either the equator or a meridian of the Bloch sphere. We perform quantum state tomography at discrete times along the trajectory to verify that we have faithfully tracked the state of the quantum system as it diffuses on the surface of the Bloch sphere. Our results demonstrate that decoherence can be mitigated by environmental monitoring and validate the foundations of quantum feedback approaches based on Bayesian statistics. Moreover, our experiments suggest a new route for implementing what Schrodinger termed "quantum steering"-harnessing action at a distance to manipulate quantum states via measurement.

  8. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS FOR LIMITATION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    direction to deploy HPSS at computing centers for operational use in high performance computing environments. The ultimate goal is the continued viability of this...

  9. Quantum Process Tomography via L1-norm Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Kosut

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For an initially well designed but imperfect quantum information system, the process matrix is almost sparse in an appropriate basis. Existing theory and associated computational methods (L1-norm minimization) for reconstructing sparse signals establish conditions under which the sparse signal can be perfectly reconstructed from a very limited number of measurements (resources). Although a direct extension to quantum process tomography of the L1-norm minimization theory has not yet emerged, the numerical examples presented here, which apply L1-norm minimization to quantum process tomography, show a significant reduction in resources to achieve a desired estimation accuracy over existing methods.

  10. How to pull yourself up by your adversary's quantum discord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmo Lupo; Seth Lloyd

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum physics allows us to certify the security of a communication line against an eavesdropper with unbounded computational power. The achievable rates of quantum secured communication are also limited by the laws of quantum physics and in particular by the properties of entanglement. For the most relevant case of a lossy communication line, this implies that the secret key generation rate vanishes at least exponentially with the distance. In this letter we show that this fundamental limitation can be violated by a constant amount if one seeks secrecy against an eavesdropper still endowed with unlimited computational power but capable of storing quantum information only for a limited time. Under this relaxed but still concrete security assumption, we show that the phenomenon of quantum data locking can be harnessed to bootstrap a `locked' key at a rate as high as the eavesdropper's quantum discord. For the case of the lossy bononic channel, this yields a constant locked key generation rate of one bit per mode over arbitrarily long communication distances.

  11. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  12. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  13. An Introduction to Quantum Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Matthew

    , stochastic control, quantum control, systems biology, networks, etc modern control #12;Quantum Control: Control of physical systems whose behaviour is dominated by the laws of quantum mechanics. 2003: Dowling of Quantum Control: controller quantum system control actions #12;· Closed loop - control actions depend

  14. Quantum process tomography with coherent states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh Rahimi-Keshari; Artur Scherer; Ady Mann; Ali T. Rezakhani; A. I. Lvovsky; Barry C. Sanders

    2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an enhanced technique for characterizing quantum optical processes based on probing unknown quantum processes only with coherent states. Our method substantially improves the original proposal [M. Lobino et al., Science 322, 563 (2008)], which uses a filtered Glauber-Sudarshan decomposition to determine the effect of the process on an arbitrary state. We introduce a new relation between the action of a general quantum process on coherent state inputs and its action on an arbitrary quantum state. This relation eliminates the need to invoke the Glauber-Sudarshan representation for states; hence it dramatically simplifies the task of process identification and removes a potential source of error. The new relation also enables straightforward extensions of the method to multi-mode and non-trace-preserving processes. We illustrate our formalism with several examples, in which we derive analytic representations of several fundamental quantum optical processes in the Fock basis. In particular, we introduce photon-number cutoff as a reasonable physical resource limitation and address resource vs accuracy trade-off in practical applications. We show that the accuracy of process estimation scales inversely with the square root of photon-number cutoff.

  15. Generalized quantum defect methods in quantum chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altunata, Serhan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction matrix of multichannel quantum defect theory, K, gives a complete picture of the electronic structure and the electron - nuclear dynamics for a molecule. The reaction matrix can be used to examine both bound ...

  16. Fast quantum algorithm for numerical gradient estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen P. Jordan

    2005-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a blackbox for f, a smooth real scalar function of d real variables, one wants to estimate the gradient of f at a given point with n bits of precision. On a classical computer this requires a minimum of d+1 blackbox queries, whereas on a quantum computer it requires only one query regardless of d. The number of bits of precision to which f must be evaluated matches the classical requirement in the limit of large n.

  17. On the "principle of the quantumness", the quantumness of Relativity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    -priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field of Quantum Gravity--Lucien Hardy would say. Or, even to a more profound understanding of the whole Physics

  18. Quantum Signatures of Spacetime Graininess Quantum Signatures of Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum Field Theory on Noncommutative Spacetime Implementing Poincaré Symmetry Hopf Algebras, Drinfel Quantum Mechanics on Noncommutative Spacetime 4 Quantum Field Theory on Noncommutative Spacetime Covariant Derivatives and Field Strength Noncommutative Gauge Theories 6 Signatures of Spin

  19. Revealing Quantum Advantage in a Quantum Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaushiki Mukherjee; Biswajit Paul; Debasis Sarkar

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of source independence was used to reveal nonlocal (apart from standard Bell-CHSH scenario) nature of correlations generated in entanglement swapping experiments. In this work, we have derived a set of sufficient criteria, imposed on the states (produced by the sources) under which source independence can reveal nonbilocal nature of correlations in a quantum network. To show this, we have considered real two qubit X states thereby discussing the various utilities of assuming source independence in a quantum network.

  20. Raman-induced limits to efficient squeezing in optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruifang Dong; Joel Heersink; Joel F. Corney; Peter D. Drummond; Ulrik L. Andersen; Gerd Leuchs

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new experiments on polarization squeezing using ultrashort photonic pulses in a single pass of a birefringent fiber. We measure what is to our knowledge a record squeezing of -6.8 +/- 0.3 dB in optical fibers which when corrected for linear losses is -10.4 +/- 0.8 dB. The measured polarization squeezing as a function of optical pulse energy, which spans a wide range from 3.5-178.8 pJ, shows a very good agreement with the quantum simulations and for the first time we see the experimental proof that Raman effects limit and reduce squeezing at high pulse energy.

  1. Photonic quantum technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien; Akira Furusawa; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first quantum technology, which harnesses uniquely quantum mechanical effects for its core operation, has arrived in the form of commercially available quantum key distribution systems that achieve enhanced security by encoding information in photons such that information gained by an eavesdropper can be detected. Anticipated future quantum technologies include large-scale secure networks, enhanced measurement and lithography, and quantum information processors, promising exponentially greater computation power for particular tasks. Photonics is destined for a central role in such technologies owing to the need for high-speed transmission and the outstanding low-noise properties of photons. These technologies may use single photons or quantum states of bright laser beams, or both, and will undoubtably apply and drive state-of-the-art developments in photonics.

  2. Generalized quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Srikanth, R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Optics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore-560080 (India)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a generalization of quantum secret sharing (QSS) in which classical shares play a complementary role to quantum shares, exploring further consequences of an idea first studied by Nascimento, Mueller-Quade, and Imai [Phys. Rev. A 64, 042311 (2001)]. We examine three ways, termed inflation, compression, and twin thresholding, by which the proportion of classical shares can be augmented. This has the important application that it reduces quantum (information processing) players by replacing them with their classical counterparts, thereby making quantum secret sharing considerably easier and less expensive to implement in a practical setting. In compression, a QSS scheme is turned into an equivalent scheme with fewer quantum players, compensated for by suitable classical shares. In inflation, a QSS scheme is enlarged by adding only classical shares and players. In a twin-threshold scheme, we invoke two separate thresholds for classical and quantum shares based on the idea of information dilution.

  3. Page 1 of 14 UNSW Foundation Limited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , Coca-Cola Amatil Limited and Ingeus Limited. David is Chairman of the National E-Health Transition

  4. Quantum Non-Demolition Detection of Polar Molecule Complexes: Dimers, Trimers, Tetramers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor B. Mekhov

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical nondestructive method for in situ detection of the bound states of ultracold polar molecules is developed. It promises a minimally destructive measurement scheme up to a physically exciting quantum non-demolition (QND) level. The detection of molecular complexes beyond simple pairs of quantum particles (dimers, known, e.g., from the BEC-BCS theory) is suggested, including three-body (trimers) and four-body (tertramers) complexes trapped by one-dimensional tubes. The intensity of scattered light is sensitive to the molecule number fluctuations beyond the mean-density approximation. Such fluctuations are very different for various complexes, which leads to radically different light scattering. This type of research extends "quantum optics of quantum gases" to the field of ultracold molecules. Merging the quantum optical and ultracold gas problems will advance the experimental efforts towards the study of the light-matter interaction at its ultimate quantum level, where the quantizations of both light and matter are equally important.

  5. INSTITUTE for QUANTUM STRUCTURES AND DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Steven S.

    , and #12;the design and fabrication of quantum devices based on magnetic, quantum dot, and superconducting

  6. Heisenberg-limited metrology with a squeezed vacuum state, three-mode mixing and information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonekaboni, Behnam; Szigeti, Stuart S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that quantum-enhanced atom interferometry can be achieved by mapping the quantum state of squeezed optical vacuum to one of the atomic inputs via a beamsplitter-like process [Phys.~Rev.~A \\textbf{90}, 063630 (2014)]. Here we ask the question: is a better phase sensitivity possible if the quantum state transfer (QST) is described by a three-mode-mixing model, rather than a beamsplitter? The answer is yes, but only if the portion of the optical state not transferred to the atoms is incorporated via information recycling. Surprisingly, our scheme gives a better sensitivity for lower QST efficiencies, and with a sufficiently large degree of squeezing can attain near-Heisenberg-limited sensitivities for arbitrarily small QST efficiencies. Furthermore, we use the quantum Fisher information to demonstrate the near-optimality of our scheme.

  7. Heisenberg-limited metrology with a squeezed vacuum state, three-mode mixing, and information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnam Tonekaboni; Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that quantum-enhanced atom interferometry can be achieved by mapping the quantum state of squeezed optical vacuum to one of the atomic inputs via a beamsplitter-like process [Phys.~Rev.~A \\textbf{90}, 063630 (2014)]. Here we ask the question: is a better phase sensitivity possible if the quantum state transfer (QST) is described by a three-mode-mixing model, rather than a beamsplitter? The answer is yes, but only if the portion of the optical state not transferred to the atoms is incorporated via information recycling. Surprisingly, our scheme gives a better sensitivity for lower QST efficiencies and with a sufficiently large degree of squeezing can attain near-Heisenberg-limited sensitivities for arbitrarily small QST efficiencies. Furthermore, we use the quantum Fisher information to demonstrate the near optimality of our scheme.

  8. Dynamics of a Simple Quantum System in a Complex Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aurel Bulgac; Gui DoDang; Dimitri Kusnezov

    1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory for the dynamical evolution of a quantum system coupled to a complex many-body intrinsic system/environment. By modelling the intrinsic many-body system with parametric random matrices, we study the types of effective stochastic models which emerge from random matrix theory. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we derive the influence functional and obtain either analytical or numerical solutions for the time evolution of the entire quantum system. We discuss thoroughly the structure of the solutions for some representative cases and make connections to well known limiting results, particularly to Brownian motion, Kramers classical limit and the Caldeira-Leggett approach.

  9. Underdamped quantum ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Denisov; S. Kohler; P. Hanggi

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum ratchet effect under the influence of weak dissipation which we treat within a Floquet-Markov master equation approach. A ratchet current emerges when all relevant symmetries are violated. Using time-reversal symmetric driving we predict a purely dissipation-induced quantum ratchet current. This directed quantum transport results from bath-induced superpositions of non-transporting Floquet states.

  10. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G. [Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale G. Ferraris, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); ELSAG SpA, Via Puccini 2, 16154, Genova (Italy)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  11. Quantum information science as an approach to complex quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Nielsen

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    What makes quantum information science a science? These notes explore the idea that quantum information science may offer a powerful approach to the study of complex quantum systems. We discuss how to quantify complexity in quantum systems, and argue that there are two qualitatively different types of complex quantum system. We also explore ways of understanding complex quantum dynamics by quantifying the strength of a quantum dynamical operation as a physical resource. This is the text for a talk at the ``Sixth International Conference on Quantum Communication, Measurement and Computing'', held at MIT, July 2002. Viewgraphs for the talk may be found at http://www.qinfo.org/talks/.

  12. FOURIER TRANSFORM MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drobny, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of transition observed in Fourier transform multiple quantumDecember 18-19, 1979 FOURIER TRANSFORM MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMRof London, December 1978. FOURIER TRANSFO~~ MULTIPLE QUANTUM

  13. Vacuum Energy in Quantum Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the vacuum energy in quantum graphs. Vacuum energy arose in quantum physics but has an independent mathematical interest as a functional carrying information about the eigenvalue spectrum of a system. A quantum graph is a metric graph...

  14. Quantum Mind from a Classical Field Theory of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Zizzi

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that, with regard to a theory of quantum mind, brain processes can be described by a classical, dissipative, non-abelian gauge theory. In fact, such a theory has a hidden quantum nature due to its non-abelian character, which is revealed through dissipation, when the theory reduces to a quantum vacuum, where temperatures are of the order of absolute zero, and coherence of quantum states is preserved. We consider in particular the case of pure SU(2) gauge theory with a special anzatz for the gauge field, which breaks Lorentz invariance. In the ansatz, a contraction mapping plays the role of dissipation. In the limit of maximal dissipation, which corresponds to the attractive fixed point of the contraction mapping, the gauge fields reduce, up to constant factors, to the Pauli quantum gates for one-qubit states. Then tubuline-qubits can be processed in the quantum vacuum of the classical field theory of the brain, where decoherence is avoided due to the extremely low temperature. Finally, we interpret the classical SU(2) dissipative gauge theory as the quantum metalanguage (relative to the quantum logic of qubits), which holds the non-algorithmic aspect of the mind.

  15. Signal Flows in Non-Markovian Linear Quantum Feedback Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Bing Wu; Jing Zhang; Yu-xi Liu; Tzyh-Jong Tarn

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Enabled by rapidly developing quantum technologies, it is possible to network quantum systems at a much larger scale in the near future. To deal with non-Markovian dynamics that is prevalent in solid-state devices, we propose a general transfer function based framework for modeling linear quantum networks, in which signal flow graphs are applied to characterize the network topology by flow of quantum signals. We define a noncommutative ring $\\mathbb{D}$ and use its elements to construct Hamiltonians, transformations and transfer functions for both active and passive systems. The signal flow graph obtained for direct and indirect coherent quantum feedback systems clearly show the feedback loop via bidirectional signal flows. Importantly, the transfer function from input to output field is derived for non-Markovian quantum systems with colored inputs, from which the Markovian input-output relation can be easily obtained as a limiting case. Moreover, the transfer function possesses a symmetry structure that is analogous to the well-know scattering transformation in \\sd picture. Finally, we show that these transfer functions can be integrated to build complex feedback networks via interconnections, serial products and feedback, which may include either direct or indirect coherent feedback loops, and transfer functions between quantum signal nodes can be calculated by the Riegle's matrix gain rule. The theory paves the way for modeling, analyzing and synthesizing non-Markovian linear quantum feedback networks in the frequency-domain.

  16. Generalizations of quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. W. Greenberg

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review generalizations of quantum statistics, including parabose, parafermi, and quon statistics, but not including anyon statistics, which is special to two dimensions.

  17. Rotational Quantum Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rongkuo Zhao; Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier García de Abajo; J. B. Pendry

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the frictional forces due to quantum fluctuations acting on a small sphere rotating near a surface. At zero temperature, we find the frictional force near a surface to be several orders of magnitude larger than that for the sphere rotating in vacuum. For metallic materials with typical conductivity, quantum friction is maximized by matching the frequency of rotation with the conductivity. Materials with poor conductivity are favored to obtain large quantum frictions. For semiconductor materials that are able to support surface plasmon polaritons, quantum friction can be further enhanced by several orders of magnitude due to the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons.

  18. Quantum mechanical Carnot engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bender, C M; Meister, B K

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclic thermodynamic heat engine runs most efficiently if it is reversible. Carnot constructed such a reversible heat engine by combining adiabatic and isothermal processes for a system containing an ideal gas. Here, we present an example of a cyclic engine based on a single quantum-mechanical particle confined to a potential well. The efficiency of this engine is shown to equal the Carnot efficiency because quantum dynamics is reversible. The quantum heat engine has a cycle consisting of adiabatic and isothermal quantum processes that are close analogues of the corresponding classical processes.

  19. Quantum mechanical Carnot engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Bender; D. C. Brody; B. K. Meister

    2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclic thermodynamic heat engine runs most efficiently if it is reversible. Carnot constructed such a reversible heat engine by combining adiabatic and isothermal processes for a system containing an ideal gas. Here, we present an example of a cyclic engine based on a single quantum-mechanical particle confined to a potential well. The efficiency of this engine is shown to equal the Carnot efficiency because quantum dynamics is reversible. The quantum heat engine has a cycle consisting of adiabatic and isothermal quantum processes that are close analogues of the corresponding classical processes.

  20. QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Januaryas it occurs in modern photosynthesis can only take place inof the problem or photosynthesis, or any specific aspect of

  1. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Ü. C. Hardal; Özgür E. Müstecapl?oglu

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum physics has revolutionized the classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. It modernized our society with many advances such as lasers and transistors. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to the quantum regimes. Inevitably, development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires investigations of thermodynamical principles from quantum mechanical perspective, and motivates the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate on whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative that quantum coherence can be a catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work capability of the QHE becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up a QHE, our results reveal a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  2. Multiparty quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Zhanjun [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li Yong [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Man Zhongxiao [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol [Phys. Rev. A 69 052319 (2004)], we propose a (n,n)-threshold scheme of multiparty quantum secret sharing of classical messages (QSSCM) using only single photons. We take advantage of this multiparty QSSCM scheme to establish a scheme of multiparty secret sharing of quantum information (SSQI), in which only all quantum information receivers collaborate can the original qubit be reconstructed. A general idea is also proposed for constructing multiparty SSQI schemes from any QSSCM scheme.

  3. Geometric Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekert, A K; Hayden, P; Inamori, H; Jones, J A; Oi, D K L; Vedral, V

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe in detail a general strategy for implementing a conditional geometric phase between two spins. Combined with single-spin operations, this simple operation is a universal gate for quantum computation, in that any unitary transformation can be implemented with arbitrary precision using only single-spin operations and conditional phase shifts. Thus quantum geometrical phases can form the basis of any quantum computation. Moreover, as the induced conditional phase depends only on the geometry of the paths executed by the spins it is resilient to certain types of errors and offers the potential of a naturally fault-tolerant way of performing quantum computation.

  4. Geometric Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ekert; M. Ericsson; P. Hayden; H. Inamori; J. A. Jones; D. K. L. Oi; V. Vedral

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe in detail a general strategy for implementing a conditional geometric phase between two spins. Combined with single-spin operations, this simple operation is a universal gate for quantum computation, in that any unitary transformation can be implemented with arbitrary precision using only single-spin operations and conditional phase shifts. Thus quantum geometrical phases can form the basis of any quantum computation. Moreover, as the induced conditional phase depends only on the geometry of the paths executed by the spins it is resilient to certain types of errors and offers the potential of a naturally fault-tolerant way of performing quantum computation.

  5. Quantum Dots: Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vukmirovic, Nenad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petersilka, Density Functional Theory (Springer, New York,Quantum Dots: Theory Nenad Vukmirovi´ and Lin-Wang Wang cdensity functional theory; electronic structure; empirical

  6. Cooling and Heating of the Quantum Motion of Trapped Cd+ Louis Deslauriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Christopher

    ABSTRACT Cooling and Heating of the Quantum Motion of Trapped Cd+ Ions by Louis Deslauriers Chair information processor has seen tremendous progress in many fields of physics. In the last decade, trapped ions for entanglement generation limiting the fidelity of quantum logic gates. Effective ground state cooling of trapped

  7. Quantum Ground State and Single Phonon Control of a Mechanical Resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    -limited measurements must then be demonstrated. Here, using conventional cryo- genic refrigeration, we show that we can, eases the stringent temperature requirements, and when combined with quantum optics-based refrigeration conventional cryogenic refrigeration, we show that we can demonstrably cool a mechanical mode to its quantum

  8. Unified theory of bound and scattering molecular Rydberg states as quantum maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, Maurice

    of the quantum analysis of such states was the Quantum Defect Theory (see e.g. the review article by Seaton [1, the levels near the ionization limit follow the hydrogenic Rydberg law En = -Ry/(n+d)2 , with only a constant of this anisotropy on the ionic potential decays faster with distance r than the point charge 1/r Coulomb po- tential

  9. The Quantum Affine Origin of the AdS/CFT Secret Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marius de Leeuw; Vidas Regelskis; Alessandro Torrielli

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a new quantum affine symmetry of the S-matrix of the one-dimensional Hubbard chain. We show that this symmetry originates from the quantum affine superalgebra U_q(gl(2|2)), and in the rational limit exactly reproduces the secret symmetry of the AdS/CFT worldsheet S-matrix.

  10. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)] [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q., E-mail: qaisarm@ncp.edu.pk [National Center for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H?=?2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H?=?2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  11. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T. [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  12. Cavity-enabled spin squeezing for a quantum-enhanced atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleier-Smith, Monika Helene

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past decade, the stability of microwave atomic clocks has stood at the standard quantum limit, set by the projection noise inherent in measurements on ensembles of uncorrelated particles. Here, I demonstrate an ...

  13. Quantum measure and integration theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Gudder

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article begins with a review of quantum measure spaces. Quantum forms and indefinite inner-product spaces are then discussed. The main part of the paper introduces a quantum integral and derives some of its properties. The quantum integral's form for simple functions is characterized and it is shown that the quantum integral generalizes the Lebesgue integral. A bounded, monotone convergence theorem for quantum integrals is obtained and it is shown that a Radon-Nikodym type theorem does not hold for quantum measures. As an example, a quantum-Lebesgue integral on the real line is considered.

  14. Some foundational aspects of quantum computers and quantum robots.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.; Physics

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses foundational issues related to quantum computing. The need for a universally valid theory such as quantum mechanics to describe to some extent its own validation is noted. This includes quantum mechanical descriptions of systems that do theoretical calculations (i.e. quantum computers) and systems that perform experiments. Quantum robots interacting with an environment are a small first step in this direction. Quantum robots are described here as mobile quantum systems with on-board quantum computers that interact with environments. Included are discussions on the carrying out of tasks and the division of tasks into computation and action phases. Specific models based on quantum Turing machines are described. Differences and similarities between quantum robots plus environments and quantum computers are discussed.

  15. Scattering resonances as viscosity limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Zworski

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the method of complex scaling we show that scattering resonances of $ - \\Delta + V $, $ V \\in L^\\infty_{\\rm{c}} ( \\mathbb R^n ) $, are limits of eigenvalues of $ - \\Delta + V - i \\epsilon x^2 $ as $ \\epsilon \\to 0+ $. That justifies a method proposed in computational chemistry and reflects a general principle for resonances in other settings.

  16. Model checking quantum Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan Feng; Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the security of quantum cryptography is provable based on the principles of quantum mechanics, it can be compromised by the flaws in the design of quantum protocols and the noise in their physical implementations. So, it is indispensable to develop techniques of verifying and debugging quantum cryptographic systems. Model-checking has proved to be effective in the verification of classical cryptographic protocols, but an essential difficulty arises when it is applied to quantum systems: the state space of a quantum system is always a continuum even when its dimension is finite. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a novel notion of quantum Markov chain, specially suited to model quantum cryptographic protocols, in which quantum effects are entirely encoded into super-operators labelling transitions, leaving the location information (nodes) being classical. Then we define a quantum extension of probabilistic computation tree logic (PCTL) and develop a model-checking algorithm for quantum Markov chains.

  17. Model checking quantum Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yuan; Ying, Mingsheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the security of quantum cryptography is provable based on the principles of quantum mechanics, it can be compromised by the flaws in the design of quantum protocols and the noise in their physical implementations. So, it is indispensable to develop techniques of verifying and debugging quantum cryptographic systems. Model-checking has proved to be effective in the verification of classical cryptographic protocols, but an essential difficulty arises when it is applied to quantum systems: the state space of a quantum system is always a continuum even when its dimension is finite. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a novel notion of quantum Markov chain, specially suited to model quantum cryptographic protocols, in which quantum effects are entirely encoded into super-operators labelling transitions, leaving the location information (nodes) being classical. Then we define a quantum extension of probabilistic computation tree logic (PCTL) and develop a model-checking algorithm for quantum Markov c...

  18. Thermalization in Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of equilibrated states. iv. Definition for "quantum integrability". v. Many-body localization... vi. Open systems () 0 = ||2 . ETH: is approximately constant in the "energy window" of the state . ETH: For all 10 #12;Integrability 101 Quantum Integrability Classical systems: Definition: A system is integrable

  19. Are quantum states real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucien Hardy

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider theories in which reality is described by some underlying variables. Each value these variables can take represents an ontic state (a particular state of reality). The preparation of a quantum state corresponds to a distribution over the ontic states. If we make three basic assumptions, we can show that the distributions over ontic states corresponding to distinct pure states are non-overlapping. This means that we can deduce the quantum state from a knowledge of the ontic state. Hence, if these assumptions are correct, we can claim that the quantum state is a real thing (it is written into the underlying variables that describe reality). The key assumption we use in this proof is ontic indifference - that quantum transformations that do not affect a given pure quantum state can be implemented in such a way that they do not affect the ontic states in the support of that state. In fact this assumption is violated in the Spekkens toy model (which captures many aspects of quantum theory and in which different pure states of the model have overlapping distributions over ontic states). This paper proves that ontic indifference must be violated in any model reproducing quantum theory in which the quantum state is not a real thing. The argument presented in this paper is different from that given in a recent paper by Pusey, Barrett, and Rudolph. It uses a different key assumption and it pertains to a single copy of the system in question.

  20. Quantum Sequence States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. V. Mendes; R. V. Ramos

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper it has been shown how to create a quantum state related to the prime number sequence using Grover's algorithm. Moreover, its multiqubit entanglement was analyzed. In the present work, we compare the multiqubit entanglement of several quantum sequence states as well we study the feasibility of producing such states using Grover's algorithm.

  1. Quantum motor and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny G. Fateev

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a popular language, the possibilities of the Casimir expulsion effect are presented, which can be the basis of quantum motors. Such motors can be in the form of a special multilayer thin film with periodic and complex nanosized structures. Quantum motors of the type of the Casimir platforms can be the base of transportation, energy and many other systems in the future.

  2. Eutactic quantum codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svozil, Karl [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, University of Technology Vienna, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/136, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider sets of quantum observables corresponding to eutactic stars. Eutactic stars are systems of vectors which are the lower-dimensional 'shadow' image, the orthogonal view, of higher-dimensional orthonormal bases. Although these vector systems are not comeasurable, they represent redundant coordinate bases with remarkable properties. One application is quantum secret sharing.

  3. Quantum weak turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Devashish [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta 700032 (India)]. E-mail: tpds@mahendra.iacs.res.in; Sen, Siddhartha [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: sen@maths.tcd.ie

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present manuscript dealing with large occupation of states of a quantum system, extends the study to the case of quantum weak turbulence. The quasiparticle spectrum, calculated for such a system, using a Green's function approach, establishes the dissipative and inertial regimes, hence a Kolmogorov type of picture.

  4. Quantum universality by state distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben W. Reichardt

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum universality can be achieved using classically controlled stabilizer operations and repeated preparation of certain ancilla states. Which ancilla states suffice for universality? This "magic states distillation" question is closely related to quantum fault tolerance. Lower bounds on the noise tolerable on the ancilla help give lower bounds on the tolerable noise rate threshold for fault-tolerant computation. Upper bounds show the limits of threshold upper-bound arguments based on the Gottesman-Knill theorem. We extend the range of single-qubit mixed states that are known to give universality, by using a simple parity-checking operation. For applications to proving threshold lower bounds, certain practical stability characteristics are often required, and we also show a stable distillation procedure. No distillation upper bounds are known beyond those given by the Gottesman-Knill theorem. One might ask whether distillation upper bounds reduce to upper bounds for single-qubit ancilla states. For multi-qubit pure states and previously considered two-qubit ancilla states, the answer is yes. However, we exhibit two-qubit mixed states that are not mixtures of stabilizer states, but for which every postselected stabilizer reduction from two qubits to one outputs a mixture of stabilizer states. Distilling such states would require true multi-qubit state distillation methods.

  5. Optimal Performance of Quantum Refrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tova Feldmann; Ronnie Kosloff

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reciprocating quantum refrigerator is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. We find that if the energy spectrum of the working medium possesses an uncontrollable gap, then there is a minimum achievable temperature above zero. Such a gap, combined with a negligible amount of noise, prevents adiabatic following during the demagnetization stage which is the necessary condition for reaching $T_c \\to 0$. The refrigerator is based on an Otto cycle where the working medium is an interacting spin system with an energy gap. For this system the external control Hamiltonian does not commute with the internal interaction. As a result during the demagnetization and magnetization segments of the operating cycle the system cannot follow adiabatically the temporal change in the energy levels. We connect the nonadiabatic dynamics to quantum friction. An adiabatic measure is defined characterizing the rate of change of the Hamiltonian. Closed form solutions are found for a constant adiabatic measure for all the cycle segments. We have identified a family of quantized frictionless cycles with increasing cycle times. These cycles minimize the entropy production. Such frictionless cycles are able to cool to $T_c=0$. External noise on the controls eliminates these frictionless cycles. The influence of phase and amplitude noise on the demagnetization and magnetization segments is explicitly derived. An extensive numerical study of optimal cooling cycles was carried out which showed that at sufficiently low temperature the noise always dominates restricting the minimum temperature.

  6. Permutational Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen P. Jordan

    2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In topological quantum computation the geometric details of a particle trajectory are irrelevant; only the topology matters. Taking this one step further, we consider a model of computation that disregards even the topology of the particle trajectory, and computes by permuting particles. Whereas topological quantum computation requires anyons, permutational quantum computation can be performed with ordinary spin-1/2 particles, using a variant of the spin-network scheme of Marzuoli and Rasetti. We do not know whether permutational computation is universal. It may represent a new complexity class within BQP. Nevertheless, permutational quantum computers can in polynomial time approximate matrix elements of certain irreducible representations of the symmetric group and simulate certain processes in the Ponzano-Regge spin foam model of quantum gravity. No polynomial time classical algorithms for these problems are known.

  7. High Performance Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon J. Devitt; William J. Munro; Kae Nemoto

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The architecture scalability afforded by recent proposals of a large scale photonic based quantum computer, utilizing the theoretical developments of topological cluster states and the photonic chip, allows us to move on to a discussion of massively scaled Quantum Information Processing (QIP). In this letter we introduce the model for a secure and unsecured topological cluster mainframe. We consider the quantum analogue of High Performance Computing, where a dedicated server farm is utilized by many users to run algorithms and share quantum data. The scaling structure of photonics based topological cluster computing leads to an attractive future for server based QIP, where dedicated mainframes can be constructed and/or expanded to serve an increasingly hungry user base with the ideal resource for individual quantum information processing.

  8. Quench Dynamics of Isolated Many-Body Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Torres-Herrera; Lea F. Santos

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study isolated quantum systems with two-body interactions after a quench. In these systems, the energy shell is a Gaussian of width $\\sigma$, and it gives the maximum possible spreading of the energy distribution of the initial states. When the distribution achieves this shape, the fidelity decay can be Gaussian until saturation. This establishes a lower bound for the fidelity decay in realistic systems. An ultimate bound for systems with many-body interactions is also derived based on the analysis of full random matrices. We find excellent agreement between numerical and analytical results. We also provide the conditions under which the short-time dynamics of few-body observables is controlled by $\\sigma$. The analyses are developed for systems, initial states, and observables accessible to experiments.

  9. Quantum Information Processing with Finite Resources - Mathematical Foundations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Tomamichel

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the predominant challenges when engineering future quantum information processors is that large quantum systems are notoriously hard to maintain and control accurately. It is therefore of immediate practical relevance to investigate quantum information processing with limited physical resources, for example to ask: How well can we perform information processing tasks if we only have access to a small quantum device? Can we beat fundamental limits imposed on information processing with classical resources? This book will introduce the reader to the mathematical framework required to answer such questions. The focus is on measures of entropy and information that underly finite resource information theory, in particular Renyi and smooth entropies. We will review quantum generalizations of Renyi entropies and discuss their properties in detail. Smooth entropies are variants of Renyi entropies that have found various applications ranging from quantum cryptography to thermodynamics. A particular goal of this book is to give simple and concise proofs of the most important properties of Renyi and smooth entropies. A few specific applications of the framework are discussed.

  10. The quantum field theory interpretation of quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto C. de la Torre

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that adopting the \\emph{Quantum Field} ---extended entity in space-time build by dynamic appearance propagation and annihilation of virtual particles--- as the primary ontology the astonishing features of quantum mechanics can be rendered intuitive. This interpretation of quantum mechanics follows from the formalism of the most successful theory in physics: quantum field theory.

  11. Quantum secret sharing schemes and reversibility of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Tomohiro [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan); Sasaki, Akira [Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, 1-3-2, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0005 (Japan); Iwamoto, Mitsugu [Graduate School of Information Systems, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan); Yamamoto, Hirosuke [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan)

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum secret sharing schemes encrypting a quantum state into a multipartite entangled state are treated. The lower bound on the dimension of each share given by Gottesman [Phys. Rev. A 61, 042311 (2000)] is revisited based on a relation between the reversibility of quantum operations and the Holevo information. We also propose a threshold ramp quantum secret sharing scheme and evaluate its coding efficiency.

  12. Quantum theory Bohrification: topos theory and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spitters, Bas

    Quantum theory Bohrification: topos theory and quantum theory Bas Spitters Domains XI, 9/9/2014 Bas Spitters Bohrification: topos theory and quantum theory #12;Quantum theory Point-free Topology The axiom, Krein-Millman, Alaoglu, Hahn-Banach, Gelfand, Zariski, ... Bas Spitters Bohrification: topos theory

  13. Universal blind quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Broadbent; Joseph Fitzsimons; Elham Kashefi

    2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a protocol which allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for her such that the client's inputs, outputs and computation remain perfectly private, and where she does not require any quantum computational power or memory. The client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. Our protocol is interactive: after the initial preparation of quantum states, the client and server use two-way classical communication which enables the client to drive the computation, giving single-qubit measurement instructions to the server, depending on previous measurement outcomes. Our protocol works for inputs and outputs that are either classical or quantum. We give an authentication protocol that allows the client to detect an interfering server; our scheme can also be made fault-tolerant. We also generalize our result to the setting of a purely classical client who communicates classically with two non-communicating entangled servers, in order to perform a blind quantum computation. By incorporating the authentication protocol, we show that any problem in BQP has an entangled two-prover interactive proof with a purely classical verifier. Our protocol is the first universal scheme which detects a cheating server, as well as the first protocol which does not require any quantum computation whatsoever on the client's side. The novelty of our approach is in using the unique features of measurement-based quantum computing which allows us to clearly distinguish between the quantum and classical aspects of a quantum computation.

  14. Einstein and the Quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virendra Singh

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We review here the main contributions of Einstein to the quantum theory. To put them in perspective we first give an account of Physics as it was before him. It is followed by a brief account of the problem of black body radiation which provided the context for Planck to introduce the idea of quantum. Einstein's revolutionary paper of 1905 on light-quantum hypothesis is then described as well as an application of this idea to the photoelectric effect. We next take up a discussion of Einstein's other contributions to old quantum theory. These include (i) his theory of specific heat of solids, which was the first application of quantum theory to matter, (ii) his discovery of wave-particle duality for light and (iii) Einstein's A and B coefficients relating to the probabilities of emission and absorption of light by atomic systems and his discovery of radiation stimulated emission of light which provides the basis for laser action. We then describe Einstein's contribution to quantum statistics viz Bose-Einstein Statistics and his prediction of Bose-Einstein condensation of a boson gas. Einstein played a pivotal role in the discovery of Quantum mechanics and this is briefly mentioned. After 1925 Einstein's contributed mainly to the foundations of Quantum Mechanics. We choose to discuss here (i) his Ensemble (or Statistical) Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and (ii) the discovery of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) correlations and the EPR theorem on the conflict between Einstein-Locality and the completeness of the formalism of Quantum Mechanics. We end with some comments on later developments.

  15. Global quantum discord and quantum phase transition in XY model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si-Yuan Liu; Yu-Ran Zhang; Wen-Li Yang; Heng Fan

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship between the behavior of global quantum correlations and quantum phase transitions in XY model. We find that the two kinds of phase transitions in the studied model can be characterized by the features of global quantum discord (GQD) and the corresponding quantum correlations. We demonstrate that the maximum of the sum of all the nearest neighbor bipartite GQDs is effective and accurate for signaling the Ising quantum phase transition, in contrast, the sudden change of GQD is very suitable for characterizing another phase transition in the XY model. This may shed lights on the study of properties of quantum correlations in different quantum phases.

  16. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  17. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  18. Continuous-variable quantum-state sharing via quantum disentanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance, Andrew M.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bowen, Warwick P. [Quantum Optics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Quantum Optics Group, Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Sanders, Barry C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tyc, Tomas [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Ralph, T.C. [Department of Physics, University of Queensland, St. Lucia QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-state sharing is a protocol where perfect reconstruction of quantum states is achieved with incomplete or partial information in a multipartite quantum network. Quantum-state sharing allows for secure communication in a quantum network where partial information is lost or acquired by malicious parties. This protocol utilizes entanglement for the secret-state distribution and a class of 'quantum disentangling' protocols for the state reconstruction. We demonstrate a quantum-state sharing protocol in which a tripartite entangled state is used to encode and distribute a secret state to three players. Any two of these players can collaborate to reconstruct the secret state, while individual players obtain no information. We investigate a number of quantum disentangling processes and experimentally demonstrate quantum-state reconstruction using two of these protocols. We experimentally measure a fidelity, averaged over all reconstruction permutations, of F=0.73{+-}0.02. A result achievable only by using quantum resources.

  19. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  20. Quantum Correlation in One-dimensional Extend Quantum Compass Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Long You

    2012-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the correlations in the one-dimensional extended quantum compass model in a transverse magnetic field. By exactly solving the Hamiltonian, we find that the quantum correlation of the ground state of one-dimensional quantum compass model is vanishing. We show that quantum discord can not only locate the quantum critical points, but also discern the orders of phase transitions. Furthermore, entanglement quantified by concurrence is also compared.

  1. Nonlinear friction in quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roumen Tsekov

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nonlinear friction forces in quantum mechanics is studied via dissipative Madelung hydrodynamics. A new thermo-quantum diffusion equation is derived, which is solved for the particular case of quantum Brownian motion with a cubic friction. It is extended also by a chemical reaction term to describe quantum reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear friction as well.

  2. Quantum Computing, Metrology, and Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang Lee; Pavel Lougovski; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Information science is entering into a new era in which certain subtleties of quantum mechanics enables large enhancements in computational efficiency and communication security. Naturally, precise control of quantum systems required for the implementation of quantum information processing protocols implies potential breakthoughs in other sciences and technologies. We discuss recent developments in quantum control in optical systems and their applications in metrology and imaging.

  3. AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS... ...the light as you've never seen before... Optics:http://science.howstuffworks.com/laser5.htm #12;5 DEFINITION Quantum Optics: "Quantum optics is a field in quantum physics, dealing OPTICS OPERATORS Light is described in terms of field operators for creation and annihilation of photons

  4. Magmatic "Quantum-Like" Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elemer E Rosinger

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computation has suggested, among others, the consideration of "non-quantum" systems which in certain respects may behave "quantum-like". Here, what algebraically appears to be the most general possible known setup, namely, of {\\it magmas} is used in order to construct "quantum-like" systems. The resulting magmatic composition of systems has as a well known particular case the tensor products.

  5. An absolute quantum energy inequality for the Dirac field in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin J. Smith

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Weak Energy Inequalities (QWEIs) are results which limit the extent to which the smeared renormalised energy density of a quantum field can be negative. On globally hyperbolic spacetimes the massive quantum Dirac field is known to obey a QWEI in terms of a reference state chosen arbitrarily from the class of Hadamard states; however, there exist spacetimes of interest on which state-dependent bounds cannot be evaluated. In this paper we prove the first QWEI for the massive quantum Dirac field on four dimensional globally hyperbolic spacetime in which the bound depends only on the local geometry; such a QWEI is known as an absolute QWEI.

  6. Quantum teleportation using active feed-forward between two Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-song Ma; Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Daqing Wang; Sebastian Kropatschek; William Naylor; Alexandra Mech; Bernhard Wittmann; Johannes Kofler; Elena Anisimova; Vadim Makarov; Thomas Jennewein; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum teleportation [1] is a quintessential prerequisite of many quantum information processing protocols [2-4]. By using quantum teleportation, one can circumvent the no-cloning theorem [5] and faithfully transfer unknown quantum states to a party whose location is even unknown over arbitrary distances. Ever since the first experimental demonstrations of quantum teleportation of independent qubits [6] and of squeezed states [7], researchers have progressively extended the communication distance in teleportation, usually without active feed-forward of the classical Bell-state measurement result which is an essential ingredient in future applications such as communication between quantum computers. Here we report the first long-distance quantum teleportation experiment with active feed-forward in real time. The experiment employed two optical links, quantum and classical, over 143 km free space between the two Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. To achieve this, the experiment had to employ novel techniques such as a frequency-uncorrelated polarization-entangled photon pair source, ultra-low-noise single-photon detectors, and entanglement-assisted clock synchronization. The average teleported state fidelity was well beyond the classical limit of 2/3. Furthermore, we confirmed the quality of the quantum teleportation procedure (without feed-forward) by complete quantum process tomography. Our experiment confirms the maturity and applicability of the involved technologies in real-world scenarios, and is a milestone towards future satellite-based quantum teleportation.

  7. Analysis of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells using Suns-Voc measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beattie, N. S.; Zoppi, G.; See, P.; Farrer, I.; Duchamp, M.; Morrison, D. J.; Miles, R. W.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    . Appl. Phys. 32 (1961) 510. [10] G. Wei, K. Shiu, N.C. Giebink, S.R. Forrest, Thermodynamic limits of quantum photovoltaic cell efficiency, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 (2007) 223507. [11] A. Martí, A. Luque, Comment on Thermodynamics limits of quantum photo... /GaAs quantum dot solar cells and the influence on the open circuit voltage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97 (2010) 123505. [26] A. Martí, A. Luque, Next Generation Photovoltaics: High Efficiency Through Full Spectrum Utilization, IOP Publishing, Bristol, UK, 2004. [27] H...

  8. GRANIT project: a trap for gravitational quantum states of UCN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pignol, G; Rebreyend, D; Vezzu, F; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Petukhov, A K; Börner, H G; Soldner, T; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Kreuz, M; Forest, D; Ganau, P; Mackowski, J M; Michel, C; Montorio, J L; Morgado, N; Pinard, L; Remillieux, A; Gagarski, A M; Petrov, G A; Kusmina, A M; Strelkov, A V; Abele, H; Baeßler, S; Voronin, A Yu

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons showed the quantization of energy levels, and confirmed quantum mechanical predictions for the average size of the two lowest energy states wave functions. Improvements in position-like measurements can increase the accuracy by an order of magnitude only. We therefore develop another approach, consisting in accurate measurements of the energy levels. The GRANIT experiment is devoted to the study of resonant transitions between quantum states induced by an oscillating perturbation. According to Heisenberg's uncertainty relations, the accuracy of measurement of the energy levels is limited by the time available to perform the transitions. Thus, trapping quantum states will be necessary, and each source of losses has to be controlled in order to maximize the lifetime of the states. We discuss the general principles of transitions between quantum states, and consider the main systematical losses of neutrons in a trap.

  9. GRANIT project: a trap for gravitational quantum states of UCN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; D. Rebreyend; F. Vezzu; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; A. K. Petukhov; H. G. Börner; T. Soldner; P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; M. Kreuz; D. Forest; P. Ganau; J. M. Mackowski; C. Michel; J. L. Montorio; N. Morgado; L. Pinard; A. Remillieux; A. M. Gagarski; G. A. Petrov; A. M. Kusmina; A. V. Strelkov; H. Abele; S. Baeßler; A. Yu. Voronin

    2007-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons showed the quantization of energy levels, and confirmed quantum mechanical predictions for the average size of the two lowest energy states wave functions. Improvements in position-like measurements can increase the accuracy by an order of magnitude only. We therefore develop another approach, consisting in accurate measurements of the energy levels. The GRANIT experiment is devoted to the study of resonant transitions between quantum states induced by an oscillating perturbation. According to Heisenberg's uncertainty relations, the accuracy of measurement of the energy levels is limited by the time available to perform the transitions. Thus, trapping quantum states will be necessary, and each source of losses has to be controlled in order to maximize the lifetime of the states. We discuss the general principles of transitions between quantum states, and consider the main systematical losses of neutrons in a trap.

  10. Quantum maximum entropy principle for a system of identical particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By introducing a functional of the reduced density matrix, we generalize the definition of a quantum entropy which incorporates the indistinguishability principle of a system of identical particles. With the present definition, the principle of quantum maximum entropy permits us to solve the closure problem for a quantum hydrodynamic set of balance equations corresponding to an arbitrary number of moments in the framework of extended thermodynamics. The determination of the reduced Wigner function for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions is found to become possible only by assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2}. Quantum contributions are expressed in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2} while classical results are recovered in the limit (Planck constant/2pi)->0.

  11. Reducing Collective Quantum State Rotation Errors with Reversible Dephasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin C. Cox; Matthew A. Norcia; Joshua M. Weiner; Justin G. Bohnet; James K. Thompson

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21 dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of $2.1 \\times 10^5$ laser cooled and trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  12. On the quantum analogue of Galileo's leaning tower experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Md. Manirul Ali; A. S. Majumdar; Dipankar Home; Alok Kumar Pan

    2006-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum analogue of Galileo's leaning tower experiment is revisited using wave packets evolving under the gravitational potential. We first calculate the position detection probabilities for particles projected upwards against gravity around the classical turning point and also around the point of initial projection, which exhibit mass dependence at both these points. We then compute the mean arrival time of freely falling particles using the quantum probability current, which also turns out to be mass dependent. The mass dependence of both the position detection probabilities and the mean arrival time vanish in the limit of large mass. Thus, compatibility between the weak equivalence principle and quantum mechanics is recovered in the macroscopic limit of the latter.

  13. Quantum metrology with imperfect states and detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, Animesh; Zhang Lijian; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Smith, Brian J.; Walmsley, Ian A. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Dorner, Uwe [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum enhancements of precision in metrology can be compromised by system imperfections. These may be mitigated by appropriate optimization of the input state to render it robust, at the expense of making the state difficult to prepare. In this paper, we identify the major sources of imperfection of an optical sensor: input state preparation inefficiency, sensor losses, and detector inefficiency. The second of these has received much attention; we show that it is the least damaging to surpassing the standard quantum limit in a optical interferometric sensor. Further, we show that photonic states that can be prepared in the laboratory using feasible resources allow a measurement strategy using photon-number-resolving detectors that not only attain the Heisenberg limit for phase estimation in the absence of losses, but also deliver close to the maximum possible precision in realistic scenarios including losses and inefficiencies. In particular, we give bounds for the tradeoff between the three sources of imperfection that will allow true quantum-enhanced optical metrology

  14. Emergence of wave equations from quantum geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid, Shahn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, 327 Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that classical geometry should be viewed as a special limit of noncommutative geometry in which aspects which are inter-constrained decouple and appear arbitrary in the classical limit. In particular, the wave equation is really a partial derivative in a unified extra-dimensional noncommutative geometry and arises out of the greater rigidity of the noncommutative world not visible in the classical limit. We provide an introduction to this 'wave operator' approach to noncommutative geometry as recently used[27] to quantize any static spacetime metric admitting a spatial conformal Killing vector field, and in particular to construct the quantum Schwarzschild black hole. We also give an introduction to our related result that every classical Riemannian manifold is a shadow of a slightly noncommutative one wherein the meaning of the classical Ricci tensor becomes very natural as the square of a generalised braiding.

  15. Practical Quantum Cryptography for Secure Free-Space Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  16. Quantum Lyapunov Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Falsaperla; G. Fonte; G. Salesi

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that it is possible to associate univocally with each given solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation a particular phase flow ("quantum flow") of a non-autonomous dynamical system. This fact allows us to introduce a definition of chaos in quantum dynamics (quantum chaos), which is based on the classical theory of chaos in dynamical systems. In such a way we can introduce quantities which may be appelled "Quantum Lyapunov Exponents". Our approach applies to a non-relativistic quantum-mechanical system of n charged particles; in the present work numerical calculations are performed only for the hydrogen atom. In the computation of the trajectories we first neglect the spin contribution to chaos, then we consider the spin effects in quantum chaos. We show how the quantum Lyapunov exponents can be evaluated and give several numerical results which describe some properties found in the present approach. Although the system is very simple and the classical counterpart is regular, the most non-stationary solutions of the corresponding Schroeodinger equation are "chaotic" according to our definition.

  17. Layered architecture for quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Cody Jones; Rodney Van Meter; Austin G. Fowler; Peter L. McMahon; Jungsang Kim; Thaddeus D. Ladd; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a layered quantum computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The timescales of physical hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the timescale of days.

  18. Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Open Quantum Systems JOSEPH E. AVRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avron, Joseph

    Adiabatic Charge Pumping in Open Quantum Systems JOSEPH E. AVRON Technion ALEXANDER ELGART Courant pumps con- nected to a number of external leads. It is proven that under the rather general assumption on the Hamiltonian describing the system, in the adiabatic limit, the current through the pump is given by a formula

  19. Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balibar, Sébastien

    Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1 Xavier Rojas,1 Andrew D. Fefferman,1 John R crystals may irreversibly deform. This phenomenon is known as plasticity and it is due to the motion and in the zero temperature limit, helium 4 crystals present a giant plasticity that is anisotropic and reversible

  20. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Bilal A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Brun, Todd A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly ''innocent'' message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  1. Room-temperature high-speed nuclear-spin quantum memory in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Shim; I. Niemeyer; J. Zhang; D. Suter

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum memories provide intermediate storage of quantum information until it is needed for the next step of a quantum algorithm or a quantum communication process. Relevant figures of merit are therefore the fidelity with which the information can be written and retrieved, the storage time, and also the speed of the read-write process. Here, we present experimental data on a quantum memory consisting of a single $^{13}$C nuclear spin that is strongly coupled to the electron spin of a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. The strong hyperfine interaction of the nearest-neighbor carbon results in transfer times of 300 ns between the register qubit and the memory qubit, with an overall fidelity of 88 % for the write - storage - read cycle. The observed storage times of 3.3 ms appear to be limited by the T$_1$ relaxation of the electron spin. We discuss a possible scheme that may extend the storage time beyond this limit.

  2. On quantum and parallel transport in a Hilbert bundle over spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Drechsler; Philip A. Tuckey

    1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Hilbert bundle description of stochastic quantum mechanics in curved spacetime developed by Prugove\\v{c}ki, which gives a powerful new framework for exploring the quantum mechanical propagation of states in curved spacetime. We concentrate on the quantum transport law in the bundle, specifically on the information which can be obtained from the flat space limit. We give a detailed proof that quantum transport coincides with parallel transport in the bundle in this limit, confirming statements of Prugove\\v{c}ki. We furthermore show that the quantum-geometric propagator in curved spacetime proposed by Prugove\\v{c}ki, yielding a Feynman path integral-like formula involving integrations over intermediate phase space variables, is Poincar\\'e gauge covariant (i.e.$\\!$ is gauge invariant except for transformations at the endpoints of the path) provided the integration measure is interpreted as a ``contact point measure'' in the soldered stochastic phase space bundle raised over curved spacetime.

  3. Testing honesty of quantum server

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoyuki Morimae

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Alice, who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology, delegates her quantum computing to Bob, who has a fully-fledged quantum computer. Can she check whether the computation Bob performs for her is correct? She cannot recalculate the result by herself, since she does not have any quantum computer. A recent experiment with photonic qubits suggests she can. Here, I explain the basic idea of the result, and recent developments about secure cloud quantum computing.

  4. Linear Quantum Feedback Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gough; R. Gohm; M. Yanagisawa

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed for general open quantum dynamical systems interacting with bosonic input fields. In this article we show, for the special case of linear dynamical systems Markovian systems with instantaneous feedback connections, that the transfer functions can be deduced and agree with the algebraic rules obtained in the nonlinear case. Using these rules, we derive the the transfer functions for linear quantum systems in series, in cascade, and in feedback arrangements mediated by beam splitter devices.

  5. Quantum Theory of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir I. Zverev; Alexander M. Tishin

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the given work the first attempt to generalize quantum uncertainty relation on macro objects is made. Business company as one of economical process participants was chosen by the authors for this purpose. The analogies between quantum micro objects and the structures which from the first sight do not have anything in common with physics are given. The proof of generalized uncertainty relation is produced. With the help of generalized uncertainty relation the authors wanted to elaborate a new non-traditional approach to the description of companies' business activity and their developing and try to formulate some advice for them. Thus, our work makes the base of quantum theory of econimics

  6. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  7. Quantum Channel Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graeme Smith

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum communication channel can be put to many uses: it can transmit classical information, private classical information, or quantum information. It can be used alone, with shared entanglement, or together with other channels. For each of these settings there is a capacity that quantifies a channel's potential for communication. In this short review, I summarize what is known about the various capacities of a quantum channel, including a discussion of the relevant additivity questions. I also give some indication of potentially interesting directions for future research.

  8. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ita, Eyo Eyo; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental canonical commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  9. Critically damped quantum search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we have found that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum $O(\\sqrt{N})$ and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  10. Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed Quantum Enabled...

  11. Gradient limits and SCRF performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Pellin, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting rf gradients are limited by a number of mechanisms, among them are field emission, multipactor, Lorentz detuning, global and local heating, quench fields, Q-Slope, assembly defects, and overall power use. We describe how each of these mechanisms interacts with the cavity fields and show how significant improvements may be possible assuming improvements in control over the cavity surface. New techniques such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), the use of layered composites, Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) smoothing and Dry Ice Cleaning (DIC) have been proposed as ways to control the surface.

  12. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonna Friend Donna FriendLimits

  13. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th DayANVAblamp Limited Jump

  14. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural PubNova AlincaNovacem Limited

  15. Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass FacilityBioethanol Limited

  16. Lysanda Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyonLysanda Limited

  17. Fault Tolerant Quantum Filtering and Fault Detection for Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing Gao; Daoyi Dong; Ian R. Petersen

    2015-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to determine the fault tolerant quantum filter and fault detection equation for a class of open quantum systems coupled to laser fields and subject to stochastic faults. In order to analyze open quantum systems where the system dynamics involve both classical and quantum random variables, a quantum-classical probability space model is developed. Using a reference probability approach, a fault tolerant quantum filter and a fault detection equation are simultaneously derived for this class of open quantum systems. An example of two-level open quantum systems subject to Poisson-type faults is presented to illustrate the proposed method. These results have the potential to lead to a new fault tolerant control theory for quantum systems.

  18. System identification for passive linear quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Naoki Yamamoto

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    System identification is a key enabling component for the implementation of quantum technologies, including quantum control. In this paper, we consider the class of passive linear input-output systems, and investigate several basic questions: (1) which parameters can be identified? (2) Given sufficient input-output data, how do we reconstruct system parameters? (3) How can we optimize the estimation precision by preparing appropriate input states and performing measurements on the output? We show that minimal systems can be identified up to a unitary transformation on the modes, and systems satisfying a Hamiltonian connectivity condition called "infecting" are completely identifiable. We propose a frequency domain design based on a Fisher information criterion, for optimizing the estimation precision for coherent input state. As a consequence of the unitarity of the transfer function, we show that the Heisenberg limit with respect to the input energy can be achieved using non-classical input states.

  19. Optimized quantum random-walk search algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Potocek; A. Gabris; T. Kiss; I. Jex

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shenvi, Kempe and Whaley's quantum random-walk search (SKW) algorithm [Phys. Rev. A 67, 052307 (2003)] is known to require $O(\\sqrt N)$ number of oracle queries to find the marked element, where $N$ is the size of the search space. The overall time complexity of the SKW algorithm differs from the best achievable on a quantum computer only by a constant factor. We present improvements to the SKW algorithm which yield significant increase in success probability, and an improvement on query complexity such that the theoretical limit of a search algorithm succeeding with probability close to one is reached. We point out which improvement can be applied if there is more than one marked element to find.

  20. Optimal performance of endoreversible quantum refrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Correa; José P. Palao; Gerardo Adesso; Daniel Alonso

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The derivation of general performance benchmarks is important in the design of highly optimized heat engines and refrigerators. To obtain them, one may model phenomenologically the leading sources of irreversibility ending up with results which are model-independent, but limited in scope. Alternatively, one can take a simple physical system realizing a thermodynamic cycle and assess its optimal operation from a complete microscopic description. We follow this approach in order to derive the coefficient of performance at maximum cooling rate for \\textit{any} endoreversible quantum refrigerator. At striking variance with the \\textit{universality} of the optimal efficiency of heat engines, we find that the cooling performance at maximum power is crucially determined by the details of the specific system-bath interaction mechanism. A closed analytical benchmark is found for endoreversible refrigerators weakly coupled to unstructured bosonic heat baths: an ubiquitous case study in quantum thermodynamics.

  1. Performance bound for quantum absorption refrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Correa; José P. Palao; Gerardo Adesso; Daniel Alonso

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An implementation of quantum absorption chillers with three qubits has been recently proposed, that is ideally able to reach the Carnot performance regime. Here we study the working efficiency of such self-contained refrigerators, adopting a consistent treatment of dissipation effects. We demonstrate that the coefficient of performance at maximum cooling power is upper bounded by 3/4 of the Carnot performance. The result is independent of the details of the system and the equilibrium temperatures of the external baths. We provide design prescriptions that saturate the bound in the limit of a large difference between the operating temperatures. Our study suggests that delocalized dissipation, which must be taken into account for a proper modelling of the machine-baths interaction, is a fundamental source of irreversibility which prevents the refrigerator from approaching the Carnot performance arbitrarily closely in practice. The potential role of quantum correlations in the operation of these machines is also investigated.

  2. Quantum gravity effects in the Kerr spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Tuiran, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Norte, Km 5 via a Puerto Colombia, AA-1569 Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the impact of the leading quantum gravity effects on the properties of black holes with nonzero angular momentum by performing a suitable renormalization group improvement of the classical Kerr metric within quantum Einstein gravity. In particular, we explore the structure of the horizons, the ergosphere, and the static limit surfaces as well as the phase space available for the Penrose process. The positivity properties of the effective vacuum energy-momentum tensor are also discussed and the 'dressing' of the black hole's mass and angular momentum are investigated by computing the corresponding Komar integrals. The pertinent Smarr formula turns out to retain its classical form. As for their thermodynamical properties, a modified first law of black-hole thermodynamics is found to be satisfied by the improved black holes (to second order in the angular momentum); the corresponding Bekenstein-Hawking temperature is not proportional to the surface gravity.

  3. Remote quantum states in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Francis

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is seen that issues of the evolution of the wave function in curved spacetime can be resolved by describing the evolution of quantum states in Minkowski tangent space, in accordance with the orthodox interpretation that the wave function is not physical but is part of a mathematical method for the calculation of probabilities of measurement results. The teleconnection is defined between Hilbert spaces at different points in spacetime motivated by arguments from the probability interpretation. The teleconnection is analogous to a connection between vector spaces and reduces to the Levi-Civita connection in the limit of near initial and final measurements. Gravitational redshift is as in classical general relativity, as is the redshift for the cosmological microwave background. An argument is given that the cosmological redshift of photons treated as quantum particles should be treated differently. If correct this argument has important implications for the age of the universe, galaxy evolution and missing matter.

  4. Properties of Quantum Graphity at Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Caravelli; Fotini Markopoulou

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mapping of dynamical graphs and, in particular, the graphs used in the Quantum Graphity models for emergent geometry, into an Ising hamiltonian on the line graph of a complete graph with a fixed number of vertices. We use this method to study the properties of Quantum Graphity models at low temperature in the limit in which the valence coupling constant of the model is much greater than the coupling constants of the loop terms. Using mean field theory we find that an order parameter for the model is the average valence of the graph. We calculate the equilibrium distribution for the valence as an implicit function of the temperature. In the approximation in which the temperature is low, we find the first two Taylor coefficients of the valence in the temperature expansion. A discussion of the susceptibility function and a generalization of the model are given in the end.

  5. Multi-stage quantum absorption heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Correa

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized $N$-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging $N-2$ elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths, and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of $N$. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  6. Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Sheffield

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

  7. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Benjamin S. (Benjamin Stanford), 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the terahertz frequency range has long been impeded by the relative dearth of compact, coherent radiation sources of reasonable power. This thesis details the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) ...

  8. A Quantum Production Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luís Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The production system is a theoretical model of computation relevant to the artificial intelligence field allowing for problem solving procedures such as hierarchical tree search. In this work we explore some of the connections between artificial intelligence and quantum computation by presenting a model for a quantum production system. Our approach focuses on initially developing a model for a reversible production system which is a simple mapping of Bennett's reversible Turing machine. We then expand on this result in order to accommodate for the requirements of quantum computation. We present the details of how our proposition can be used alongside Grover's algorithm in order to yield a speedup comparatively to its classical counterpart. We discuss the requirements associated with such a speedup and how it compares against a similar quantum hierarchical search approach.

  9. Geometrically frustrated quantum magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolić , Predrag, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) more general lessons on frustrated quantum magnetism. At the end, we demonstrate some new mathematical tools on two other frustrated two-dimensional systems, and summarize our conclusions, with an outlook to remaining ...

  10. Reconstructing quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucien Hardy

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how to reconstruct quantum theory from operational postulates. In particular, the following postulates are consistent only with for classical probability theory and quantum theory. Logical Sharpness: There is a one-to-one map between pure states and maximal effects such that we get unit probability. This maximal effect does not give probability equal to one for any other pure state. Information Locality: A maximal measurement is effected on a composite system if we perform maximal measurements on each of the components. Tomographic Locality: The state of a composite system can be determined from the statistics collected by making measurements on the components. Permutability: There exists a reversible transformation on any system effecting any given permutation of any given maximal set of distinguishable states for that system. Sturdiness: Filters are non-flattening. To single out quantum theory we need only add any requirement that is inconsistent with classical probability theory and consistent with quantum theory.

  11. A loop quantum multiverse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  12. A loop quantum multiverse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  13. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  14. Quantum Complex Minkowski Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

  15. On quantum Lyapunov exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wladyslaw A. Majewski; Marcin Marciniak

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that quantum analysis constitutes the proper analytic basis for quantization of Lyapunov exponents in the Heisenberg picture. Differences among various quantizations of Lyapunov exponents are clarified.

  16. Modulational instability of electrostatic acoustic waves in an electron-hole semiconductor quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yunliang, E-mail: ylwang@ustb.edu.cn; Lü, Xiaoxia [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modulational instability of quantum electrostatic acoustic waves in electron-hole quantum semiconductor plasmas is investigated using the quantum hydrodynamic model, from which a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with damping effects is derived using the reductive perturbation method. Here, we consider the combined effects of quantum recoil, quantum degenerate pressures, as well as the exchange-correlation effect standing for the electrons (holes) spin. The modulational instability for different semiconductors (GaAs, GaSb, and InP) is discussed. The collision between electron (hole) and phonon is also investigated. The permitted maximum time for modulational instability and the damping features of quantum envelope solitary wave are all determined by the collision. The approximate solitary solution with damping effects is presented in weak collision limit. The damping properties were discussed by numerical method.

  17. Parameter scaling in a novel measure of quantum-classical difference for decohering chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Wiebe; Parin Sripakdeevong; Arnaldo Gammal; Arjendu K. Pattanayak

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce a diagnostic for measuring the quantum-classical difference for open quantum systems, which is the normalized size of the quantum terms in the Master equation for Wigner function evolution. For a driven Duffing oscillator, this measure shows remarkably precise scaling over long time-scales with the parameter $\\zeta_0=\\hbar^2/D$. We also see that, independent of $\\zeta_0$ the dynamics follows a similar pattern. For small $\\zeta_0$ all of our curves collapses to essentially a single curve when scaled by the maximum value of the quantum-classical difference. In both limits of large and small $\\zeta_0$ we see a saturation effect in the size of the quantum-classical difference; that is, the instantaneous difference between quantum and classical evolutions cannot be either too small or too large.

  18. Input-output Analysis of Quantum Finite-level Systems in Response to Single Photon States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Pan; Guofeng Zhang; Matthew R. James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single photon states, which carry quantum information and coherently interact with quantum systems, are vital to the realization of all-optical quantum networks and quantum memory. In this paper we derive the conditions that enable an exact analysis of the response of passive quantum finite-level systems under the weak driving of single photon input. We show that when a class of finite level systems is driven by single photon inputs, expressions for the output states may be derived exactly using linear systems transfer functions. This removes the need for physical approximations such as weak excitation limit in the analysis of quantum nonlinear systems under single photon driving. We apply this theory to the analysis of a single photon switch. The input-output relations are consistent with the existing results in the study of few photon transport through finite-level systems.

  19. A space-efficient quantum computer simulator suitable for high-speed FPGA implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Frank; Liviu Oniciuc; Uwe Meyer-Baese; Irinel Chiorescu

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional vector-based simulators for quantum computers are quite limited in the size of the quantum circuits they can handle, due to the worst-case exponential growth of even sparse representations of the full quantum state vector as a function of the number of quantum operations applied. However, this exponential-space requirement can be avoided by using general space-time tradeoffs long known to complexity theorists, which can be appropriately optimized for this particular problem in a way that also illustrates some interesting reformulations of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we describe the design and empirical space-time complexity measurements of a working software prototype of a quantum computer simulator that avoids excessive space requirements. Due to its space-efficiency, this design is well-suited to embedding in single-chip environments, permitting especially fast execution that avoids access latencies to main memory. We plan to prototype our design on a standard FPGA development board.

  20. On the Consistency of Approximate Quantum Dynamics Simulation Methods for Vibrational Spectra in the Condensed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Mariana; Paesani, Francesco; Bowman, Joel; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Including quantum mechanical effects on the dynamics of nuclei in the condensed phase is challenging, because the complexity of exact methods grows exponentially with the number of quantum degrees of freedom. Efforts to circumvent these limitations can be traced down to two approaches: methods that treat a small subset of the degrees of freedom with rigorous quantum mechanics, considering the rest of the system as a static or classical environment, and methods that treat the whole system quantum mechanically, but using approximate dynamics. Here we perform a systematic comparison between these two philosophies for the description of quantum effects in vibrational spectroscopy, taking the Embedded Local Monomer (LMon) model and a mixed quantum-classical (MQC) model as representatives of the first family of methods, and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics (TRPMD) as examples of the latter. We use as benchmarks D$_2$O doped with HOD and pure H$_2$O at three distinc...

  1. Single photon absorption and dynamic control of a coupled quantum dot-cavity system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Johne; Andrea Fiore

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic interaction of a quantum dot in a nanocavity with timesymmetric single photon pulses. The simulations, based on a wavefunction approach, reveal that almost perfect single photon absorption occurs for quantum dot-cavity systems operating on the edge between strong and weak coupling regime. The computed maximum absorptions probability is close to unity for pulses with a typical length comparable to the half of the Rabi period. Furthermore, the dynamic control of the quantum dot energy via electric fields allows the freezing of the light-matter interaction leaving the quantum dot in its excited state. Shaping of single photon wavepackets by the electric field control is limited by the occurrence of chirping of the single photon pulse. This understanding of the interaction of single photon pulses with the quantum dot-cavity system provides the basis for the development of advanced protocols for quantum information processing in the solid state.

  2. Quantum error control codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  3. Optical Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Ralph; G. J. Pryde

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the field of Optical Quantum Computation, considering the various implementations that have been proposed and the experimental progress that has been made toward realizing them. We examine both linear and nonlinear approaches and both particle and field encodings. In particular we discuss the prospects for large scale optical quantum computing in terms of the most promising physical architectures and the technical requirements for realizing them.

  4. Quantum computation of multifractal exponents through the quantum wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier; Georgeot, Bertrand [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), UPS, Universite de Toulouse, F-31062 Toulouse (France); LPT - IRSAMC, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the use of the quantum wavelet transform to extract efficiently information about the multifractal exponents for multifractal quantum states. We show that, combined with quantum simulation algorithms, it enables to build quantum algorithms for multifractal exponents with a polynomial gain compared to classical simulations. Numerical results indicate that a rough estimate of fractality could be obtained exponentially fast. Our findings are relevant, e.g., for quantum simulations of multifractal quantum maps and of the Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition.

  5. Chiral Quantum Walks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DaWei Lu; Jacob D. Biamonte; Jun Li; Hang Li; Tomi H. Johnson; Ville Bergholm; Mauro Faccin; Zoltán Zimborás; Raymond Laflamme; Jonathan Baugh; Seth Lloyd

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Wigner separated the possible types of symmetries in quantum theory into those symmetries that are unitary and those that are antiunitary. Unitary symmetries have been well studied whereas antiunitary symmetries and the physical implications associated with time-reversal symmetry breaking have had little influence on quantum information science. Here we develop a quantum circuits version of time-reversal symmetry theory, classifying time-symmetric and time-asymmetric Hamiltonians and circuits in terms of their underlying network elements and geometric structures. These results reveal that many of the typical quantum circuit networks found across the field of quantum information science exhibit time-asymmetry. We then experimentally implement the most fundamental time-reversal asymmetric process, applying local gates in an otherwise time-symmetric circuit to induce time-reversal asymmetry and thereby achieve (i) directional biasing in the transition probability between basis states, (ii) the enhancement of and (iii) the suppression of these transport probabilities. Our results imply that the physical effect of time-symmetry breaking plays an essential role in coherent transport and its control represents an omnipresent yet essentially untapped resource in quantum transport science.

  6. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J; Gamble, John King,; Nielsen, Erik; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Scholten, Travis L.; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography su %7C ers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more e %7C ectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  7. Topics in Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jadczyk

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper consists of two parts. In the first part Schroedinger's equation for a charged quantum particle in a Galilei-Newton curved space-time is derived in a fully geometrical way. Gravitational and electromagnetic fields are coded into space metric and space-time connection. The fundamental geometrical object is a quantum connection in a Hermitian line bundle over the 7-dimensional jet space of 3-velocities. The secondary object is the bundle of Hilbert spaces over absolute time. Time appears as a superselection quantity while Shroedinger equation is interpreted as parallel transport in this bundle. In the second part the problem of measurement in quantum theory is discussed as a part of a more general problem of coupling between quantum and classical systems. The standard framework of quantum theory is extended so as to allow for dynamical central observables within dissipative dynamics. It is shown that within this approach one obtains not only Liouville equation that describes statistical ensembles, but also a piecewise-deterministic random process describing sequences of "events" that can be monitored by a continuous observation of the single, coupled classical system. It also describes "quantum jumps" or "wave packet reductions" that accompany these events. Two example are worked out in some details. The last one deals with the problem oof "how to determine the wave function ?".

  8. Fault-tolerant quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shor, P W

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, it was realized that use of the properties of quantum mechanics might speed up certain computations dramatically. Interest in quantum computation has since been growing. One of the main difficulties of realizing quantum computation is that decoherence tends to destroy the information in a superposition of states in a quantum computer, thus making long computations impossible. A futher difficulty is that inaccuracies in quantum state transformations throughout the computation accumulate, rendering the output of long computations unreliable. It was previously known that a quantum circuit with t gates could tolerate O(1/t) amounts of inaccuracy and decoherence per gate. We show, for any quantum computation with t gates, how to build a polynomial size quantum circuit that can tolerate O(1/(log t)^c) amounts of inaccuracy and decoherence per gate, for some constant c. We do this by showing how to compute using quantum error correcting codes. These codes were previously known to provide resistance to erro...

  9. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  10. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  11. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  12. Limits to the lunar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, T.H. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C. (USA)); Shemansky, D.E. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of sodium and potassium on the Moon implies that other more abundant species should be present. Volatile molecules like H{sub 2}O are significantly more abundant than sodium in any of the proposed external atmospheric sources. Source mechanisms which derive atoms from the surface should favor abundant elements in the regolith. It is therefore puzzling that the Apollo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment set limits on the density of oxygen of N{sub O} < 5 {times} 10{sup 2} cm{sup {minus}3}, and that the Apollo Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment data imply N{sub O} < 50 cm{sup {minus}3} above the subsolar point. These limits are surprisingly small relative to the measured value for sodium. A simple consideration of sources and sinks predicts significantly greater densities of oxygen. It is possible but doubtful that the Apollo measurements occur ed during an epoch in which source rates were small. A preferential loss process for oxygen on the darkside of the Moon is considered in which ionization by electron capture in surface collisions leads to escape through acceleration in the local electric field. Cold trapping in permanently shadowed regions as a net sink is considered and discounted, but the episodic nature of cometary insertion may allow formation of ice layers which act as a stablized source of OH. On the basis of an assumed meteoroid impact source, the authors predict a possible emission brightness of {approximately} 50 R in the OH(A {minus} X)(0,0) band above the lunar bright limb. A very uncertain small comet source of H{sub 2}O could raise this value by more than two orders of magnitude.

  13. Strong reactions in quantum super PDEs. III: Exotic quantum supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostino Prástaro

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the previous two parts, of a work devoted to encode strong reaction dynamics in the A. Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super PDE's, nonlinear quantum propagators in the observed quantum super Yang-Mills PDE, $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$, are further characterized. In particular, nonlinear quantum propagators with non-zero defect quantum electric-charge, are interpreted as {\\em exotic-quantum supergravity} effects. As an application, the recently discovered bound-state called $Zc(3900)$, is obtained as a neutral quasi-particle, generated in a $Q$-quantum exotic supergravity process. {\\em Quantum entanglement} is justified by means of the algebraic topologic structure of nonlinear quantum propagators. Quantum Cheshire cats are considered as examples of quantum entanglements. Existence theorem for solutions of $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$ admitting negative local temperatures ({\\em quantum thermodynamic-exotic solutions}) is obtained too and related to quantum entanglement. Such exotic solutions are used to encode Universe at the Planck-epoch. It is proved that the Universe's expansion at the Planck epoch is justified by the fact that it is encoded by a nonlinear quantum propagator having thermodynamic quantum exotic components in its boundary. This effect produces also an increasing of energy in the Universe at the Einstein epoch: {\\em Planck-epoch-legacy} on the boundary of our Universe. This is the main source of the Universe's expansion and solves the problem of the non-apparent energy-matter ({\\em dark-energy-matter}) in the actual Universe. Breit-Wheeler-type processes have been proved in the framework of the Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super Yang-Mills PDEs. Numerical comparisons of nonlinear quantum propagators with Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory in Standard Model are given.

  14. Strong reactions in quantum super PDEs. III: Exotic quantum supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostino Prástaro

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the previous two parts, of a work devoted to encode strong reaction dynamics in the A. Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super PDE's, nonlinear quantum propagators in the observed quantum super Yang-Mills PDE, $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$, are further characterized. In particular, nonlinear quantum propagators with non-zero defect quantum electric-charge, are interpreted as {\\em exotic-quantum supergravity} effects. As an application, the recently discovered bound-state called $Zc(3900)$, is obtained as a neutral quasi-particle, generated in a $Q$-quantum exotic supergravity process. {\\em Quantum entanglement} is justified by means of the algebraic topologic structure of nonlinear quantum propagators. Quantum Cheshire cats are considered as examples of quantum entanglements. Existence theorem for solutions of $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$ admitting negative local temperatures ({\\em quantum thermodynamic-exotic solutions}) is obtained too and related to quantum entanglement. Such exotic solutions are used to encode Universe at the Planck-epoch. It is proved that the Universe's expansion at the Planck epoch is justified by the fact that it is encoded by a nonlinear quantum propagator having thermodynamic quantum exotic components in its boundary. This effect produces also an increasing of energy in the Universe at the Einstein epoch: {\\em Planck-epoch-legacy} on the boundary of our Universe. This is the main source of the Universe's expansion and solves the problem of the non-apparent energy-matter ({\\em dark-energy-matter}) in the actual Universe. Breit-Wheeler-type processes have been proved in the framework of the Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super Yang-Mills PDEs. Numerical comparisons of nonlinear quantum propagators with Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory in Standard Model are given.

  15. Strong reactions in quantum super PDEs. III: Exotic quantum supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostino Prástaro

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the previous two parts, of a work devoted to encode strong reaction dynamics in the A. Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super PDE's, nonlinear quantum propagators in the observed quantum super Yang-Mills PDE, $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$, are further characterized. In particular, nonlinear quantum propagators with non-zero defect quantum electric-charge, are interpreted as {\\em exotic-quantum supergravity} effects. As an application, the recently discovered bound-state called $Zc(3900)$, is obtained as a neutral quasi-particle, generated in a $Q$-quantum exotic supergravity process. {\\em Quantum entanglement} is justified by means of the algebraic topologic structure of nonlinear quantum propagators. Quantum Cheshire cats are considered as examples of quantum entanglements. Existence theorem for solutions of $\\hat{(YM)}[i]$ admitting negative local temperatures ({\\em quantum thermodynamic-exotic solutions}) is obtained too and related to quantum entanglement. Such exotic solutions are used to encode Universe at the Planck-epoch. It is proved that the Universe's expansion at the Planck epoch is justified by the fact that it is encoded by a nonlinear quantum propagator having thermodynamic quantum exotic components in its boundary. This effect produces also an increasing of energy in the Universe at the Einstein epoch: {\\em Planck-epoch-legacy} on the boundary of our Universe. This is the main source of the Universe's expansion and solves the problem of the non-apparent energy-matter ({\\em dark-energy-matter}) in the actual Universe. Breit-Wheeler-type processes have been proved in the framework of the Pr\\'astaro's algebraic topology of quantum super Yang-Mills PDEs. Numerical comparisons of nonlinear quantum propagators with Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory in Standard Model are given.

  16. THE SMALL QUANTUM COHOMOLOGY OF A WEIGHTED PROJECTIVE SPACE, A MIRROR D-MODULE AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Etienne

    for weighted projective spaces 12 4. B-model 16 4.1. The setting 16 4.2. Gauss-Manin systems and Brieskorn 22 5.2. The small quantum product and the Jacobian ring 24 6. Limits 25 6.1. Canonical limits

  17. Playing games in quantum mechanical settings: A necessary and sufficient condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Shimamura; Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of recent studies have focused on novel features in game theory when the games are played using quantum mechanical toolbox (entanglement, unitary operators, measurement). Researchers have concentrated in two-player-two strategy, 2x2, dilemma containing classical games, and transferred them into quantum realm showing that in quantum pure strategies dilemmas in such games can be resolved if entanglement is distributed between the players armed with quantum operations. Moreover, it became clear that the players receive the highest sum of payoffs available in the game, which are otherwise impossible in classical pure strategies. Encouraged by the observation of rich dynamics of physical systems with many interacting parties and the power of entanglement in quantum versions of 2x2 games, it became generally accepted that quantum versions can be easily extended to N-player situations by simply allowing N-partite entangled states. In this article, however, we show that this is not generally true because the reproducibility of classical tasks in quantum domain imposes limitations on the type of entanglement and quantum operators. We propose a benchmark for the evaluation of quantum and classical versions of games, and derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a physical realization. We give examples of entangled states that can and cannot be used, and the characteristics of quantum operators used as strategies.

  18. Highlighting the mechanism of the quantum speedup by time-symmetric and relational quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Castagnoli

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Bob hides a ball in one of four drawers. Alice is to locate it. Classically she has to open up to three drawers, quantally just one. The fundamental reason for this quantum speedup is not known. We explain it by extending the usual representation of the quantum algorithm, limited to the process of solving the problem, to the process of setting the problem. The number of the drawer with the ball becomes a unitary transformation of the random outcome of the preparation measurement. This brings in relational quantum mechanics: the extension is with respect to Bob and cannot be with respect to Alice. It would tell her the drawer number before she opens any drawer. To Alice, the projection of the quantum state due to the preparation measurement should be retarded at the end of her search; in the input state of the search, the drawer number is determined to Bob and undetermined to Alice. A second consequence is the emergence of an ambiguity. Either the preparation measurement or the final one required to read the solution selects the solution. For reasons of symmetry, we assume that the selection shares evenly between the two measurements. All is as if Alice, by reading the solution, selected half of the information that specifies the drawer number. This selection leaves the input state to Bob unaltered and projects that to Alice on a state of lower entropy where she knows that half in advance. The quantum algorithm is a sum over histories in each of which Alice knows in advance that the ball is in a pair of drawers and locates it by opening one of the two. More in general, given an oracle problem, this explanation of the speedup predicts the number of queries required to solve it in an optimal quantum way.

  19. A bird's eye view of quantum computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuliano Benenti; Giuliano Strini

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computers are discussed in the general framework of computation, the laws of physics and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

  20. An algorithm for minimization of quantum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new algorithm for minimization of quantum cost of quantum circuits has been designed. The quantum cost of different quantum circuits of particular interest (eg. circuits for EPR, quantum teleportation, shor code and different quantum arithmetic operations) are computed by using the proposed algorithm. The quantum costs obtained using the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing results and it is found that the algorithm has produced minimum quantum cost in all cases.

  1. Quantum Equivalence and Quantum Signatures in Heat Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raam Uzdin; Amikam Levy; Ronnie Kosloff

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum heat engines (QHE) are thermal machines where the working substance is quantum. In the extreme case the working medium can be a single particle or a few level quantum system. The study of QHE has shown a remarkable similarity with the standard thermodynamical models, thus raising the issue what is quantum in quantum thermodynamics. Our main result is thermodynamical equivalence of all engine type in the quantum regime of small action. They have the same power, the same heat, the same efficiency, and they even have the same relaxation rates and relaxation modes. Furthermore, it is shown that QHE have quantum-thermodynamic signature, i.e thermodynamic measurements can confirm the presence of quantum coherence in the device. The coherent work extraction mechanism enables power outputs that greatly exceed the power of stochastic (dephased) engines.

  2. Quantum theory of gravitational collapse (lecture notes on quantum conchology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Hajicek

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary version No.~2 of the lecture notes for the talk ``Quantum theory of gravitational collapse'' given at the 271. WE-Heraeus-Seminar ``Aspects of Quantum Gravity'' at Bad Honnef, 25 February--1 March 2002

  3. Exploiting locality in quantum computation for quantum chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrod R. McClean; Ryan Babbush; Peter J. Love; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route towards highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost, however this solution still carries a large overhead. In this perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provide numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  4. Displacement Echoes: Classical Decay and Quantum Freeze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyril Petitjean; Diego V. Bevilaqua; Eric J. Heller; Philippe Jacquod

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments, we investigate the decay of the fidelity with which a wave packet is reconstructed by a perfect time-reversal operation performed after a phase space displacement. In the semiclassical limit, we show that the decay rate is generically given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical dynamics. For small displacements, we additionally show that, following a short-time Lyapunov decay, the decay freezes well above the ergodic value because of quantum effects. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  5. Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellal, Ahmed

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum Hall effect in a monolayer graphene by using an approach based on thermodynamical properties. This can be done by considering a system of Dirac particles in an electromagnetic field and taking into account of the edges effect as a pseudo-potential varying continuously along the $x$ direction. At low temperature and in the weak electric field limit, we explicitly determine the thermodynamical potential. With this, we derive the particle numbers in terms of the quantized flux and therefore the Hall conductivity immediately follows.

  6. Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum Hall effect in a monolayer graphene by using an approach based on thermodynamical properties. This can be done by considering a system of Dirac particles in an electromagnetic field and taking into account of the edges effect as a pseudo-potential varying continuously along the $x$ direction. At low temperature and in the weak electric field limit, we explicitly determine the thermodynamical potential. With this, we derive the particle numbers in terms of the quantized flux and therefore the Hall conductivity immediately follows.

  7. Noncommutative Time in Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapio Salminen; Anca Tureanu

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze, starting from first principles, the quantization of field theories, in order to find out to which problems a noncommutative time would possibly lead. We examine the problem in the interaction picture (Tomonaga-Schwinger equation), the Heisenberg picture (Yang-Feldman-K\\"all\\'{e}n equation) and the path integral approach. They all indicate inconsistency when time is taken as a noncommutative coordinate. The causality issue appears as the key aspect, while the unitarity problem is subsidiary. These results are consistent with string theory, which does not admit a time-space noncommutative quantum field theory as its low-energy limit, with the exception of light-like noncommutativity.

  8. Multiparty data hiding of quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, Patrick; Leung, Debbie; Smith, Graeme [Institute for Quantum Information, Caltech 107-81, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for multiparty data hiding of quantum information that implement all possible threshold access structures. Closely related to secret sharing, data hiding has a more demanding security requirement: that the data remain secure against unrestricted attacks via local operation and classical communication. In the limit of hiding a large amount of data, our protocols achieve an asymptotic rate of one hidden qubit per local physical qubit. That is, each party holds a share that is the same size as the hidden state to leading order, with accuracy and security parameters incurring an overhead that is asymptotically negligible. The data-hiding states have very unusual entanglement properties, which we briefly discuss.

  9. Displacement Echoes: Classical Decay and Quantum Freeze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petitjean, Cyril [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bevilaqua, Diego V. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Heller, Eric J. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Jacquod, Philippe [Physics Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments, we investigate the decay of the fidelity with which a wave packet is reconstructed by a perfect time-reversal operation performed after a phase-space displacement. In the semiclassical limit, we show that the decay rate is generically given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical dynamics. For small displacements, we additionally show that, following a short-time Lyapunov decay, the decay freezes well above the ergodic value because of quantum effects. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  10. A Note on Quantum Security for Post-Quantum Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang Song

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shor's quantum factoring algorithm and a few other efficient quantum algorithms break many classical crypto-systems. In response, people proposed post-quantum cryptography based on computational problems that are believed hard even for quantum computers. However, security of these schemes against \\emph{quantum} attacks is elusive. This is because existing security analysis (almost) only deals with classical attackers and arguing security in the presence of quantum adversaries is challenging due to unique quantum features such as no-cloning. This work proposes a general framework to study which classical security proofs can be restored in the quantum setting. Basically, we split a security proof into (a sequence of) classical security reductions, and investigate what security reductions are "quantum-friendly". We characterize sufficient conditions such that a classical reduction can be "lifted" to the quantum setting. We then apply our lifting theorems to post-quantum signature schemes. We are able to show that the classical generic construction of hash-tree based signatures from one-way functions and and a more efficient variant proposed in~\\cite{BDH11} carry over to the quantum setting. Namely, assuming existence of (classical) one-way functions that are resistant to efficient quantum inversion algorithms, there exists a quantum-secure signature scheme. We note that the scheme in~\\cite{BDH11} is a promising (post-quantum) candidate to be implemented in practice and our result further justifies it. Finally we demonstrate the generality of our framework by showing that several existing works (Full-Domain hash in the quantum random-oracle model~\\cite{Zha12ibe} and the simple hybrid arguments framework in~\\cite{HSS11}) can be reformulated under our unified framework.

  11. Enhanced optical limiting effects of graphene materials in polyimide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yao; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing, E-mail: hbzhan@fzu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different graphene nanostructure suspensions of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) are prepared and characterized. Using a typical two-step method, the GONSs, GONRs, and GOQDs are incorporated into a polyimide (PI) matrix to synthesize graphene/PI composite films, whose nonlinear optical (NLO) and optical limiting (OL) properties are investigated at 532?nm in the nanosecond regime. The GONR suspension exhibits superior NLO and OL effects compared with those of GONSs and GOQDs because of its stronger nonlinear scattering and excited-state absorption. The graphene/PI composite films exhibit NLO and OL performance superior to that of their corresponding suspensions, which is attributed primarily to a combination of nonlinear mechanisms, charge transfer between graphene materials and PI, and the matrix effect.

  12. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration.

  13. Quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of the computation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As noted in the proceedings of this conference it is of importance to determine if quantum mechanics imposes fundamental limits on the computation process. Some aspects of this problem have been examined by the development of different types of quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of Turing machines. (Benioff 1980, 1982a, 1982b, 1982c). Turing machines were considered because they provide a standard representation of all digital computers. Thus, showing the existence of quantum mechanical models of all Turing machines is equivalent to showing the existence of quantum mechanical models of all digital computers. The types of models considered all had different properties. Some were constructed on two-dimensional lattices of quantum spin systems of spin 1/2 (Benioff 1982b, 1982c) or higher spins (Benioff 1980). All the models considered Turing machine computations which were made reversible by addition of a history tape. Quantum mechanical models of Bennett's reversible machines (Bennett 1973) in which the model makes a copy of the computation result and then erases the history and undoes the computation in lockstep to recover the input were also developed (Benioff 1982a). To avoid technical complications all the types of models were restricted to modelling an arbitrary but finite number of computation steps.

  14. The world of quantum noise and the fundamental output process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Belavkin; O. Hirota; R. Hudson

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A stationary theory of quantum stochastic processes of second order is outlined. It includes KMS processes in wide sense like the equilibrium finite temperature quantum noise given by the Planck's spectral formula. It is shown that for each stationary noise there exists a natural output process output process which is identical to the noise in the infinite temperature limit, and flipping with the noise if the time is reversed at finite temperature. A canonical Hilbert space representation of the quantum noise and the fundamental output process is established and a decomposition of their spectra is found. A brief explanation of quantum stochastic integration with respect to the input-output processes is given using only correlation functions. This provides a mathematical foundation for linear stationary filtering transformations of quantum stochastic processes. It is proved that the colored quantum stationary noise and its time-reversed version can be obtained in the second order theory by a linear nonadapted filtering of the standard vacuum noise uniquely defined by the canonical creation and annihilation operators on the spectrum of the input-output pair.

  15. Robust quantum parameter estimation: Coherent magnetometry with feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockton, John K.; Geremia, J.M.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, Mail Code 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the formalism for optimally estimating and controlling both the state of a spin ensemble and a scalar magnetic field with information obtained from a continuous quantum limited measurement of the spin precession due to the field. The full quantum parameter estimation model is reduced to a simplified equivalent representation to which classical estimation and control theory is applied. We consider both the tracking of static and fluctuating fields in the transient and steady-state regimes. By using feedback control, the field estimation can be made robust to uncertainty about the total spin number.

  16. Tomography increases key rates of quantum-key-distribution protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shun Watanabe; Ryutaroh Matsumoto; Tomohiko Uyematsu

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a practically implementable classical processing for the BB84 protocol and the six-state protocol that fully utilizes the accurate channel estimation method, which is also known as the quantum tomography. Our proposed processing yields at least as high key rate as the standard processing by Shor and Preskill. We show two examples of quantum channels over which the key rate of our proposed processing is strictly higher than the standard processing. In the second example, the BB84 protocol with our proposed processing yields a positive key rate even though the so-called error rate is higher than the 25% limit.

  17. Energy diffusion in strongly driven quantum chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Elyutin

    2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy evolution of a quantum chaotic system under the perturbation that harmonically depends on time is studied for the case of large perturbation, in which the rate of transition calculated from the Fermi golden rule exceeds the frequency of perturbation. It is shown that the energy evolution retains its diffusive character, with the diffusion coefficient that is asymptotically proportional to the magnitude of perturbation and to the square root of the density of states. The results are supported by numerical calculation. They imply the absence of the quantum-classical correspondence for the energy diffusion and the energy absorption in the classical limit $\\hbar \\to 0$.

  18. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, Larry, E-mail: lguth@math.mit.edu [Department of Mathematics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lubotzky, Alexander, E-mail: alex.lubotzky@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ?}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  19. Quantum Spin Formulation of the Principal Chiral Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Schlittgen; U. -J. Wiese

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the two-dimensional principal chiral model as a quantum spin model, replacing the classical fields by quantum operators acting in a Hilbert space, and introducing an additional, Euclidean time dimension. Using coherent state path integral techniques, we show that in the limit in which a large representation is chosen for the operators, the low energy excitations of the model describe a principal chiral model in three dimensions. By dimensional reduction, the two-dimensional principal chiral model of classical fields is recovered.

  20. A quantum dot heterojunction photodetector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arango, Alexi Cosmos, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new device architecture for photodetectors utilizing colloidally grown quantum dots as the principle photo-active component. We implement a thin film of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot sensitizers, ...