Sample records for ultimate consumers retail

  1. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”Adjustment of U.K. Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes. ”documented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  2. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjustment of U.K. Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes. ”The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”documented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  3. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    George. (2004) “Retail Gasoline Price Dynamics and Localof Information and Retail Gasoline Price Behavior: Andocumented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  4. Consumer Attitudes and Handling Practices of Retailers for Lamb, Mutton and Goat.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stelly, Randall

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with respect to carcass and wholesale cuts and grade and weight of cuts, (4) seasonality of sales and (5) promotion policies and practices in selling lamh, mutton and goat meat. Types of Retail Stores Retail meat stores included in this stud! were... About 50 percent of the independent meat retailers and 2 out of 3 retailers in chain stores stated that they purchase wholesale cuts of lamb. Wholesale cuts purchased most often by inde- pendent retailers are leg, rack or rib chops and shank of lamb...

  5. Dynamic retail assortment models with demand learning for seasonal consumer goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, Felipe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main research question we explore in this dissertation is: How should a retailer modify its product assortment over time in order to maximize overall profits for a given selling season? Historically, long development, ...

  6. Managing Product Variety and Collocation in a Competitive Environment: An Empirical Investigation of Consumer Electronics Retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Charlotte R.

    Product variety is an important strategic tool that firms can use to attract customers and respond to competition. This study focuses on the retail industry and investigates how stores manage their product variety, contingent ...

  7. Update: World average retail gasoline and diesel prices. Crude oil falls, but consumer taxes rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil prices plunged to five year lows late in 1993. However, examination of consumer petroleum product prices around the world reveals that consumers in many countries did not enjoy a consequent drop.

  8. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  9. Retail electricity competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a number of unstudied aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling of consumers whose traditional meters do not allow for measurement of their real time consumption, ...

  10. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides...

  11. Supply chain networks, consisting of manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and consumers, provide the critical infrastructure for the production of goods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    developed in Part I to energy supply chains in the form of electric power generation and distri- bution not only in terms of the product flows but also in terms of pricing in order to satisfy the consumers competition as well as cooperation and yield the resulting product and ma- terial flows and prices

  12. CSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling optimal given load-profiling and retail competition. Fi- nally, we consider the effects of physical consumers are homogeneous up to a scaling factor. In general, the combination of retail competition and load

  13. RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation, fuel type requires retail providers of electricity to disclose fuel source information to consumers about, and fuel type consumed (as a percentage of generation) data to the system operator on a quarterly basis

  14. RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." All retail providers of electricity must disclose fuel source information to consumers about's default product. #12;- 2 - The law also requires all electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation (in kWh), generator technology, and fuel type consumed (as

  15. Tenderness Assessment of Beef Steaks from US Foodservice and Retail Establishments Using Warner-Bratzler Shear and Consumer Sensory Panel Ratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guelker, Miles

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ranged from 1 to 358 d with a mean of 20.5 d, and those from foodservice establishments aging times ranged from 9 to 67 d with an average of 15.9 d. For retail, top blade had the lowest (P < 0.05) WBS values, while cuts from the round top round...

  16. Improving promotional effectiveness through supplier-retailer collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapur, Gautam, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consumer products industry, retail chains and manufacturers run promotions to maintain consumer and brand loyalty. The two major issues in planning and executing promotions are to accurately forecast demand and to ...

  17. Why do we need electricity retailers?; or, can you get it cheaper wholesale?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The opportunities for retail electricity competition to provide new value-added services to retail electricity consumers are discussed. The physical attributes of electricity supply make many of the traditional "convenience ...

  18. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

  19. Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations/C) on integrated retail and wholesale power market operations. The physical operations of the A/C sys- tem at wholesale conditional on A/C load, and the retail energy prices offered to residential A/C consumers

  20. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar...

  1. April 21, 2006 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & waste 0.0% -Geothermal 4.0% -Small hydroelectric 0.7% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.0% Coal 38.5% Large calculates Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific

  2. April 16, 2007 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & waste 0.3% -Geothermal 4.2% -Small hydroelectric 0.3% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.3% Coal 28.6% Large System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific claims

  3. April 15, 2005 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydroelectric 1.1% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.2% Coal 28.9% Large hydroelectric 20.1% Natural gas 45.0% Nuclear 1 Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific claims

  4. CSEM WP 120 Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    CSEM WP 120 Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline of Economics November 13, 2003 Abstract It has been documented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly theoretical model of asymmetric adjustment that empiri- cally matches observed retail gasoline price behavior

  5. Retail market test: An in-depth evaluation of a new product concept for lamb.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naylor, Robert Kenneth

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumer panel test 42 42 43 Design of Consumer Purchase and Acceptance Test ~ 44 Retail store test 45 Test city criteria Sales analysis procedure Promotional campaign Television Newspaper Radio Point-of-Purchase 47 47 47 47 In... Multiple covariance analysis Field Organization for the Market Test 50 50 VI THE RETAIL STORE TEST 52 General Consumer Awareness 52 General Sales Analysis Lamb sales analysis Summary Pork sales analysis Beef sales analysis 53 53 57 58 59...

  6. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETAIL PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna. (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All BrandsCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY

  7. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All Brands ExceptCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch

  8. Table 14. U.S. Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and EIA-782B, "Resellers'Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." 14. U.S. Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type 28 Energy Information Administration ...

  9. Reconciliation of Retailer Claims, 2005 CommissionReport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used to provide electric services." All retail providers of electricity must disclose fuel source's default product. The law also requires all electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation (in kilowatt-hours), generator technology, and fuel type consumed (as

  10. Optimal Power Flow Formulation in Market of Retail Wheeling Taiyou Yong, Student Member, IEEE Robert Lasseter, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power plants, nuclear power plants etc and selling power to consumers. The suppliers have contractsOptimal Power Flow Formulation in Market of Retail Wheeling Taiyou Yong, Student Member, IEEE at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Abstract: Power system deregulation along with retail wheeling

  11. Product design for supply chain : quantifying the costs of complexity in Hewlett-Packard's retail desktop PC business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphel, Aaron Matthew

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, Hewlett-Packard Company's North America Consumer Computing (NACC) division has faced pressures to increase retail product variety in response to growing customer demand. As they pursue incremental ...

  12. Market behavior under partial price controls: the case of the retail gasoline market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camm, F.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of firm-specific controls on the price of gasoline during 1979 and 1980, at both the wholesale and the retail level, dramatically affected the retail market for gasoline. The most visible effect was a diversity of monetary prices across service stations within particular retail market areas. Price could no longer play its usual role in clearing the retail market for gasoline. Queues and other changes in quality of service at stations arose to maintain the balance of market demand and supply. This report examines the behavior of an otherwise competitive market in the presence of such regulation-induced nonprice phenomena. In such a market, consumers consider both monetary prices and costs imposed by queues in deciding where to buy gasoline and how much to buy. Using a price-theoretic model of behavior, this paper predicts how various changes in effective price regulation affect consumers. 14 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Edgeworth Price Cycles: Evidence from the Toronto Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson. “Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctua- tions”,Canadian cities, retail gasoline prices are very volatileset of twelve-hourly retail gasoline prices for 22 service

  14. Retail Policies and Competition in the Gasoline Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, Jim

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wholesale gasoline prices and retail prices. It includes theTable 4 - Gasoline Price Components Year Retail Price TaxesSupply Lower Retail Gasoline Prices? ” Contemporary Economic

  15. Ultimate Energy Densities for Electromagnetic Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate electric and magnetic energy densities that can be attained by bandlimited electromagnetic pulses in free space are calculated using an ab initio quantized treatment, and the quantum states of electromagnetic fields that achieve the ultimate energy densities are derived. The ultimate energy densities also provide an experimentally accessible metric for the degree of localization of polychromatic photons.

  16. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ?P [ max s E [S (s, ?) ? p ? D (s, ?) | ? ? P ] ] ? C(P) } . (7) This utility is maximized when the consumer is confronted with the wholesale prices: p? ? = p ? . Proposition 4 With real-time meters and imperfectly reactive, but rational consumers: (i... purchase cost corresponds to: 1 entire consumption profile (RT meter) yes customer’s RT profile 2 entire consumption profile (RT meter) no / partial customer’s RT profile 3 aggregate consumption only (traditional meter) no customer’s RT profile 4 aggregate...

  17. Statistical Analysis of the Factors Influencing Consumer Use of E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromiley, P.; Gerlach, T.; Marczak, K.; Taylor, M.; Dobrovolny, L.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the sales patterns of E85 retail outlets can provide important information about consumer behavior regarding E85, locating future E85 fueling infrastructure, and developing future alternative fuel policies and programs.

  18. Contractual form, retail price and asset characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Andrea

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions derived from a principal-agent analysis of the manufacturer-retailer relationship are derived and tested using microdata on contractual form, outlet characteristics and retail prices for gasoline stations in ...

  19. Consumer and Retail Market Test of Prepackaged Deboned Frozen Beef.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branson, Robert E.; King, G. T.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be able to see what she is buying. The opaque package was used because fro- zen meats lack the attractive color that characterizes the fresh product. Freezing sharply reduces the red color and also frost particles that form on the meat NEW PREMIUM... have both more exposure to the types of news media used plus freezer compartments or deep freeze cabinets in which to keep frozen food items. INFLUENCE...

  20. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S.

  1. The role of vibrant retail electricity markets in assuring that wholesale power markets operate effectively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, A.J.; Rufin, C.; Swinand, G.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barriers to competitive supplier entry such as California's wholesale-price pass-through model can provide an almost insurmountable barrier to effective retail competition. The telecommunications, airline, and software industries provide lessons--positive and negative--on how creating competitive wholesale markets is insufficient to bring the benefits of competition to smaller consumers.

  2. Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo integration cycle Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates The Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate DeviceV Thermo Scientific MAT 253 or the 3-kV DELTA V isotope ratio mass spectrometer meets the requirements

  3. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate...

  4. Relative efficiency benefits of wholesale and retail competition in electricity: An analysis and a research agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohi, D.R.; Palmer, K.L. [Resources for the Future, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)] [Resources for the Future, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in the debate over restructuring the electric power industry is the extent to which the market should be open to competition. One aspect of this debate is whether competition ought to be restricted to the whole sale power market or be extended to final retail consumers. This report begins to explore the potential differences in economic efficiency between wholesale and retail competition in the electric power industry. The two market-structure scenarios are defined and the factors responsible for differences in efficiency are described. The report also contains an assessment of the relative importance of the factors and recommendations for pursuing further research.

  5. Residential property values and neighborhood retail : a comparison of pedestrian and automobile oriented retail clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiffany, Thacher

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study tests the hypothesis that home buyers pay a premium to live within walking distance of pedestrian accessible retail. To answer this question two types of retail clusters are identified in the Boston metropolitan ...

  6. Setting a retail generation credit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.M.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the additional cost components will vary depending on the way that the wholesale energy component is calculated, at minimum a generation credit should recognize the following costs: Additional value of shaping or load-following; Premia associated with the risks of serving retail load; Transmission costs incurred by competitive suppliers; Commercial costs; and Reasonable profits. In this article the author reviews the construction of a generation credit, starting with three different ways to compute the wholesale cost of electric energy--as a forecast, as a forward price, or from the spot market--and then moving to consideration of additional cost items. Throughout the authors attempts to estimate the costs an efficient competitor will incur in order to illustrate the difference between a retail generation credit and a wholesale price index.

  7. Vertical relationships between manufacturers and retailers: inference with limited data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villas-Boas, Sofia B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    square-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolinesquare-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolineprices and retail wages also look reasonable for some states; in general, increases in gasoline

  8. Vertical relationships between manufacturers and retailers: inference with limited data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villas-Boas, Sofia B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    square-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolinesquare-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolineprices and retail wages also look reasonable for some states; in general, increases in gasoline

  9. An assessment of the value of retail ready packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kathleen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of retail-ready packaging reduces the costs of replenishing store shelves by eliminating the labor of removing packaging materials and stocking individual items on shelves. While reducing costs for retailers, retail-ready ...

  10. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

  11. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  12. Volume 30, Issue 2 Penalizing Consumers for Saving Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , new entrant retailer Poweo introduced an innovative time-of-use tariff with discounted running charges electric utilities introduce pricing schemes to induce their customers to consume less electricity. When enhances understanding of why a typical electric utility may instead prefer to increase prices, in so doing

  13. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY The...

  14. Integrated Retail & Wholesale Power System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Integrated Retail & Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality PIs: Dionysios Retail/Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Project PIs: Dionysios Aliprantis (open-source release): AMES Wholesale Power Market Testbed (ISU) + GridLAB-D distribution platform (DOE

  15. prescription drug program highlights retail pharmacy prescriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    prescription drug program highlights SHIP retail pharmacy prescriptions The informedRx retail interactions and duplicate therapies. Brand name and generic drugs are included in your pharmacy benefit, but you will save the most money by selecting generic drug options when available. On myinformedRx.com you

  16. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0OctoberRetail Sales

  17. Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

  18. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  19. Edgeworth Price Cycles, Cost-based Pricing and Sticky Pricing in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson. “Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctua- tions”,were collected on retail gasoline prices, wholesale (rack)ancillary information. Retail gasoline prices, RET AIL mt ,

  20. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  1. Ultimate Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSOdatabase[1]Ultimate Biofuels

  2. Segmentation strategies for managing retail supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Catherine G. (Catherine Gloria)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-technology manufacturing companies often face rapid price decline and capacity constraints. Especially in the retail side of the business where the supply chain is much longer and revenue is sometimes not recognized ...

  3. Edgeworth price cycles in retail gasoline markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael David, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I present three essays that are motivated by the interesting and dynamic price-setting behavior of firms in Canadian retail gasoline markets. In the first essay, I examine behavior at the market level ...

  4. STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES 2005 TO 2018 Mignon Marks Principal Author Mignon Marks Project Manager David Ashuckian Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY DIVISION B.B. Blevins Executive Director

  5. The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olson, and Stuart Chaitkin (LBNL). We also want to thank ourand Mithra Moezzi, also of LBNL. This work was supported byLBNL – 44749 The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

  6. The bricks, clicks, economics and mortar of contemporary retail : the consequences that retailer storing strategies and retail performance across markets have on real estate investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagan, Kevin William

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retail industry in the 21st century is undergoing a confluence of transformative changes. In this paper we discuss particularly noteworthy changes related to demography, retail economics and the Internet. We note how, ...

  7. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average county retail gasoline prices in May 2009, denotedor retail gas price, to affect margins on gasoline, which

  8. RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumers and calculating net system power (a default fuel source mix, established annually by the Energy Principal Author Chuck Mizutani Manager TECHNOLOGY MARKET DEVELOPMENT OFFICE Terry Surles Deputy Director Energy Commission (Energy Commission) to prepare an annual report comparing the source of power

  9. Inventory planning for low demand items in online retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhaochhria, Pallav

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large online retailer strategically stocks inventory for SKUs with low demand. The motivations are to provide a wide range of selections and faster customer fulfillment service. We assume the online retailer has the ...

  10. Communicating the value of veal to retail and food service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeill, Michael Scott

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and associated components by trained meat cutters. Each style selected (n = 6) was used to generate mean retail yields and labor requirements, which were calculated from wholesale and retail weights (kg) and processing times (s) . Means and standard errors...

  11. A Model of Vertical Restriction and Equilibrium in Retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittlingmayer, George

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This model of distribution provides a rationale for restrictions placed on retailers by manufacturers. The manufacturer's customers are located uniformly along a road, and retailing operations are subject to increasing ...

  12. Composition of carcasses and retail cuts from lightweight heifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzman Mirabal, Luis Alejandro

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. H. R. cross Dr. J, W, Savell Twenty-nine sides from lightweight heifer carcasses, ranging from 113 to 250 kg, were fabricated into wholesale and retail cuts using standardized procedures. Retail cuts were trimmed to either zero or 0. 64... were below the ten percent fat level. Retail cut yields from the chuck, rib, loin and round for both trim levels were considerably lower than those reported in other studies. Retail cut yield from the four major wholesale cuts increased...

  13. Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing Programs: The Case of Jersey Fresh Ramu #12;Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing Programs: The Case of Jersey Fresh Ramu is expressed to each and every participant of the retailer and wholesaler focus group meeting and mail survey

  14. Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges N° 2006-08 Mai 2006 Evens SALIES OFCE hal-00972962,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges-efficiency as variables relating to price and profitability. The retail electricity market is a case in point, as high

  15. Dominion Retail Inc (Ohio) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion Retail

  16. Retail competition in the UK electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    residential · about 50% of total demand · used to phase in competition for coal industry · useful experience) · Initial concern about vertical integration: · between networks and activities across networks · fear-through, for 2 yrs · with 9% price reduction: end of coal protection cost · So retail competition means benefits

  17. February 8, 2002 Dear: Retail Provider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dates: Report/Filing Due Date 2001 Annual Retail Providers Report (to Energy Commission) March 1, 2002 2001 Annual Power Content Label (to Customers)i April 15, 2002 Independent Audit/Verification of 2001 Annual Power Content Label and Annual Report (to Energy Commission) June 1, 2002 As someone involved

  18. February 10, 2003 Dear Retail Provider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that purchase electricity from a power pool that submits an Annual Report to the Energy Commission may provideFebruary 10, 2003 Dear Retail Provider: Subject: Power Source Disclosure and Customer Credit on the mailing lists for the Power Source Disclosure Program and the Customer Credit Program. As someone involved

  19. August 13, 2001 To Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.energy.ca.gov/regulations/retail_disclosure.html#retaildisclosure>. Sample power content labels for the "no specific purchase case" (default) and the "50% specific purchase Disclosure Regulations (SB 1305, Power Source Disclosure Program) In March of this year, the Energy Providers for providing customers with a quarterly power content label and additionally, in some cases

  20. Retail Lighting: Title 24 & Technology Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Retail Lighting: Title 24 & Technology Update Kelly Cunningham Outreach Director kcunning@ucdavis.edu California Lighting Technology Center, UC Davis RESEARCH . INNOVATION . PARTNERSHIP Supporting compliance Lighting: Title 24 and Technology Update C00005 Kelly Cunningham April 24,2014 #12;Credit(s) earned

  1. Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made to enable widespread adoption of this clean and sustainable contribution to meeting energy needs. It is seen to micro-renewable energy resource exploitation since wired power transmission is only cost effective over

  2. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets: An Empirical Evidence from Contract Changes in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Justine

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”vertical contracts and retail gasoline prices. The thirdthe differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is

  3. Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade Find Mølholt Jensen Risø-PhD-34(EN) ISBN 978 2008 #12;#12;Author: Find Mølholt Jensen Title: Ultimate strength of a large wind turbine blade contains a study of the structural static strength of wind turbine blades loaded in flap-wise direction

  4. Ris-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1111(EN) Ultimate Loading of Wind Turbines Gunner Chr. Larsen, Knut Ronold, Hans E analysis as well as a wind turbine reliability study. In the wind climate analysis, the distribution to analyse wind turbine components with respect to failure in ultimate loading, and in addition to establish

  5. State of competition in gasoline marketing. The effects of refiner operation at retail (a study required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the Congress on the extent to which producers, refiners, and other suppliers of motor fuel subsidize the sale of such fuel at retail or wholesale with profits obtained from other operations. This is Part I of the report required under that Title. It addresses a number of questions relating to the central issue - the state of competition in the gasoline marketing industry. Part II of the report, to be issued this fall, will discuss the subpoenaed documents of nine integrated companies, and will contain recommendations for action, if deemed necessary. The basic thrust of Part I is an examination of three issues: (1) Are integrated refiners subsidizing their company operated gasoline retail outlets; (2) Are integrated refiners moving gasoline away from their branded dealer network into their own retail outlets; and (3) Are integrated refiners manipulating the allocation system in favor of their own retail outlets to the detriment of other gasoline marketers. At a series of regional hearings, independent marketers charged that integrated refiners were engaging in each of these practices. In essence, integrated refiners were portrayed as using unfair or illegal competitive practices which would ultimately lead to their domination of retail gasoline markets. This report addresses each allegation, after providing a historical and theoretical framework for today's debate.

  6. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  7. The modern day discount house as a separate retail establishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Carroll James

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the economic bases for the . uccess of discount houses relative to other retail operations; 3, to determine the effect, if any, of dis- count house retailing on the historic channels of distribution; 4. to determine and predict the future of discount..., wholesale and retail, provided ad- ded incentives to move more goods, but still there were surpluses, It was now relatively easy for additional stores, such as discount houses, to obtain merchandise which they could sell at low prices because of their un...

  8. An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, becauseof the retail cost and the break-even gasoline price, foreven gasoline prices at least double, and initial retail

  9. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers Decisions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have...

  10. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  11. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  12. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (and-eventually, spray ponds) that are proposed to be used as ultimate heat sinks in nuclear power plant emergency core cooling systems. The need is derived from the concern...

  13. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest...

  14. VEHICLE FUEL Informing Consumers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States. 2. Automobiles--Tires. 3. Automobiles--Fuel consumption. 4. Consumer education--United States. I

  15. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    , if any, of the differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is attributable to differences substantially higher retail gasoline prices than other regions of the country. For example, for the first week of August 1999, the price of reformulated gasoline in California was 39.6 cents higher than the average

  16. Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast Principal Author: Ben Arikawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast March 1998 Principal Author: Ben Arikawa Electricity 1997 FORE08.DOC Page 1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE REVISED 1997 RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICE FORECAST Introduction The Electricity Analysis Office of the California Energy Commission

  17. Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providers that purchase electricity from a power pool that submits an Annual Report to the Energy CommissionNotes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2003 Power Source Disclosure an energy mix or fuel mix different than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you

  18. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  19. Marketing of Retail Signage in Different Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Mai

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    will be found at locations with higher quality architecture, which contributes to the overall atmosphere of a nicer area. On the other end of the spectrum, a small town like Tomball does not have luxury brands, simply because of the different target market...://www.cstx.gov/Modules/ShowDocument. aspx?documentid=5723 Code of Ordinances. (2006, December 06). Retrieved from http://library.municode.com/ index. aspx?clientId=11633 Davis, B. and Ward P. (2002). Managing Retail Consumption. Great Britain: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Ewald, W...

  20. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut)

  1. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail Inc

  2. Dominion Retail Inc (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail IncMaryland) Jump

  3. Dominion Retail Inc (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail IncMaryland)

  4. Dominion Retail Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion

  5. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominionDominion

  6. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation TengchongTex-La ElectricTexas Retail

  7. Certain aspects of inventory control as one of the management tools for the retail lumber and building material dealer of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amason, Robert Daniel

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sales volumes and ~ xpense accounts, but few of them realise that their own accounting section could prepare adequate factual data to supplement )udgment and experience for the control of inventory. Regardless of the type of merchandise within... the retail bus- iness, and regardless oi the investment required, there must be a sufficient quantity of goods on hand to take care of consumer demand. Otherwise many sales can be lost. In order to meet demand, and to prevent customer dissatisfaction...

  8. The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology Editorial overview to provide a landscape of current research at the interface between outstanding ecological questions to the biotechnologist for mining enzymatic activities from unusual environments. It is a fact that, despite many

  9. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluor Federal ServicesDepartment ofDepartment of|

  10. Consumers (Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure) Consumer Acceptance Group A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex FlowConocimientoUsefulEnergyConsumer

  11. Inventory optimization in a retail multi-echelon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkaresvimun, Rintiya

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study is to find an optimal inventory distribution in a retail three-echelon environment, consisting of a supplier, a DC, and stores. An inventory model is built by replicating the echelons' periodic, ...

  12. Who stocks the shelf? : an analysis of retail replenishment strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuai, Jiaqi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to analyze the trade-offs of two retail replenishment strategies, DSD (Direct Store Delivery) model and Traditional model. Conceptual and cost models are set up to analyze the trade-offs, ...

  13. Demand allocation strategies in the seasonal retail industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Carin H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amazon.com is a publicly-held company headquartered in Seattle, Washington. It revolutionized the retail industry by being one of the first major companies to sell goods over the Internet. It is an international company ...

  14. Trends in demand for retail and wholesale cuts of meat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holloway, David Wayne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Approved as to style and content by: Donald E. Farris (Chair of Committee) Carl E. Shafer (Member) Rudo J...

  15. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  16. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  17. The efficiency of wholesale vs. retail competition in electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohi, D.R.; Palmer, K. [Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)] [Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If markets are sufficiently competitive, the retail model of restructuring is likely to produce a greater array of products and services and lower electricity prices, but the wholesale model may yield lower transaction costs and better encourage transmission investment. Which model is best? The answer is not known yet. A central issue in the debate over restructuring the electric power industry is the extent to which the market should be opened to competition. One aspect of this debate is whether competition ought to be restricted to the wholesale power market or extended all the way to retail customers. Some state regulators have recommended retail competition, while others, including the U.S. Department of Energy, prefer to limit competition to the wholesale level, at least until experience warrants taking the additional step. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the potential differences in economic efficiency that could arise between the wholesale and retail competition models. The comparison is limited to the qualitative properties of two hypothetical market structures that are intended to reflect the essential differences between wholesale and retail competition. The authors are not concerned with problems of getting from today`s market structure to either end state.

  18. April 24, 2001 To all retail Providers/Wholesalers/Power Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 24, 2001 To all retail Providers/Wholesalers/Power Pools: This letter is to alert you a tradable certificates program for use by generators, pools/wholesalers and retail providers for supporting

  19. The growth of retail REITs : an exploration of current practices and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toth, A. Eric (Anthony Eric), 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an exploration of the current growth activity of retail real estate investment trusts (REITs). The specific questions to be explored are: How are retail REITs currently growing, how is this growth being ...

  20. Consumer Energy Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  1. April 15, 2004 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4% -Biomass & waste 2.0% -Geothermal 5.0% -Small hydroelectric 1.9% -Solar 0.3% -Wind 1.2% Coal 21.3% Large Eligible Renewable 8.1% -Biomass & waste 2.0% -Geothermal 3.3% -Small hydroelectric 2.3% -Solar 0.0% -Wind Commission calculates Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California

  2. May 13, 2003 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .7% -Small hydroelectric 1.9% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.5% Coal 15.4% Large hydroelectric 22.5% Natural gas 42.9% -Biomass & waste 2.6% -Geothermal 5.1% -Small hydroelectric 1.6% -Solar 0.3% -Wind 1.3% Coal 20.0% Large Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have

  3. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  4. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  5. Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality Leigh of the Integrated Retail/Wholesale (IRW) project at Iowa State University · IRW Test Bed development · Integration-NE, MISO, XM, RTE, MEC IRW Project: Integrated Retail/Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart

  6. 2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the meter data reported to the system operator (Retail providers that purchase electricity from a power pool2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2005 Power Source Disclosure than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you are probably aware that all

  7. Plugging in the consumer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for senior executives around critical public and private sector issues. This executive brief is basedPlugging in the consumer Innovating utility business models for the future Energy and Utilities IBM and figuratively. But the confluence of climate change concerns, rising energy costs and technology advances

  8. Dominion Retail Inc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion Retail Inc

  9. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  10. Noncooperative Games for Autonomous Consumer Load Balancing over Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Tarun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, most consumers of electricity pay for their consumptions according to a fixed rate. With the ad- vancement of Smart Grid technologies, large-scale implementation of variable-rate metering becomes more practical. As a result, consumers will be able to control their electricity consumption in an automated fashion, where one possible scheme is to have each individual maximize their own utility as a noncooperative game. In this paper, noncooperative games are formulated among the electricity consumers in Smart Grid with two real-time pricing schemes, where the Nash equilibrium operation points are investigated for their uniqueness and load balancing properties. The first pricing scheme charges a price according to the average cost of electricity borne by the retailer and the second one charges according to a time-variant increasing-block price, where for each scheme, a zero-revenue model and a constant-rate revenue model are considered. In addition, the relationship between the studied games and ce...

  11. Consumers' Image of Broilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtenay, Henry V.; Branson, Robert E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which they feel the product possesses. This research was designed to determine consumers' favorable and unfavorable images as to broilers, both in making purchases in stores and in serving them as a meat dish. These images, summarized briefly here... count. The Preparation and Cooking Image: The h0u.l wife's image of broilers focuses on one metliotl- frying. The major deterrent to preparing othci dishes was that these are either too difficult or canno* be prepared satisfactorily...

  12. Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchetti, Franz

    1 Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market Cory Thoma, Tao Cui, Student Member, IEEE, Franz Franchetti, Member, IEEE Abstract--Smart metering systems multi-party compu- tation (SMC) based privacy preserving smart metering system. Using the proposed SMC

  13. Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF) Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the wholesaler/distributor level or below. This presents additional challenges in tracking untaxed fuel after approved ORNL's plan to conduct a Phase II Pilot Test titled Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale

  14. Retail Shelf-life Characteristics of Dry-aged Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Carson

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    counts, lactic acid bacteria, and yeast and mold counts. Surface discoloration (P = 0.007) and fat discoloration (P < 0.0001) of steaks increased as aging period and retail steak shelf-life day increased. Also, off-odor development increased (P < 0...

  15. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  16. Because Horry County attracts a large level of spending by visitors and because of the growing consumer demand for locally produced food, the region is in a position to grow the local food system, increase the incomes of local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    gap between consumers and producers; and estimate the costs of required physical infrastructure to strengthen their ability to satisfy wholesale, retail, and institutional demand." The shared cost and working capital. Project coordinators will conduct producer and distributor surveys along with an analysis

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  18. Contractual Pricing Problems for Retail Distribution under Different Channel Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Su

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mallik (2010)) examining this setting under the wholesale price contract from supplier-driven perspective, the prior work considers Bertrand com- petition (Bertrand (1883)) between buyers. That is, “In the Bertrand model, firms simultaneously choose... of competing on quantities or prices after observing the suppliers’ wholesale prices. However, either Cournot or Bertrand competition is not involved in the buyer-driven channel. It is because after observing the suppliers’ wholesale prices, the buyers’ retail...

  19. Public Utilities Commission Consumer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Public Utilities Commission Consumer Programs Water Programs The CPUC regulates privately owned water companies, which may provide specific as- sistance programs that are unique to each about consumer programs. For infor- mation on income eligibility limits and for a list of water

  20. Traditional Inventory Models in an E-Retailing Setting: A Two-Stage Serial System with Space Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allgor, Russell

    In an e-retailing setting, the efficient utilization of inventory, storage space, and labor is paramount to achieving high levels of customer service and company profits. To optimize the storage space and labor, a retailer ...

  1. Dr. StrangeBox or : how I learned to stop worrying and love urban big box retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, Jared Harding

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, Big Box retailers have been trying to tap into urban markets after years of explicitly avoiding them in favor of suburban environments. In the past few years, retailers have begun experimenting with ...

  2. Does mix matter? : comparing the performance of mixed-use and single-use retail clusters during an economic downturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Caroline (Caroline Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retail development in suburban locations has long been dominated by retail "strips" along major roadways and large, enclosed shopping malls. More compact, planned alternatives to sprawl development have been gaining in ...

  3. Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering Diffusion in Retail Electricity Markets via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering Diffusion in Retail Electricity on promoting smart metering in the U.K. retail electricity market. We break down the policy into four possible recommendations for the energy mar- ket is the adoption of smart metering technology, which, in addition

  4. Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Dionysios of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid functionality. This test bed seams together two existing test beds, the AMES Wholesale Power Market Test Bed

  5. Fiber to the Premise (FTTP) Industry Structure: Implications of a Wholesale-Retail Split

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirbu, Marvin

    Fiber to the Premise (FTTP) Industry Structure: Implications of a Wholesale-Retail Split Anupam. In other cases, either out of choice or regulation, we observe the network owner (the wholesaler) leasing the shared network (wholesale-retail split). The network owner can either wholesale dark fiber or "lit

  6. A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization illustrated for groceries' goods2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization ­ illustrated38 * Corresponding author9 10 11 1 IFSTTAR,12 Production Systems, logistics, Transport Organisation as retailers, through in-house or51 outsourced logistics deliveries to points of sale, have a high share

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S. DepartmentRetail

  8. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

  9. Reliant Energy Retail Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesys Holdings Ltd JumpReliant Energy Retail

  10. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesys Holdings Ltd JumpReliant Energy RetailReliant

  11. Dominion Retail Inc (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail

  12. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNew EnergyCity DataNextEra Retail of

  13. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation TengchongTex-La ElectricTexas Retail Energy,

  14. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNetPriceGas, WetThrough Retail

  15. Private Regulation of Consumer Arbitration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.; Zyontz, Samantha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arbitration providers, such as the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) and JAMS, have promulgated due process protocols to regulate the fairness of consumer and employment arbitration agreements. A common criticism of these due process...

  16. Consumer Impact on Resource Productivity Consumer Regulation: Top-down control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraco, Thomas

    Consumer Impact on Resource Productivity Consumer Regulation: Top-down control Nutrient Limitation: Bottom-up control Primary producers: phytoplankton Primary production: Nutrients or consumer(s) #12;Mid-American Lake Ecosystems Productivity Varies with Nutrients, Phosphorous [P] Explains

  17. Age effects in L2 acquisition: ultimate attainment at the syntax-morphology interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Paulina

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a selective overview of studies that have examined age effects in second language (L2) acquisition. The focus was on adult second language learners and the L2 ultimate attainment at syntax-interface morphology, with particular...

  18. Consumer survey data as a basis for the derivation of retail price and income elasticities of demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Winston Lewis

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Powell, O'Reagan, and Godwin in 1958 [7]. The test involved three brands of orange juice. Prices of all three brands were varied above and below the prevailing market price . Results were used to derive de- mand and revenue curves for frozen orange...

  19. A Tale of Two Brands: The Joint Effect of Manufacturer Brand and Retailer Brand on Consumers’ Evaluation of Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ying

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    depends on the reference point evoked, and whether each of the two brands is perceived as a gain or loss relative to the reference point. Five lab experiments provide empirical support for the hypothesized effects. Study 1 reveals that the joint effect...

  20. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCalifornia State0 Cleanr Clean

  1. Consumers Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consumers Energy residential electric customers are eligible to apply for a variety of rebates on energy efficient equipment. Customers must install equipment in the Consumers Energy service area...

  2. Consumers Energy (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consumers Energy residential electric customers are eligible to apply for a variety of rebates on energy efficient equipment. Customers must install equipment in the Consumers Energy service area...

  3. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the low participation in state retail choice programs. A quick assessment of the wholesale market shows that 60% - 70% of the nation's electric system participates in...

  4. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

  5. Foreign Direct Investment in Food Retailing: The Case of the People’s Republic of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au-Yeung, Amelia Y.S.

    Foreign direct investment (FDI) in food retailing has generated a considerable amount of attention in both the media and the business world throughout the 199Os, with a strong focus on Asian and Central and Eastern ...

  6. A Case Study of Food Safety Culture Within a Retailer Corporate Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santibanez-Rivera, Rodrigo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The retail business has been negatively affected due to the increasing customer concerns about food safety and the recent events related to microbiological and chemical contamination of food products, such as the melamine in infant formula...

  7. Market research of commercial recommendation engines for online and offline retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Yaoyao Clare

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the era of big data and predictive analytics, recommendation systems or recommendation engines that recommend merchandise or service offerings based on individual preferences have had a revolutionary impact on retail ...

  8. Big box, no more quick fixes : a historical account of consumption, retail and discount shopping typologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Erik R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As of 2011, the fastest growing sectors of the American economy are related to, or directly involved in the retail business. The conditions which led to this phenomenon are rooted in the fundamental precepts of capitalism, ...

  9. An analysis of the threshold necessary to sustain rural Texas retail outlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adcock, Donna P

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE THRESHOLD NECESSARY TO SUSTAIN RURAL TEXAS RETAIL OUTLETS A Thesis by DONNA PFLUGER ADCOCK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics AN ANALYSIS OF THE THRESHOLD NECESSARY TO SUSTAIN RURAL TEXAS RETAIL OUTLETS A Thesis by DONNA PFLUGER ADCOCK Approved as to style and content by: Dennis U. Fisher (Chair...

  10. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abalin, S. S.; Alekseev, P. N.; Ignat'ev, V. V.; Kolyaskin, O. E.; Men'shikov, L. I.; Mostovoi, V. I.; Prusakov, V. N.; Subbotin, S. A.; Krasnykh, A. K.; Popov, Yu. P.; Rudenko, V. T.; Somov, L. N.; Dikansky, N. S.; Novokhatsky, A. V.; Dovbnia, A. N. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kharkov Physical Technical Institute, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the ''ultimate safety reactor'' using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R and D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  11. Predicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis of AE signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on ``testing'' the real structure rather than trying to model it. Experiments on reinforced concrete (RC) beamsPredicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis the unloading and loading phases of a cycle test and it showed a clear correlation with the bending failure load

  12. he mobile world depends on lithium-ion batteries --today's ultimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    T he mobile world depends on lithium- ion batteries -- today's ultimate rechargeable energy store -- a performance roughly on a par with the best Li-ion batteries. His batteries are based on lithium­sulphur (Li is applied to reverse the electron flow, which also drives the lithium ions back. In a Li­S battery

  13. Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible Energy Source" John D. Moody, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" " Presented to: MIT ­ PSFC IAP 2014" " January 15, 2014" This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

  14. The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    The ultimate goal "Deciphering" the DNA nucleotide sequence of a living system*. Tools difficult macromolecule to analyse. Now it is possible to determine the nucleotide sequence at a rate of several hundred nucleotide a day. (August 2005: 1011 bases) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; = 0.283 #12

  15. MFR PAPER 987 During 1968-1971, retail prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20 percent and poultry prices, 6 percent, in the ame period (Figure I). Despite the price freeze on meat products shortly afte r- ward , and other pro posals in the wi nd would serve to create fur- ther dispa rities between the meat farmer' share of the consumer's dollar and the fisherman's share. Also

  16. Application of Dynamic Pricing toApplication of Dynamic Pricing to Retail and Supply Chain ManagementRetail and Supply Chain Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcotte, Patrice

    profit Variable cost Profit increase of 8.0% Capture 1% price increase Fixed cost Price is the biggestApplication of Dynamic Pricing toApplication of Dynamic Pricing to Retail and Supply Chain OF PRESENTATION ·· The pricing challengeThe pricing challenge ·· The practice of pricingThe practice of pricing

  17. Systems analysis of major consumer energy decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisler, Nicholas Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American consumers make a number of decisions that significantly impact their energy use. Some of the most important of these decisions were identified and analyzed for the purpose of including them in a Consumer Energy ...

  18. An Empirical Study of AAA Consumer Arbitrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.; Zyontz, Samantha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Article presents the results from the first detailed empirical study of consumer arbitration as administered by the American Arbitration Association. Primarily using a sample of 301 AAA consumer arbitrations that ...

  19. CONNECTICUT CONSUMER HEALTH INFORMATI0N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CONNECTICUT CONSUMER HEALTH INFORMATI0N NETWORK RECOMMENDED BOOKS FOR A CONSUMER HEALTH LIBRARY many different types of consumer health questions. Titles marked with a double asterisk (**) are considered essential for a basic collection in any size public library. A single asterisk (*) indicates

  20. Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics Current Trends and Future Challenges, for innovative eHealth systems to have true value and impact, they must first and foremost be usable challenges in the usability and accessibility of consumer health informatics will be described. Consumer

  1. An analysis of consumer purchasing patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feist, Joseph Clarence

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and attracting new spending. Many of the rural counties in the Panhandle District of Texas are losing substantial retail sales, creating economic leakages that result in the loss of employment and income from the community. Since plugging economic leakages... four-county study regions. The Northwest Panhandle consisted of Dallam, Hartley, Moore, and Sherman Counties, and the North Central Panhandle consisted of Hansford, Hutchinson, Lipscomb, and Ochiltree Counties. Data from the Bureau of Economic...

  2. The Consumer Market for Beef.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branson, Robert E.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is purchased. Most families prefer a 1-pound package of hamburger meat. About a third of the families prefer either small or large roasts. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This report represents the results of personal efforts and contributions of many individuals. R. E... of the consumers did not choose an!. of the afore-mentioned roasts or steaks. Other miscellaneous meat cuts found preference \\vith them. The importance of hamburger meat as a beef product cannot be minimized. Although only 3 percent cited it as their first...

  3. Consumers Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentratingEnergy Information Hallein, Austria)Consumers

  4. Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic Durch die Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic wird Studierenden ermglicht, Mandanten in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytag, Johann-Christoph

    Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic Die Idee: Durch die Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic wird Studierenden rechtlich zu beraten. Die Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic bietet Ihnen eine hervorragende Möglichkeit Theorie und Praxis zu verbinden! Das Projekt: Wenn Sie sich für ein Jahr Humboldt Consumer Law Clinic

  5. Analysis of Various Pumping Methods With Respect to the Lowest Achievable Ultimate Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Ganapati; Rao Myneni, Ganapati; Favale, Anthony; Poelker, Benard; Stutzman, Marcy

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Labzs CEBAF Accelerator Facility uses most of the currently available vacuum pumping systems for its successful operations.These vacuum systems include turbo, ion, NEG and cryo pumps.The theoretical lowest pressure obtainable with these pumps is different and also the effective pumping speeds of all these pumps at lowest pressures are likely to vary depending on the prevailing conditions. Consequently, the ultimate pressure of a given vacuum system pumped by each of the above mentioned pumps could be expected to vary under the same operating conditions. In this paper the results of the analysis of above pumps with respect to their lowest achievable ultimate pressures are presented.z This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

  6. Results from large scale ultimate strength tests of K-braced jacket frame structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolt, H.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 2 of the JIP Frames Project included four large scale collapse tests of K-braced frames in which both gap and overlap K joints were the critical components. The results are presented in this paper. The local failure modes differed from typical isolated component tests, yet were representative of structural damage observed following Hurricane Andrew. The frame test results therefore provide important insight to the ultimate response of offshore jacket structures.

  7. Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, “While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle.” Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

  8. An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations D study of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid functionality. The test bed will seam together two existing test beds, the AMES Wholesale

  9. A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid with Residential Users and PEVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid California Los Angeles, CA USA {yli760, yanzhiwa, shahin, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--In the smart grid, real their electricity consumption, thereby improving the reliability of the grid. Retailers are incorporated

  10. M A R K E T S P O T L I G H T Optimizing Supplier-Retailer Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    new collaboration opportunities and driving innovation across the entire retail and manufacturing supply chain. In addition to being a new means of data collection, mobile applications and smart devices. IDC Manufacturing Insights' Supply Chain Survey found that retailers and manufacturers alike have

  11. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  12. The Texas Retail Meat Industry -- Structure, Operational Characteristics, and Competitive Practices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , supermarkets accounted for more than 90 percent of the 1,040 million pounds of fresh and processed red meat merchandised by Texas retail food stores. Grocery firms and affiliated independent groups with 11 or more stores accounted for more than four... interviewed. Forty-five percent found it difficult to estimate the effect of meat specials on total com- pany sales, since such specials were conducted on a weekly or daily basis. However, one-third of the retailers found company sales increas- ing from 1...

  13. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing SupportRetail Competition and Demand Response?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper,Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As retail choice states reach the end of their transitional, rate-cap periods, state regulators must decide what type of default supply service to provide to customers that have not switched to a competitive retail supplier. In a growing number of states, regulators have adopted real-time pricing (RTP) as the default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Although this trend is driven chiefly by policy objectives related to retail competition, default service RTP may have the added benefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate the potential role of RTP as a means to both ends--retail market development and demand response--we conducted a comprehensive review of experience with default RTP in the U.S. and examined the emergence of RTP as a product offering by competitive retail suppliers. Across the ten utilities with default RTP in place in 2005, between 5% and 35% of the applicable load remained on the rate. Based on interviews with competitive retailers, we find evidence to suggest that a comparable amount of load in these states has switched to hourly pricing arrangements with competitive retailers. Many customers on default or competitive hourly pricing are paying prices indexed to the real-time spot market, and thus have no advance knowledge of prices. Because the price responsiveness of customers under these conditions has yet to be formally analyzed, and relatively few efforts have been undertaken to help these customers become price responsive, the actual demand response impacts from hourly pricing in retail choice states remains largely an open question. However, we find that policymakers and other stakeholders in retail choice states have various strategies at their disposal to capture the potential demand response benefits from hourly pricing, while simultaneously supporting retail competition.

  14. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  15. Impact of Energy Disaggregation on Consumer Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarty, Prateek; Gupta, Abahy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. Utility Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans, &ZigBee radio chips in Smart Meters such that consumers cantime data access from Smart Meters. Millions of these Smart

  16. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  17. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal...

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal...

  20. Impact on retail prices of non-neutral wholesale prices for content providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact on retail prices of non-neutral wholesale prices for content providers Giuseppe D Atlantique Rennes, France Email: bruno.tuffin@irisa.fr Abstract--The impact of wholesale prices is examined equal wholesale prices to the two content providers), the benefits coming from wholesale price

  1. THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET: REQUERIMENTS FOR AN E-BUSINESS SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Edmundo

    THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET: REQUERIMENTS FOR AN E-BUSINESS SYSTEM Victor Santos ISCAC to Client . Abstract: In the last decade the electric energy market as changed is structure in several countries, mainly in the most developed, ones where the regulated activity of electrical companies where

  2. Analysis of Competitive Electricity Markets under a New Model of Real-Time Retail Pricing with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Analysis of Competitive Electricity Markets under a New Model of Real-Time Retail Pricing with Ex for Information and Decision Systems, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA {mardavij, mdrine loop system. Under this pricing mechanism, electricity is priced at the exant´e price (calculated based

  3. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  4. Retail Beamed Power for a Micro Renewable Energy Architecture: Survey Narayanan Komerath, Girish Chowdhary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    komerath@gatech.edu Abstract-- Retail delivery of electric power through millimeter waves is relevant in developing areas where the market for micro devices outpaces the power grid infrastructure. It is also for the electric power grid as well. This poses a window of opportunity for options that are compatible with micro

  5. E-BUSINESS FOR THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET A Business to Client perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Edmundo

    , real time price. Abstract: In the new deregulated market of the electricity industry the communication tool to reflect the changes made by one of the intervenients in the whole value chain. When prices prices that could take retail companies to bankruptcy, to huge blackouts that happened in Europe

  6. The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

  7. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

  8. Consumer Expenditure Patterns for Fish and Shellfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on/ish and shellfish. March )WJ2. 44(.7) Table 1. - Price, per capita consumption, and share of fish Service. 1981). Per capita Consumer price Per capita total Consumer price index Fish/shellfish fish/shellfish index for red meat/poultry/ for tofal red meat/ expenditure consumption fish/sheIIIish seafood

  9. Multiscale Agent-Based Consumer Market Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    , and Visualization Group; and 3 Center for Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis, Argonne NationalMultiscale Agent-Based Consumer Market Modeling MICHAEL J. NORTH,1 CHARLES M. MACAL,1 JAMES ST 8, 2009; revised August 19, 2009; accepted September 8, 2009 Consumer markets have been studied

  10. UCDavis University of California About PEV Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Consumers · Lifestyle studies · Market demand · Usage patterns · CEC, BMW, ARB, ECOtality Consumers · Lifestyle studies · Market demand · Usage patterns · CEC, BMW, ARB, ECOtality Fleet Development · Market of home PV 5. Split on technology interest 6. Split on environment: "I used `carbon' because

  11. Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com SECRET PLANS -Eagles of Death Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SECRET PLANS - Eagles of Death Metal It Secret Plans Midnight missions Wheels in motion Hoo Hoo Secret Plans Midnight mission With emotion Hou

  12. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  13. Should India open foreign direct investment in multi-brand retail : a case study using the Wal-Mart effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashish Kumar, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As India grows, driven by its success in information technology and services, there is another revolution waiting to happen in the Retail sector dependent on whether the Government of India can unshackle the various ...

  14. The role of content regulation on pricing and market power in regional retail and wholesale gasoline markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muehlegger, Erich J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, regional retail and wholesale gasoline markets in the United States have experienced significant price volatility, both intertemporally and across geographic markets. This paper focuses on one potential explanation ...

  15. A review of "Perceptions of Retailing in Early Modern England. Hampshire, England." by Nancy Cox and Karin Dannehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayworth, Gene

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Daniel Defoe during the 1720s, excerpts from literature of the period, images of English townships, and retail handbills serve as the primary material from which they draw their conclusions. Concepts of shopping from eighteenth century dictionaries...

  16. The Carotene Consuming Power of Certain Feeds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carotene consuming power. The dif- ferences were not great, however, but on the other hand were compara- tirely small. Very little carotene was aestroyed in the rats by the meat scraps with high carotene consuming power. Table 20. Effect of carotene... worked out and are given in detail. Samples of meat and bone scraps, meat scraps, tankage, dried fish, dried skim milk and dried butter milk may have it high consuming power for carotene. Vegetable feeds such as corn meal, cottonseed med, aheat pay...

  17. Advertising and consumer search in differentiated markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriott, Kevin Kenton

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an unadvertised store k where he realizes a surplus )( p k ?? . The partially informed consumer?s decision of whether to accept the advertised offer from firm 1 or search the other stores hinge critically on his expected benefits from searching. Recall... is given as ? +? ?+ ? ppx a n dFppF 1 ? 111 1 )()( ?? . Proposition 2. The expected demand from uninformed consumers for firm 1?s product is given as (3.4) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? +?+ ? ? ?+?= ?+ ? ppx a n n u dFppF xF xF ppxF n LcppD 1 ? 1 1 1011 )()( )]?(1...

  18. Determination of the total fat content of retail cuts of pork at different external fat trim levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Linda Katherine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained from each pork subprimal . . . . 18 3. Chemical fat mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork loin retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . 24 4. Chemical fat mean, minimum..., maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork ham retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 5. Chemical moisture mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test...

  19. Consumers Energy (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Passage of the Clean, Renewable and Energy Efficiency Act of 2008, paved the way for the Consumers Energy Business Solutions Program to provide incentives for customers who upgrade eligible...

  20. Technology and Consumer Products Branch: program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Technology and Consumer Products Branch (TCP) is to encourage the development and commercialization of energy-efficient technologies and equipment used in buildings and purchased by consumers. The TCP program conducts technical research, development, and demonstration efforts jointly funded with private industry, educational institutions, utilities, and other Federal and state agencies as appropriate. All contracts, grants, or interagency agreements have the major thrust of developing products and disseminating information that will accelerate commercial availability of energy-efficient, low-cost, reliable technologies, techniques, and products suitable for use by consumers and design professionals in the residential and commercial building sectors. Specifically, the technologies pursued by the branch include heating and cooling systems, consumer appliances, lighting design, and systems. Projects for each of these areas are summarized briefly, and publications resulting from the activities are listed.

  1. Consumers Power, Inc.- Solar Energy System Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consumers Power, Inc. (CPI) offers rebates to its residential customers who install solar water heating systems or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. The...

  2. Self-Reflection and Articulated Consumer Preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauser, John R.

    Accurate measurement of consumer preferences reduces development costs and leads to successful products. Some product-development teams use quantitative methods such as conjoint analysis or structured methods such as ...

  3. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kurani, “Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy,Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMa car, do they think about fuel costs over time, are they

  4. Packaging and fabrication systems for extending storage life and subsequent retail caselife of pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rape, Steven Wayne

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These chops were changes were (1973) further reported that bacterial counts (log ) from cuts stored in poly- vinyl chloride film were 100 to 1, 000 fold higher than those from vacuum packaged cuts. Ashby and James (1973 b) compared the effects of certain... was created by use of a stationary nozzle type vacuum n&n- Table l. Experimental design for comparisons of packaging systems for fresh pork cuts Packaging treatment Cut Number of samples Storage temperature (' C) Storage intervals (days) Retail...

  5. The Beef Nutrient Database Improvement Project: Retail Cuts From the Chuck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Sarah

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    through fabrication, and the chucks were collected in combos. They then were shipped via refrigerated truck to the Rosenthal Meat Science and Technology Center at Texas A&M University and stored (0-4 ?C) until fabrication. 3.2. Fabrication Chucks... ........................................................... 15 4.1. Separable tissue components of raw and cooked retail cuts .... 15 4.2. Proximate analysis of the separable lean ................................. 16 4.3. Cooking...

  6. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdle Reduction WeightRebate - LADWPPublicE85 Retail Business

  7. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  8. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  9. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  10. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action...

  11. AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments to:DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges AARP, National Consumer Law...

  12. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building Design & Passive Solar Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building Design & Passive...

  13. DOE Collects Civil Penalties for Failure to Certify Consumer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Collects Civil Penalties for Failure to Certify Consumer Refrigeration Products DOE Collects Civil Penalties for Failure to Certify Consumer Refrigeration Products April 22, 2015 -...

  14. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel...

  15. area consumer liquid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of major consumer energy decisions MIT - DSpace Summary: American consumers make a number of decisions that significantly impact their energy use. Some of the most important...

  16. 2014-09-19 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    9 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fans;NOPR 2014-09-19 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test...

  17. ISSUANCE 2015-04-01: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  18. ISSUANCE 2015-03-27: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  19. assessing consumer values: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Vulnerability in the Web Physics Websites Summary: Vulnerability in the Web 2.0 Society Abstract The young consumers constitute one of the fastest growing Internet:...

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential...

  1. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005a. Time- varying retail electricity prices: Theory andpractice. Electricity Deregulation: Choices and Challenges.efficiency of real-time electricity pricing. Energy Journal

  2. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Proximate and Ultimate Compositional Changes in Corn Stover during Torrefaction using Thermogravimetric Analyzer and Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The world is currently aiming to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is considered carbon neutral because the carbon dioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle. Increasing the use of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol. Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes, including thermochemical (direct combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation), or chemical (esterification) technologies. There are lot challenges in using biomass for energy applications. To name few low bulk density, high moisture content, irregular size and shape, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value. In commercial scale operation large quantities of biomass are needed and this will create problems associated with storage and transportation. Furthermore, grinding raw biomass with high moisture content is very challenging as there are no specific equipments and can increase the costs and in some cases it becomes highly impossible. All of these drawbacks led to development of some pretreatment techniques to make biomass more suitable for fuel applications. One of the promising techniques is torrefaction. Torrefaction is heating the biomass in an inert environment or reduced environment. During torrefaction biomass losses moisture, becomes more brittle and with increased energy density values. There are different techniques used for torrefaction of biomass. Fixed bed, bubbling sand bed and moving bed are the most common ones used. The use of microwaves for torrefaction purposes has not been explored. In the present study we looked into the torrefaction of biomass using the regular and microwaves and their effect on proximate and ultimate composition. Studies indicated that microwave torrefaction is a good way to torrefy the biomass in short periods of time. A maximum calorific value of 21 MJ/kg is achievable at 6 min residence time compared to 15 min using the dry torrefaction technique. Increasing the residence time increased the carbon content where a maximum carbon content of 52.20 % was achievable at lower residence time. The loss of volatiles is comparatively lower compared to dry torrefaction technique. Moisture content of microwave torrefied samples was in between 2-2.5 % (w.b).

  4. Florida consumer confidence holds steady in May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    . Consumer confidence held steady at 68 in May after dropping for three months since Feb. 1 when gasoline prices began shooting up, according to a new survey. But Floridians' perceptions of their own finances.8 from a revised 66 in April on worries about jobs and inflation for groceries and gasoline. The survey

  5. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    The Graduate School 4 The SOHE Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education 4 The Consumer Science of the Department's most precious resources, and we hope that you are as excited to be furthering your education student. The Graduate School updates your academic standing and eventually grants the degree of either M

  6. QER- Comment of Process Gas Consumer Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Attached are comments offered by the Process Gas Consumers Group in response to the August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice soliciting comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. Please let us know if you have any questions or would like any additional information.

  7. Consumer Alert Pirated Software May Contain Malware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Consumer Alert Pirated Software May Contain Malware http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2013/august. Today, the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination (IPR) Center - of which the FBI is a key key (often a ploy to disseminate additional malware) Printed with the Permission of FBI #12;And

  8. IEEE Consumer Electronics Society Standards Architect, CSR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    applications Managing charging at home: Smart Energy Profile Keeping the car: avoiding collisions with DSRC #12;IEEE Consumer Electronics Society 3 Other subjects addressed Keynote: Policy and Technology PEV Market been studying the impact of a "Smart Grid" They produced a report titled 1108 rev 2: Framework

  9. Reciprocity of Advantage: The Antidote to the Antidemocratic Trend in Regulatory Takings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Andrew W.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    objective of reducing retail gasoline prices. Ignoring Delin a reduction in retail gasoline prices to consumers. 21 Toto escalating retail gasoline prices, in 1997 the State of

  10. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the sources of retail gasoline price volatility and thedata on the average retail gasoline price at the state levelvolatility in retail gasoline prices, making consumers worse

  11. Empirical examination of allegations of ''below-cost'' retail selling of gasoline by refiners: Research study No. 038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogarty, T.F.; Lindstrom, P.M.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is alleged by some dealers that (major) refiners consistently sell their gasoline through directly operated stations at retail prices below the prices charged to resellers. The results of this examination, involving more than 2000 price comparisons, failed to reveal a single instance where the average monthly retail price at refiner operated stations was below the price charged resellers by refiners. This result obtained not only for all gasoline sales by major refiners, but also for specific grades of gasoline sold by all refiners. Moreover, a large majority of the average monthly price differentials were greater than 6 cents per gallon, and exceeded 10 cents per gallon in a significant number of instances. Thus, the data do not support the allegation of widespread ''below-cost'' selling by refiners through outlets which they own and operate. Therefore, the rationale offered for legislation mandating retail divorcement, or prohibiting ''below-cost'' is not supported by the evidence. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.; Margolis, R.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  13. The effect of blade tenderization on the palatability and retail caselife of beef steaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Nelson Orlando

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Student Newman-Keuls' test. (Steel and Torrie, 1960). E i tie. S * t*pra ds (ZMPS168) ad 7 bottom rounds (IMPS 171B) were wrapped in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film (Goodyear "Prime Wrap" ) and stored for 23-25 days at 3-4 C in order to develop slime... steak. All steaks in this experiment were placed in individual styroi'oam trays, overwrapped with PVC film (Goodyear "Prime 25 Wrap" ) and placed under simulated retail caselife conditions (1-3 C under 90 ft-C of incandescent light). A trained 2...

  14. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  15. Impact of different subcutaneous fat trim levels on the composition of beef retail cuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Darron Kirk

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the top mund, bottom round, eye of mund, sirloin tip, top sirloin butt, strip loin, tenderloin, rib, arm and blade sections of the chuck, and brisket. The retail cuts were serially assigned to the following treatments: (A) trimmed to 0. 6 cm... external fat, raw; (B) ~ to 0. 6 cm external fat, cooked; (C) ~ to 0. 0 cm external fat, cooked. The samples that were treated as raw, trimmed to 0. 6 cm were dissected into separable lean, external fat, seam fat, and heavy connective tissue and bone...

  16. Retail appearance and microbiological characteristics of vacuum packaged pork loin chops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrana, Julie Ann

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    packaged chops were acceptable for 10 days for all storage treatments, chops from the parchment paper and vacuum packaged storage treatments contained off-odors which were 11miting factors in achieving long shelf-life. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author 1s... and retail display. Means within packaging film underscored by a coamon line are not different (P&. 05). ' Means in the same column within each storage treatment bearing a common superscript letter are not different (Px. 05). d. e. f. g, h, i 28 surface...

  17. Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06Retail Sales of

  18. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousand Dollars) by State by Provider

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06Retail Sales ofRevenue

  19. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.

  20. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  1. Macroeconomic models of consumer demand for consumer packaged goods in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mau, Jonathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CPGCo, a global manufacturer of consumer packaged goods, has had tremendous difficulty in producing accurate forecasts for its products in developing markets. The problem was especially apparent during the global economic ...

  2. ISSUANCE 2015-05-12: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

  3. Noncooperative Games for Autonomous Consumer Load Balancing Over Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Tarun

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, most consumers of electricity pay for their consumption according to a fixed-rate. The few existing implementations of real time pricing have been restricted to large industrial consumers, where the benefits could justify the high...

  4. Noncooperative Games for Autonomous Consumer Load Balancing Over Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Tarun

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, most consumers of electricity pay for their consumption according to a fixed-rate. The few existing implementations of real time pricing have been restricted to large industrial consumers, where the benefits could justify the high...

  5. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates Desmond W.H. Cai a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    companies to recover its fixed costs. However, higher electricity rates give households more incentives companies could lose a significant fraction of high consumption customers. a r t i c l e i n f o Article) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential

  6. What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Soren T. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Prices? Soren T. Anderson Michigan State University of consumers about their expectations of future gasoline prices. Overall, we find that consumer beliefs follow a random walk, which we deem a reasonable forecast of gasoline prices, but we find a deviation from

  7. Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Mona

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information than their disclosure...

  8. Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Mona

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information than their disclosure...

  9. ight-derived energy enters the biosphere through photosyn-thesis, and ultimately sustains virtually all living organisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarhan, Fathey

    supplied through photochemistry and the energy consumed through photosynthetic CO2 assimilation under con- ditions of either high light or cold temperatures, which lead to increased PSII excitation measured as either the quantum yield of CO2 assimilation ( CO2) or the quantum yield of O2 evo- lution ( O2

  10. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gallon of gasoline (not E85 or ethanol) consumed, assumingpercentage blend (85% ethanol), known as E85, which can beWisconsin indicate that ethanol blended as E85 accounted for

  11. Customer targeting and micro-marketing in a retail supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, John P. (John Phillip), 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As most companies in the consumer products space develop operational capabilities to produce and distribute high-quality low-cost products, leading firms in the industry continuously seek new ways to increase profitability ...

  12. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103 224,846

  13. South Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet) (MillionFeet)Year

  14. South Dakota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet) VehicleYear Jan

  15. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. Vehicle

  16. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. VehicleNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15

  17. Tennessee Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.DecadeFuel2009YearYear

  18. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559

  19. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15

  20. Vermont Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers35,929 37,242 38,047

  1. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New MexicoFeet) WorkingFeet)

  2. Consumers Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| OpenCongress,Consolidated EdisonMinorEnergyConsumer

  3. Oregon Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear JanYear Jan Feb

  4. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet)17 34 44 67Feet)Sales2009

  5. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuelDecade Year-0

  6. Trends in the cost of efficiency for appliances and consumer electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appliances and consumer electronics Louis-Benoit Desroches,appliances and consumer electronics have decreased in realappliances and consumer electronics are likely to diminish

  7. Considerations for centralized packaging of beef retail cuts / by Davey Brian Griffin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Davey Brian

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nt) December 1981 AB S TRACT Considerations for Centralized Packaging of Beef Retail Cuts. (December 1981) Davey Brian Griffin, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. W. Savell Dr. G. C. Smith A two-part study... film (days) (days) 2M 75: Display i~tom High d ~h (drys) 2T. 7't 2't 7'C 12 0 13. 34 13. 01 1 12. 90 12. 55 2 12. 21 11. 52 3 11. 26 10. 72 4 11. 27 10. 19 5 9. 90 9. 47 g 6 9. 20 8. 538 0 13. 69 13. 76 11. 97 11. 34 11. 75 11. 01 10. 66...

  8. Benchmarking and Equipment and Controls Assessment for a 'Big Box' Retail Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haves, Philip; Coffey, Brian; Williams, Scott

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes work to enable improved energy performance of existing and new retail stores belonging to a national chain and thereby also identify measures and tools that would improve the performance of 'big box' stores generally. A detailed energy simulation model of a standard store design was developed and used to: (1) demonstrate the benefits of benchmarking the energy performance of retail stores of relatively standard design using baselines derived from simulation, (2) identify cost-effective improvements in the efficiency of components to be incorporated in the next design cycle, and (3) use simulation to identify potential control strategy improvements that could be adopted in all stores, improving operational efficiency. The core enabling task of the project was to develop an energy model of the current standard design using the EnergyPlus simulation program. For the purpose of verification of the model against actual utility bills, the model was reconfigured to represent twelve existing stores (seven relatively new stores and five older stores) in different US climates and simulations were performed using weather data obtained from the National Weather Service. The results of this exercise, which showed generally good agreement between predicted and measured total energy use, suggest that dynamic benchmarking based on energy simulation would be an effective tool for identifying operational problems that affect whole building energy use. The models of the seven newer stores were then configured with manufacturers performance data for the equipment specified in the current design and used to assess the energy and cost benefits of increasing the efficiency of selected HVAC, lighting and envelope components. The greatest potential for cost-effective energy savings appears to be a substantial increase in the efficiency of the blowers in the roof top units and improvements in the efficiency of the lighting. The energy benefits of economizers on the roof-top units were analyzed and found to be very sensitive to the operation of the exhaust fans used to control building pressurization.

  9. Interplay of federal and consuming state regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phone survey of 22 state regulatory commissions, which represent 84% of the interstate gas market, presents a snapshot of the attitudes of key staff during the month of November 1985. The results are indicative rather than definitive, and represent attitudes of individuals rather than state policies. The responses reflect changes within the interstate gas pipeline industry, particularly in the area of expanded voluntary carriage activity. The survey found states willing to comply with new rulings of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to encourage this activity. Carriage programs within consuming states are common. The major remaining problem is to establish carriage rates for the local distribution companies. Despite an expected increase in intrastate carriage activity, the commission staffs expect interstate pipelines to retain the dominant role in supply planning. 2 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Essays on Consumers' Goal Orientation and Price Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo Jin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ESSAYS ON CONSUMERS? GOAL ORIENTATION AND PRICE SENSITIVITY A Dissertation by WOO JIN CHOI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Marketing Essays on Consumers? Goal Orientation and Price Sensitivity Copyright 2012 Woo Jin Choi ESSAYS ON CONSUMERS? GOAL ORIENTATION AND PRICE...

  12. The implications of consumer surplus levels for equitable pricing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Neal Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits, expressed as consumer surplus, derived by the campers as a result of participating in their present trip. The contingent valuation method was approved by the U. S, Water Resource Council in 1979 for use by government agencies as an acceptable... the individual demand function. This inverse demand function specified price as the dependent variable. In the proposed model a measure of a consumer' s surplus was used as an alternative to price. A Consumer's surplus was defined as the amount which...

  13. The Path to Savings: Understanding the Federal Purchase of Energy-Consuming Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooler Retail price ($) Gas Water Heater Goal to Code By:>$25K Commercial Gas Water Heaters $3K – 25K B Motors Water Heaters (Residential Gas)

  14. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  15. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications 2014-02-21 Issuance: Proposed Determination of Computer Servers as a Covered Consumer Product; Withdrawal 2014-03-26 Issuance: Proposed...

  16. Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Privacy Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy The United States Telecom Association...

  17. ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Final Rule ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

  19. african consumer perceptions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?? Executive summary Purpose: Current research 1 compared the differences in terms of perception of trustworthiness and emotional appeal of traditional and consumer generated...

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. sercvthighlight.pdf More...

  1. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-Income Weatherization Efforts. sercmthighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy...

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    upgrade measures to maximize savings. sercmdhighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 Building America Webinar:...

  3. Department of Energy Announces Funding to Help Consumers Better...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consumers to better manage their electricity use through improved access to their own electricity consumption data. Under the "Smart Grid Data Access" Funding Opportunity...

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics.

  5. ,"New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12015","1152013"...

  6. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:05:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)"...

  7. Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and other entities 1 to empower consumers (and perhaps others) through access to detailed energy information in electronic form-including real-time information from smart meters,...

  8. Consumer Attitudes About Renewable Energy: Trends and Regional Differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natural Marketing Institute, Harleysville, Pennsylvania

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data in this report are taken from Natural Marketing Institute's (NMI's) Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability Consumer Trends Database. Created in 2002, the syndicated consumer database contains responses from 2,000 to 4,000 nationally representative U.S. adults (meaning the demographics of the sample are consistent with U.S. Census findings) each year. NMI used the database to analyze consumer attitudes and behavior related to renewable energy and to update previously conducted related research. Specifically, this report will explore consumer awareness, concerns, perceived benefits, knowledge of purchase options, and usage of renewable energy as well as provide regional comparisons and trends over time.

  9. Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens Saves Consumers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Positive Impact Significant savings to consumer energy bills and reductions in carbon pollution. Locations Nationwide Partners Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Navigant EERE...

  10. The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Christopher

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inferred descriptions of business energy consumption, muchresidential and small business energy consumers, what policyOn”: Energy Information and Behavior in Small Businesses. ”

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

  12. Guidance Concerning Applicable Sampling Plan for Certification of Consumer Product

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, authorizes the Department of Energy to enforce compliance with the energy conservation standards established for certain consumer...

  13. AARP submits the following comments on consumers and smart grid...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    consumer advocacy organization with over 150,000 dues-paying members across the United States. Public Citizen supports cost-effective clean energy and energy efficiency...

  14. Improved Grades and Consumer Demand for In-Shell Pecans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brison, Fred R.; Branson, Robert E.; Clark, Wayne W.; Krezdorn, A. H.; Storey, J. B.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the proposed grade index, Suc- cess cmd Mahan retail store samples that were be- low grade according to USDA grade standards, were actually superior to the U. S. No. 1 grade store sam- 1 ples of Stuart and mixed varieties. About half of the pecans sold... and at- tractiveness of the product. In many cases the quality of the pecans stocked appeared to be poor. The Stuart was the most common variety handled. It has acceptable but not superior eat- ing and shelling qualities. Shelled nuts of various...

  15. Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06Retail

  16. Charges, Costs and Market Power: the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , but consume a lower absolute quantity of energy than those who are richer. Prices for different consumption Economics Department, City University and Catherine Waddams Price* Centre for Competition and Regulation changed supplier in the first four years. After three years price caps were removed. We review

  17. Home Energy Displays: Consumer Adoption and Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMarche, J.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.; Sachs, O.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this project was to investigate the factors influencing consumer adoption of Home Energy Displays (HEDs) and to evaluate electricity consumption in households with basic HEDs versus enhanced feedback methods - web portals or alerts. We hypothesized that providing flexible and relatable information to users, in addition to a basic HED, would make feedback more effective and achieve persistent energy savings. In Phase I, we conducted three user research studies and found preferences for aesthetically pleasing, easy to understand feedback that is accessible through multiple media and offered free of charge. The deployment of HEDs in 150 households planned for Phase II encountered major recruitment and HED field deployment problems. First, after extensive outreach campaigns to apartment complexes with 760 units, only 8% of building's tenants elected to receive a free HED in their homes as part of the field study. Second, the HED used, a leading market model, had a spectrum of problems, including gateway miscommunications, failure to post to a data-hosting third party, and display malfunctions. In light of these challenges, we are pursuing a modified study investigating the energy savings of a web portal versus alert-based energy feedback instead of a physical HED.

  18. CSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    CSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: A Study of UK Energy Markets Monica Giulietti and Industrial Policy: a study of UK Energy Markets# Monica Giulietti Aston Business School Catherine Waddams are responsible for any remaining errors. #12;2 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: a study of UK Energy

  19. Automobile Prices, Gasoline Prices, and Consumer Demand for Fuel Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    2008 Abstract The relationship between gasoline prices and the demand for vehicle fuel efficiencyAutomobile Prices, Gasoline Prices, and Consumer Demand for Fuel Economy Ashley Langer University evidence that automobile manufacturers set vehicle prices as if consumers respond to gasoline prices. We

  20. Some European Developments in Welding Consumables L. Karlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Some European Developments in Welding Consumables L. Karlsson and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* November 1 a selected survey of incisive research on novel welding consumables which contribute to the structural and insight based on metallurgical experience. We congratulate the Japan Welding Society for organising

  1. Green Energy Options for Consumer-Owned Business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Co-opPlus of Western Massachusetts

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to define, test, and prototype a replicable business model for consumer-owned cooperatives. The result is a replicable consumer-owned cooperative business model for the generation, interconnection, and distribution of renewable energy that incorporates energy conservation and efficiency improvements.

  2. Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; McBride, Merle F.; Crall, C.

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (AEDG-SR) was developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The guide is intended to offer recommendations to achieve 30% energy savings and thus to encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The baseline level energy use was set at buildings built at the turn of the millennium, which are assumed to be based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (refer to as the ?Standard? in this report). ASHRAE and its partners are engaged in the development of a series of guides for small commercial buildings, with the AEDG-SR being the second in the series. Previously the partnership developed the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings: Achieving 30% Energy Savings Over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, which was published in late 2004. The technical support document prepared by PNNL details how the energy analysis performed in support of the Guide and documents development of recommendation criteria.

  3. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J (Decision and Information Sciences); (Auburn Univ.)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  4. EV Everywhere Consumer/Charging Workshop: Target-Setting Framework and Consumer Behavior

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune 20,inConsumer/Charging Workshop:

  5. Television meets Facebook : social networking through consumer electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baca Del Rosario, Mariana Cristina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores how the merging of ubiquitous consumer electronics and the sociable web improve the user experience of these devices, increase the functionality of both, and help distribute content in a more sociable ...

  6. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed...

  7. Contributed Paper Eutrophication and Consumer Control of New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertness, Mark D.

    Contributed Paper Eutrophication and Consumer Control of New England Salt Marsh Primary is increasing insect herbivory in these marshes. Experimental nitrogen eutrophication initially increased plant on primary productivity in pristine marshes, but suppressed primary productivity in eutrophic salt marshes

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:05:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  9. Smart Meters Helping Oklahoma Consumers Save Hundreds During...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    meters give consumers real-time information on how their energy use affects their energy costs. With a two-tiered pricing system, you get a discount during lower usage...

  10. The Need for Essential Consumer Protections: Smart metering proposals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    metering proposals and the move to time-based pricing. August 2010 The Need for Essential Consumer Protections: Smart metering proposals and the move to time-based pricing. August...

  11. (De)marketing to Manage Consumer Quality Inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Juanjuan

    Savvy consumers attribute a product’s market performance to its intrinsic quality as well as the seller’s marketing push. The authors study how sellers should optimize their marketing decisions in response. They find that ...

  12. american consumers nhanes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 American Wine Consumer CiteSeer Summary: Marketing strategies addressing underserved African...

  13. ,"New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:13:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  14. ,"New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:13:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045NY2"...

  15. Familiarity and Its Impact on Consumer Decision Biases and Heuristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, C. Whan; Lessig, V. Parker

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of familiarity on consumer decision biases and heuristics is examined. Subjects at three different familiarity levels revealed interesting differences in perceptual category breadth, usage of functional and ...

  16. ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ULTimateCO2 : A FP7 European Project dedicated to the understanding of the long term fate of geologically stored CO2 Audigane, P.1 , Brown, S.2 , Dimier A.3 , Frykman P.4 , Gherardi F.5 , Le Gallo Y.6 Recherches Géologiques et minières - France 2 CO2SENSE limited, United Kingdom 3 EIFER, EIFER europaisches

  17. Ultra Wideband Technology and the Struggle to Adopt a Standard for the Consumer Electronics Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malakooty, Nina

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30). No Standard for UWB. Electronics News. Retrieved Marchuse throughout consumer electronics, is building a wirelessfor the Consumer Electronics Industry Nina Malakooty

  18. QER- Comment of Industrial Energy Consumer Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks Tony. We'll be announcing dates for a number of other meetings in the next few days so hopefully you'll be able to participate in one of those, or have some of your member companies join. Regards, Karen Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 Phone: +1 (202) 586-1347 Cell: +1 (240) 751-8483 From: Buxton, Anthony W. Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:44 AM To: Wayland, Karen Subject: Re: Save the Date: June 19 QER meeting on Water-Energy Nexus Thank you, Karen. Our participation in the Providence hearing was a very positive and useful experience. IECG will be unable to attend the San Francisco hearing for obvious reasons, though it is always a temptation. IECG appreciates the effort going into and the significance of the Review and will continue to observe and comment as appropriate. We have become increasingly concerned recently about whether the Federal Power Act and related statutes provide adequate authority for the federal government and related energy institutions ( NERC) to take the actions necessary to ensure the supply of energy to America on a reliable and low cost basis. The decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals invalidating FERC's Order 750 and the consequent challenges to Order 1000 on the same basis exemplify this difficulty. The states are generally without adequate powers and legal authority as well, save for several large states. The RTOs are an ongoing answer from FERC, but they also are limited by the Federal Power Act. We urge attention to this important issue. Thank you again for your New England hearings and for your excellent work. Tony Buxton Counsel to Industrial Energy Consumer Group. From: Wayland, Karen [mailto:Karen.Wayland@Hq.Doe.Gov] Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:22 AM Eastern Standard Time To: Wayland, Karen Subject: Save the Date: June 19 QER meeting on Water-Energy Nexus Thank you for your interest in the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), and apologies for any duplicate emails. The next stakeholders meeting for the QER will focus on the Water-Energy Nexus. The meeting will be held at the San Francisco City Hall on June 19 at 9 am. Doors open at 8 am. We will be posting an agenda and background memo on the QER website over the next week at http://www.energy.gov/epsa/events/qer-public-meeting-water-energy-nexus, so check back regularly. We encourage you to attend and participate, and to share the meeting information with your lists. Please note that we are extending the comment period for stakeholders during the open mic session from 3 minutes (as described in the Federal Register notice) to 5 minutes to give stakeholders adequate time to make substantive statements. We look forward to hearing from you! Information on past meetings, including panelists' statements and summaries of discussions, as well the list of upcoming meetings, can be found at www.energy.gov/qer. Regards, Karen Wayland Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 In accordance with Internal Revenue Service Circular 230, we hereby advise you that if this E-mail or any attachment hereto contains any tax advice, such tax advice was not intended or written to be used, and it cannot be used, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer by the Internal Revenue Service. This E-Mail may contain information that is privileged, confidential and / or exempt from discovery or disclosure under applicable law. Unintended transmission shall not constitute waiver of the attorney-client or any other privilege. If you are not the intended recipient of this communication, and have received it in error, please do not distribute it and notify me immediately by E-mail at abuxton@preti.com or via telephone at 207.791.3000 and delete the original message. Unless expressly stated in this e-mail, noth

  19. A restructuring agenda for developing competitive retail electric markets that is based on a low-cost, real-time, smart-kilowatt-hour meter adapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasek, N.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes six agenda items that should expedite a politically smooth transition into a most efficient economically viable market-driven public power system. The agenda would introduce: the virtual marketplace for retail electric power, smart meters, smart meter readers, near-real-time load balancing and load apportionment, advanced supply and demand or commodity-style pricing, and reliability metering.

  20. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

  1. North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 8/2013 BIODIESEL RETAIL STATIONS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .ncsc.ncsu.edu | 8/2013 BIODIESEL RETAIL STATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www Mountain Avenue 828-669-9813 Durham Carolina Biodiesel B20 1410 Cross St 919-957-1500 Durham Cruizer's B20 Biodiesel B100 110 N. Chimney Rock Road 336-209-0728 Hillsborough Carolina Biofuels B100/B80 112 Baldwin

  2. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Furnaces and Boilers, Comment Period Extension

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Furnaces and Boilers, Comment Period Extension

  3. Assessment of the transmission grid of Maryland utilities and some potential consequences of retail competition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullenbaum, M.S.; Moore, M.K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the transmission systems used by the four Maryland utilities--Delmarva Power and Light Company (Delmarva), Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE), Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), and Allegheny Power Company (AP)--to provide a cost-effective, reliable source of power to consumers in the State. Maryland utilities use the high-voltage transmission systems in their own service territories and in utility systems in neighboring states to integrate their sources of supply to meet the demand of their customers. Transmission facilities make this possible by allowing Maryland utilities to import their share of remote generation in other states, to gain access to energy markets that reduce day-to-day generating costs, and to reduce the amount of capacity they must hold in reserve. The high-voltage system also permits Maryland utilities to purchase cost-effective energy that may be available in other nearby regions.

  4. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  5. Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5334-09 Freezing Meat game, meat, and poultry. Freezing meat and fish is the most acceptable way to maintain quality. The meat should be chilled without delay to 40 degrees F or lower to prevent spoilage. Then, freeze meat

  6. Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or small quantities of onion also freeze well. However, potatoes may not be satisfactory. Baked meat loafCopyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5308-09 Freezing for freezing. Prepare the food in the usual way. Cookthoroughlybutdonotovercook.Theremay be further cooking

  7. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for consumers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  8. CONSUMERS' BEHAVIOUR TOWARDS FOOD SAFETY: A LITTERATURE REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    within the meat group. According to Eurostat1 , in 1990, beef and veal per capita consumption in the EU revealed that some consumers after a longer period had decreased their beef consumption and others (less was studied more precisely by Angulo and Gil (2007). In all cases consumption had dropped consider

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics.

  10. Analysing the Carbon Footprint of Food Insights for Consumer Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Energy and Technology Uppsala Doctoral Thesis for approximately 30% of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. There has been huge interest in estimating the carbon seasonal', showed that consuming tomatoes and carrots seasonally in Sweden could reduce the CF by 30

  11. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Consumers 3 You've heard about the new generation of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) like the Chevy Volt. Gasoline- and diesel-powered ICE vehicles ended up dominating trans- portation in the 20th century. However Electric Ranger. Although many vehicles from this generation were discon- tinued in the early 2000s

  12. For Immediate Release RADICAL CHANGES IN CONSUMER PATTERNS PREDICTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Open_House on the future of broadcast media today brought together over 100 key thinkers in the sector who debated a radical shift in the broadcast industry that is changing consumers from passive media About Open_House Open_House at Media Lab Europe is a series of monthly research driven forums

  13. Do Consumers Switch to the Best Chris M. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    , almost all households consume electricity and for many, it forms a significant part of their household of Oxford & Catherine Waddams Price ESRC Centre for Competition Policy and Norwich Business School and transparent market. Across two independent datasets from the UK electricity market we find, on aggregate

  14. From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology* Caroline Gauthier proposes to study the resistance of stakeholders, by exploring the nanotech field. Nanotechnology is today in the resistance context. Keywords. Nanotechnology; Resistance Bio. Caroline Gauthier is currently Professor

  15. Beyond Couch Potatoes: From Consumers to Designers Gerhard Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Beyond ÒCouch PotatoesÓ: From Consumers to Designers Gerhard Fischer Center for LifeLong Learning and behavior [44] and contributes to the degeneration of humans into Òcouch potatoes,Ó for whom a remote control is the most important instrument of their cognitive activities. (A Òcouch potatoÓ is a colloquial

  16. Impact of consumer/client issues on passive solar design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, S.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate test of any passive solar building's performance is user satisfaction. Some of the issues which affect the user's perception of passive solar are discussed. Results of questionnaire and interview surveys of both teachers and students in two Santa Fe passive solar schools are presented. Particular attention is given to perceptions of daylighting, and to both visual and thermal comfort. The importance of factoring results of post-occupancy surveys into the design of the next generation of passive solar buildings is emphasized.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides Utah consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Production Model and Consumer Preferences for Texas Pecans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chammoun, Christopher James

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Joe Outlaw Marco A. Palma Committee Members, Leonardo Lombardini Marvin K. Harris Head of Department, John P. Nichols August 2012 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics iii ABSTRACT Production... Model and Consumer Preferences for Texas Pecans. (August 2012) Christopher James Chammoun, B.S.A., University of Georgia Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joe Outlaw Dr. Marco A. Palma High prices in any industry, agricultural...

  19. How One Utility is Building Industrial Consumer Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, D. E.

    HOW ONE UT1~ITY IS BUILDING INDUSTRIAL CONSUMER RELATIONSHIPS DONALD E. HAMILTON Manager-Industrial Services and Cogeneration Gulf States Utilities Company Beaumont, Texas COMPETITION AND THE UTILITY INDUSTRY The refining and petrochemical... in the eighties: depletion of old low cost oil and gas fields within the United States, the formation of OPEC, a run-up in oil and gas prices, leveling of demand in the petrochemical industry, the transfer of substantial wealth from industrial to oil...

  20. Consumer Query Health Profile Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Consumer Query Health Profile Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center Query resulted in 570 BSU Classified and Non-Classified employees that participated in the Fall 2004 Health Risk Appraisal. Non.2% 9.6% 7.7% 9.0% Heart Disease 2.3% 2.3% 2.6% 3.1% No Primary Care Physician 33.0% 31.8% 30.0% 24

  1. Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term green pricing refers to programs offered by utilities in traditionally regulated electricity markets, which allow customers to support the development of renewable energy sources by paying a small premium on their electric bills. Since the introduction of the concept in the United States, the number of unique utility green pricing programs has expanded from just a few programs in 1993 to more than 90 in 2002. About 10% of U.S. utilities offered a green pricing option to about 26 million consumers by the end of 2002. This report provides: (1) aggregate industry data on consumer response to utility programs, which indicate the collective impact of green pricing on renewable energy development nationally; and (2) market data that can be used by utilities as a benchmark for gauging the relative success of their green pricing programs. Specifically, the paper presents current data and trends in consumer response to green pricing, as measured by renewable energy sales, participants, participation rates, and new renewable energy capacity supported. It presents data on various aspects of program design and implementation, such as product pricing, ownership of supplies, retention rates, marketing costs, the effectiveness of marketing techniques, and methods of enrolling and providing value to customers.

  2. Why and how should innovative industries with high consumer switching costs be re-regulated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Why and how should innovative industries with high consumer switching costs be re-regulated? N-00973051,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Why and how should innovative industries with high consumer switching costs be re-regulated? Jackie Krafft1 and Evens Salies2 Abstract The existence of costs to consumers to switch

  3. Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods in Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods in Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis Benjamin #12;Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods In Korea: Factor and Cluster Analysis Abstract and desirability of food biotechnology 2 #12;Introduction Consumer acceptance of genetically modified (GM) 1 food

  4. Essays on horizontal merger simulation: the curse of dimensionality, retail price discrimination, and supply channel stage-games 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pofahl, Geoffrey Michael

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the words of Joel I. Klein, former Assistant Attorney General of the United States, âÂ?Â?[a]ntitrust enforcement in the merger area has never been as time-consuming, complex, or as central to the functioning of our economy as it is todayâÂ?Â...

  5. Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry, substantial energy savings can be made. Savings are expected to be even greater in the case of new steels, which will require extensive mapping over large experimental ranges of parameters such as voltage, current, speed, heat input and pre-heat.

  6. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0YearIndustrial Consumers

  7. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers (Number

  8. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers

  9. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0YearCommercial Consumers

  10. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  11. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of

  12. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet) Price AllFuelCommercial Consumers

  13. Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices - Sales to End Users

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436 Energy

  14. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436INCIDENCE2009 2010 2011

  15. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436INCIDENCE2009 2010

  16. Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 3,430 4,062 4,669

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 3,430Feet)

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663

  19. Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103

  20. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116 3,110IIF2009 2010 2011

  1. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116 3,110IIF2009 2010

  2. South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116Cubic Feet) Decade

  3. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116CubicWithdrawals

  4. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia

  5. South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet) (MillionFeet)Year(Dollars

  6. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6Year

  7. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6YearNov-14

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6Cubic Feet)

  9. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6WithdrawalsElements)

  10. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6

  11. South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet) VehicleYear

  12. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. VehicleNov-14 Dec-14YearFeet)

  13. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0Fuel

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0FuelIndustrial

  15. Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.DecadeFuel2009YearYearper Thousand

  16. Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14 Dec-14Feet) Decade

  17. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14DecadeDecadeFueland

  18. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation

  19. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessAprilResidential Consumers (Number of

  20. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14Decade Year-0Industrial Consumers

  1. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602andDecadeCommercial Consumers

  2. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1Feet)Industrial Consumers

  3. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088: FederalEconomicEnergy Consumers |a

  4. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1Residential Consumers (Number

  5. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090Industrial Consumers (Number

  6. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUES ESF 12DepartmentConsumer Acceptance

  7. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUES ESF 12DepartmentConsumer

  8. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  9. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of

  10. Vermont Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers35,929 37,242

  11. Now Available: Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

  12. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers (Number of

  13. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAINCommercial Consumers

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal ConsumptionperFeet)Commercial Consumers

  15. Self-Consuming Downhole Packer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory10 March 2010 DOE STANDARDSelf-Consuming

  16. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011Industrial Consumers

  17. Property:DailyOpWaterUseConsumed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation, search ThisDailyOpWaterUseConsumed

  18. Summary report on the Solar Consumer Assurance Network (SOLCAN) Program Planning Task in the southern region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, M. B. [comp.] [comp.

    1981-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the SOLCAN Program Planning Task is to assist in the development, at the state and local levels, of consumer assurance approaches that will support the accelerated adoption and effective use of new products promoted by government incentives to consumers to meet our nation's energy needs. The task includes state-conducted evaluations and state SOLCAN meetings to identify consumer assurance mechanisms, assess their effectiveness, and identify and describe alternative means for strengthening consumer and industry assurance in each state. Results of the SOLCAN process are presented, including: a Solar Consumer Protection State Assessment Guide; State Solar Consumer Assurance Resources for Selected States; State Solar Consumer Protection Assessment Interviews for Florida; and state SOLCAN meeting summaries and participants. (LEW)

  19. A Guide to Display Provider Quality Information and Involving Consumers in Generating Provider Ratings for Consumer Driven Health Plans Web Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Sourav

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Provider’s quality information is one of the most important pieces of information that a consumer seeks out when searching for a health care provider. Most often, a consumer finds a provider by word of mouth from friends or relatives...

  20. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have demonstrated robust operation when tested at various orientations, temperatures, and humidity levels. Durability testing has progressed significantly over the course of the program. MEA, engine, and system level steady state testing has demonstrated degradation rates acceptable for initial product introduction. Test duration of over 5000 hrs has been achieved at both the MEA and breadboard system level. P3 level prototype life testing on engines (stacks with reactant conditioning) showed degradation rates comparable to carefully constructed lab fixtures. This was a major improvement over the P2 and P1 engine designs, which exhibited substantial reductions in life and performance between the lab cell and the actual engine. Over the course of the work on the P3 technology set, a platform approach was taken to the system design. By working in this direction, a number of product iterations with substantial market potential were identified. Although the main effort has been the development of a prototype charger for consumer electronic devices, multiple other product concepts were developed during the program showing the wide variety of potential applications.

  1. Method for forming consumable electrodes from metallic chip scraps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girshov, Vladimir Leonidovich (St. Petersburg, RU); Podpalkin, Arcady Munjyvich (St. Petersburg, RU); Treschevskiy, Arnold Nikolayevich (St. Petersburg, RU); Abramov, Alexey Alexandrovich (St. Petersburg, RU)

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The method relates to metallurgical recycling of waste products, preferably titanium alloys chips scrap. Accordingly after crushing and cleaning, the chip scrap is subjected to vacuum-thermal degassing (VTD); the chip scrap is pressed into briquettes; the briquettes are placed into a mould allowing sufficient remaining space for the addition of molten metal alloy; the mould is pre-heated before filling with the molten metal alloy; the mould remaining space is filled with molten metal alloy. After cooling, the electrode is removed from the mould. The method provides a means for 100% use of chip scrap in producing consumable electrodes having increased mechanical strength and reduced interstitial impurities content leading to improved secondary cast alloys.

  2. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  3. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  4. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  5. 2011 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. Vol. 38 February 2012 All rights reserved. 0093-5301/2012/3805-0010$10.00. DOI: 10.1086/660854

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    regulatory agencies like the Federal Trade Com- mission (FTC) exert control over the content of these dis://business.ftc.gov/ documents/bus47-advertising-retail-electricity-and-natural- gas, 2000; personal communication on FTC

  6. 2011 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. Vol. 38 February 2012 All rights reserved. 0093-5301/2012/3805-0009$10.00. DOI: 10.1086/660854

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    regulatory agencies like the Federal Trade Com- mission (FTC) exert control over the content of these dis://business.ftc.gov/ documents/bus47-advertising-retail-electricity-and-natural- gas, 2000; personal communication on FTC

  7. Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A consumer guide about solar electricity for the home. Includes information about types of solar electric systems, how to choose a system, financing, and costs.

  8. Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A consumer guide about solar electricity for the home. Includes information about types of solar electric systems, how to choose a system, financing, and costs.

  9. Green Marketing: A Study of Consumer Perception and Preferences in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Mayank; Jain, Amit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    initiatives taken for promoting green marketing practices byID: Family Income: Electronic Green Journal, Issue 36, 2013,and Naylor, R. W. (2010). Green Consumer Values. Handbook of

  10. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters.

  11. Can Household Consumers Save the Wild Fish? Lessons from a Sustainable Seafood Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallstein, Eric; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mario F. Teisl. Genetically modified food labeling: TheConsumers Tolerant of Genetically Modified Foods. Review offirewood [48] and genetically modified foods [43] and how

  12. The short- and long-run effects of the vector grocery store consumer price information program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Robert D.; Perloff, Jeffrey M

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more useful to consumers Hho differ from the average is toor specific item prices. People Hho find it di fficult to

  13. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for ConsumerSecretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, OfficeSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Asilomar,

  14. Mesoscale regulation comes from the bottom-up: intertidal interactions between consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Karina J.

    REPORT Mesoscale regulation comes from the bottom-up: intertidal interactions between consumers variation in nutrient supply to shift community structure over mesoscales. Keywords Macroalgae, upwelling

  15. 4 JULY/AUGUST 2006 BRANDINGCreating Intangible Competitive Advantages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -to-consumer environments (retail settings); examples include Coca- Cola, Ford, and Nike. This view, however, has broadened

  16. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and long-lasting reductions in their energy bills. Vermont-SERC is administered by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and is carried out by five local weatherization agencies. The purpose of the program is to identify technologies and new approaches-in this case, solar energy and energy efficiency coaches-that can improve weatherization services to low-income clients. The program selects households that have previously received weatherization services. This has several advantages. First, the clients already understand how weatherization works and are willing to strive for additional energy savings. Second, the weatherization agencies are working with clients who have previously had weatherization and therefore have complete energy usage data from utility bills collected during the first energy upgrade installation. This allows the agencies to select the best potential candidates for solar energy. Agencies have existing knowledge of the homes and can pre-screen them for potential structural problems or lack of south-facing exposure.

  17. Consumer's Guide to the economics of electric-utility ratemaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide deals primarily with the economics of electric utilities, although certain legal and organizational aspects of utilities are discussed. Each of the seven chapters addresses a particular facet of public-utility ratemaking. Chapter One contains a discussion of the evolution of the public-utility concept, as well as the legal and economic justification for public utilities. The second chapter sets forth an analytical economic model which provides the basis for the next four chapters. These chapters contain a detailed examination of total operating costs, the rate base, the rate of return, and the rate structure. The final chapter discusses a number of current issues regarding electric utilities, mainly factors related to fuel-adjustment costs, advertising, taxes, construction work in progress, and lifeline rates. Some of the examples used in the Guide are from particular states, such as Illinois and California. These examples are used to illustrate specific points. Consumers in other states can generalize them to their states and not change the meaning or significance of the points. 27 references, 8 tables.

  18. Using Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    , many people annotate their images with captions such as "George and Martha in their canoe" whichUsing Group Prior to Identify People in Consumer Images Andrew C. Gallagher Carnegie Mellon this idea and describe the benefits of using a group prior for identifying people in consumer images

  19. WORKING PAPER SERIES: GSPP13-001 Consumers' willingness to pay for alternative fuel vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    or natural-gas powered vehicles could become more significant in the future.4 The US, Japan, and otherWORKING PAPER SERIES: GSPP13-001 Consumers' willingness to pay for alternative fuel vehicles model to estimate consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid

  20. A modified sorting task to investigate consumer perceptions of extra virgin olive oils Metta Santosa a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Hervé

    of the extra virgin olive oil products. Consumer agreements were explained by 46% of the vari- ances found to the second stage of the sorting task was observed in the olive oil product structures. Con- sumers were asked differences in the usage of olive oil products, the majority of the consumers per- ceived the product set

  1. Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

  2. The Business Logic of Sustainability: Merging Economic Growth with Social Responsibility--The explosion of organic and eco-friendly products on retail store shelves and in our daily lives is more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Business Logic of Sustainability: Merging Economic Growth with Social Responsibility-- The explosion of organic and eco-friendly products on retail store shelves and in our daily lives is more than and sustainability marketing present unique challenges, not the least of which is the lack of standards

  3. Rosemount Orchard is a sustainable development driven by a sense of community. It will offer affordable housing, "green" and local retail, a picking orchard, a community garden, and plenty of open space. The goal of the community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    will have solar panels, passive housing, district heating, will reuse all stormwater and greywater on site affordable housing, "green" and local retail, a picking orchard, a community garden, and plenty of open space everyone! The community will have a variety of different housing and different prices, a variety

  4. Essays on Retail Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Hao-Chun

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the second essay, we develop a dynamic simulation model to analyze multiple antecedents of IRI. Based on simulation results, we derive two hypotheses on the association between IRI and labor. The panel data analysis shows that both the level and the mix...

  5. jcpenney retail renovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Zhang, Jian; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Wilburn, Matthew S.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    JC Penney is a partner with the DOE's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program, working with PNNL to explore energy design measures (EDMs) that may be applied to their building portfolio. A site in Colonial Heights, VA was chosen for a retrofit project; computer modeling predicts 45% improved energy performance compared to baseline operations. This case study reviews EDMs that were selected and their performance as of June 2011.

  6. State heating oil and propane program: Final report. Survey of No.2 heating oil and propane prices at the retail level, October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Efficiency Division of the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) monitored the price and inventory of residential heating oil and propane during the 1997--98 heating season under a grant from the US Department of Energy`s Energy Information Administration (EIA). DPS staff collected data biweekly between October 5, 1997 and March 16, 1998 on the retail price of {number_sign}2 home heating oil and propane by telephone survey. Propane price quoted was based on the rate for a residential home heating customer using 1,000+ per year. The survey included a sample of fuel dealers selected by the EIA, plus additional dealers and fuels selected by the DPS. The EIA weighted, analyzed, and reported the data collected from their sample.

  7. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 ?m. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were then used to determine the ventilation rates, filtration strategies, or source reductions needed to maintain indoor contaminant concentrations below reference levels. Several scenarios of potential concern were considered: (i) formaldehyde levels in furniture/hardware stores, (ii) contaminants associated with cooking (e.g., PM, acrolein, and acetaldehyde) in grocery stores, and (iii) outdoor contaminants (e.g., PM and O{sub 3}) impacting stores that use natural ventilation. Estimated formaldehyde emission rates suggest that retail stores would need to ventilate at levels far exceeding the current Title 24 requirement to lower indoor concentrations below California’s stringent formaldehyde reference level. Given the high costs of providing ventilation but only modest chronic health benefit is expected, effective source control is an attractive alternative, as demonstrated by some retail stores in this study. Predictions showed that grocery stores need MERV 13 air filters, instead of MERV 8 filters that are more commonly used, to maintain indoor PM at levels that meet the chronic health standards for PM. Exposure to acrolein is a potential health concern in grocery stores, and should be addressed by increasing the use of kitchen range hoods or improving their contaminant removal efficiency. In stores that rely on natural ventilation, indoor PM can be a health concern if the stores are located in areas with high outdoor PM. This concern may be addressed by switching to mechanical ventilation when the outdoor air quality is poor, while continuing natural ventilation when outdoor air quality is good.

  8. Measuring Consumer Acceptance and Willingness-To-Pay for Specialty Tomatoes: Impact of Product, Taste, and Health Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segovia Coronel, Michelle S

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    for marketing the benefits of such products. While there have been numerous studies examining the potential impacts of these attributes on consumer demand, few studies combine consumer valuation of credence attributes with sensory analysis of products...

  9. -"The effect of Perceived risk on the process of online buying electrical products by Jordanian consumers in Amman", Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -"The effect of Perceived risk on the process of online buying electrical products by Jordanian the effect of Perceived risk on the process of online buying electrical products by Jordanian consumers of online buying electrical products by Jordanian consumers. #12;

  10. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

  11. The optimal reverse logistics network for consumer batteries in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Asgar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recycling of household consumer batteries is gaining legislative support throughout North America. The intent of this thesis document is to provide a broad overview of the current North American reverse logistics network ...

  12. Think consumer; the enforcement of the trade mark quality guarantee revisited: a legal and economic analysis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Jamil

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of a wide range of branded products makes the selection of the right type of good a difficult process. This is particularly true in the case of goods whose characteristics consumers do not have complete ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: PEV Consumer Behavior in Practice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of California, Davis at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about PEV consumer...

  14. Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas consumers rises, but tax collection introduces distortions in other parts of the economy.natural gas users, these gains are o?set by tax distortions in other parts of the economy.

  15. Case studies in the digital fabrication of open-source consumer electronic products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellis, David Adley

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the effects of digital fabrication on the design, production, and customization of consumer electronic devices. It does so through a series of three case studies - a radio, a pair of speakers, and a ...

  16. A credit risk management model for a portfolio of low-income consumer loans in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez Montesinos, Jorge Alberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-income consumer lending (LICL) in Latin America has experienced a boom in recent years. This has attracted the interest of a large number of financial players eager to capture a portion in this still under-banked ...

  17. Semiotics and Advanced Vehicles: What Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) Mean and Why it Matters to Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Reid R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Would You Buy a Hybrid Vehicle? Study #715238, conducted forcars/high-cost-of-hybrid-vehicles- 406/overview.htm ConsumerRelease. (2005) Most Hybrid Vehicles Not as Cost-Effective

  18. Problems of tort litigation as a means of patient and consumer protection in health care systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Michael David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. health care system relies on tort litigation as a means of protecting patients and consumers from medical malpractice. The system of tort litigation has contributed to the U.S. having the highest health care ...

  19. Consumer and shear force evaluation of steaks from the M. Serratus ventralis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagley, Jason Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , tenderness of cut, juiciness desirability, juiciness of cut, flavor desirability, and flavor intensity. When cooked on the grill, in the oven, or in a skillet, injected steaks received the highest (P < 0.05) ratings for tenderness. Furthermore, consumers...

  20. Department of Energy Putting Power in the Hands of Consumers through Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory announced today the results of a year-long effort to put the power grid in the hands of consumers through technology.