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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Using Customers' Reported Forecasts to Predict Future Sales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Customers' Reported Forecasts to Predict Future Sales Nihat Altintas , Alan Montgomery , Michael Trick Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. nihat

Gordon, Geoffrey J.

2

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainability initiatives, working with UBC Food Services and AMS Food Services to develop and conduct marketUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability Mandy Cheng, Sara Harrison, Andria Lam, Cristina Machial, Lena Syrovy, Diana

3

Calculation of calorific values of coals from ultimate analyses: theoretical basis and geochemical implications. Final report. Part 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various formulae for calculating calorific values for coals from ultimate analyses depend essentially on a propositon due to Dulong, that the heat of combustion of an organic compound is nearly equal to the heats of combustion of the elements in it, multiplied by their percentage content in the compound in question. This proposition assumes that the enthalpy of decomposition is negligible compared with the heat of combustion. The various published formulae, such as that due to Mott and Spooner, include empirical adjustments to allow for the fact that the enthalpy of formation or decomposition of no organic compound is zero (except rarely by chance). A new equation is proposed, which excludes empirical correction terms but includes a term explicitly related to the enthalpy of decomposition. As expected from the behavior of known compounds, this enthalpy varies with rank, but it also varies at the same level of rank with the geological history of the sample: rank is not the only source of variance in coal properties. The new equation is at least as effective in predicting calorific values for a set of 992 coals as equivalent equations derived for 6 subsets of the coals. On the whole, the distributions of differences between observed and calculated calorific values are skewed to only a small extent. About 86% of the differences lie between -300 and +300 Btu/lb (+- 700 kJ/kg). 10 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

Given, P.H.; Weldon, D.; Zoeller, J.H.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) customer satisfaction survey, 1997. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the EREN Customer Satisfaction Survey 1997 was designed to follow up the results of the 1995-96 Surveys, enabling comparison to the 1995- 96 baseline, and to provide additional qualitative feedback about EREN. Both the 1995-96 and 1997 Surveys had these objectives: Identify and define actual EREN users; Determine the value or benefits derived from the use of EREN; Determine the kind and quality of services that users want; Determine the users` levels of satisfaction with existing services; Determine users` preferences in both the sources of service and means of delivery; and Establish continuous quality improvement measures. This report presents the methodology used, scope and limitations of the study, description of the survey instrument, and findings regarding demographics, technical capabilities, usage patterns, general use, importance of and satisfaction with resources, and additional information and comments.

Anderson, A.V. [Information International Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henderson, D.P. [USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Solar process water heat for the Iris Images Custom Color Photo Lab. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report of the solar facility locted at Iris Images Custom Photo Laboratory in Mill Valley, California. It was designed to provide 59 percent of the hot water requirements for developing photographic film and domestic hot water use. The design load is to provide 6 gallons of hot water per minute for 8 hours per working day at 100/sup 0/F. It has 640 square feet of flat plate collectors and 360 gallons of hot water storage. The auxiliary back up system is a conventional gas-fired water heater. Freeze protection in this mild climate was originally provided by closed-loop circulation of hot water from the storage tank. Later this was changed to a drain-down system due to a freeze when electrical power failed. This system has been relatively successful with little or no scheduled maintenance. The site and building description, subsystem description, as-built drawings, cost breakdown and analysis, performance analysis, lessons learned, and the operation and maintenance manual are included.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forum Energy Imbalance Market Meetings Customer Comments Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Network Integration Transmission Service (NT Service) Network Open...

7

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerCommentsCustomer-Comments

8

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Customer List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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10

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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11

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailmentCustomer-Comments Sign

12

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailmentCustomer-Comments

13

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerComments Sign In About |

14

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerComments Sign In About

15

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerComments Sign In

16

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerComments Sign

17

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013CustomerComments

18

CRSP Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS AND "HOW-TO" REPORT

19

Using Utility Information to Calibrate Customer Demand Management Behavior Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Utility Information to Calibrate Customer Demand Management Behavior Models Murat Fahrio ­ Madison Report PSerc 99­06 June 10, 1999 Abstract In times of stress customers can help a utility by means be optimized if the utility can estimate the outage or substitution costs of its customers. This report

20

Customer Data Entry User's Guide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Customer Data Entry User's Guide, Version 2 Updated: September 18, 2014 The Customer Data Entry (CDE) Application provides BPA transmission customers with capability to view and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electric retail market options: The customer perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

24

Dear Customer/Stakeholder,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1132014 Subject: BPA Post-2011 Energy Efficiency Review Update 4 - Material for January 16 meeting and Proposed Schedule for Workgroups and Meetings Dear CustomerStakeholder,...

25

Does dynamic pricing make sense for mass market customers?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The added incentive to modify electric use under hourly versus monthly market-based pricing is small for most mass market customers in Upstate New York. If the ultimate policy goal of demand-response programs is to reduce peak load, then promoting conservation measures under monthly market-based pricing holds more promise. (author)

McDonough, Catherine; Kraus, Robert

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Probabilistic metrology defeats ultimate deterministic bound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum-enhanced measurements exploit quantum mechanical effects to provide ultra-precise estimates of physical variables for use in advanced technologies, such as frequency calibration of atomic clocks, gravitational waves detection, and biosensing. Quantum metrology studies the fundamental limits in the estimation precision given a certain amount of resources (e.g. the number of probe systems) and restrictions (e.g. limited interaction time, or coping with unavoidable presence of noise). Here we show that, even in the presence of noise, probabilistic measurement strategies (which have a certain probability of failure or abstention) can provide, upon a heralded successful outcome, estimates with a precision that violates the deterministic bounds. This establishes a new ultimate quantum metrology limit. For probe systems subject to local dephasing, we quantify such precision limit as a function of the probability of failure that can be tolerated. We show that the possibility of abstaining can substantially set back the detrimental effects of noise.

J. Calsamiglia; B. Gendra; R. Munoz-Tapia; E. Bagan

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Customization for tool design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ICEMDDN capabilities have been adapted to the specific needs of the tool designer for creation of tool and gage designs. A customized graphic system allows the designer to concentrate on the design task, not on the mechanics of the graphs system. Prerequisites of customization include management support, user acceptance, user contributions, CAD/CAM operations support and cooperation from Control Data Corporation. Benefits from customization included a measurable increase in design production, better completion schedules, high quality drawings with better accuracy, and job satisfaction from participation in system development and improvement.

Michaelson, B.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

QUEUEING PERFORMANCE WITH IMPATIENT CUSTOMERS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or they are useless to the receivers and considered icy decides the customer service order and also which lost. Two the deadlines are i.i.d. random variables with the customers. Therefore some server work is useless a concave State customer(s) to reject. The rejection is necessary since Center for Advanced Technology

Panwar, Shivendra S.

29

Library Services Customer Charter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Services Customer Charter Our commitment to you is to: · ensure your needs are the focus you informed of progress. To help us achieve this we ask you to: · treat your fellow users and library staff with respect and courtesy · carry your College ID or Library membership card in order to access

Applebaum, David

30

Ris-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines Gunner Chr. Larsen, Knut Ronold, Hans E analysis as well as a wind turbine reliability study. In the wind climate analysis, the distribution to analyse wind turbine components with respect to failure in ultimate loading, and in addition to establish

31

Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade Find Mlholt Jensen Ris-PhD-34(EN) ISBN 978 2008 #12;#12;Author: Find Mlholt Jensen Title: Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction

32

DSW customer meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic2005-2007 Budget Dear2,Summary ofCustomer

33

Customers in UGP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: Crude OilPublic Safety and100Current StudentsCustomerUpper

34

Customer Service Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments Sign In About Customer

35

Timeline for Customer Choices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A:decisional. 1 B O N N E V IresponseCUSTOMER

36

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(and-eventually, spray ponds) that are proposed to be used as ultimate heat sinks in nuclear power plant emergency core cooling systems. The need is derived from the concern...

37

Customer Service Reliability Program Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in Transmission Services Planning and Asset Management, in the Customer Service Engineering (TPC) organization. A successful candidate in this position will be a...

38

Hybrid Dynamical Systems, or HDS: The Ultimate Switching Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Dynamical Systems, or HDS: The Ultimate Switching Experience Michael S. Branicky Laboratory concentrated on formalizing the notion of a hybrid system as switching among an indexed collection of dynamical give a quick overview of the area of hybrid systems. I also briefly review the formal definition

Branicky, Michael S.

39

Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call January 22, 2015...

40

SNR Customer Meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDNTM7/31/13SLACM60-G (9-2013)SNL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administrations (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2011 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agencys programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 6.2 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 489 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled more than $264 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeasterns customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2011. This funding, which totaled more than $45 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeasterns marketing area. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in the funding efforts in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems of projects. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rain placed strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2011 totaled approximately $38 million. About $9 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeasterns customer contract requirements. Southeasterns goal is to maximize the benefits of our regions water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeasterns employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to preference customers, which ultimately serve more than 12 million consumers in the southeast.

none,

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administrations (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2012 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agencys programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 5.4 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 487 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled about $263 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeasterns customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2012. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in funding infrastructure renewal efforts of powerplants feeding the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems. This funding, which totaled more than $71 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeasterns marketing area. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rainfall strained our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2012 in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System totaled approximately $29 million. About $8 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeasterns customer contract requirements. Southeasterns goal is to maximize the benefits of our regions water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeasterns employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to preference customers, which ultimately serve more than 12 million consumers in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

none,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Custom Coolers: Order (2013-CE-5315)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Custom Coolers, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Custom Coolers had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

45

Does Customer Auditing Help Chinese Workers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does Customer Auditing Help Chinese Workers? Guojun He* andgovernment training and help, (4) fines and punishments, (5)

He, Goujun; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

customs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepareA Review 2008 A0 YEAR6customs |

47

SPPR Project Customer Comments Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u aSPPProject Customer

48

2013 Total Electric Industry- Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICS H. I.Plasma Camp View largerCustomers (Data

49

Black Hills Power- Residential Customer Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Black Hills Power offers cash rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Incentives exist for water heaters, demand control units, air...

50

Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

as well as continually assess the changing needs of the organization's customers. Feedback from these sessions will be utilized to expand upon, or reexamine, the methods in...

51

Platform for a modern grid: customer engagement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stories engaging the customer when deploying new technologies in the nation's largest smart grid demonstration. Related Articles (by tag) NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors,...

52

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Custom...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trusted ASIC Custom MEMS MEMS Accelerometers MEMS Actuators MEMS Sensors & Switches Microfluidics Optical MEMS RF MEMS (oscillators, filters, ...) Shared reticle through SAMPLES...

53

Idaho Power- Large Commercial Custom Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large commercial and industrial Idaho Power customers that reduce energy usage through more efficient electrical commercial and industrial processes may qualify for an incentive that is the lesser...

54

Price war with migrating customers Patrick Maille  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price war with migrating customers Patrick Maill´e TELECOM Bretagne 2, rue de la Ch^ataigneraie CS customers churn between providers due to better prices, better reputation or better services. We propose in this paper to study the price war between two providers in the case where users' decisions are modeled

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

55

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Administrative and Laboratory Building, Springfield, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Laboratory in Springfield, Virginia.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Data Center, Springfield, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Data Center in Springfield, Virginia.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ultimate strength of carbon nanotubes: A theoretical study Qingzhong Zhao, Marco Buongiorno Nardelli, and J. Bernholc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultimate strength of carbon nanotubes: A theoretical study Qingzhong Zhao, Marco Buongiorno 27695-8202 Received 7 June 2001; published 27 March 2002 The ultimate strength of carbon nanotubes is investigated by large-scale quantum calculations. While the formation energy of strain-induced topological

58

Not All Large Customers are Made Alike: Disaggregating Response toDefault-Service Day-Ahead Market Pricing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For decades, policymakers and program designers have gone onthe assumption that large customers, particularly industrial facilities,are the best candidates for realtime pricing (RTP). This assumption isbased partly on practical considerations (large customers can providepotentially large load reductions) but also on the premise thatbusinesses focused on production cost minimization are most likely toparticipate and respond to opportunities for bill savings. Yet fewstudies have examined the actual price response of large industrial andcommercial customers in a disaggregated fashion, nor have factors such asthe impacts of demand response (DR) enabling technologies, simultaneousemergency DR program participation and price response barriers been fullyelucidated. This second-phase case study of Niagara Mohawk PowerCorporation (NMPC)'s large customer RTP tariff addresses theseinformation needs. The results demonstrate the extreme diversity of largecustomers' response to hourly varying prices. While two-thirdsexhibitsome price response, about 20 percent of customers provide 75-80 percentof the aggregate load reductions. Manufacturing customers are mostprice-responsive as a group, followed by government/education customers,while other sectors are largely unresponsive. However, individualcustomer response varies widely. Currently, enabling technologies do notappear to enhance hourly price response; customers report using them forother purposes. The New York Independent System Operator (NYISO)'semergency DR programs enhance price response, in part by signaling tocustomers that day-ahead prices are high. In sum, large customers docurrently provide moderate price response, but there is significant roomfor improvement through targeted programs that help customers develop andimplement automated load-response strategies.

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Reliability Technology Solutions Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources Prepared the consequences. #12;#12;Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources iii Table of Contents

60

Low-Interest Loans for Customer-Side Distributed Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Long-term financing is available to retail end-use customers for the installation of customer-side distributed resources. Customer-side distributed resources are defined by Conn. Gen. Stat. 16-1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Solving Customer-Driven Microgrid Optimization Problems as DCOPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solving Customer-Driven Microgrid Optimization Problems as DCOPs Saurabh Gupta , Palak Jain common customer-driven microgrid (CDMG) optimization problems ­ a comprehensive CDMG optimization problem

Yeoh, William

62

Modesto Irrigation District- Custom Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The MPower Custom Rebate Program is available to larger commercial, industrial or agricultural customers that replace existing equipment or systems with high efficiency equipment. To be eligible...

63

Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Custom Energy Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dakota Electric's Custom Energy Grant Program is offered for any commercial or industrial customer that installs qualifying energy-efficient products which exceed conventional models and result in...

64

Nebraska Customized Job Training Advantage (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nebraska Customized Job Training Advantage is a flexible job training program with grants from $800-$4000 per qualified new job. Additional grant funding may be available for jobs created in...

65

Custom Coolers: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5315)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Custom Coolers, LLC, failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer (WICF) components as compliant with the energy conservation standards.

66

Santee Cooper- Business Custom Rebate (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Santee Cooper has developed a Business Custom Rebate as part of their Reduce the Use: Business Prescriptive Rebate Program, which was designed to reduce a business's overall electricity use.

67

The ultimate solution to simplify your data center Fiscal year 2012-2013 annual report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as many virtual machines within that pool as they wish. They decide on and control the level of priority electrical power for future projects. Therefore, we are very pleased to announce that the Policy Board Services, Performance Pool Storage (IOPS On-Demand), and Manag

Sura, Philip

68

A Customer Service Management Architecture for the Internet page 1 of 12 A Customer Service Management Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CSMA), based on work done earlier in [1]. Customer Service Management (CSM) transfers a part- clusions and possible directions for future work. 2 Customer Service Management Figure 1 shows an overviewA Customer Service Management Architecture for the Internet page 1 of 12 A Customer Service

Pras, Aiko

69

Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ({mu}Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a {mu}Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the {mu}Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into {mu}Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular {mu}Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a {mu}Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a credible example California {mu}Grid for use in this study and in future work. The work performed during this year demonstrates the viability of DER-CAM and of our approach to analyzing adoption of DER.

Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ubiquitous Computing, Customer Tracking, and Price Discrimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ubiquitous Computing, Customer Tracking, and Price Discrimination Alessandro Acquisti H. John Heinz's analysis is the possibility of combining context, historical, location and other personal data to dynamically alter the price of a product for each consumer - a form of price discrimination also known

Sadeh, Norman M.

71

US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

Van Houten, N.C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Finding Ultimate Limits of Performance for Hybrid Electric Edward D. Tate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

00FTT-50 Finding Ultimate Limits of Performance for Hybrid Electric Vehicles Edward D. Tate Stephen electric vehicles are seen as a solution to improving fuel economy and reducing pollution emissions from including: · nonlinear fuel/power maps · min and max battery charge · battery efficiency · nonlinear vehicle

73

The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*. Tools difficult macromolecule to analyse. Now it is possible to determine the nucleotide sequence at a rate of several hundred nucleotide a day. (August 2005: 1011 bases) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; = 0.283 #12

Morante, Silvia

74

Temperature dependent elastic constants and ultimate strength of graphene and graphyne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature dependent elastic constants and ultimate strength of graphene and graphyne Tianjiao strength of graphene and graphyne Tianjiao Shao,1,2 Bin Wen,1,a) Roderick Melnik,3,4 Shan Yao,2 Yoshiyuki strength of graphene and graphyne. For the linear thermal expan- sion coefficient, both graphene

Melnik, Roderick

75

The Ultimate-Sustainable-Yield Problem in Nonlinear Age-Structured Populations*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that it assumes that recruitment is independent of population density. *This work was partially supportedThe Ultimate-Sustainable-Yield Problem in Nonlinear Age-Structured Populations* WAYNE M. GETZ Africa Received 24 January 1979; revised IO Ju& 1979 ABSTRACT The Beverton-Holt theory of harvesting

Getz, Wayne M.

76

Predicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis of AE signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ``testing'' the real structure rather than trying to model it. Experiments on reinforced concrete (RC) beamsPredicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis the unloading and loading phases of a cycle test and it showed a clear correlation with the bending failure load

77

Synthesis Techniques for Semi-Custom Dynamically Reconfigurable Superscalar Processors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often disregarded assessment for partial reconfiguration. Common reconfigurable computing approaches today attempt to create custom circuitry in static co-processor accelerators. We instead focused on a new approach that synthesized semi-custom general...

Ortiz, Jorge

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Inter-organizational information sharing of customer data in retail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As massive online retailers are putting increasing pressure on the traditional brick-and-mortar retailers, new ways to compete for customers is needed. Identifying customers' behavior and understanding their needs could ...

Tengberg, John C.F. (John Claes Fredrik)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5803E The Future of Utility Customer- Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025

80

Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call March 12, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulating Customer Experience and Word-Of-Mouth in Retail -A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Simulating Customer Experience and Word-Of-Mouth in Retail - A Case Study Peer-Olaf Siebers Uwe the relationship between people management practices and retail performance. We report on the current development behavior due to changes in store management practices. Our multi-disciplinary research team draws upon

Aickelin, Uwe

82

Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

Remote power -- Integrated, customer oriented solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout its history, BP Solar has focused strongly on the production of integrated power solutions to it`s customers, using photovoltaics as the central, but not unique, technology. This paper discusses the customer driven development of two new generation hybrid power systems, one AC the other DC. Both involve the combination of renewable energy with a conventional power source in a fully integrated system, as well as providing remote electronic system access, advanced data and event logging, and comprehensive computer graphic analysis software. The first is a DC system providing power to telecommunication authorities in the Asian-Pacific region, the second is generating abundant high quality AC power for Australian domestic users.

Jordan, D.; Twidell, M.; Patel, J.; Teofilo, F.; Soin, R. [BP Solar Australia, Brookvale, New South Wales (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

2012 SEPA Customer Brochure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement Awardflash2007-42attachment1.pdfmodule(EE)2012 Nuclear Energy20122012 SEPA Customer

85

Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #39  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are 49,300 customers without power in Florida as of 7:00 AM EST 11/9 due to Hurricane Wilma, down from a peak of about 3.6 million customers. Currently, less than 1 percent of the customers are without power in the state. This is the last report we will due on outages due to Hurricane Wilma.

none,

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Customer System Efficiency Improvement Assessment: Description and examination of system characterization data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes three data bases that were developed in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment project to help characterize transmission and distribution (T and D) system losses experienced by utility customers in the Pacific Northwest. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for electric energy conservation in the T and D systems of BPA's utility customers. The three data bases provide essential input on the number and operating characteristics of T and D component stocks that was used in another task of the CSEI Project to estimate the conservation supply functions that result from replacing existing stocks with more efficient components (Tepel et al. 1986). This document describes the three data bases, provides a guide to their use, and presents a summary characterization of the principal loss-generating components (lines and transformers) of the region's T and D systems.

Callaway, J.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analysis of Various Pumping Methods With Respect to the Lowest Achievable Ultimate Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jefferson Labzs CEBAF Accelerator Facility uses most of the currently available vacuum pumping systems for its successful operations.These vacuum systems include turbo, ion, NEG and cryo pumps.The theoretical lowest pressure obtainable with these pumps is different and also the effective pumping speeds of all these pumps at lowest pressures are likely to vary depending on the prevailing conditions. Consequently, the ultimate pressure of a given vacuum system pumped by each of the above mentioned pumps could be expected to vary under the same operating conditions. In this paper the results of the analysis of above pumps with respect to their lowest achievable ultimate pressures are presented.z This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

Myneni, Ganapati; Rao Myneni, Ganapati; Favale, Anthony; Poelker, Benard; Stutzman, Marcy

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

none,

2006-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Individual Permit reports are prepared annually to facilitate public review of activities for the previous year. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

90

FY 2010 Report on Customer Service Texas Transportation Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, processes and products to improve the state and nation's transportation systems. The Texas Department and to identify areas of improvement. On-site interviews were conducted at 36 TxDOT offices (25 TxDOT Districts for a sponsoring agency or organization, and who determine overall direction for their agency's or company

91

Transmission Reassignment Reporting Requirement - April 2, 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CommitteesTeams Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of Conduct Tariff TF Web Based Training Transmission Reassignment Reporting Requirement This notice...

92

Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition mechanisms of fuel particles and fission fragments during the initial phase of the Chernobyl accident. Through this study, it is now possible to generally reconstruct the radiological consequences by using a dispersion calculation technique, combined with the meteorological data at the time of the accident and land contamination densities of {sup 137}Cs measured and reported around the Chernobyl area. Although it is challenging to incorporate lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident into the source term issues, the author has already developed an example of safety goals by incorporating the radiological consequences of the accident. The example provides safety goals by specifying source term releases in a graded approach in combination with probabilities, i.e. risks. The author believes that the future source term specification should be directly linked with safety goals. (author)

Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; some of our major achievements in FY 2009; FY 2009 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

none,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

2010 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

none,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

Meade, D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2012 Net Requirements Transparency Process for SliceBlock Customers Description of Changes and a Response to Comments September 24, 2012 Background and Description of Changes:...

97

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most out of using less energy? Making the most of Responsive...

98

New pilot saves customers money and reduces BPA reserve requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

paced energy schedules, increasing the electric grid's flexibility to absorb changes in wind energy generation and reducing costs for both the customers and BPA. Portland General...

99

California Customer Load Reductions during the Electricity Crisis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions during the Electricity Crisis: Did They Help to Keep the Lights On? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: California Customer Load Reductions during...

100

aec radioisotope customers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OR CUSTOMER EQUITY? BARBARA A. PENKALA Senior Research Analyst Houston Lighting & Power Company Houston. Texas ABSTRACT The contract provisions and ratchets con tained in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

affect customer performance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

load programs? University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Assessment of Demand Response Potential The total subscribedpotential. Specifically, many customers...

102

May 3, 2011 Situation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Beginning Wednesday April 27, 2011, severe storms with heavy rain, hail, and tornadoes impacted States in the Mid-Atlantic and Southern regions. As of 3:00 pm EDT, May 3, 2011, the impacted States report a total of 122,941 customers without power. This is a decrease from the 149,210 customers reported in this mornings Situation Report #11. Restoration efforts by electric utilities are reported below.

103

Custom VLSI circuits for high energy physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides a brief guide to integrated circuits, including their design, fabrication, testing, radiation hardness, and packaging. It was requested by the Panel on Instrumentation, Innovation, and Development of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, as one of a series of articles on instrumentation for future experiments. Their original request emphasized a description of available custom circuits and a set of recommendations for future developments. That has been done, but while traps that stop charge in solid-state devices are well known, those that stop physicists trying to develop the devices are not. Several years spent dodging the former and developing the latter made clear the need for a beginner`s guide through the maze, and that is the main purpose of this text.

Parker, S. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sit Down with Sabin: Henrik Scheller: Customizing plants for biofuels. (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Henrik Scheller from the JBEI appeared on August 3rd, 2011 for this installment of "Sit Down with Sabin," a conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Lab staff about innovative science. They will discuss "Customizing plants for biofuels." During this series of conversations, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science, all without the aid of PowerPoints.

Sabin, Russell; Scheller, Henrik

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sit Down with Sabin: Henrik Scheller: Customizing plants for biofuels. (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Henrik Scheller from the JBEI appeared on August 3rd, 2011 for this installment of "Sit Down with Sabin," a conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Lab staff about innovative science. They will discuss "Customizing plants for biofuels." During this series of conversations, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science, all without the aid of PowerPoints.

Sabin, Russell; Scheller, Henrik

2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Computer Resource Optimization for Differentiated Customer Services Kaiqi Xiong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-defined value for class r customers. This QoS metric is more realistic than the mean response time typically used in the literature. Numerical results show the applicability of the approach and validate its service requests from a customer within negotiated QoS requirements for a given price. Figure 1 de- picts

Perros, Harry

108

Airline price discrimination: A practice of yield management or customer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airline price discrimination: A practice of yield management or customer profiling? Rasha H.h.j.dierckx@student.utwente.nl ABSTRACT Prices of airline tickets frequently change, which is traditionally caused by yield management as price discrimination practice. In more recent times however, customer information is easily obtainable

Twente, Universiteit

109

A Case Study of a product software vendor's Customer Configuration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Case Study of a product software vendor's Customer Configuration Updating Process: GX Creative Case Study of a product software vendor's Customer Configuration Updating Process: GX Creative Online the results of a case study of GX creative online development, a Dutch product software vendor, into its

Utrecht, Universiteit

110

Agile Customer Engagement: a Longitudinal Qualitative Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. a supplier of packaged software. Most published work on agile processes focus on single-customer development a plan-based development process to an evolutionary software development process. The agile method being Customer Engagement, Agile Process, Stakeholder Management, Process Transition. 1. INTRODUCTION Software

111

Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

ight-derived energy enters the biosphere through photosyn-thesis, and ultimately sustains virtually all living organisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transformation of the light into reducing power (NADPH) and chemical energy (ATP) and its ultimate utilization can be divided into two principal components. Adaptation is a geno- typic response to long

Sarhan, Fathey

113

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/13/600451-00073-1 2. Government Accession in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel consumption per vehicle and ultimately drawing down

115

Instrument Qualification of Custom Fabricated Water Activity Meter for Hot Cell Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a custom fabricated water activity meter and the results of the qualification of this meter as described in the laboratory test plan LAB-PLN-11-00012, Testing and Validation of an Enhanced Acquisition and Control System. It was calibrated against several NaOH solutions of varying concentrations to quantify the accuracy and precision of the instrument at 20 C and 60 C. Also, a schematic and parts list of the equipment used to make the water activity meter will be presented in this report.

McCoskey, Jacob K.

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric Achromats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed an 'ultimate' storage ring for the PEP-X light source that achieves the diffraction limited emittances (at 1.5 {angstrom}) of 12 pm-rad in both horizontal and vertical planes with a 4.5-GeV beam. These emittances include the contribution of intrabeam scattering at a nominal current of 200 mA in 3300 bunches. This quality beam in conjunction with a conventional 4-m undulator in a straight section can generate synchrotron radiation having a spectral brightness above 10{sup 22} [photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW] at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In addition, the beam lifetime is several hours and the dynamic aperture is large enough to allow off-axis injection. The alignment and stability tolerances, though challenging, are achievable. A ring with all these properties is only possible because of several major advances in mitigating the effects of nonlinear resonances.

Cai, Yunhai; Bane, Karl; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels for Enhancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels results in 3D printing and steerable needle motion planning to create customized implants containing

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

118

Microsoft PowerPoint - Customer Follow Up RHWM BP-16 Workshop...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

since the initial forecasts were distributed in FebruaryMarch 2014 * 7 SliceBlock contract customers * 6 Load following contract customers Forecast changes have had minimal...

119

Microsoft Word - Customer Forum 38 Agenda_web_final  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4:00 pm Location: BPA Rates Hearing Room Phone Bridge: (877) 336-1828 Passcode: 2034081 Web site for additional information: http:www.bpa.govtransmissionCustomerInvolvement...

120

A methodology to assess cost implications of automotive customization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on determining the cost of customization for different components or groups of components of a car. It offers a methodology to estimate the manufacturing cost of a complex system such as a car. This ...

Fournier, Latitia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE GC Joins Customs Service Trade Data System to Strengthen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Service Trade Data System to Strengthen Enforcement Effort DOE GC Joins Customs Service Trade Data System to Strengthen Enforcement Effort February 14, 2011 - 5:48pm Addthis The...

122

Smart customization : making evidence-based environmental decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the environmental benefits created by the manufacture, distribution, and consumer use of products that are mass customized (MC) or produced "on-demand" and tailored to individual end-user preferences. ...

Chin, Ryan C. C., 1974-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Estimating market potential for reducing customer peak loads through photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past studies have quantified photovoltaics` (PV) peak load matching capability on a utility-wide scale. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the number of utility subloads (e.g., customers, substations) whose peak loads are well matched with solar availability. A simple tool based on the utility scale load-PV match is developed to estimate the market size of customer scale PV applications with high load-PV matches. Illustrative examples of customer owned PV economics are also provided. The authors show that (1) the market size of high load matching PV applications on the subload scale is significant even within utility systems whose load requirements are not particularly well matched with PV output; and (2) the cost of PV as a peak shaving resource for utility customers is approaching competitive levels.

Bryan, J. [Citizens Advisory Panel, Central Islip, NY (United States); Perez, R. [Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Database-driven decision support system: customized mortality prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We hypothesize that local customized modeling will provide more accurate mortality prediction than the current standard approach using existing scoring systems. Mortality prediction models were developed for two subsets ...

Celi, Leo Anthony G.

125

Delivery optimization for a make to order custom wire mill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the face of growing competition in the Tantalum business, H.C.Starck's management is minimizing the delivery time for custom-made capacitor-grade tantalum wire products. H.C. Starck, Inc., Newton, Massachusetts faces ...

Slivinskiy, Andrey L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Natural Gas Utility Restructuring and Customer Choice Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to natural gas utilities that have restructured in order to acquire rate-based facilities. The regulations address customer choice offerings by natural gas utilities, which...

127

Utilities Sell Lighting, Cooling and Heating to Large Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric utility industry is entering an era of unprecedented competition. Competition from traditional sources such as natural gas companies, customer cogeneration, and independent power producers are being joined by new sources of competition...

Horne, M. L.; Zien, H. B.

128

Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Custom, HVAC, and Motor Business Efficiency Incentives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Prescriptive rebates are available for many HVAC and motor efficiency improvements. Pre-approval is required for all rebates. The programs are available only to non-residential customers that...

129

Future Competitive Positioning of Electric Utilities and their Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses the future competitive positioning of electric and gas utilities and their industrial customers. Each must respond to a dramatic reshaping of the utility industry while confronting aggressive environmental pressures and taking...

Schrock, D.; Parker, G.; Baechler, M.

130

Device-oriented telecommunications customer call center demand forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verizon Wireless maintains a call center infrastructure employing more than 15,000 customer care representatives across the United States. The current resource management process requires a lead time of several months to ...

Koul, Ashish, 1979-

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

NEBRASKA PUBLIC POWER DISTRICT CUSTOMER MEETING ON ENERGY ALTERNATIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................9 Do you think NPPD should go forward with a 200 megawatt wind farm? ...........10 Do you think the wind farm program is the right size? .........................................10 How many total customers value solar power? ..................................................................20 Cumulative

132

Midas: Fabricating Custom Capacitive Touch Sensors to Prototype Interactive Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. While digital fabrication techniques such as 3D printing make it easier to prototype the shape of custom processes like 3D printing and CNC ma- chining make it easier to prototype the form of such products

California at Irvine, University of

133

Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SliceBlock contract in the Pre-TRM contracts provided those customers with block step ups to reduce non-BPA resources to integrate SliceBlock power, Block Step Ups for the...

134

Customizing mass housing : a discursive grammar for Siza's Malagueira houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a process of providing mass-customized housing based on computer-aided design and production systems. It focuses on the design part, which mainly consists of an interactive system for the generation ...

Duarte, Jos Pinto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Contract Provisions and Ratchets: Utility Security or Customer Equity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTRACT PROVISIONS ANO RATCHETS: UTILITY SECURITY OR CUSTOMER EQUITY? BARBARA A. PENKALA Senior Research Analyst Houston Lighting & Power Company Houston. Texas ABSTRACT The contract provisions and ratchets con tained in an electric... of customers and the magnitude of the load served. A smaller part of the cost is dependent on kilowatt-hours. or energy supplied. The high investment required in the electric utility business relative to annual revenue has an important influence on price...

Penkala, B. A.

136

Proximate and Ultimate Compositional Changes in Corn Stover during Torrefaction using Thermogravimetric Analyzer and Microwaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The world is currently aiming to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is considered carbon neutral because the carbon dioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle. Increasing the use of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol. Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes, including thermochemical (direct combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation), or chemical (esterification) technologies. There are lot challenges in using biomass for energy applications. To name few low bulk density, high moisture content, irregular size and shape, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value. In commercial scale operation large quantities of biomass are needed and this will create problems associated with storage and transportation. Furthermore, grinding raw biomass with high moisture content is very challenging as there are no specific equipments and can increase the costs and in some cases it becomes highly impossible. All of these drawbacks led to development of some pretreatment techniques to make biomass more suitable for fuel applications. One of the promising techniques is torrefaction. Torrefaction is heating the biomass in an inert environment or reduced environment. During torrefaction biomass losses moisture, becomes more brittle and with increased energy density values. There are different techniques used for torrefaction of biomass. Fixed bed, bubbling sand bed and moving bed are the most common ones used. The use of microwaves for torrefaction purposes has not been explored. In the present study we looked into the torrefaction of biomass using the regular and microwaves and their effect on proximate and ultimate composition. Studies indicated that microwave torrefaction is a good way to torrefy the biomass in short periods of time. A maximum calorific value of 21 MJ/kg is achievable at 6 min residence time compared to 15 min using the dry torrefaction technique. Increasing the residence time increased the carbon content where a maximum carbon content of 52.20 % was achievable at lower residence time. The loss of volatiles is comparatively lower compared to dry torrefaction technique. Moisture content of microwave torrefied samples was in between 2-2.5 % (w.b).

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Service Level Agreement University ServicesPurchasing with University Services customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be determined individually with each customer for each service contract. USP provides services that can

Webb, Peter

138

Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclearReporting Unethical or

140

REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963American |Purpose This procedurenote: The REPORT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dynamic pricing for residential electric customers: a ratepayer advocate's perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New Jersey's Rate Counsel urges that the consideration of alternative pricing mechanisms aimed at encouraging a reduction or shift in residential electricity usage include recognition of the needs and wishes of consumers. Without consumer buy-in, any such pricing mechanisms will fail. To achieve the desired goals, customers must be able to understand and react to the pricing signals. (author)

Brand, Stefanie A.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Engagement Academy Page 1 Customized Program/Service Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engagement Academy Page 1 Customized Program/Service Request Form The Engagement Academy faculty. Hosting an Engagement Academy program at your site gives you the flexibility and convenience to address-mail Address #12;Engagement Academy Page 2 Which program or service are you interested in bringing to yourself

Liskiewicz, Maciej

143

How Sensitive is Processor Customization to the Workload's Input Datasets?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Sensitive is Processor Customization to the Workload's Input Datasets? Maximilien Breughe Zheng though is to what extent processor customiza- tion is sensitive to the training workload's input datasets. Current practice is to consider a single or only a few input datasets per workload during the processor

Eeckhout, Lieven

144

A Framework for Context-Aware Services Using Service Customizer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) [1] is a high-level and technology-independent concept, the proposed approach improves the privacy and security features of web services. Keywords: Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA); Context- Aware Services; Software Agent; Knowledge Management; Service Customizer. I

Sartipi, Kamran

145

Classifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

searching, the set of terms for which a user searches is called the query. If a user enters a query and then clicks on a result, these query terms are embedded within the URL that is passed from the search engineClassifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers Adan Ortiz-Cordova 329

Jansen, James

146

Customizing Painterly Rendering Styles Using Stroke Processes Mingtian Zhao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Customizing Painterly Rendering Styles Using Stroke Processes Mingtian Zhao Song-Chun Zhu styles rendered using our method. (a) has lower lightness contrast than (b) thus appears a little more. Abstract In this paper, we study the stroke placement problem in painterly rendering, and present

Zhu, Song Chun

147

Joint Customer Response to Comments October 21, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in working with the public interest groups, the Joint Customers have agreed to delegate specific BPA hearings around the region and we have also continued discussions with public interest groups, the DSIs interest groups and with your staff. This will offer all of us the opportunity to further close any gaps

148

Resilient Smart Grid Customers April 3 4, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilient Smart Grid Customers April 3 ­ 4, 2014 Berkner Hall, Room B ­ Building 488 Agenda, Department Manager-Smart Grid Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. Robert Broadwater, Chief Technology Officer President, Legal, Regulatory And Energy Policy General MicroGrids 9:45 ­10:00 a.m. Break 10:00 ­ 11:30 a

Ohta, Shigemi

149

Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a Berkeley Lab effort to model the economics and operation of small-scale (<500 kW) on-site electricity generators based on real-world installations at several example customer sites. This work builds upon the previous development of the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment, and idealized operating schedule, that would minimize the site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a historic test period, usually a recent year. This study offered the first opportunity to apply DER-CAM in a real-world setting and evaluate its modeling results. DER-CAM has three possible applications: first, it can be used to guide choices of equipment at specific sites, or provide general solutions for example sites and propose good choices for sites with similar circumstances; second, it can additionally provide the basis for the operations of installed on-site generation; and third, it can be used to assess the market potential of technologies by anticipating which kinds of customers might find various technologies attractive. A list of approximately 90 DER candidate sites was compiled and each site's DER characteristics and their willingness to volunteer information was assessed, producing detailed information on about 15 sites of which five sites were analyzed in depth. The five sites were not intended to provide a random sample, rather they were chosen to provide some diversity of business activity, geography, and technology. More importantly, they were chosen in the hope of finding examples of true business decisions made based on somewhat sophisticated analyses, and pilot or demonstration projects were avoided. Information on the benefits and pitfalls of implementing a DER system was also presented from an additional ten sites including agriculture, education, health care, airport, and manufacturing facilities.

Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Keep Customers-and Energy-From Slipping Through the Cracks |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

project. Instead of accepting these customers as losses, GCEA had its full-time energy advisor make phone calls to each of these customers to learn why they weren't completing...

151

Independent review of estimated load reductions for PJM's small customer load response pilot project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Estimated Load Reductions for PJMs Small Customer Loadof Estimated Load Reductions for PJMs Small Customer LoadResponse Pilot Project Prepared for PJM Interconnection, LLC

Heffner, G.; Moezzi, M.; Goldman, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy...

153

Identifying system-wide contact center cost reduction opportunities through lean, customer-focused IT metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dell's long-term success depends on its customers' future buying patterns. These patterns are largely determined by customers' satisfaction with the after-sales service they receive. Previously, Dell has been able to deliver ...

Sen, Avijit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Considering the customer : determinants and impact of using technology on industry evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation raises two questions: How do customers come to understand and use a technology? What is the influence of customers using a technology on industry evolution and competition? I use two historical cases to ...

Kahl, Steven J. (Steven John)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Helping C&I Customers to Get C.L.E.A.N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute's (EPRI) tailored collaborative, TVA has customized CLEAN -Comprehensive Least Emissions ANalysis --to assist its C&I customers. CLEAN is a database and software tool for calculating the comprehensive emissions from end-use technologies...

Williams, J.; Beames, B.

156

Inter-Organizational Information and Communication Technology (IICT) in the Customer Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inter-Organizational Information and Communication Technology (IICT) in the Customer Interface dimensions of customer interface IICT adoption: 1) impact on internal business process efficiency, 2) impact When Inter-organizational Information and Communication Technology (IICT) implementation is properly

Wu, Qinglin

157

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand response, participation can imply: (1) customer enrollment in voluntary programs and tariffs, or (2) the retention

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Customer Communications Management in the New Digital Era Center for Marketing Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. The importance of brand community building, in particular via digital tools, is then examined. WeCustomer Communications Management in the New Digital Era Center for Marketing Studies Darla Moore. Madden January 2012 #12;Customer Communications Management In the New Digital Era 1 Customer

Almor, Amit

159

Green Marketing, Renewables, and Free Riders: Increasing Customer Demand for a Public Good  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-40632 UC-1321 Green Marketing, Renewables, and Free Riders: Increasing Customer Demand Customers that They Can "Make a Difference" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Emphasize Customer Retention errors and/or omissions are, of course, the full responsibility of the authors. The work described

160

Factored Models for Multiscale Decision-Making in Smart Grid Customers Prashant P. Reddy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of customers in the management of demand, and renewable energy supply, is a critical goal of the Smart Grid on offering customers financial incentives through variable-price tariffs; we also contribute an ef- fective the past decade (Str- bac 2008). Smart Grid customers are steadily acquiring dis- tributed renewable

Veloso, Manuela M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 20092011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new construction, commercial/industrial custom rebate programs). In this report, the focus is on gross energy savings and the costs borne by the program administratorincluding administration, payments to implementation contractors, marketing, incentives to program participants (end users) and both midstream and upstream trade allies, and evaluation costs. We collected data on net savings and costs incurred by program participants. However, there were insufficient data on participant cost contributions, and uncertainty and variability in the ways in which net savings were reported and defined across states (and program administrators).

Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

Rines, Kenneth [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Shaping the spectrum of downconverted photons through optimized custom poling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a scheme for engineering the joint spectrum of photons created via spontaneous parametric down conversion. Our method relies on customizing the poling configuration of a quasi-phase-matched crystal. We use simulated annealing to find an optimized poling configuration which allows almost arbitrary shaping of the crystal's phase-matching function. This has direct application in the creation of pure single photons---currently one of the most important goals of single-photon quantum optics. We describe the general algorithm and provide code, written in C++, that outputs an optimized poling configuration given specific experimental parameters.

Annamaria Dosseva; Lukasz Cincio; Agata M. Branczyk

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Customer Participation in the Smart Grid - Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | DepartmentOffice of Policy,Customer

168

Table 15. Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328AdministrationReleaseMetallurgical Coal Exports by Customs

169

"2013 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane PAD2006..........A49.Customers" "(Data from

170

Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the spring of 2009, billions of federal dollars have been allocated to state and local governments as grants for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects and programs. The scale of this American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding, focused on 'shovel-ready' projects to create and retain jobs, is unprecedented. Thousands of newly funded players - cities, counties, states, and tribes - and thousands of programs and projects are entering the existing landscape of energy efficiency programs for the first time or expanding their reach. The nation's experience base with energy efficiency is growing enormously, fed by federal dollars and driven by broader objectives than saving energy alone. State and local officials made countless choices in developing portfolios of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs and deciding how their programs would relate to existing efficiency programs funded by utility customers. Those choices are worth examining as bellwethers of a future world where there may be multiple program administrators and funding sources in many states. What are the opportunities and challenges of this new environment? What short- and long-term impacts will this large, infusion of funds have on utility customer-funded programs; for example, on infrastructure for delivering energy efficiency services or on customer willingness to invest in energy efficiency? To what extent has the attribution of energy savings been a critical issue, especially where administrators of utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs have performance or shareholder incentives? Do the new ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs provide insights on roles or activities that are particularly well-suited to state and local program administrators vs. administrators or implementers of utility customer-funded programs? The answers could have important implications for the future of U.S. energy efficiency. This report focuses on a selected set of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs administered by state energy offices: the State Energy Program (SEP) formula grants, the portion of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) formula funds administered directly by states, and the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP). Since these ARRA programs devote significant monies to energy efficiency and serve similar markets as utility customer-funded programs, there are frequent interactions between programs. We exclude the DOE low-income weatherization program and EECBG funding awarded directly to the over 2,200 cities, counties and tribes from our study to keep its scope manageable. We summarize the energy efficiency program design and funding choices made by the 50 state energy offices, 5 territories and the District of Columbia. We then focus on the specific choices made in 12 case study states. These states were selected based on the level of utility customer program funding, diversity of program administrator models, and geographic diversity. Based on interviews with more than 80 energy efficiency actors in those 12 states, we draw observations about states strategies for use of Recovery Act funds. We examine interactions between ARRA programs and utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs in terms of program planning, program design and implementation, policy issues, and potential long-term impacts. We consider how the existing regulatory policy framework and energy efficiency programs in these 12 states may have impacted development of these selected ARRA programs. Finally, we summarize key trends and highlight issues that evaluators of these ARRA programs may want to examine in more depth in their process and impact evaluations.

Goldman, Charles A.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Ian; Fuller, Merrian C.; Billingsley, Megan A.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986.

Lamar, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems, July 24, 2014, Call Slides and Discussion Summary....

173

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms, including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: 1) isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; 2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; 3) isotopes purchased cross- referenced with customer numbers; 4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and 5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1987.

Lamar, D.A.; Van Houten, N.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Provider-Customer Coalitional Games Alireza Aram, Saswati Sarkar, and Chandramani Singh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provider-Customer Coalitional Games Alireza Aram, Saswati Sarkar, and Chandramani Singh Abstract. Aram & S. Sarkar are in the Dep. of Electrical and Systems Eng., University of Pennsylvania

Sarkar, Saswati

175

Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN): Customer satisfaction survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) Customer Satisfaction Survey was developed and executed in support of EREN`s continuous quality improvement (CQI) plan. The study was designed to provide information about the demographic make up of EREN users, the value or benefits they derive from EREN, the kinds and quality of services they want, their levels of satisfaction with existing services, their preferences in both the sources of service and the means of delivery, and to provide benchmark data for the establishment of continuous quality improvement measures. The survey was performed by soliciting voluntary participation from members of the EREN Users Group. It was executed in two phases; the first being conducted by phone using a randomly selected group; and the second being conducted electronically and which was open to all of the remaining members of the Users Group. The survey results are described.

Anderson, A.V. [Information International Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henderson, D.P. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Office of Scientific and Technical Information

1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Engineering Service Products: The Case of Mass-Customizing Service Agreements for Heavy Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Service Products: The Case of Mass- Customizing Service Agreements for Heavy Equipment develop a reference model of service agreement engineering to help mass-customize and evaluate service. The Problem of Engineering Service Products for Manufacturers Manufacturers of heavy industry are increasingly

Hsu, Cheng

178

An example of trust-based marketing and customer advocacy in e-commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor Glen L. Urban at MIT Sloan advocates a new style of marketing based on trust-building. One way to build this trust is to use an advisor to have a conversation with the customer rather than talking at the customer. ...

Zhang, Min, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thematic note to substantiate Ris's strategy impact on society Customer-driven activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Competitive power as high-technology society Introduction Customer-driven activities are activities undertakenThematic note to substantiate Risø's strategy ­ impact on society Customer-driven activities Impact and embedding Risø's research in society and thereby having significant impact. To Risø, the activities provide

180

Pricing Electricity for Default Customers: Pass Through or Performance-Based Rates?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-066 Pricing Electricity for Default Customers: Pass Through or Performance-Based Rates? Carl;1 Pricing Electricity for Default Customers: Pass Through or Performance-Based Rates? Carl Blumstein1 August 1999 Abstract California electricity consumers can choose a retail electricity service provider

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Customer Service Representative II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The University Benefit Programs Customer Service Unit is responsible for providing counseling, financial Open Enrollment function on a systemwide basis. Under the general direction of a Customer Service Unit and statistical studies using a variety of formats #12;for easy interpretation and use. Strong verbal

Nguyen, Danh

182

A Customer-Item Decomposition Approach to Stochastic Inventory Systems with Correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that arise from this formulation to show that the optimal policy is a state- dependent base-stock policy time, with a batch of such customers arriving in each period. Inventory (both in-stock, on- order to a particular customer. This decision can be made, in some cases, by taking into account only the marginal cost

Benjaafar, Saifallah

183

Customization and 3D Printing: A Challenging Playground for Software Product Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Customization and 3D Printing: A Challenging Playground for Software Product Lines Mathieu Acher firstname.lastname@irisa.fr ABSTRACT 3D printing is gaining more and more momentum to build customized. We provide hints that SPL-alike techniques are practically used in 3D printing and thus relevant

Boyer, Edmond

184

ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2 Audigane, P.1 , Brown, S.2 , Dimier A.3 , Frykman P.4 , Gherardi F.5 , Le Gallo Y.6 Recherches Géologiques et minières - France 2 CO2SENSE limited, United Kingdom 3 EIFER, EIFER europaisches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

US DOE EECBG BBNP REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wisconsin Energy Efficiency (WE2) Program delivered residential and commercial programming for the City of Milwaukee (Me2) and the City of Madison (Green Madison) as well as commercial only programming for the City of Racine (Re2). Direct incentives and loan products for homeowners and business owners were offered, with the goal to achieve at least 15 percent in energy savings. At the time of this report, there were more than 2,000 residential energy efficiency upgrades completed and more than 300 commercial energy efficiency upgrades completed. The average energy savings for the WE2 Programs portfolio of residential and commercial projects exceeds 15 percent and is closer to 30 percent energy savings. Combined energy savings of both residential and commercial activities were: 20,937,369 kWh; 1,018,907 Therms; and 31,655 gallons of heating oil; or at least 332,788 MMBTUs; or at least $3,444,828 in estimated energy costs saved. Conservative economic impact estimates include the employment of more than 100 residential auditors and contractors, more than 90 commercial contractors, and more than $41 million in total project costs expended in the targeted communities. WECC, along with the Partner Cities, attempted to create energy efficiency programming that helped to increase economic activity, increase workforce opportunities, and save energy in three of the largest communities in Wisconsin. Homeowners were assisted through the residential process by Energy Advocates, consultants, and contractors. Business owners were assisted through the commercial process by Program Advocates, contractors and trade allies. Contractors in both the residential and commercial programs were educated and trained by the many offerings provided by WECC. Together, all parties involved made the WE2 Program successful. The most prominent innovative approaches employed in the Me2 and Green Madison programs for residential retrofits were: use of a loan loss reserve approach to improve access to lower cost financing; a primary focus on community-based marketing and outreach through local organizations to attract program participants; use of Energy Advocates to facilitate homeowner understanding during participation of the retrofit process; increase in financial incentives, especially to achieve higher project savings; and additional building science and sales training for participating contractors, as well as the use of a Community Workforce Agreement (CWA). The most prominent innovative approaches used in the commercial building retrofit programs for the Me2, Green Madison and Re2 programs were: development and use of innovative customer financing through loan-loss reserves for small commercial building retrofits; cash collateral advance account for larger projects which mitigated the financial risk of lenders; and the ultimate development of a Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) program in the City of Milwaukee. Other approaches included: increased customer financial incentives, especially for small commercial projects, in excess of the incentives available from the Focus on Energy program. Each Partner Citys commercial program was built on existing Focus on Energy programming, which allowed the WE2 Program to leverage experience from Focus on Energy personnel to help promote participation, and encourage more extensive retrofits. Several legacy items will continue into the future, while there will be ongoing attempts to create a sustainable program. In the future, homeowners in Milwaukee and Madison will continue to have opportunities for incentives through the Focus on Energy program, as well as loan products being offered through Me2 and Green Madison. Similarly, business owners will continue to benefit from incentives through the Focus on Energy program, as well as loan products being offered through Me2 and Green Madison. Finally, the most recent development and implementation of C-PACE for large commercial building owners or business owners in Milwaukee may have substantial economic impacts. C-PACE may have simila

Driscoll, Brian; Conkey, Todd; Edgar, George; Fox, Lisa; Kahl, Shannon; Lightbourn, Steve; Moubry, Cindy; Nettleton, Greg; Plunkett, Mike; Smith, Paul; Thibert-Blank, Jackie; Wollin, Amanda

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Independent review of estimated load reductions for PJM's small customer load response pilot project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the results of a low-cost approach used to measure reported load reductions from a residential electric water heater (EWH) load control program operated as part of PJM Interconnection's Demand Response small customer pilot program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducted this independent review of the engineering estimates for EWH load control reported by a Curtailment Service Provider (CSP) at PJM's request. LBNL employed low-cost measurement and verification (M&V) approaches that utilized existing interval metering equipment to monitor results for a series of load control tests. The CSP collected hourly load data for two substations and several hundred households over a six-week period in October and November 2003. During this time period, the CSP operated its electric water heater load control program during pre-specified test periods in the morning, afternoon and early evening. LBNL then analyzed substation and premise-level data from these tests in order to verify the diversified demand reductions claimed by the CSP for customers participating in the EWH load control program. We found that the observed load reductions for the premise-level data aggregated over all households in the two participating electric cooperatives were, respectively, 40 percent-60 percent less and 3 percent less-10 percent higher than the estimated diversified demand reduction values assumed by the CSP, depending on whether observed or normalized results are considered. We also analyzed sub-station level data and found that the observed load reductions during the test periods were significantly lower than expected, although confounding influences and operational problems signifiogram during pre-specified test periods in the morning, afternoon and early evening. LBNL then analyzed substation and premise-level data from these tests in order to verify the diversified demand reductions claimed by the CSP for customers participating in the EWH load control program. We found that the observed load reductions for the premise-level data aggregated over all households in the two participating electric cooperatives were, respectively, 40 percent-60 percent less and 3 percent less-10 percent higher than the estimated diversified demand reduction values assumed by the CSP, depending on whether observed or normalized results are considered. We also analyzed sub-station level data and found that the observed load reductions during the test periods were significantly lower than expected, although confounding influences and operational problems significantly limit our ability to differentiate between control-related and non-control related differences in substation-level load shape data. The usefulness and accuracy of the results were hampered by operational problems encountered during the measurement period as well as in sufficient number of load research grade interval meters at one cooperative. Given the larger sample size at one electric cooperative and more statistically-robust results, there is some basis to suggest that the Adjusted Diversified Demand Factor (ADDF) values used by the CSP somewhat over-state the actual load reductions. Given the results and limitations of the M&V approach as implemented, we suggest several options for PJM to consider: (1) require load aggregators participating in ISODR programs to utilize formal PURPA-compliant load research samples in their M&V plans, and (2) continue developing lower cost M&V approaches for mass market load control programs that incorporate suggested improvements described in this study.

Heffner, G.; Moezzi, M.; Goldman, C.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Beanstalk Chip Report David Harris & Brett Bissinger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design seminar to construct a second FIFO using a custom integrated circuit. This report documents or frequency errors between the transmitter and receiver. The clinic team is constructing one FIFO for speedy bug fixes and tool enhancements. This chip report describes the ASP* pipeline organization

Harris, David Money

188

Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program (WIP). History of the State Energy Program. and history of utility customer- funded programs, institutional capacity of state energyand history of utility customer-funded programs, institutional capacity of state energy

Goldman, Charles A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A study of the demographic and program variables influencing customer satisfaction in the Texas Agricultural Extension Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to increase customer satisfaction levels. Public and Private Industry Bryant and Jaesung (1996) compared public and private industries in the area of customer satisfaction. Reasons for evaluating public industries include resource allocation decisions..., and to assess customer segments to determine profitability. In the study by Bryant and Jaesung (1996), overall customer satisfaction was rated higher in private industries. Females, rural residents, blacks, less educated people, and older people (those born...

Bondurant, Susan Elizabeth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Interactions Between Energy Efficiecy Programs Funded Under Recover Act and Utility Customer-funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Interactions Between Energy Efficiecy Programs Funded Under Recover Act and Utility Customer-funded Energy Efficiency Programs Webinar.

191

Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The report also examines when consumers want to recharge vehicles, and to what extent pricing and incentives can encourage consumers to charge during off-peak periods. Evaluating...

192

MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF CUSTOMER-SITED PV SYSTEMS USING STORAGE AND CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U.S. have become increasingly accustomed to a highly reliable source of electricity. As a result. Outage recovery: provide customers with an "outage- reactive" capability by supporting local critical

Perez, Richard R.

193

Transportation Research Board Conference January 10, 2005 Using Custom Transportation Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Research Board Conference January 10, 2005 Using Custom Transportation Data Collection Software with Handheld Computers for Education, Research, and Practice Transportation Research, Andrew Byrd, Michael Rose, Tarek Abou El-Seoud #12;Transportation Research Board Conference January 10

Bertini, Robert L.

194

Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Niagara Mohawks Standard Offer Tariff * Richard N. BoisvertThis default-service commodity tariff (SC-3A Option One)electricity usage data, tariff history, basic customer

Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

choices in the face of real options, or surveys can beoptions may differ from their actual behavior when faced with realReal-Time Demand Response (RTDR) program offers customers two advance-notice options:

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SDG&E Customers Can Connect Home Area Network Devices With Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the appliances are turned on or off. "Now that this technology is enabled through SDG&E's smart meter system, customers can see how much energy they are using in their home in near...

197

The determination of the customer needs and expectations of the Texas Department of Transportation construction operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of a Total Quality Management model to identify, the customer needs and expectations of the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT) construction operations. The established mission and goals of the TXDOT have...

Garduno, Lauren Deon

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Impact of information and communications technologies on residental customer energy services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the potential impact of information and communications technologies on utility delivery of residential customer energy services. Many utilities are conducting trials which test energy-related and non-energy services using advanced communications systems.

Goldman, C.; Kempton, W.; Eide, A.; Iyer, M. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lean concepts in customer care : adding value and reducing waste with proactive order status messaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information technology (IT), operational efficiency, and a strong relationship with customers are three critical components to Dell's success over the last twenty four years. Information technology throughout Dell's history ...

Gill, Kaine C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mining customer credit by using neural network model with logistic regression approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The objective of this research was to investigate the methodologies to mine customer credit history for the bank industry. Particularly, combination of logistic regression model and neural network technique are proposed to determine if the predictive capability...

Kao, Ling-Jing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Application Developer Application developers create custom software solutions to meet clients' needs. Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administrator Network administrators are in charge of existing networks, rather than planning and implementing networks. Network administrators may be responsible for customizing a network to an individual company, troubleshooting, and maintaining the network. Network administrators may also provide daily support

Indiana University

202

Advertising in a Competitive Market: The Role of Product Standards, Customer Learning, and Switching Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard models of competition predict that firms will sell less when competitors target their customers with advertising. This is particularly true in mature markets with many competitors that sell relatively undifferentiated ...

Anderson, Eric T.

203

How much do electric customers want to pay for reliability; New evidence on an old controversy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric utilities are facing competitive challenges from independent power producers, cogenerators, qualifying facilities, and customer bypass, in addition to increasing resistance to building new capacity whether it be conventional or nuclear. Utilities are meeting these challenges by offering an array of demand-side management programs and differentiated tariffs that better match utility rates and customer preferences for service reliability. Customer preferences for service reliability may be gathered by market survey, however, survey estimates are subject to various common criticisms a fact that has retarded the adoption of this approach. by using power survey design techniques and statistical methods, the authors show in this paper, how accurate customer value of service reliability data may be collected with a market survey.

Woo, C.K. (Dept. of Economics and Finance, City Polytechnic of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (HK)); Pupp, R.L. (Quantitative Solutions, San Francisco, CA (US)); Flaim, T.; Mango, R. (Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Syracuse, NY (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Service bulletin inventory management and modeling for aerospace parts in customer service organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Customer Service department of United Technology Corporation (UTC) Aerospace System is primarily responsible for providing spare parts, repair services, training, and technical support for products that UTC Aerospace ...

Pardede, Erna K. (Erna Kertasasmita)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Order promising/fulfillment and customer/channel collaboration in supply chain management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigates the order promising and fulfillment and customer and channel collaboration functions of a company. In addition to presenting more precise definitions, we identify and analyze current and emerging ...

An, Yimin, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Lean manufacturing in a mass customization plant : improved efficiencies in raw material presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the application of the principles of lean manufacturing at Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates (VSEA). The company faces the challenges of highly customized assembly as well as fluctuating ...

Daneshmand, Moojan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Improving customer order visibility to enable improved planning and decision making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The General Purpose Drives organization of ABB Switzerland does not capture sufficient data on the movement of customer orders through the production process to make efficient decisions on where to allocate improvement ...

Krause, Karla M. (Karla Margarete)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Residential Customer Response to Real-time Pricing: The Anaheim Critical Peak Pricing Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

need to install a special smart meter on your home. * Thisunable to install the smart meter at some customer locationsWe will install a smart meter on your home to keep track

Wolak, Frank A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D printed, gynecologic 192Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2015 253 Cunha et al. : PC-ISO for 3D printed brachytherapy1, 2015 Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D printed,attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Industrial DSM Programs: Low-Cost Resource and Smart Customer Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

customers through demand-side management programs. The economic consequences of the utility's involvement has been far-reaching in each of the cases presented, and these examples illustrate the close interdependence between utilities and all industries...

Jaussaud, D.

211

Establishing an inventory management process to meet high customer service levels in a vaccines organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory management is a complex aspect of Supply Chain Management that is frequently discussed and debated due to the fact that it has a high impact on customer satisfaction as well as financial performance. This thesis ...

Wonsowicz, Johanna Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Customized digital manufacturing : concept to construction methods across varying product scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architectural design and construction is rapidly changing through the extensive adoption of digital design, manufacture and assembly tools. Customized assemblies are paired and recombined to create unique spatial enclosures. ...

Botha, Marcel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Besting the tract home : a software-based bricolage approach to affordable custom housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tract housing has earned its position as the overwhelmingly dominant paradigm of home building and ownership in America because it's such an efficient and therefore cost-effective system. Custom-designed housing has provable ...

Plewe, Thomas Clayton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Provider-Customer Coalitional Games Chandramani Singh*, Saswati Sarkar, Alireza Aram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provider-Customer Coalitional Games Chandramani Singh*, Saswati Sarkar, Alireza Aram Abstract), Project No. 4000-IT-A. S. Sarkar & A. Aram are in the Dep. of Electrical and Systems Eng. and Wharton

Sarkar, Saswati

215

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT TIME OF USE WATER METER IMPACTS · Transportation Time-of-Use Water Meter Impacts on Customer Water Use is the final report for the Time of Use This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission. It does

216

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Report by Eve Streicker May 10, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are without access to clean drinking water and more than two out of six lack proper sanitation ("Water CrisisStreiker 1 Report by Eve Streicker May 10, 2008 GEOS 206 Clean Water: The Ultimate Resource Low-Flow Fixtures in Williams Hall Figure 1. A trickling faucet. Low-flow water fixtures can be both environmentally

Aalberts, Daniel P.

218

Ris Energy Report 4 Efficiency improvements Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

END ULTIMATE MEANS END-USE TRADE LINE Figure 9: The energy chain with the three levels of potential, to South Africa where the coal is mined. The further up the chain that efficiency is improved, the greaterRisø Energy Report 4 Efficiency improvements 6 Introduction Energy efficiency can be improved

219

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Laboratory, Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Laboratory in Houston, Texas. The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost and low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electricity and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

2011 Annual Report [WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westerns achievements for 2011 are reported and include: Experienced a banner water year meaning more hydropower delivered; Changed energy scheduling to better support intermittent renewable resources; Maintained reliability ensuring maximum use of the grid by reducing the frequency and duration of planned and unplanned outages; Connected communities providing customers energy products and related services at cost-based rates; Managed transmission projects.

none,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Enhancing User Customization through Novel Software Architecture for Utility Scale Solar Siting Software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for a spatial decision support application that allows users to create customized metrics for comparing proposed locations of a new solar installation. This document discusses how PVMapper was designed to overcome the customization problem through the development of loosely coupled spatial and decision components in a JavaScript plugin architecture. This allows the user to easily add functionality and data to the system. The paper also explains how PVMapper provides the user with a dynamic and customizable decision tool that enables them to visually modify the formulas that are used in the decision algorithms that convert data to comparable metrics. The technologies that make up the presentation and calculation software stack are outlined. This document also explains the architecture that allows the tool to grow through custom plugins created by the software users. Some discussion is given on the difficulties encountered while designing the system.

Brant Peery; Sam Alessi; Randy Lee; Leng Vang; Scott Brown; David Solan; Dan Ames

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Customer service model for waste tracking at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deployment of any new software system in a production facility will always face multiple hurtles in reaching a successful acceptance. However, a new waste tracking system was required at the plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) where waste processing must be integrated to handle Special Nuclear Materials tracking requirements. Waste tracking systems can enhance the processing of waste in production facilities when the system is developed with a focus on customer service throughout the project life cycle. In March 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Technical Services (WTS) replaced the aging systems and infrastructure that were being used to support the plutonium processing facility. The Waste Technical Services (WTS) Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) Project Team, using the following customer service model, succeeded in its goal to meet all operational and regulatory requirements, making waste processing in the facility more efficient while partnering with the customer.

Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ashbaugh, Andrew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ris-R-Report Support Schemes and Ownership Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to its potential contribution to energy savings, efficiency gains, customer proximity comments on this report. The FC4Home Project (FC4Home ­ SocioEconomic and Energy Systems AnalysisRisø-R-Report Support Schemes and Ownership Structures The Policy Context for Fuel Cell Based Micro

225

The LiveWire Project final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Midterm Supply Chain Planning Under Demand Uncertainty : Customer Demand Satisfaction and Inventory Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Inventory Management Anshuman Gupta and Costas D. Maranas1 Department of Chemical Engineering inventory depletion at the production sites and excessive shortage at the customer. A chance constraint and standard deviation of the inventory are derived and used for setting the appropriate CDS level

Maranas, Costas

227

DRIVE Analysis Tool Generates Custom Vehicle Drive Cycles Based on Real-World Data (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory describes the Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation, Visualization, and Evaluation (DRIVE) analysis tool, which uses GPS and controller area network data to characterize vehicle operation and produce custom vehicle drive cycles, analyzing thousands of hours of data in a matter of minutes.

Not Available

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Vehicle Scheduling Problem with Intermittent Customer Demands W. C. Benton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering The Ohio State University May 9, 1991 revised June 11, 2008 #12;Abstract The vehicle scheduling is to minimize the total cost of operating the vehicle fleet. The key cost components are labor, fuelThe Vehicle Scheduling Problem with Intermittent Customer Demands W. C. Benton Academic Faculty

Rossetti, Manuel D.

229

Spatial Data Mining, Michael May, Fraunhofer AIS 1 Spatial Data Mining for Customer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Data Mining, Michael May, Fraunhofer AIS 1 Spatial Data Mining for Customer Segmentation Intelligente Systeme #12;Spatial Data Mining, Michael May, Fraunhofer AIS 2 Introduction: a classic example? A good representation is the key to solving a problem Disease cluster #12;Spatial Data Mining, Michael

Morik, Katharina

230

---Search Finance Home Yahoo! Help Welcome, dalemeade08540 [ ]Sign Out -My Yahoo! View Customize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- - -Search Finance Home Yahoo! Help Welcome, dalemeade08540 [ ]Sign Out -My Yahoo! View Customize Financial News Enter symbol(s) Basic Get Symbol Lookup Associated Press EU Expected to Offer Japan Bigger, Russia, South Korea and China plan to join forces to research uses of fusion energy to create clean, long-term

231

Soft-core Processor Customization using the Design of Experiments David Sheldon, Frank Vahid*, Stefano Lonardi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the analysis in turn drives a soft-core tuning heuristic. We show that using DoE to sort the parameters by 40-45% by using predictive tuning methods already built into a DoE tool. 1. Introduction Soft-coreSoft-core Processor Customization using the Design of Experiments Paradigm David Sheldon, Frank

Lonardi, Stefano

232

Adaptability Design to Meet Dynamic Customer's Needs N. Janthong1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB), Thailand 3 Thai-France Innovation Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB), Thailand Abstract - The customer is the core element to answer unexpected demand and to adapt to SMEs where resources are limited is now needed. Design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

Gluten-Free Guidelines A BASIC GUIDE TO SERVING GLUTEN-FREE CUSTOMERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gluten-Free Guidelines A BASIC GUIDE TO SERVING GLUTEN-FREE CUSTOMERS Celiac disease and gluten intolerance are SERIOUS medical conditions. A strict gluten-free diet is REQUIRED to maintain health. Gluten not constitute endorsement. The materials in the Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness and Gluten-Free Food Service

Hill, Wendell T.

234

Custom 3D-Printed Rollers for Frieze Pattern Cookies Robert Hanson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Custom 3D-Printed Rollers for Frieze Pattern Cookies Robert Hanson Towson University, Emeritus a method for converting images of repeating patterns, e.g., Roman friezes or Escher tessellations, into 3D-printed the world of mathematics and the art of cooking. Fractal cookies based on stretching and folding [1] and 3D-printed

235

Demand Response from Day-Ahead Hourly Pricing for Large Customers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Day-ahead default-service RTP for large customers not only improves the linkage between wholesale and retail markets, but also promotes the development of retail competition. The default service sets a standard for competitive alternatives and its structure shapes the types of retail market products that develop. (author)

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, e2Homes, Winterpark, FL, Custom Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305 ft2 custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray foam, and ductless mini-split heat pumps.

237

Strategic Planning Session STRATEGIC THEMES AND DRIVERS (w/Customer Satisfaction Element)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.1 Reactive Maintenance work requests 4.1.2 All FM Units Achieve Customer Satisfaction of 85% 85% ? Annual 4.1.3 Reduce: Maintenance% 37% ? 6.1.5 Maint Cost/GSF +/ 5% of APPA Avg for Peer Inst +/5% 6.1.6 Landscape Cost/GSF +/5% of APPA

Howitt, Ivan

238

Integrating Customized Test Requirements with Traditional Requirements in Web Application Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Customized Test Requirements with Traditional Requirements in Web Application Testing Existing test suite reduction techniques employed for test- ing web applications have either used-based requirements in relation to test suite reduction for web applications. We investigate the use of usage

Sampath, Sreedevi

239

Control and Protection of Power Electronics Interfaced Distri-buted Generation Systems in a Customer-Driven Microgrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Customer-Driven Microgrid Fang Z. Peng, Yun Wei Li and Leon M. Tolbert Abstract ­ This paper discusses-driven microgrid (CDM). Particularly, the following topics will be addressed: microgrid system configurations); renewable energy source (RES); micro-source; microgrid; customer-driven micro- grid (CDM), power electronics

Tolbert, Leon M.

240

The Impact of Vendor Customizations on Android Security Lei Wu, Michael Grace, Yajin Zhou, Chiachih Wu, Xuxian Jiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of Vendor Customizations on Android Security Lei Wu, Michael Grace, Yajin Zhou, Chiachih, allowing them to differentiate themselves from their competitors. However, vendor customizations analyze ten representative stock Android im- ages from five popular smartphone vendors (with two models

Reeves, Douglas S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

1162 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 25, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 Nontechnical Loss Detection for Metered Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity consumption has been an active research area in recent years. This paper presents a new approach historical customer consumption data. This SVM based approach uses customer load profile in- formation Tiong, Member, IEEE, Syed Khaleel Ahmed, Member, IEEE, and Malik Mohamad Abstract--Electricity consumer

Ducatelle, Frederick

242

Integration of supplier and customer's production Marek Eisler, M.Sc.1, Remigiusz Horbal, Ph.D.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in improving the whole. This #12;phenomenon can be observed for example in area of inventory management encompasses two cooperating, manufacturing companies: a customer making products and a supplier proIntegration of supplier and customer's production processes. Marek Eisler, M.Sc.1, Remigiusz Horbal

Boyer, Edmond

243

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8-Perceptions of UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price of food at UBC Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price

244

Process Improvements in Pratt & Whitney's Deficiency Report Investigation Process: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This case study describes Pratt & Whitney's process improvement activities on its deficiency report (DR) investigation process for the F100 engine program between 2004 and 2006. The DR investigation process is a customer ...

Colatat, Phech

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 4.3.2 Customer Solar Leasefinancing, customer solar lease financing, property-assessedagreement (PPA), the solar lease, and property-assessed

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Photovoltaics for demand-side management utility markets: A utility/customer partnership approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems located at customer sites can be used to meet utility needs for demand-side management (DSM) applications. PV-DSM can also represent a high-value intermediate market for PV in the utility sector. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been the higher value DSM application for US utilities. This analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and peak demand pricing characteristics. This paper presents the results for PV-DSM systems located within the service territories of five case study utilities.

Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the third quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re- injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fourth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the second quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the twelfth quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the final quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the tenth quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the eleventh quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Lessons Learned: A review of utility experience with conservation and load management programs for commercial and industrial customers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines utility experience with conservation and load management (C LM) programs of commercial and industrial (C I) customers in order to summarize the lessons learned from program experiences to date and what these teach us about how to operate successful programs in the future. This analysis was motivated by a desire to learn about programs which achieve high participation rates and high electricity savings while remaining cost effective. Also, we wanted to review the very latest experiences with innovative program approaches -- approaches that might prove useful to utilities as they scale up their C LM activities. Specific objectives of this phase of the study are threefold: (1) To disseminate information on utility C LM experience to a nationwide audience. (2) To review current New York State utility programs and make suggestions on how these programs can be improved. (3) To collect data for the final phase of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy/New York State Energy Research and Development Authority project, which will examine the savings that are achievable if C LM programs are pushed to the limit'' of current knowledge on how to structure and run cost-effective C LM programs. 19 tabs.

Nadel, S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

77Chapter 7 -General Equilibrium Analysis of Effects of Regional Cooperation in Trade Policy, Transport, and Customs Transit on the Kyrgyz Republic General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Transport, and Customs Transit on the Kyrgyz Republic 7 General Equilibrium Analysis of the Effects of Regional Cooperation in Trade Policy, Transport, and Customs Transit on the Kyrgyz Republic The preceding policy, transport, and customs transit. In particular, Chapter 4 argued that by acceding to the WTO

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A comparison of the full custom, standard cell and gate array design methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF THE FULL CUSTOM, STANDARD CELL AND GATE ARRAY DESIGN METHODOLOGIES A Thesis by KING-WAI I&WAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulffllment of the requirements for the degree... approaches, the designers can select appropriate cells in the libraries which meet their specific requirements such as driving capability and power consumption. But standard cell designs can be used to implement specialized macros such as multi-port...

Kwan, King-Wai

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A test of a multilevel model of personnel selection in a customer service organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mental ability? (p. 348). However, specific abilities substantially improve the classification efficiency beyond the use of general cognitive ability alone (e.g., Scholarios, Johnson & Zeidner, 1994; Zeidner & Johnson, 1994). Noncognitive predictors... test of this model by extending the traditional individual-differences approach to validation research and including group- and organization-criteria (e.g., unit-level performance and customer satisfaction). Using a quasi-experimental design...

Sheehan, Mary Kathleen

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

An automated vehicle arrival notification system for paratransit customers at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, PTTS Manager; dispatchers Pat Hernandez, Robert Barron, and Andrea Paxton; and the paratransit drivers. The participating paratransit customers deserve much recognition for their cooperation and data collection efforts. Many individuals at the Texas... automatically. AVL Units Onboard AVL units rcccivc outside data for calculating current position and then transmit their current-location information to a central receiver. The receiver is often housed at the transit dispatch facility. AVL units aboard...

Donovan, Rachel A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electric & Gas Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Electric & Gas Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers Presented by: CL&P?s Conservation and Load Management Department 2 ? Connecticut Energy Efficiency... watts/sq.ft. calculations relative to ASHRAE 90.1-2004 baselines 7 Energy Conscious Blueprint Program ? Provides prescriptive rebates for: ? CT Cool Choice for HVAC Equipment ($ per ton) ? Utility prescriptive caps apply to the following: ? VFDs...

Sermakekian, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract atInc.,House, Devens, MA |Custom

266

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DSW customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S.11-26-2013 1 2 3 4 5

271

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailment Date

272

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailment

273

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013

274

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY

275

Customer Comments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments Sign In About | Careers

276

Customer Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments Sign In About |

277

Customer Involvement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments Sign In About |default

278

Customer Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments Sign In About

279

Our Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performanceOther Resources TheseOurBestOur

280

Mass-customization in commercial real estate : how the aviation industry can help us create beautiful buildings that add value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The term "mass-customization" in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry refers to architectural elements that have similar purpose but are completely different from each other. Architects use ...

Goldklang, Shaul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Design and performance evaluation of an electric go-kart and custom permanent magnet brushless DC motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This undergraduate thesis documents the design considerations and specifications of building a personal battery-powered go-kart. This includes designing and building a custom brushless DC motor for use in the drivetrain. ...

Davis, Eli Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

IceCube Project Monthly Report September 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube Project Monthly Report September 2005 Accomplishments All of the IceCube Digital Optical the long- term project goals of 90% first pass yield and 95% ultimate yield. The additional data handling at the Pole and one at McMurdo. The drilling procedures are nearing completion. A final review and sign

Saffman, Mark

285

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perez Clean Power Research Napa, California 94558 and Albany, New York 12203 Contract Number: 500Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT UTILITY SYSTEM CAPACITY AND CUSTOMER DEMAND VALUE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Clean

286

Belle II Technical Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Belle detector at the KEKB electron-positron collider has collected almost 1 billion Y(4S) events in its decade of operation. Super-KEKB, an upgrade of KEKB is under construction, to increase the luminosity by two orders of magnitude during a three-year shutdown, with an ultimate goal of 8E35 /cm^2 /s luminosity. To exploit the increased luminosity, an upgrade of the Belle detector has been proposed. A new international collaboration Belle-II, is being formed. The Technical Design Report presents physics motivation, basic methods of the accelerator upgrade, as well as key improvements of the detector.

Abe, T; Adamczyk, K; Ahn, S; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Aloi, M; Andricek, L; Aoki, K; Arai, Y; Arefiev, A; Arinstein, K; Arita, Y; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Barberio, E; Barvich, T; Belous, K; Bergauer, T; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Brovchenko, O; Browder, T E; Cao, G; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, K -F; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C -C; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Choi, S -K; Chung, K; Comerma, A; Cooney, M; Cowley, D E; Critchlow, T; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dieguez, A; Dierlamm, A; Dillon, M; Dingfelder, J; Dolenec, R; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dungel, W; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Enomoto, A; Epifanov, D; Esen, S; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Garcia, M Fernandez; Fifield, T; Fischer, P; Flanagan, J; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Freixas, L; Frey, A; Friedl, M; Fruehwirth, R; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Fukuma, Y; Funakoshi, Y; Furukawa, K; Fuster, J; Gabyshev, N; Cueto, A Gaspar de Valenzuela; Garmash, A; Garrido, L; Geisler, Ch; Gfall, I; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Gorton, I; Grzymkowski, R; Guo, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Haruyama, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashi, K; Hayashii, H; Heck, M; Heindl, S; Heller, C; Hemperek, T; Higuchi, T; Horii, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, C -H; Hwang, S; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iglesias, C; Iida, Y; Iijima, T; Imamura, M; Inami, K; Irmler, C; Ishizuka, M; Itagaki, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwai, G; Iwai, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Iwata, S; Jang, H; Ji, X; Jinno, T; Jones, M; Julius, T; Kageyama, T; Kah, D H; Kakuno, H; Kamitani, T; Kanazawa, K; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, M; Kawai, Y; Kawasaki, T; Kennedy, J; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, M; Kiesling, C; Kim, B K; Kim, G N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J -B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, S K; Kim, K T; Kim, T Y; Kinoshita, K; Kishi, K; Kisielewski, B; van Dam, K Kleese; Knopf, J; Ko, B R; Koch, M; Kodys, P; Koffmane, C; Koga, Y; Kohriki, T; Koike, S; Koiso, H; Kondo, Y; Korpar, S; Kouzes, R T; Kreidl, Ch; Kreps, M; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Krueger, H; Kruth, A; Kuhn, W; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kupper, S; Kuzmin, A; Kvasnicka, P; Kwon, Y -J; Lacasta, C; Lange, J S; Lee, I -S; Lee, M J; Lee, M W; Lee, S -H; Lemarenko, M; Li, J; Li, W D; Li, Y; Libby, J; Limosani, A; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Liventsev, D; Virto, A Lopez; Makida, Y; Mao, Z P; Marinas, C; Masuzawa, M; Matvienko, D; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Miyoshi, T; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Mori, T; Morita, A; Morita, Y; Moser, H -G; Martin, D Moya; Mueller, T; Muenchow, D; Murakami, J; Myung, S S; Nagamine, T; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakano, H; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nam, S -H; Natkaniec, Z; Nedelkovska, E; Negishi, K; Neubauer, S; Ng, C; Ninkovic, J; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Novikov, E; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohmi, K; Ohnishi, Y; Ohshima, T; Ohuchi, N; Oide, K; Olsen, S L; Ono, M; Ono, Y; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, H; Park, H K; Peak, L S; Peng, T; Peric, I; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Prim, M; Prothmann, K; Regimbal, K; Reisert, B; Richter, R H; Riera-Babures, J; Ritter, A; Ritter, A; Ritter, M; Roehrken, M; Rorie, J; Rosen, M; Rozanska, M; Ruckman, L; Rummel, S; Rusinov, V; Russell, R M; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Santelj, L; Sasaki, T; Sato, N; Sato, Y; Scheirich, J; Schieck, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwenker, B; Seljak, A; Senyo, K; Seon, O -S; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiizuka, S; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Simonis, H J; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Sitarz, M; Smerkol, P; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Suetsugu, Y; Sugihara, S; Sugimura, T; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Takagaki, H; Takasaki, F; Takeichi, H; Takubo, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Taniguchi, N; Tarkovsky, E; Tatishvili, G; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsunada, K; Tu, Y -C; Uchida, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S; Valentan, M; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vazquez, P; Vila, I; Vilella, E; Vinokurova, A; Visniakov, J; Vos, M; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wassatch, A; Watanabe, M; Watase, Y; Weiler, T; Wermes, N; Wescott, R E; White, E; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Williams, K M; Won, E; Xu, H; Yabsley, B D; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, H; Yamaoka, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yin, Y; Yoon, H; Yu, J; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zander, D; Zdybal, M; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, L; Zhao, Z; Zhilich, V; Zhou, P; Zhulanov, V; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A; Zyukova, O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solar lease grant program. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress on a lease program for the installation of a solar water heater with no installation charge is reported. Information on the announcement of the program, the selection of participants, the contractural agreement, progress on installation of equipment, monitoring, and evaluation is summarized. The status of the budget concerned with the program is announced. Forms used for applications for the program and an announcement from Resource Alternatives for Cilco customers are presented.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

GEND planning report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 accident on March 28, 1979 was and is of great concern to the nuclear industry; electric power generating companies and their customers, regulatory and other government agencies, the entire nuclear community, and to the country as a whole. While the accident resulted in only limited external plant radiation exposure, the plant itself suffered extensive damage with high radiation contamination within the reactor and auxiliary system facilities. The GEND Planning Report for cleanup activities at TMI-2 covers the areas of: instrumentation and electrical equipment survivability; fission product transport; decontamination/radiation dose reduction technology; data bank organization and sample archive facility; characterization of primary system pressure boundary and mechanical components; core damage assessment; and fuel handling, removal, examination and disposal.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park, FL, Custom  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |DepartmentSystemsCustom Home, Downers

290

Energy Smart Grocer Program Sign-up Form FY2014-FY2015 Customer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmart Grocer Program Sign-up Form FY2014-FY2015 Customer

291

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Transformations, Inc., Custom House, Devens, MA  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero EnergyNewTC LegendCustom

292

When the going gets tough, species start merging. Lake-dwelling fish species that once lived separately began interbreeding when pollution forced them together. Ultimately most of the lakes'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

separately began interbreeding when pollution forced them together. Ultimately most of the lakes' remarkable favouring the lake bottom and others the surface layers. That all changed when the lakes became polluted and rivers, are most at risk. Journal reference: Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature10824 ADVERTISEMENT Home | Life

293

Prediction of Air Conditioning Load Response for Providing Spinning Reserve - ORNL Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the use of air conditioning load for providing spinning reserve and discusses the barriers and opportunities. Air conditioning load is well suited for this service because it often increases during heavy load periods and can be curtailed for short periods with little impact to the customer. The report also provides an appendix describing the ambient temperature effect on air conditioning load.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Annual report to Congress 1994, Energy Information Administration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1994, EIA`s main goal was to assure its data and analyses were of the highest quality, relevant to its customers` needs, and easily accessible. Efforts to ensure product relevance and quality consisted of conducting new or modified surveys, issuing new information products, revising existing products to include data and analyses desired by EIA`s customers, and eliminating products that no longer meet customer needs. Efforts to improve access to energy information consisted of several electronic dissemination initiatives, including Internet services, the Energy Information Highway, and the Energy Emergency Notebook. These activities are discussed in detail in the first two sections of this report. In addition to maintaining its traditional energy information base, EIA plays an important role in developing new information resources required by policymakers and legislators around the world. Examples include data on alternative fuels and greenhouse gas emissions.

NONE

1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Astroparticle Physics with a Customized Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c^2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

MAJORANA Collaboration; C. E. Aalseth; M. Amman; F. T. Avignone III; H. O. Back; A. S. Barabash; P. S. Barbeau; M. Bergevin; F. E. Bertrand; M. Boswell; V. Brudanin; W. Bugg; T. H. Burritt; M. Busch; G. Capps; Y-D. Chan; J. I. Collar; R. J. Cooper; R. Creswick; J. A. Detwiler; J. Diaz; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Ely; J. Esterline; H. Farach; J. E. Fast; N. Fields; P. Finnerty; B. Fujikawa; E. Fuller; V. M. Gehman; G. K. Giovanetti; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusey; A. L. Hallin; G. C Harper; R. Hazama; R. Henning; A. Hime; E. W. Hoppe; T. W. Hossbach; M. A. Howe; R. A. Johnson; K. J. Keeter; M. Keillor; C. Keller; J. D. Kephart; M. F. Kidd; A. Knecht; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; L. Leviner; J. C. Loach; P. N. Luke; S. MacMullin; M. G. Marino; R. D. Martin; D. -M. Mei; H. S. Miley; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; A. W. Meyers; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; D. Peterson; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; J. Qian; D. C. Radford; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; L. Rodriguez; K. P. Rykaczewski; H. Salazar; A. G. Schubert; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; D. Steele; J. Strain; G. Swift; K. Thomas; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; T. D. Van Wechel; I. Vanyushin; R. L. Varner; K. Vetter; J. F. Wilkerson; B. A. Wolfe; W. Xiang; E. Yakushev; H. Yaver; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; C. Zhang; S. Zimmerman

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c{sup 2} mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Custom data support for the FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-institution FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project, funded by the DOE Earth System Modeling program, aims to evaluate and improve the parameterizations of fast processes (those involving clouds, precipitation and aerosols) in global climate models, using a combination of numerical prediction models, single column models, cloud resolving models, large-eddy simulations, full global climate model output and ARM active and passive remote sensing and in-situ data. This poster presents the Custom Data Support effort for the FASTER project. The effort will provide tailored datasets, statistics, best estimates and quality control data, as needed and defined by FASTER participants, for use in evaluating and improving parameterizations of fast processes in GCMs. The data support will include custom gridding and averaging, for the model of interest, using high time resolution and pixel level data from continuous ARM observations and complementary datasets. In addition to the FASTER team, these datasets will be made available to the ARM Science Team. Initial efforts with respect to data product development, priorities, availability and distribution are summarized here with an emphasis on cloud, atmospheric state and aerosol properties as observed during the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP and the Spring 2003 Aerosol IOP at the ARM Southern Great Plains site.

Toto, T.; Jensen, M.; Vogelmann, A.; Wagener, R.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Study: Final Report,energy efficiency market potential (section 2 of this report);Report: Figure 2-1. Relative Relationships of Energy-Efficiency Potential

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Onicescu, Georgiana [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Clarke, Harry S. [Department of Urology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Net metering has become a widespread policy in the U.S. for supporting distributed photovoltaics (PV) adoption. Though specific design details vary, net metering allows customers with PV to reduce their electric bills by offsetting their consumption with PV generation, independent of the timing of the generation relative to consumption - in effect, compensating the PV generation at retail electricity rates (Rose et al. 2009). While net metering has played an important role in jump-starting the residential PV market in the U.S., challenges to net metering policies have emerged in a number of states and contexts, and alternative compensation methods are under consideration. Moreover, one inherent feature of net metering is that the value of the utility bill savings it provides to customers with PV depends heavily on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate, as well as on the characteristics of the customer and PV system. Consequently, the value of net metering - and the impact of moving to alternative compensation mechanisms - can vary substantially from one customer to the next. For these reasons, it is important for policymakers and others that seek to support the development of distributed PV to understand both how the bill savings varies under net metering, and how the bill savings under net metering compares to other possible compensation mechanisms. To advance this understanding, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE). The analysis is based on hourly load data from a sample of 215 residential customers located in the service territories of the two utilities, matched with simulated hourly PV production for the same time period based on data from the nearest of 73 weather stations in the state.

Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

none,

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 186,627 customers remain without power. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 6 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below.

none,

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Validation of a Custom-made Software for DQE Assessment in Mammography Digital Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This works presents the validation of a custom-made software, designed and developed in Matlab, intended for routine evaluation of detective quantum efficiency DQE, according to algorithms described in the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. DQE, normalized noise power spectrum NNPS and pre-sampling modulation transfer function MTF were calculated from RAW images from a GE Senographe DS (FineView disabled) and a Siemens Novation system. Calculated MTF is in close agreement with results obtained with alternative codes: MTF lowbar tool (Maidment), ImageJ plug-in (Perez-Ponce) and MIQuaELa (Ayala). Overall agreement better than {approx_equal}90% was found in MTF; the largest differences were observed at frequencies close to the Nyquist limit. For the measurement of NNPS and DQE, agreement is similar to that obtained in the MTF. These results suggest that the developed software can be used with confidence for image quality assessment.

Ayala-Dominguez, L.; Perez-Ponce, H.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Southeastern Power Administration 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dear Secretary Chu: I am proud to submit Southeastern Power Administrations (Southeasterns) fiscal year (FY) 2007 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this report reflects Southeasterns programs, accomplishments, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2006 and ending September 30, 2007. Southeastern marketed more than 5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 492 wholesale Federal power customers in an 11-state marketing area in FY 2007. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $219 million. Drought conditions continued to plague the southeast region of the United States during 2007 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Southeastern purchased more than $40 million in replacement power to meet customer contract requirements to ensure the continued reliability of our nations power grid. With the financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, continued funding for capitalized equipment replacements at various Corps of Engineers (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging facilities. Southeasterns cyber and physical security program continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and requirements. Plans for the upcoming year include communication and cooperation with DOE, Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our nations water resources. Competition for the use of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency. The employees at Southeastern will be proactive in meeting these challenges and providing reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

none,

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Privacy Market The privacy market has three considerable segments. There is the market of customers who seek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of customers who seek privacy in all transactions. There is the market for merchants who wish to distinguishThe Privacy Market The privacy market has three considerable segments. There is the market themselves with respect to privacy practice. There is the market for merchants seeking to avoid the risks

Camp, L. Jean

306

2008 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved. Smart Meters, Rates and the Customer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2008 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved. Smart Meters, OR #12;2 SDG&E Smart Meter Goals · Install AMI/smart metering for all SDG&E electric and gas business're starting to recreate our relationship with customers and transform our company #12;Smart Meter Business

307

Customer-Focused Innovation in High Tech Industries Benchmark best practices and performances for next-generation success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Engaged people/human capital acquisition, development, and retention: Secure a competitive performance: Develop and manage supply chains and partnerships that provide flexibility, response time, and delivery manufacturing principles, it all begins with clearly identifying and attempting to satisfy customer demand

Narasayya, Vivek

308

Project Recap This project challenged the team with the task of creating a new custom blaster that could be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Recap This project challenged the team with the task of creating a new custom blaster Streamline© foam darts After construction of the blaster, we set the following procedures to test of redness on skin from direct dart impact. In conclusion to this project, the blaster incorporates new

Demirel, Melik C.

309

The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Net metering has become a widespread mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), but has faced challenges as PV installations grow to a larger share of generation in a number of states. This paper examines the value of the bill savings that customers receive under net metering, and the associated role of retail rate design, based on a sample of approximately two hundred residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities. We find that the bill savings per kWh of PV electricity generated varies by more than a factor of four across the customers in the sample, which is largely attributable to the inclining block structure of the utilities' residential retail rates. We also compare the bill savings under net metering to that received under three potential alternative compensation mechanisms, based on California's Market Price Referent (MPR). We find that net metering provides significantly greater bill savings than a full MPR-based feed-in tariff, but only modestly greater savings than alternative mechanisms under which hourly or monthly net excess generation is compensated at the MPR rate.

Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley; Darghouth, Naim R.; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

SPACE WEATHER, VOL. 11, 529541, doi:10.1002/swe.20092, 2013 A survey of customers of space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE WEATHER, VOL. 11, 529541, doi:10.1002/swe.20092, 2013 A survey of customers of space weather August 2013; published 24 September 2013. [1] We present an analysis of the users of space weather information based on 2783 responses to an online survey among subscribers of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction

Schrijver, Karel

311

Investigating the Operational Capabilities of Custom and Pedestrian Portal Monitoring Systems for Screening Livestock for Radioactive Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radionuclide identification capabilities. An array of six sodium iodide detectors was mounted on a panel and field-tested beside a cattle chute and in a walkway. The custom portal, the Bovine Screening Portal (BSP), observed increased count rates (>10?) from a...

Erchinger, Jennifer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

CUSTOMER-MANAGED END-TO-END LIGHTPATH PROVISIONING Jing Wu, J. Michel Savoie, Scott Campbell, Hanxi Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

networks. Schools, hospitals and government departments are acquiring their own dark fibers in metropolitan.st.arnaud@canarie.ca Abstract: Customer owned and managed optical networks bring new cost-saving benefits. Two types resource consumption by utilizing resources from different suppliers. Remote peering and transit reduce

von Bochmann, Gregor

313

Abstract--A key component of the smart grid is the ability to enable dynamic residential pricing to incentivize the customer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

day-ahead variable peak pricing in order to minimize the customer's energy bill (and alsoAbstract-- A key component of the smart grid is the ability to enable dynamic residential pricing to incentivize the customer and the overall community to utilize energy more uniformly. However

Sapatnekar, Sachin

314

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CRD Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Division Report Deconstructing Microbes Metagenomicon page 2 (Scientific Report SciDAC continued from page 1www.ctwatch.org/quarterly. Report Nano Letters continued

Wang, Ucilia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Wealth Transfers Among Large Customers from Implementing Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available at http://www.ucei.org. PJM Interconnection Marketmarket-monitor/downloads/mmu- reports/pjm-som-2004.pdf.

Borenstein, Severin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operator (NYISO) and New York State Energy Research andin New York. Final Report prepared for California Energy

Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to create a community tool infrastructure for program development tools targeting Petascale class machines and beyond. This includes performance analysis, debugging, and correctness tools, as well as tuning and optimization frameworks. The infrastructure provides a comprehensive and extensible set of individual tool building components. Within this project we developed the basis for this infrastructure as well as set of core modules that allow a comprehensive performance analysis at scale. Further, we developed a methodology and workflow that allows others to add or replace modules, to integrate parts into their own tools, or to customize existing solutions.

Hollingsworth, Jeff

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

Southeastern Power Administration 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administrations (Southeasterns) fiscal year (FY) 2008 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this document reflects our agencys programs, accomplishments, operational and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2007 and ending September 30, 2008. Southeastern marketed more than 4.5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 491 wholesale customers in ten southeastern states this past year. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $263 million. Drought conditions persisted in the southeastern region of the United States during FY 2008 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2008 totaled $91 million. Approximately $44 million of this amount was for replacement power which is paid only during adverse water conditions in order to meet our customers contract requirements. With the continued financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for these aging facilities. Southeasterns cyber and physical security programs continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) standards and requirements. In the coming year, Southeastern will continue open communication and cooperation with DOE, the Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our regions water resources. Although competing uses of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency, Southeasterns employees will meet these challenges and continue to provide reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E.Legg Administrator

none,

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

BI (XML) Publisher Conversion from Third Party Software in E-Business Suite: An ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) Reporting Framework Conversion Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by internal users for data analysis purposes such as monthly sales reports and ledger consolidation reports. These reports, such as the packing list report and purchase order report, which are sent to the external customers for communication purposes, need.... 2012) Some companies have decided to implement their own ERP framework because they want to have full control of the ERP system and make sure that the ERP framework is 100 percent tailored to the business process. Other companies prefer to purchase...

Wang, Shuai

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454.

Gilbert, J.L.

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Economic Value of PV and Net Metering to Residential Customers in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incentives under the California Solar Initiative takeRates Undermine Californias Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies? Solar PV and Retail Rate Design, Unpublished draft report for the California

Darghouth, Naim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location More Documents & Publications PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Slide 1 Slide 1...

328

Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: the Customer Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE's mission under the Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability (DEER) Program is to strengthen America's electric energy infrastructure and provide utilities and consumers with a greater array of energy-efficient technology choices for generating, transmitting, distributing, storing, and managing demand for electric power and thermal energy. DOE recognizes that distributed energy technologies can help accomplish this mission. Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the potential energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention has been the desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and other potential impacts on the distribution system. It is important to assess the costs and benefits of DE to consumers and distribution system companies. DOE commissioned this study to assess the costs and benefits of DE technologies to consumers and to better understand the effect of DE on the grid. Current central power generation units vent more waste heat (energy) than the entire transportation sector consumes and this wasted thermal energy is projected to grow by 45% within the next 20 years. Consumer investment in technologies that increase power generation efficiency is a key element of the DOE Energy Efficiency program. The program aims to increase overall cycle efficiency from 30% to 70% within 20 years as well. DOE wants to determine the impact of DE in several small areas within cities across the U.S. Ann Arbor, Michigan, was chosen as the city for this case study. Ann Arbor has electric and gas rates that can substantially affect the market penetration of DE. This case study analysis was intended to: (1) Determine what DE market penetration can realistically be expected, based on consumer investment in combined heat and power systems (CHP) and the effect of utility applied demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate and quantify the impact on the distribution utility feeder from the perspective of customer ownership of the DE equipment. (3) Determine the distribution feeder limits and the impact DE may have on future growth. For the case study, the Gas Technology Institute analyzed a single 16-megawatt grid feeder circuit in Ann Arbor, Michigan to determine whether there are economic incentives to use small distributed power generation systems that would offset the need to increase grid circuit capacity. Increasing circuit capacity would enable the circuit to meet consumer's energy demands at all times, but it would not improve the circuit's utilization factor. The analysis spans 12 years, to a planning horizon of 2015. By 2015, the demand for power is expected to exceed the grid circuit capacity for a significant portion of the year. The analysis was to determine whether economically acceptable implementation of customer-owned DE systems would reduce the peak power demands enough to forestall the need to upgrade the capacity of the grid circuit. The analysis was based on economics and gave no financial credit for improved power reliability or mitigation of environmental impacts. Before this study was completed, the utility expanded the capacity of the circuit to 22 MW. Although this expansion will enable the circuit to meet foreseeable increases in peak demand, it also will significantly decrease the circuit's overall utilization factor. The study revealed that DE penetration on the selected feeder is not expected to forestall the need to upgrade the grid circuit capacity unless interconnection barriers are removed. Currently, a variety of technical, business practice, and regulatory barriers discourage DE interconnection in the US market.

Kelly, J.

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 237,030 customers remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 8 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington.

none,

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1994 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy Order 5400.1, Chapter 2.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one ``site``. In 1994, Western provided power to more than 600 wholesale power customers consisting of cooperatives, municipalities, public utility districts, investor-owned utilities, federal and state agencies, irrigation districts, and project use customers. The wholesale power customers, in turn, provide service to millions of retail consumers in the States of California, Nevada, Montana, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of nearly 17,000 miles of transmission lines, 271 substations, 55 hydroelectric power stations, and a coal-fired power plant.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1993 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy Order 5400.1, Chapter 2.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has facilities located in 15 States, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one ``site``. In 1993, Western provided power to more than 600 wholesale power customers consisting of cooperatives, municipalities, public utility districts, investor-owned utilities, federal and state agencies, irrigation districts, and project use customers. The wholesale power customers, in turn, provide service to millions of retail consumers in the States of California, Nevada, Montana, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1992 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, Chapter II.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one ``site.`` In 1992, Western provided power to 612 wholesale power customers consisting of cooperatives, municipalities, public utility districts, investor-owned utilities, Federal and State agencies, irrigation districts, and project use customers. The wholesale power customers, in turn, provided service to millions of retail consumers in the States of California, Nevada, Montana, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of more than 16,450 miles of transmission lines, 268 substations, 51 hydroelectric power plants, and a coal-fired power plant.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program which has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1991 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to demonstrate the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy Order 5400.1, Chapter 2.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has numerous facilities located in 15 states, this report was written to address the environmental activities in all of the facilities as one ``site``. In 1991, Western provided power to 615 wholesale power customers consisting of cooperatives, municipalities, public utility districts, investor-owned utilities, federal and state agencies, irrigation districts, and project use customers. The wholesale power customers, in turn, provide service to millions of retail consumers in the States of California, Nevada, Montana, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

UPVG phase 2 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orlando, FL: Dryden Press, 1988. PJM Interconnection Marketmonitor/downloads/mmu- reports/pjm-som-2004.pdf. FIGURE 1:gures are taken from the PJM (2005), pages 82-83. California

Borenstein, Severin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

Ramirez, Amanda Ann

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The ultimate downscaling limit of FETs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We created a highly efficient, universal 3D quant um transport simulator. We demonstrated that the simulator scales linearly - both with the problem size (N) and number of CPUs, which presents an important break-through in the field of computational nanoelectronics. It allowed us, for the first time, to accurately simulate and optim ize a large number of realistic nanodevices in a much shorter time, when compared to other methods/codes such as RGF[~N 2.333 ]/KNIT, KWANT, and QTBM[~N 3 ]/NEMO5. In order to determine the best-in-class for different beyond-CMOS paradigms, we performed rigorous device optimization for high-performance logic devices at 6-, 5- and 4-nm gate lengths. We have discovered that there exists a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs). We have found that, at room temperatures, all FETs, irre spective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths.

Mamaluy, Denis; Gao, Xujiao; Tierney, Brian David

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Ultimate Law of Social Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 THE ULTIf'ATE LAW OF SOCIAL E7GLUTI0?-T. I n de termin ing the u n d e r l y i n g force? o f the s o c i a l organism, t h e o r i s t s and s c i e n t i... s t s have become i n v o l v e d i n q u e r i e s exceed ing ly p r o b l e m a t i c a l . One r e l i e s upon B c e r t a i n c o n d i t i o n o f f a c t s andvo i rcumstan- ces to f i x and e s t a b l i s h what hp deems the on lv p o s s i b l e...

Overlander, Jacob Alphaeus

1901-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

EMPIRE ULTIMATE EXPANSION: RESONANCES AND COVARIANCES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMPIRE code system is being extended to cover the resolved and unresolved resonance region employing proven methodology used for the production of new evaluations in the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Another directions of Empire expansion are uncertainties and correlations among them. These include covariances for cross sections as well as for model parameters. In this presentation we concentrate on the KALMAN method that has been applied in EMPIRE to the fast neutron range as well as to the resonance region. We also summarize role of the EMPIRE code in the ENDF/B-VII.0 development. Finally, large scale calculations and their impact on nuclear model parameters are discussed along with the exciting perspectives offered by the parallel supercomputing.

HERMAN,M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; PIGNI, M.T.; KAWANO, T.; CAPOTE, R.; ZERKIN, V.; TRKOV, A.; SIN, M.; CARSON, B.V.; WIENKE, H. CHO, Y.-S.

2007-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vacuum pressure into a cryogenic trapping system. Water and non- condensable gases evolved during phosphorolysis are removed from the CO2 gas phase under high vacuum in the first trap. Prior to transfer into a defined volume. In the microvolume, the dry CO2 is prepared for analysis in a dual microvolume inlet

Lachniet, Matthew S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ultimate Best Buy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator Jump to: navigation,UTEKUlster County, New York:Buy

342

Ultimate Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator Jump to: navigation,UTEKUlster County, New

343

Precursor Report of Data Needs and Recommended Practices for PV Plant Availability Operations and Maintenance Reporting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the factors that affect reliability of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant is an important aspect of optimal asset management. This document describes the many factors that affect operation and maintenance (O&M) of a PV plant, identifies the data necessary to quantify those factors, and describes how data might be used by O&M service providers and others in the PV industry. This document lays out data needs from perspectives of reliability, availability, and key performance indicators and is intended to be a precursor for standardizing terminology and data reporting, which will improve data sharing, analysis, and ultimately PV plant performance.

Hill, Roger R.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; John Balfour, John R Balfour, High Performance PV

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Life cycle cost report of VHLW cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Life Cycle Cost Report (LCCR) for the VHLW Cask, presents the life cycle costs for acquiring, using, and disposing of the VHLW casks. The VHLW cask consists of a ductile iron cask body, called the shielding insert, which is used for storage and transportation, and ultimately for disposal of Defense High Level Waste which has been vitrified and placed into VHLW canisters. Each ductile iron VHLW shielding insert holds one VHLW canister. For transportation, the shielding insert is placed into a containment overpack. The VHLW cask as configured for transportation is a legal weight truck cask which will be licensed by NRC. The purpose of this LCCR is to present the development of the life cycle costs for using the VHLW cask to transport VHLW canisters from the generating sites to a disposal site. Life cycle costs include the cost of acquiring, operating, maintaining, and ultimately dispositioning the VHLW cask and its associated hardware. This report summarizes costs associated with transportation of the VHLW casks. Costs are developed on the basis of expected usage, anticipated source and destination locations, and expected quantities of VHLW which must be transported. DOE overhead costs, such as the costs associated with source and destination facility handling of the VHLW, are not included. Also not included are costs exclusive to storage or disposal of the VHLW waste.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 134,868 customers remain without power. The number of outages is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent less than 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy and Seattle City Light.

none,

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Customized Dose Prescription for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Insights From a Multicenter Analysis of Dosimetry Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rate in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologically effective dose (BED) and risk group. Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 3,928 permanent brachytherapy patients with postimplant dosimetry results. The mean prostate-specific antigen level was 8.9 ng/mL. {sup 125}I was used in 2,293 (58%), {sup 103}Pd in 1,635, and supplemental external beam radiotherapy in 882 (22.5%) patients. The patients were stratified into low- (n = 2,188), intermediate- (n = 1,188), and high- (n = 552) risk groups and into three BED groups of < 140 Gy (n = 524), 140-200 Gy (n = 2284), and >200 Gy (n = 1,115). Freedom from biochemical disease progression (biochemical freedom from failure [bFFF]) was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions and calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors compared using the log-rank test. Results: The 10-year prostate-specific antigen bFFF rate for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions was 79.2% and 70%, respectively. The corresponding bFFF rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 84.1% and 78.1%, 76.8% and 63.6%, and 64.4% and 58.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the three BED groups was 56.1% and 41.4%, 80% and 77.9%, and 91.1% and 82.9% (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the low-risk patients by dose group was 69.8% and 49.8%, 86% and 85.2%, and 88.1% and 88.3% for the low-, intermediate, and high-dose group, respectively (p <0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the intermediate-risk patients by dose group was 52.9% and 23.1%, 74.1% and 77.7%, and 94.3% and 88.8% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for high-risk patients by dose group was 19.2% and 41.7%, 61.8% and 53.2%, and 90% and 69.6% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: These data suggest that permanent brachytherapy dose prescriptions can be customized to risk status. In low-risk patients, achieving a BED of {>=}140 Gy might be adequate for prostate-specific antigen control. However, high-risk disease might require a BED dose of {>=}200 Gy.

Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute at South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. B.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Most-Favoured-Customer Guarantee with a Twist Pinar Akman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UK. www.ccp.uea.ac.uk t: +44(0) 1603 593715 f: +44 (0) 1603 591622 ISSN 1745-9648 #12;1 Introduction is organised as follows. Section two provides a general introduction to the pro- and anti-competitive effects are explored further in section three, where we 1 `Foreign package holidays: A report on the supply in the UK

Feigon, Brooke

349

Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers (September 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the lessons learned from utilities' consumer engagement efforts as part of the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program. These lessons offer practical steps that can reduce risks and increase efficiencies, thereby lowering project costs and increasing the chances of successful outcomes.

350

Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be sold in Canada. The export Under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (S a permit from the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA), and application for a permit must be made

Machel, Hans

351

EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

Gajewski, Katherine [City of Philadelphia] [City of Philadelphia

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

2001 annual report 2001 annual report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual reportelectrical & computer engineering 2001 annual report the university of new mexico department of 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual

New Mexico, University of

353

Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 World Materials Summit, held on 10/9-12/2011 in Washington DC, provided a forum for top decision makers and energy experts from aropund the world to focus on the materials research needs for the growing energy economy. Organized jointly by the Materials Research Society (MRS), the European MRS (E-MRS), and the Chinese MRS (C-MRS), the goal of the Summit was to explore how the different regions of the world can work together on the critical issue of clean energy, including its relation to environmental sustainability and water. The participants considered the area of materials research as well as advocacy, economics, outreach, and education. Realizing that the concerns are long-term and that young players will ultimately be the ones who are going to need to solve the energy challenges, the chairs of the Summit inaugurated a Student Congress, a program for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in fields directly related to energy and environmental science, engineering, and/or policy. The top 45 candidates coming from 18 countries were selected on a competititve basis to participate in the Student Congress. The four-day effort culminated in a 2011 Worlds Materials Summit Declaration delineating materials directions related to global access to clean energy and water in a sustainable way.

,; ,; ,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

none,

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Annual report to Congress 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its creation in 1977, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has provided high-quality energy information products and services to a broad spectrum of customers across the Nation and around the world, including Congress, representatives of the print and broadcast news media, businesses, officials of Federal, State, and local agencies, foreign governments and international organizations, students, librarians, researchers, lawyers and private citizens. Our motto: {open_quotes}On-line or off the shelf, EIA is the first place to go for the last word in energy information.{close_quotes} Established as an independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), EIA was charged by its enabling legislation with: (1) Maintaining a comprehensive data and information program on energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. (2) Developing and maintaining analytical tools and collection and processing systems; providing analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and providing information dissemination services. This report summarizes the reports and contact information issued by the EIA.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The conservation planning analysis model. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains the source code for a program on conservation planning analysis for residential, commercial and industrial customers.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Custom Feeding Clients Using Texas Feedlots -- Operational Characteristics, Management Practices, and Feeding Strategies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

500 to 1.000 2.500 - ' 5,000 7,500 10.000 Less than 999 ta 2,499 to 4,999 to 7,499 to 9.999 or more r 500 head head head head head head head Average ne reported by respondents surveyed. Factors Affecting tot Selectian rietors accounted for almost... bloodlines. Crossbreds rep- resented more than 90 percent of the cattle fed by clients feeding 10,000 head or more compared to 65 percent for the clients feeding less than 2,500 head during 1972. Steers accounted for about 70 percent of the cat- tle...

Dietrich, R. A.; Martin, J. R.; Ljungdahl, P. W.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary: ReportedEnergy Intensity,92

359

Microsoft PowerPoint - Denison Customer Brief 18 June 2014a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland Operations Office Site Report Survey Purpose

360

Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 12, 2013 ... Technical Report Series: DCC-2013-13. Departamento de Cincia de Computadores. Faculdade de Cincias da Universidade do Porto.

Filipe Brandao

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Automated case reporting, administrative statistics, and epidemiological data collection for a full-service veterinary diagnostic laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEDICATION. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page V1 V1 1 LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES. . Xii CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE. . CHAPTER III. FEASIBILITY STUDY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Materials and Methods... review screen Customer data base report. 182 184 188 15 16 17 Zip code data base report (by city). . . . System flowchart ? accession subsystem. Case history screen (page 1) . . . . . . . . . . . 118 112 113 18 Case summary screen. 115 19...

Carter, Craig Nash

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

HARE: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of work done over a 6 year period under the FAST-OS programs. The first effort was called Right-Weight Kernels, (RWK) and was concerned with improving measurements of OS noise so it could be treated quantitatively; and evaluating the use of two operating systems, Linux and Plan 9, on HPC systems and determining how these operating systems needed to be extended or changed for HPC, while still retaining their general-purpose nature. The second program, HARE, explored the creation of alternative runtime models, building on RWK. All of the HARE work was done on Plan 9. The HARE researchers were mindful of the very good Linux and LWK work being done at other labs and saw no need to recreate it. Even given this limited funding, the two efforts had outsized impact: _ Helped Cray decide to use Linux, instead of a custom kernel, and provided the tools needed to make Linux perform well _ Created a successor operating system to Plan 9, NIX, which has been taken in by Bell Labs for further development _ Created a standard system measurement tool, Fixed Time Quantum or FTQ, which is widely used for measuring operating systems impact on applications _ Spurred the use of the 9p protocol in several organizations, including IBM _ Built software in use at many companies, including IBM, Cray, and Google _ Spurred the creation of alternative runtimes for use on HPC systems _ Demonstrated that, with proper modifications, a general purpose operating systems can provide communications up to 3 times as effective as user-level libraries Open source was a key part of this work. The code developed for this project is in wide use and available at many places. The core Blue Gene code is available at https://bitbucket.org/ericvh/hare. We describe details of these impacts in the following sections. The rest of this report is organized as follows: First, we describe commercial impact; next, we describe the FTQ benchmark and its impact in more detail; operating systems and runtime research follows; we discuss infrastructure software; and close with a description of the new NIX operating system, future work, and conclusions.

Mckie, Jim

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Annual Report 2013 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsibility 36 Audit Committee Report 39 Independent Auditors' Report 41 Consolidated Statement of Financial scientists from the Universities of Oxford and Reading and researchers at the Pirbright Institute, which and Technology Facilities Council and the Wellcome Trust. Diamond generates high-energy beams of electrons

Rambaut, Andrew

365

Report2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclear waste,ReportReportReport on a

366

Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The programs include: ultimate heat sink performance measurement; experimental verification of steady state codes: Task A - irradiation results and Task C - code development; graphite nondestructive testing; acoustic emission-flaw relationship for in-service monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels; fuel subassembly procurement and irradiation test program; report of resident engineer at Cadarache, France; core thermal model development; integration of nondestructive examination reliability and fracture mechanics; and steam generator tube integrity.

Hooper, J.L. (comp.)

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Meter Damage: Many customers have questions about who is responsible for repair to the electrical service at their homes. These pages may help to answer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meter Damage: Many customers have questions about who is responsible for repair. weather head stack meter base connectors house knob weather head connectors mast clamp stack meter base meter meter #12; Let's start with definitions: Meter base: This is the metal box mounted

Rose, Annkatrin

368

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin, Graduate Research Assistant; Allan Rae, Professor at Massey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin livestock trade, which has been relatively neglected. China is a net exporter of livestock products of total trade reflects a steady deterioration of China's com- parative advantage in pork and poul- try

369

Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Institutional glovebox safety committee (IGSC) annual report FY2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institutional Glovebox Safety Committee (IGSC) was chartered to minimize and/or prevent glovebox operational events. Highlights of the IGSC's third year are discussed. The focus of this working committee is to address glovebox operational and safety issues and to share Lessons Learned, best practices, training improvements, and glovebox glove breach and failure data. Highlights of the IGSC's third year are discussed. The results presented in this annual report are pivotal to the ultimate focus of the glovebox safety program, which is to minimize work-related injuries and illnesses. This effort contributes to the LANL Continuous Improvement Program by providing information that can be used to improve glovebox operational safety.

Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roybal, Richard F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Roy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

371

National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To improve upon and evolve existing solar PV O&M approaches, this report: 1. Provides perspective on the concept of PV "system" reliability and how it can inform plant design,...

373

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

Biros, George

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

DOE Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C. E., M. F. Baker, R. L. Eng, J. S. Gashwiler, and M. H. Schroeder, 1976, "Conservation Committee Report on Effects of Alteration of Sagebrush Communities on the Associated...

375

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

mm ts LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTRDU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was...

377

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 1997 [ARPA TRP turboalternator development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a quarterly report of CALSTART's progress with their programs. Their overall objectives remain: (1) efficiently and responsible management of the program and; (2) assist in the commercialization of the technology by doing the following: identifying potential strategic partners; explaining need and value of turbogenerator; reach important audiences for AlliedSignal; showcase technology at key conferences/briefings; raise technology profile via custom Web information; and extend AlliedSignal turbogenerator outreach efforts.

NONE

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

A systemic perspective for mass customization: an approach for product lines definition Antonio Giovannini1,2,3, Alexis Aubry1,2, Herv Panetto1,2, Hind El Haouzi1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systemic perspective for mass customization: an approach for product lines definition Antonio and commercializes air-handling systems. In MC, a commonly accepted solution for managing product variety is develop a configuration system in which customer can enter values for some options in order to define a product variant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Neurons to algorithms LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last three years the Neurons to Algorithms (N2A) LDRD project teams has built infrastructure to discover computational structures in the brain. This consists of a modeling language, a tool that enables model development and simulation in that language, and initial connections with the Neuroinformatics community, a group working toward similar goals. The approach of N2A is to express large complex systems like the brain as populations of a discrete part types that have specific structural relationships with each other, along with internal and structural dynamics. Such an evolving mathematical system may be able to capture the essence of neural processing, and ultimately of thought itself. This final report is a cover for the actual products of the project: the N2A Language Specification, the N2A Application, and a journal paper summarizing our methods.

Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Aimone, James Bradley; Warrender, Christina E.; Trumbo, Derek

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Test report : Milspray Scorpion energy storage device.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

RESEM-CA Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final deliverable for Project 2.2-Retrofit Tools, in the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program for High Performance Commercial Building Systems (PIER-HPCBS). The objective of Project 2.2 is to deliver an updated and California-Customized retrofit analysis tool based on the earlier federally funded RESEM (Retrofit Energy Savings Estimation Method) tool [1]. Specific tasks to accomplish this were identified in PIER HPCBS Report No. E2P2.2T1c, and addressed (a) modernization, (b) enhancement of basic analysis methods and capabilities, (c) adding, modifying, or updating databases for California building types, systems, components, utility rate structures, and weather.

Carroll, William

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

CoFlo tray Design and Technology Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of two major segments. CoFlo Tray Design is the first section. The objectives of this section are: (1) Determine the design requirements for increased capacity by the substitution of CoFlo trays for sieve trays in a 15-tray 46-inch diameter column. The Design Basis was obtained from the Separations Research Program, which was solicited by an industrial customer on the use of CoFlo trays for their application. (2) Illustrate the design procedures so that they can be computerized to rapidly provide design and cost information for future customers. A summary of the research studies on which each design procedure is based is included. (3) Compare the costs of new sieve tray and CoFlo tray columns for this application to illustrate the savings inherent in the CoFlo process. Exhibits are the second section of this report and its objectives are to: (a) Report the extensive research studies on the CoFlo tray and related items; (b) Analyze present and potential future performance of the CoFlo tray; (c) Present comparative costs for sieve and CoFlo tray columns; and (d) List the applications for the CoFlo deentrainer.

William R. Trutna

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Environmental Prosperity Game. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Environmental Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Silicon Valley Environmental Partnership. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved in environmental technologies including small and large companies, government, national laboratories, universities, environmentalists, the legal profession, finance, and the media. The primary objectives of this game were to: investigate strategies for developing a multi-agency (national/state/regional), one-step regulatory approval process for certifying and implementing environmental technologies and evaluating the simulated results; identify the regulatory hurdles and requirements, and the best approaches for surmounting them; identify technical problems and potential resources (environmental consultants, labs, universities) for solving them. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning environmental issues, including the development, licensing, and commercialization of new technologies.

Berman, M.; Boyack, K.; VanDevender, J.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy Smart Colorado, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Smart Colorado is an energy efficiency program established in 2011 in the central mountain region of Colorado. The program was funded through a grant of $4.9 million, awarded in August 2010 by the U.S. Department of Energys Better Buildings Program. As primary grant recipient, Eagle County coordinated program activities, managed the budget, and reported results. Eagle County staff worked closely with local community education and outreach partner Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability (now Walking Mountains Science Center) to engage residents in the program. Sub-recipients Pitkin County and Gunnison County assigned local implementation of the program in their regions to their respective community efficiency organizations, Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) in Pitkin County, and Office for Resource Efficiency (ORE) in Gunnison County. Utility partners contributed $166,600 to support Home Energy Assessments for their customers. Program staff opened Energy Resource Centers, engaged a network of qualified contractors, developed a work-flow, an enrollment website, a loan program, and a data management system to track results.

Gitchell, John M. [Program Administrator] [Program Administrator; Palmer, Adam L. [Program Manager] [Program Manager

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technical Direction and Laboratories FY 1999 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarize achievements and list reports issued by members of TD&L, NHC group during Fiscal Year (FY) 1999, (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999). This report, issued by this organization, describes work in support of the Hanford Site and other U S . Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) programs. It includes information on the organization make-up, interfaces, and mission of the group. The TD&L is a group of highly qualified personnel with diverse disciplines (primarily chemistry specialties) that provide process, analytical, and in-situ chemistry services to engineering customers. This year of operation and interfaces with other contract organizations consumed considerable administrative efforts. Attention was directed to the technical challenges presented by the changing roles, responsibilities, and priorities of Hanford programs.

CRAWFORD, B.A.

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. Because Western has over 400 facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one site. In March, 1996, Western established a team representing each of the four Regional Offices, the CRSP Customer Service Center and the Corporate Service Office to develop an Environmental Management System based on the guidelines in ISO 14001. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1997 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. This report is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Lidar Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Occurrence Reporting  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels DOE 5000.3B.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a conservative estimate. For wind energy, a degradation factor Preliminary TERP Report, p. 6 July 2010 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System Transmission and distribution loss: This factor adjusts the reported savings... credit for the actual power produced that is lost in the transmission and distribution system on its way to the customer. In the case of electricity generated by wind, the T&D losses were assumed to cancel out since wind energy is displacing power...

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar, J. C.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.; Liu, Z.

395

Customer Forum 34 Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 1:00 Lunch 1:00 - 1:30 Mid-C Topics Update on regional Mid-C discussions 1:30 - 2:00 WECC Operating Reserve Requirement Describe ongoing efforts to implement WECC BAL-002- 02...

396

Timeline for Customer Choices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

detail) 2008 - CONTRACT SIGNING * Core Purchase Obligation Choice (section 3 in body) o Load Following o Block (with or without Shaping Capacity) Choice of Monthly and Diurnal...

397

Trustworthy Customer Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Registration link: CHRIS 002452/0001$400.00Course Type: ClassroomCourse Location: Forrestal RM GH-043Course Description: In this interactive course, participants learn how to improve their...

398

Customs of Cambridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristic is at its most extreme in Cambridge. I cannot recall ever seeing a colleague cry, wave his arms wildly or use other forceful body language in normal life. Games and rowing, of course, are different and all the reserve is lifted and a person... on a wide range of general issues. In England, it is noticeable that in popular opinion programmes, such as Any Questions? or television current affairs programmes, hardly any academics appear. This, of course, fluctuates. There have been...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Rocky Mountain Customers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »SubmitterJ. NorbyN.Rocks Rocks Rocks have RM Home

400

Becoming a Customer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture SpatialBECOME A TEST PARTNER

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dear Customer/Stakeholder,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data Files 1 EIADeadline for Venture1/13/2014 Subject:

402

Dear Customer/Stakeholder,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data Files 1 EIADeadline for Venture1/13/2014

403

Redirect Method Customer Request  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 RevisionDivision and

404

Reducing Customer Acquisition Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof Energy Redefining9 *America

405

FAST Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FAST project was initiated by BrightSource in an attempt to provide potential solar field EPC contractors with an effective set of tools to perform specific construction tasks. These tasks are mostly associated with heliostat assembly and installation, and require customized non-standard tools. The FAST concept focuses on low equipment cost, reduced setup time and increased assembly throughput as compared to the Ivanpah solar field construction tools.

Toister, Elad

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

406

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

active projects listing PrePost CD-2 and 's including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has...

407

Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1988--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

Winefordner, J.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

R Paul Drake

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Annual Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 20141 2011 Annual Report

410

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release

411

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release4-4161

412

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited

413

FINAL REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES Committees of9, 2011 FINALOffice of FINAL REPORT

414

Workshop Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campus Working withWorkshop Reports

415

Reporting Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051SoilWindFraud toDepartmentReporting

416

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014 BIAS REPORT AND SUPPORT SYSTEM #12;8 Bias Report and Support System Charge: The Bias Report at Washington University. Through the BRSS, students will be able to report incidents of bias. The working group

Larson-Prior, Linda

417

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

418

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal carbides have recently attracted a great deal of interest due to their potential to replace noble metal catalysts in a variety of reactions. To date, attempts to develop commercial applications with bulk metal carbides have been unsuccessful, however, the catalytic behavior of nanometer-sized carbide particles are reported to be sufficiently different from the bulk materials that new research in this area is warranted. In this report, Mo/W carbides were synthesized using carbon nanotubes both as carbon source and as a catalyst support. These carbon nanotubes (FIBRIL[TM] Nanotubes) are composed of parallel layers of trigonal carbon, but in the form of a series of concentric tubes disposed about the longitudinal axis of the fibrils with diameter of 8{approx}10 nm. The special dimensions of nanotubes stabilize fine dispersion of catalytic entities as only particles with limited sizes, ca <8nm, could be supported on this nanoscale substrate. Two types of catalysts have been prepared in this manner. First, highly dispersed Mo carbide particles were generated on the carbon nanotube surface with average particle size of 3{approx}10 nm. Furthermore, stoichiometric Mo carbide was also obtained in the form of highly porous assemblages of nanorods by careful control of the reaction conditions. The prepared Mo and W carbide catalysts were tested in several industrial reactions with significant energy savings. Results from these studies demonstrated the ''poor man's platinum'' hypothesis as well as many great potentials associated with these novel catalysts in chemical and refinery industries.

Ma, Jun; Hoch, Robert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

Anderson, Robert J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL COPY Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4069-3 2. Government-Service Structures with Premature 5. Report Date October 2004, Rev. September 2005 Concrete Deterioration: Synthesis Report 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No. Amy E. Eskridge

Texas at Austin, University of

422

Electric Industry Restructuring in Five States: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric industry in the United States is undergoing fundamental changes; it is transitioning from regulated monopolies to competitive markets offering customer choice. In this process, the states have been in the forefront of considering the changes in the industry structure and regulation. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) spearheaded a project on electric restructuring in the United States. This is the final report prepared under the project. The purpose of the report is to describe and compare the overall restructuring processes that took place in five states through June 30, 1996. The five states are California, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, and Wisconsin. These are the first major states to consider restructuring or retail wheeling.

Fang, J. M.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Santa Barbara Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara Countys Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the Countys innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara Countys emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the programs first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The Countys investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative program design that has earned statewide recognition and distinction. As a result of the Countys leadership, the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) offered over $5 million in funding to continue realizing ongoing returns on the initial investment made in developing emPower, alongside remaining (extended) DOE BBNP funds. These new funding sources, accepted by the County Board of Supervisors on June 25, 2013, also allow the program to expand its innovative energy solutions to the broader region, including Ventura and San Luis Obispo Counties.

Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

University Prosperity Game. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the University Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico. This Prosperity Game was initially designed for the roadmap making effort of the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (NEMI) of the Electronics Subcommittee of the Civilian Industrial Technology Committee under the aegis of the National Science and Technology Council. The game was modified to support course material in MGT 508, Ethical, Political, and Social Environment of Business. Thirty-five students participated as role players. In this educational context the game`s main objectives were to: (1) introduce and teach global competitiveness and business cultures in an experiential classroom setting; (2) explore ethical, political, and social issues and address them in the context of global markets and competition; and (3) obtain non-government views regarding the technical and non-technical (i.e., policy) issues developed in the NEMI roadmap-making endeavor. The negotiations and agreements made during the game, along with the student journals detailing the players feelings and reactions to the gaming experience, provide valuable insight into the benefits of simulation as an advanced learning tool in higher education.

Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

NONE

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1732-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipients, geometric design, entrance ramps, exit ramps 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

427

RPS Status Report Q1 & Q2 2012 Page 2 I. ABOUT THE RPS AND THIS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale renewable energy development in California, there are other programs that stimulate development of customer- side renewable generation. The California Solar Initiative (CSI) and Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) provide incentives for customers to install renewable distributed generation technologies

428

Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA`s Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA`s Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA's Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA's Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Refinery Capacity Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Capacity Report Released: June 15, 2006 Refinery Capacity Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006...

431

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT TO THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) subsequently established a Renewable Resource Trust Fund, placed the $540 million into the fund, and directed Renewable Resources Account ($243 million) · New Renewable Resources Account ($162 million) · Emerging Renewable Resources Account ($54 million) · Customer-Side Renewable Resources Purchases Account: ­ Customer

432

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied by renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering ''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from traditional utilities and from marketers operating in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than half of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. Currently, more than 600 utilities, or about 20% of utilities nationally, offer green power programs to customers. These programs allow customers to purchase some portion of their power supply as renewable energy--almost always at a higher price--or to contribute funds for the utility to invest in renewable energy development. The term ''green pricing'' is typically used to refer to these utility programs offered in regulated or noncompetitive electricity markets. This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States.

Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5020-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 3208 Red River, Suite 200 Austin, TX 78705-2650 11. Contract or Grant No. 0-5020 13. Type of Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5020-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5

Texas at Austin, University of

434

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4079-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 Austin, TX 78705-2650 11. Contract or Grant No. Technical Report 0-4079 13. Type of Report and Period in order to expedite the acquisition process, minimize cost, and build property owners' trust in government

Texas at Austin, University of

435

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report A review of good practice in the provision of machine) Document Name: good_api_JISC_report_v0.8.doc Notes: Acknowledgements UKOLN is funded by the MLA to all those who gave up time to help with the report. Vital to this work were the people who filled

Rzepa, Henry S.

436

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. Preliminary Review Copy FHWA/TX-03/1833-01-imp-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 2002 4. Title Harrison Michael Bomba 8. Performing Organization Report No. 1833-01-imp-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9

Texas at Austin, University of

437

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-4197-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Intelligent Transportation Systems 5. Report Date May 2001 6. Performing Organization Code7. Authors Tejas Mehta, Hani S. Mahmassani, and Chandra Bhat 8. Performing Organization Report No. 10. Work Unit No

Texas at Austin, University of

438

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/0-5708-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Design of CrackScope (VCrack) [Reprint] 5. Report Date October Organization Report No. 0-5708-1 9. Performing Organization Name and Address Center for Transportation Research

Texas at Austin, University of

439

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5546-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Incompatible Uses 5. Report Date September 2007; Rev. January 2008 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Lisa Loftus-Otway, C. Michael Walton, Lynn Blais, Nathan Hutson 8. Performing Organization Report No. 0

Texas at Austin, University of

440

Quarterly Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has identified all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma; grouped those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collected, organized, and analyzed all available data; conducted characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each plays; and implemented a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. By fulfilling these objectives, the FDD project has had the goal of helping to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells and provide incentive for development and exploratory wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery.

Mary K. Banken

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CREATIVE ARTS ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS ANNUAL REPORT #12;contents COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS 2012 ANNUAL REPORT 2 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS NEWS 4 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS ENROLLMENT & FUNDRAISING 8 ART MUSEUM OF WVU REPORT SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN REPORT 22SCHOOL OF MUSIC REPORT 30SCHOOL OF THEATRE & DANCE REPORT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

442

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 m grain size for < 0.5 m thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450?C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

CHARM COST-EFFECTIVE HIGH-EFFICIENCY ADVANCED REFORMING MODULE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background Creation of a hydrogen infrastructure is an important prerequisite of widespread fuel cell commercialization, especially for the automotive market. Hydrogen is an attractive fuel since it offers an opportunity to replace petroleum-based fuels, but hydrogen occurs naturally only in chemical compounds like water or hydrocarbons that must be chemically converted to produce it. While an ultimate goal is to produce hydrogen through renewable energy sources, steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas is currently the most economical solution to initiate the transition to a hydrogen economy. Centralized hydrogen generation using large industrial SMR plants is already in place to serve customers. Yet, because of the weight and size of cylinders needed to contain hydrogen gas or liquid, transportation of hydrogen may only be economical for short distances. Consequently, distributed natural gas reforming, which trades off the economies of scale of large plants for simplified delivery logistics, is an attractive alternative that could address immediate problems with the lack of hydrogen infrastructure.

Pollica, Darryl; Cross, James C; Sharma, Atul; Shi, Yanlong; Clawson, Lawrence; O'Brien, Chris; Gilhooly, Kara; Kim, Changsik; Quet, Pierre-Francois; Bowers, Brian

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifers role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I and II. Venoco elected to terminate the project after Budget Period II and not to proceed with the activities planned for Budget Period III.

Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Glover, and Nicolas Norboge 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 5-6395-01-1 9. Performing Brianne Glover, J.D. Associate Transportation Researcher Texas Transportation Institute and Nicolas

448

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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. Report Date April 2009 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Jennifer Bennett and Tracy McMillan 8 Sector's Role in Public School Facility Planning by Jennifer Bennett Tracy McMillan Research Report SWUTC

449

2011 ECSE Annual Report Annual Report 2011  

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on is the only sustainable driver of economic growth. For these economies engineers are the "professional2011 ECSE Annual Report Annual Report 2011 Electrical, Computer & Systems Engineering & Systems Engineering Department Kim Boyer, Professor and Head Jonsson Engineering Center Rensselaer

Bystroff, Chris

450

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1884-2 2. Government Accession No. 3, paratransit systems 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

451

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5367-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, deck, slab, shear, fatigue 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

452

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00-1795-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

453

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4382-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, concrete pavement, sensitivity, fatigue, distress 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

454

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-4829-01-1 2. Government Accession No, stiffness 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Zornberg, Jorge G.

455

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4485-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

456

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/0-1843-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

457

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1747-3 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient, Information Technology 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

458

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4083-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

459

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-12/5-4829-01-3 2. Government Accession No No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Zornberg, Jorge G.

460

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-5517-01-1 2. Government Accession No, field monitoring 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Zornberg, Jorge G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1814-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

462

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-2122-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, regulations, vehicle characteristics 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

463

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FWHA/TX-05/0-1774-3 2. Government Accession No. 3, rehabilitation, encapsulation 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

464

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5197-4 2. Government Accession No. 3 consolidating concrete, microcracking 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

465

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/1892-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, nondestructive testing 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

466

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/9-580/589-1 2. Government Accession No resistance, creep, shrinkage 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

467

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5812-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Zornberg, Jorge G.

468

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/0-4562-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 concrete 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Texas at Austin, University of

469

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1405-9 2. Government Accession No. 3 joints, reinforcement coatings 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

470

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03-1838-8 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

471

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/1898-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 after the deck had hardened. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

472

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1754-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

473

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/9-580/589-2 2. Government Accession No. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

474

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/1778-4 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

475

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1734-S 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

476

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1795-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 strategies 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Texas at Austin, University of

477

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-11/0-6348-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

478

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1785-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

479

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4386-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

480

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E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4085-5 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ultimate customers reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-1401-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

482

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5974-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

483

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1395-2F 2. Government Accession No. 3 Bracing, Brace Forces, Torsional Stiffness 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

484

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1471-4 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

485

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1748-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

486

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-4808-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

487

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-6048-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Zornberg, Jorge G.

488

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/5-3933-01-P1-4 2. Government Accession No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

489

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4437-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

490

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02-1810-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 in Texas 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Texas at Austin, University of

491

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/5-4975-01-1 2. Government Accession No. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

492

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4185-4 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

493

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/5-1291-01-1 2. Government Accession No),PASSER II, GEOPAK, Vehicle Turn Templates 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

494

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i Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07 / 0-1774-4 2. Government Accession, encapsulation 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Texas at Austin, University of

495

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5185-3 2. Government Accession No. 3 Pavement. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Texas at Austin, University of

496

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4958-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

497

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-11/0-6095-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

498

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1852-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 concrete mix design 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

499

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-1700-7 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

500

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Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5410-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of